EGU22-4487, updated on 27 Mar 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-4487
EGU General Assembly 2022
© Author(s) 2022. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Characterising volatile organic compound emission changes in native black poplar under elevated carbon-dioxide (CO2), elevated ozone (O3) and herbivory

Laura James1, Christian Pfrang1, Robbie Girling2, Scott Hayward1, and Rob MacKenzie1
Laura James et al.
  • 1University of Birmingham, GEES, United Kingdom of Great Britain – England, Scotland, Wales
  • 2University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom of Great Britain - England, Scotland, Wales

Plants communicate information about their status, intra- and inter- plant, and with other ecosystem members, through the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The effects of rising CO2 in conjunction with ozone (O3) on plant VOC emissions is not yet fully understood, but research suggests that some herbivore-induced VOCs are degraded by O3, potentially reducing their signalling function. Furthermore, elevated CO2 has been shown to attenuate induced VOC responses to herbivory in Brassica oleracea

We are using two tri-trophic model systems; black poplar [Populus nigra betulifolia], winter moth [Operophtera brumata] and a tachinid fly parasitoid of winter moth, Cyzenis albicans; and oil seed rape [Brassica napus], diamond back moth [Plutella xylostella] (DBM), and a parasitoid of DBM, braconid wasp, Cotesia plutella. Additionally, we are working within two ground-breaking facilities; the Birmingham Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR)’s free-air carbon enrichment (FACE) experiment, and University of Reading’s free-air diesel and ozone enrichment experiment. We will also collect some data from lab-based experiments.

Our project seeks to characterise the volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles emitted for both plants under herbivory, examine how these VOC profiles differ under combined elevated CO2 and O3, and explore whether changes to VOC profiles impact key ecological relationships, e.g, the ability of plants to signal to herbivore enemies.

How to cite: James, L., Pfrang, C., Girling, R., Hayward, S., and MacKenzie, R.: Characterising volatile organic compound emission changes in native black poplar under elevated carbon-dioxide (CO2), elevated ozone (O3) and herbivory, EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-4487, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-4487, 2022.

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