ITS3.2/HS1.1.8

ITS3 EDI
Socio-Hydrogeology: a transdisciplinary approach to groundwater science 

Groundwater, the hidden component of the water cycle, traditionally receives less attention than surface water from both the scientific community and policy makers, due to it being "out of sight, out of mind". However, this precious resource is inextricably linked to the maintenance of natural ecosystems and human well-being. Groundwater has always been part of the lives of worldwide communities: irrigated agriculture is primarily sustained by groundwater resources, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions; holy wells and sacred springs are part of our global cultural heritage, while disagreement over groundwater resources have previously resulted in turmoil and national/transboundary conflicts. These obvious interconnections, however, are neglected in favour of the development of sectorial approaches to groundwater resource assessment.
Socio-hydrogeology has recently been proposed as an effective approach to addressing complex groundwater-related issues in an increasingly holistic and integrated manner. By focusing on the reciprocity between humans and groundwater, it aims to explore and understand their dynamic interactions and feedbacks with a final goal of developing transdisciplinary solutions for transdisciplinary problems. Due to the more "personal" (i.e., individual household/community supplies) and local nature of groundwater in many instances, socio-hydrogeology seeks to understand individuals and communities as a primary source, pathway and receptor for potable groundwater supplies, including the role of local knowledge, beliefs, risk perception, tradition/history, and consumption. In essence, the “socio” in socio-hydrogeology embodies sociology, including social, cognitive, behavioural and socio-epidemiological science.

For this session we encourage contributions from diverse fields, including:
• Examples of socio-hydrogeological assessments (e.g., participatory monitoring, stakeholder engagement, public participation, citizen science)
• Integration of “non-expert” knowledge and experience within quantitative and qualitative hydrogeological studies
• Challenges and opportunities arising from the integration of hydrogeology and social sciences
• Social and political approaches to water resources research
• Groundwater geoethics and national/transboundary conflicts
• Attempts to integrate behavioural, experiential or knowledge-based data with hydrogeological/health risk assessment models
• Educational goals for future socio-hydrogeologists

Co-organized by ERE1
Convener: Viviana Re | Co-conveners: Paul Hynds, Theresa FrommenECSECS, Bárbara Zambelli AzevedoECSECS
Presentations
| Wed, 25 May, 17:00–18:30 (CEST)
 
Room N1

Presentations: Wed, 25 May | Room N1

Chairpersons: Viviana Re, Bárbara Zambelli Azevedo
17:00–17:02
17:02–17:12
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EGU22-7114
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ECS
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solicited
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On-site presentation
Anne Van der Heijden, Maarten J. Waterloo, Anouk I. Gevaert, and Daniela Benedicto van Dalen

Groundwater resources in African drylands are important sources of freshwater but are under pressure due to population growth and climate change. It is therefore increasingly important that groundwater resources are managed in a sustainable way. Development of IWRM plans are ongoing in (semi-)arid African countries with support from national governments, NGOs and consultancies. This presentation aims to highlight two case studies in which bio-geophysical and socio-economic data were combined to assist in the Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) process: 1) catchment-scale Water Infrastructure Assessment (WIA) in Sudan and 2) assessment of pathways towards sustainable groundwater use in African drylands. Per case study lessons learned and recommended approaches are provided.

In IWRM intervention planning for semi-arid regions a local increase in available water resources is sought after, which can be found in the better use of excess runoff. A balance between water demand and water resources on community level is key and a prerequisite for implementing durable and inclusive interventions that last. The IWRM process starts with a strong knowledge base. In practice, however, the development of a good knowledge base is not simple. Challenges arise in collecting, processing, and mapping results. With hydrogeology, a 3D situation is translated to 2D maps. Socio-economic data are often stored based on administrative boundaries and need corrections for hydrological source-area delineation and seasonal and interannual variations. Population density and water demand change over seasons, following crop cycles and livestock migration patterns. Looking at local water availability, rainfall and surface water flows are becoming more variable and less reliable. Therefore, assessment of the rainfall regime and corresponding behaviour and movements of people and livestock is key. For WIAs, yields and usage are often averaged, thus disregarding seasonal changes, even though shallow wells and reservoirs regularly become depleted outside the rainy season. The Sudan case study presents an improved approach for a WIA, that is adaptable and can be applied in semi-arid environments in Africa and elsewhere, in which seasonality and socio-economic dynamics were taken into account.

Both hydrogeologic and socio-economic conditions tend to be quite location-specific. This makes developing a simple blueprint for integrated groundwater management impossible. However, by translating local conditions into regional advice, strategic pathways were developed for the drylands of Africa[1] to support IWRM. The zonal hydrogeological and socio-economic setting determined the main groundwater issues and the potential sustainability strategies. The sustainability pathways describe potential sets of strategies that can be effective in moving towards sustainable groundwater resources development and use. While these pathways provide insight into regional differences within the African drylands, these cannot be used at local scales. Tailor-made approaches are necessary. In these assessments, remote sensing provides opportunities. Gridded datasets of population density are of great value in water demand assessments on a larger scale. Participatory stakeholder processes also provide opportunities, including group interviews for development of community calendars providing useful information on the occurrence and frequency of natural hazards and water demand.

[1] Gevaert et al. 2020, Towards sustainable groundwater use in the African drylands

 

 

How to cite: Van der Heijden, A., Waterloo, M. J., Gevaert, A. I., and Benedicto van Dalen, D.: Integration of hydrogeology and social sciences in practice, two IWRM case studies with challenges and opportunities from semi-arid Africa, EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-7114, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-7114, 2022.

17:12–17:18
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EGU22-11819
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Presentation form not yet defined
Jean-Christophe Comte, Luis Artur, Zareen Bharucha, Farisse Chirindja, Rosie Day, Joyce Dube, Fulvio Franchi, Josie Geris, Stephen Hussey, Eugene Makaya, Alessia Matano, Syed Mustafa, Edward Nesamvuni, Oluwaseun Olabode, Melanie Rohse, Simon Taylor, Sithabile Tirivarombo, and Anne Van Loon

The Limpopo river basin (LRB) is water-stressed and highly susceptible to floods and droughts. The impacts of floods and droughts on water availability and quality is increasing as a result of their increase in magnitude and frequency. The LRB encompasses a large diversity of physical and socio-economical characteristics spread across four Southern Africa countries (Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe). This dictates highly heterogeneous physical and human responses, coping mechanisms, and policy frameworks from local to transboundary scales.

Understanding the multidimensional connections that exist between and within flood and drought events and cycles, between various regions across the basin, between physical and social impacts, and between users and decision-makers, is critical to sustainable water resources management and long-term resilience to hydrological extremes.

The Connect4 Water Resilience project has brought together an international multidisciplinary team of hydrologists and social scientists from academia, policy, and practice to investigate the drivers and impacts of floods and droughts, and to promote solutions towards adaptation. In our research we deployed hydrological and geological investigations alongside community and governance interviews and workshops across the LRB to jointly feed in the application of a large-scale transboundary hydrological model of the LRB. Model assessment and future management scenario definition and analysis were implemented collaboratively with stakeholders across the basin, through iterative workshops at local, national, and transboundary scales.

Results so far revealed: (1) the high complementarity of physical (hydrological and sedimentological) and social (community narrative) data to reconstruct spatiotemporal dynamics and impacts of events, which has been crucial to model application in the basin affected by highly fragmented monitoring; (2) the observed increase in floods and droughts magnitude and frequency is not responsible for significant changes in groundwater recharge, suggesting that the general observed groundwater level decline is to be related to increasing abstraction, which in turn amplifies droughts; (3) flood severity and impacts are higher after droughts regardless of rainfall magnitude; (4) mitigation, through anticipatory action and preparation for floods and droughts at policy, user and community level is uneven and inadequately resourced, with generally some forms of preparation to droughts but little for floods; (5) the uptake of forecast and management recommendations from governments is patchy, while extension officers are playing a key role for communication and NGOs for training; (6) local stakeholder expertise and experience brought in during stakeholder workshops were critical to groundwater model conceptualisation, and management scenario definition and analysis; (7) preferred scenarios of management strategies, as collaboratively defined with stakeholders, were highly variable across the LRB countries and sub-regions, including preference for local water management (e.g. temporary flood water storage for subsequent droughts) in upstream upland regions vs large scale strategies (e.g. storage in dams) in downstream floodplain regions; however, hydrological model outputs showed that local/regional strategies have basin-scale (transboundary) impacts emphasizing the importance of transboundary cooperation and management of water resources and extreme events.

Research outcomes are being translated into tailored guidance for policy and practice including feeding in ongoing early warning system development and sustainable water resource management.

How to cite: Comte, J.-C., Artur, L., Bharucha, Z., Chirindja, F., Day, R., Dube, J., Franchi, F., Geris, J., Hussey, S., Makaya, E., Matano, A., Mustafa, S., Nesamvuni, E., Olabode, O., Rohse, M., Taylor, S., Tirivarombo, S., and Van Loon, A.: Adaptation to floods and droughts in (semi) arid transboundary basins: insights, barriers and opportunities drawn from socio-hydrogeological research in the Limpopo river basin, Southern Africa, EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-11819, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-11819, 2022.

17:18–17:24
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EGU22-3487
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ECS
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Virtual presentation
Mengxiang Zhang and Ting Fong May Chui

Developing green infrastructures (GIs) for rainwater harvesting has prevailed in many arid regions, which requires a new water management framework. This paper focuses on a water policy - water trading scheme – design and analysis for integrated green infrastructures and water resource management in a watershed that consists of multiple urban areas. A multiagent model bringing together urban water management and GIs planning models for multiple water managers with hydrological models is proposed to show 1) what the optimized water trading scheme is, 2) how the scheme would affect watershed socio-hydrologic environments, and 3) what the role of GIs in the scheme is. In the model, the water trading scheme design depends not only on the hydrologic dynamics of watershed caused by GIs and but on the social interactions between watershed and multiple urban managers. The proposed model is applied to the Colorado River Lower Basin, which is one of the USA's aridest regions and is planning water trading. Results indicated that a water-trading scheme effectively allocates limited water resources with a minimized system cost in the study area. Results also show that developing GIs to use rainwater resources might further reduce the cost induced by the water trading scheme. However, it might also exacerbate water resource allocation inequity among water users. These findings can help decision-makers design the associated water policy to support sustainable watershed development in arid regions.

How to cite: Zhang, M. and Chui, T. F. M.: Modeling water trading to support integrated green infrastructure and water resources management in an arid watershed, EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-3487, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-3487, 2022.

17:24–17:30
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EGU22-4065
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ECS
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On-site presentation
Daniela Cid Escobar, Albert Folch, Nuria Ferrer, and Xavier Sanchez-Vila

Shallow groundwater is usually more accessible than surface water in remote and rural areas due to the infrastructure cost to collect and allocate surface water on dispersed communities. However, the absence of a proper hydrogeological characterization of the aquifer system added to the lack of groundwater infrastructure and maintenance, technical capacity, and governance has not allowed the development of sustainable use of local groundwater resources in different territories worldwide.

We propose an interdisciplinary approach to determine the risk of a household experiencing water shortage due to depletion of the aquifer, degradation of the water quality, not access to the water point, or sustainable functionality. Three main parameters were defined: Closeness (determined by geographical parameters and easily computed using GIS), Availability (determined by hydrogeological parameters that can be assessed from a groundwater model), and Sustainability (differentiating between software functionality and hardware functionality (Bonsor, MacDonald, Casey, Carter, & Wilson, 2018), the former analyzed through Multiple Factor Analysis. Each of these three factors range between 0 and 1, and their product provides an index that can be used to map the risk of individual households.

An application case in Kwale County, southeast coast of Kenya, is presented, where community handpumps are the main water supply system. The novelty of the index relies on the combination of groundwater model outputs with household data, which allows the generation of time-dependent risk indexes that can be calculated for several scenarios depending on the data available. In this case, we present three scenarios, one involving the potential malfunctioning of a percentage of the existing handpumps, and two other ones dealing with extreme climate scenarios, all of them designed to test the resilience and applicability of the proposed index and their applicability for decision making.

Acknowledgements: This work was funded by the Centre of Cooperation for Development of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. We want to thank UPGRO and Gro For Good projects for their support and collaboration in acquiring available data.

References: Bonsor, H., MacDonald, A., Casey, V., Carter, R., & Wilson, P. (2018). The need for a standard approach to assessing the functionality of rural community water supplies. Hydrogeology Journal, 26(2), 367–370. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10040-017-1711-0

How to cite: Cid Escobar, D., Folch, A., Ferrer, N., and Sanchez-Vila, X.: Combining groundwater numerical modelling and social sciences to assess water access in developing countries rural environments, EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-4065, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-4065, 2022.

17:30–17:36
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EGU22-2135
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Presentation form not yet defined
Tejas Kulkarni, Matthias Gassmann, Chandrakanth Kulkarni, Vijayalaxmi Khed, and Andreas Buerkert

Water extraction in Bengaluru, India's fastest expanding metropolis, entirely depends on its ~500000 wells in a crystalline rock aquifer, of which an unknown number has been abandoned and the level of others has sunk to depths of 450 meters below surface. Recent research has highlighted the spatial heterogeneity and questioned the reliability of water level data in these settings. To fill existing knowledge gaps on the likely over-extraction of groundwater as a vital resource we used a socio-hydrogeological approach of front-lining local hydrogeologists to collect primary data on the spatio-temporal evolution of well depths across the city. Our data show that over the past 60 years borewell depth has increased significantly while water yields have remained unchanged, indicating that digging deeper wells is unsustainable. Using camera inspections of 56 wells in a 2.1km2 catchment of industrial land use in Electronic City of Bengaluru, we noted that water levels in the wells are largely determined by rock fractures, not by well depth. Our data show that increased borewell depths is a good signal of declining water levels in Bengaluru’s aquifers. Analysis of δ18O and δ2H signatures of groundwater samples across all depths followed the local meteoric water line indicating recent recharge, implying that drilling deeper only increased the borehole volume and did not tap into newer water sources.

How to cite: Kulkarni, T., Gassmann, M., Kulkarni, C., Khed, V., and Buerkert, A.: Assessing the groundwater sustainability of Bengaluru megacity, India, through the lens of socio-hydrogeology , EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-2135, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-2135, 2022.

17:36–17:42
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EGU22-3412
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ECS
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Virtual presentation
Eléa Crayol, Frédéric Huneau, Emilie Garel, Viviana Re, Alexandra Mattei, Sébastien Santoni, and Vanina Pasqualini

Coastal Mediterranean lagoons are very often groundwater-dependent hydrosystems, however their hydrogeological functioning is poorly known, damaging their management. Socio-hydrogeology allows, in an inter-and transdisciplinary way to clarify the relationships linking human activities and groundwater status. Those interactions within the watershed, combined with consumption patterns of the population, and sanitation defects can generate processes leading to pollutant fluxes with impacts on surface water, groundwater and lagoon water quality. This approach integrates both social and economic components into hydrogeological investigations.

The Biguglia lagoon watershed (Northern Corsica, France) has been chosen as a pilot site. Indeed, significant nitrate content, emerging compounds, and pesticides have already been observed in the lagoon waters, but their origin still needs to be specified, both in terms of source and dispersion modalities.

The aim of this study is to (1) assess the link between groundwater quality and the anthropogenic pressures on the watershed, (2) understand water users’ and the stakeholders ‘perception and knowledge of the watershed and the local territory, (3) identify the origin of pollutions detected in the lagoon’s water.

In this purpose, a field sampling was led in spring 2021, combining several tools useful for the knowledge improvement of the hydrogeological functioning and the tracing of anthropic pollutant fluxes. Investigations with structured interviews was administered to 32 water users and 16 local stakeholders involved in the monitoring assessment, to determine the land use evolution since 1950’s to present and aiming at identifying past and present uses of the water resource over the watershed. At the same time, a multi-tracer water sampling, combining physico-chemical parameters, major ions and trace elements as well as, stable isotopes of the water molecule was carried out on 53 points (lagoon, rivers, canals waters, groundwater), of which 21 samples were also analysed for a set of pesticides (screening of 240 molecules).

Pesticide’s analysis show that the study site is affected by agricultural pollution. Indeed, neonicotinoid insecticides, extensively used worldwide, have been found on the sampling points with significant concentrations. Those pesticides are mainly used in fruit, vegetable and cereal crops. The field survey, the questionnaire and the sampling campaign have allowed to identify and confirm the presence of these cultures on the study site. In the same way, benzotriazoles, perfluorinated acids (PFAs) and DEET (insect repellent) have also been detected. They are related to the consumption habits of the population on the watershed.

Geochemical analysis correlated with the social analysis and the land use analysis permitted to better constraint pollution sources, evidencing two main sources: sanitation defect and agriculture activity.

The socio-hydrogeological approach is essential to improve the knowledge of the Biguglia lagoon hydrosystem. The purpose of this work is to offer a new functional diagram of the area, including the space-time continuum of anthropogenic impacts within the watershed. This new knowledge will help local stakeholders towards the recovery of a good geochemical and ecological status for the lagoon brackish water body of Biguglia.

How to cite: Crayol, E., Huneau, F., Garel, E., Re, V., Mattei, A., Santoni, S., and Pasqualini, V.: Socio-hydrogeological approach to identify contaminant fluxes towards groundwater-dependent hydrosystems, case of the Biguglia lagoon (Corsica, France), EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-3412, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-3412, 2022.

17:42–17:48
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EGU22-10542
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ECS
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Virtual presentation
Li Xu, James S. Famiglietti, David Ferris, Xander Huggins, Chinchu Mohan, Sara Sadri, Palash Sanyal, and Jefferson S. Wong

Managing groundwater resources is challenging because they are difficult to monitor. The application of remote sensing methods has improved our capacity to monitor variability in groundwater storage, as is the case for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the GRACE Follow-On (GRACE-FO) missions. While GRACE-based groundwater studies to date have covered many places across the globe, perspectives that link scientific studies to policymaking and practices are still limited. Challenges to applying GRACE data into practice result from their coarse resolution, which limits their utility at the smaller scales at which water management decisions are made. Another reason is that the data and related studies can be difficult to use and understand by policymakers and end-users. However, these challenges offer the GRACE scientific community opportunities to communicate with stakeholders, policymakers, and the public in raising awareness around groundwater sustainability issues. This paper addresses three questions: which GRACE data and GRACE-derived products can be useful for groundwater practices and management; how GRACE-derived groundwater messages can be better communicated with practitioners; and how to better operationalize GRACE-derived products for groundwater practice and management. This paper also aims to provide an agenda for the continued use of GRACE and GRACE-FO for the purpose of sustainable groundwater management. To gain insight into these questions, a policy Delphi survey was conducted to collect opinions of both the scientific and non-scientific communities. We made use of target search and snowballing techniques to identify suitable participants who are experienced groundwater researchers or practitioners, and who are familiar with GRACE. A total of 25 participants from around the world were surveyed (14 scientific and 11 non-scientific), and they provided thoughtful responses. We found that both communities acknowledged the potential of GRACE data and GRACE-derived products for groundwater management, and would be willing to collaborate to develop projects for practical applications. Better communication between researchers and practitioners was recommended as a key for the application of GRACE-derived products into practice. Practitioners noted their high demand for reliable data for their management responsibilities, but are more favorable towards locally observed data. The reliability of GRACE at small scales was an issue, even though some robust downscaling methods have been demonstrated down to local scales. The survey showed a desire for more comparison of GRACE-derived products to local measurements to determine whether GRACE products, e.g. downscaled data, can be useful for informing local decisions. Based on the survey, we proposed an agenda that helps to improve the usefulness of GRACE-derived products for practices. This agenda includes scientific recommendations that help to resolve the resolution and technical barriers for local applications, and professional perspectives that bridge the connection between science and policy, and facilitate communication for groundwater management.

How to cite: Xu, L., Famiglietti, J. S., Ferris, D., Huggins, X., Mohan, C., Sadri, S., Sanyal, P., and Wong, J. S.: From Coarse Resolution to Realistic Resolution: GRACE as a Science Communication and Policymaking Tool for Sustainable Groundwater Management, EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-10542, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-10542, 2022.

17:48–17:54
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EGU22-12137
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ECS
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Virtual presentation
Advancing Socio-Hydrology Through the Development of High Impact Learning Courses, Engaging Students and the Community (Costa Rica)
(withdrawn)
M. Rene Castillo and Judy Nunez
17:54–18:00
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EGU22-10877
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Presentation form not yet defined
Toward a framework for the assessment of the socio-economic impacts of irrigation under variable surface water-groundwater interactions
(withdrawn)
Laetitia Igiraneza Sinyigenga, Armando Zarco, and Francisco Munoz Arriola
18:00–18:06
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EGU22-12846
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ECS
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Virtual presentation
Fortune Gomo, Sarah Halliday, Wiktor Chichlowski, Susan Chichloska, Harlod Zaunda, and Alistair Geddes

Drinking water quality is a key component of water security to ensure clean and safe water supplies to achieve the Global SDG6. Yet frequently there are capacity constraints on the adequacy and sustained water quality monitoring programs in LDC contexts, especially in rural areas where resources are more limited and the resident population is more reliant on scattered independent groundwater supplies. In Malawi, knowledge of the importance of water quality has been developing over recent years, necessitating local capacity development for sufficient and sustained water quality monitoring.

International, transdisciplinary, and interdisciplinary research collaboration and capacity-building efforts in rural water quality monitoring can be a vehicle to improve technology development that supports operational monitoring and data reporting in resource-poor settings. However, in cognate fields, similar international partnership models have drawn some criticism of late, because of their alleged tendency to not translate collaboration agreements into demonstrable local capacity gains. We, therefore, link our consideration of these issues specific to our direct input to efforts to create a new water quality testing program in rural southern Malawi in southern Africa in a collaborative research project between the University of Dundee and Fisherman’s Rest, a local NGO in Malawi. Fisherman’s Rest works with rural communities in Malawi, specifically borehole monitoring under the Madzi Alipo program. However, their work lacked the water quality monitoring component, a key element to water security. Using our reflections, we find that the line of critique on international collaborations has some value in terms of thinking about how to advance ‘genuine’ collaboration and capacity-building in water quality monitoring programs as we look to expand our collaboration efforts with Fisherman’s Rest and other stakeholders in rural water quality monitoring in Malawi.

How to cite: Gomo, F., Halliday, S., Chichlowski, W., Chichloska, S., Zaunda, H., and Geddes, A.: Reflections on collaboration and capacity-building for sustainable groundwater quality monitoring in rural Malawi, EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-12846, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-12846, 2022.

18:06–18:12
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EGU22-4383
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ECS
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Virtual presentation
Chiara Tringali, Jonathan Rizzi, Viviana Re, Caterina Tuci, Marta Mancin, Edison Mendieta, and Antonio Marcomini

The Galápagos Archipelago (Ecuador) is traditionally considered a living museum and showcase of evolution. The rich biodiversity and distinctive environment attract thousands of visitors every year. However, this tourist flow exerts continuous pressures on the natural environment, and on water resources in particular, to the detriment of the local population who is faced with the challenges of accessing safe and sustainable drinking resources.

For this reason, over the years numerous projects, especially in the context of international cooperation activities, have tried to assess the impact of anthropogenic activities on the water quality and quantity in the islands. Unfortunately, the lack of coordination among all these projects did not allow to carry out continuous monitoring and, above all, to obtain homogenous and consistent time series of the measured hydrogeochemical parameters.

For this reason, in the framework of a joint technical cooperation project (“Health protection and prevention of anthropic pollution risks” in the Island of Santa Cruz” financed by Veneto Region, Italy; CS2012A19) a comprehensive assessment on water quality data (physico-chemical parameters, major elements, trace elements and coliforms) collected since 1985 in the Santa Cruz Island was performed. Results revealed the need of optimizing monitoring efforts to fill knowledge gaps and to better target decision making processes. All data were therefore standardized, homogenized and collected in an open database, accessible to all water stakeholders involved in water control, management and protection in the island. 

The information gathering activity also revealed the lack of coordination between the stakeholders themselves and the presence overlapping interests towards water resources, which represent an obstacle for coordinated actions targeted to sustainable water resources management in such a fragile environment. 

Therefore, under the guidance of the Santa Cruz Municipality, a Water Committee was established to foster the coordinated action among the water stakeholders in the island. The latter range from national to local authorities (e.g. National Water Secretariat, Ministry of Agriculture, Ecuador Naval Oceanographic Institute, National Park Galapagos, Municipality), research institutes (Charles Darwin Foundation), bottled water companies and Santa Cruz Households. Within the committee, shared procedures for data collection, sample analysis, evaluation and data assessment by an open access geodatabase were agreed collectively and tested in the field. Joint monitoring in the island can optimize the efforts for water quality assessment and protection, and improve accountability and outreach towards civil society and water users. Such a coordinated action can also ensure that international cooperation activities carried out in the island will respond to the real needs of the local population, and results will contribute to the long-term protection of the scarce water resources in the island.

Overall, results of the project revealed the high potential of adopting transdisciplinary approaches in complex, multi-stakeholder, framework typical of small island states.

How to cite: Tringali, C., Rizzi, J., Re, V., Tuci, C., Mancin, M., Mendieta, E., and Marcomini, A.: Insights from a transdisciplinary approach for water quality monitoring and multi-stakeholder management in the island of Santa Cruz, Galápagos (Ecuador), EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-4383, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-4383, 2022.

18:12–18:30