MAL22 | Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture by Lisa Tauxe & EMRP Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture by Alexandra R. L. Kushnir

MAL22

Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture by Lisa Tauxe & EMRP Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture by Alexandra R. L. Kushnir
Conveners: Sergio Vinciguerra, Fabio Florindo
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Tue, 19:00

Session assets

Orals: Tue, 25 Apr | Room D1

19:00–19:30
|
EGU23-1788
|
MAL22
|
solicited
|
Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture
|
On-site presentation
Lisa Tauxe

Petrus Perigrinus de Maricourt, a French physicist and mathematician wrote the first descriptions of the properties of magnets, now known as the Epistola de Magnete in 1269.  He summarized what was known at the time concerning the use of the compass, writing “that while the investigator in this subject must understand nature and not be ignorant of the celestial motions, he must also be very diligent in the use of his own hands, so that through the operation of this stone he may show wonderful effects.” (translation by J. Gimpel, 1976).  This is still true today, particularly for those of us who study the ancient magnetic field through ‘accidental’ records in geological and archaeological materials.  In this lecture I will review efforts to use ‘our own hands’ to understand the structure of the time averaged Earth’s magnetic field over the last five million years, using both directions (obtained with compasses!) and intensities.

How to cite: Tauxe, L.: Hunting the Magnetic Field, EGU General Assembly 2023, Vienna, Austria, 23–28 Apr 2023, EGU23-1788, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu23-1788, 2023.

19:30–20:00
|
EGU23-4505
|
MAL22
|
solicited
|
EMRP Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award Lecture
|
On-site presentation
Alexandra Kushnir

Permeability is a key physical property across all spatial scales in the Earth’s crust and exerts significant control on the behaviour of Earth systems, with implications for natural hazards (e.g., earthquakes, slope instabilities, volcanic eruptions) and geo-resource management (e.g., geothermal energy, carbon capture and sequestration, ore deposit formation). Amongst other processes, rock-fluid interactions and the interplay between precipitation and dissolution complicates the microstructure of these materials, modifying the efficiency of fluid flow. For example, the permeability of volcanic rocks is generally controlled by the presence of pores and microfractures, but the continuum from pore-dominated to microfracture-dominated permeability is significantly perturbed by the introduction of alteration minerals that reduce the void space available to fluid flow over time. The propensity, extent, and timescales of rock alteration are therefore important factors influencing rock permeability. However, obtaining a systematic understanding of the intricate relationships between rock alteration and changes in permeability – including dissolution, transport, and redistribution of chemical compounds – is challenging. As a result, we do not fully understand how these processes modify the structure of permeable channels and over what timescales they may hamper fluid flow, limiting our ability to effectively model, for example, geothermal reservoirs or volcanic processes.

The mission of the new Rock Physics and Geofluids (RPGL) group at EPFL is to address how secondary mineral precipitation – starting with silica (SiO2) - changes the permeability of rocks. Using a mix of rock physics, microstructural and geochemical characterization, and water-rock interaction experiments, we will quantify 1) the physical and chemical conditions promoting silica alteration under a wide range of crustal conditions, 2) how the geometry of fluid-flow pathways in rocks changes over time, 3) how these changes modify permeable flow, and 4) on what timescales these processes are active. Our goal is to establish the infrastructural, experimental, and analytical foundation needed to more broadly study the relationships between rock-fluid interactions and fluid flow, for potential application to natural hazard and geo-energy research.

How to cite: Kushnir, A.: Permeability, alteration, and microstructure: A (hopefully) coupled rock physics and geochemical approach to how rock-fluid interactions change permeability, EGU General Assembly 2023, Vienna, Austria, 23–28 Apr 2023, EGU23-4505, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu23-4505, 2023.