GM6.10 EDI

Deltas and estuaries are home to 7% of the world’s population but they are also hotspots for disasters. These riverine landforms face a wide range of challenges, now and in the future, including climatic changes (sea level rise, changing river discharge), biodiversity loss, subsidence, sediment mining, groundwater extraction, dredging and engineering measures (dams, embankments, sluices etc.). Deltas and estuaries lie at the interface of complex river, tidal and wave processes which create distinctive morphologies and environments. They provide the hinterland with protection from flooding and erosion but are also key resource areas for freshwater, ecology and sediment. Protecting delta regions and estuaries is therefore a key research area for science and policy. Understanding the functioning of delta and estuarine processes, including hydrodynamic processes, morphological development and the effects of human interference, is key for a sustainable future for these systems. To prepare for future changes it is crucial to identify the present state of these systems and learn from their past development. This session aims to bring together knowledge from multiple disciplines such as geomorphology, hydrology, ecology, social sciences and science policy to identify how deltas and estuaries change and what future societal challenges might arise along their shores. We particularly encourage early career researchers to submit to this session and welcome contributions from those working on estuary and delta management, future issues in estuaries and deltas, and process and system based science of estuaries and deltas.

Co-organized by HS13/NH5
Convener: Jana CoxECSECS | Co-conveners: Anne BaarECSECS, Lisanne BraatECSECS, Frances DunnECSECS, Iris Moeller

Deltas and estuaries are home to 7% of the world’s population but they are also hotspots for disasters. These riverine landforms face a wide range of challenges, now and in the future, including climatic changes (sea level rise, changing river discharge), biodiversity loss, subsidence, sediment mining, groundwater extraction, dredging and engineering measures (dams, embankments, sluices etc.). Deltas and estuaries lie at the interface of complex river, tidal and wave processes which create distinctive morphologies and environments. They provide the hinterland with protection from flooding and erosion but are also key resource areas for freshwater, ecology and sediment. Protecting delta regions and estuaries is therefore a key research area for science and policy. Understanding the functioning of delta and estuarine processes, including hydrodynamic processes, morphological development and the effects of human interference, is key for a sustainable future for these systems. To prepare for future changes it is crucial to identify the present state of these systems and learn from their past development. This session aims to bring together knowledge from multiple disciplines such as geomorphology, hydrology, ecology, social sciences and science policy to identify how deltas and estuaries change and what future societal challenges might arise along their shores. We particularly encourage early career researchers to submit to this session and welcome contributions from those working on estuary and delta management, future issues in estuaries and deltas, and process and system based science of estuaries and deltas.