G2.3 | Global Geodetic Observing System: The Reference for Earth System Monitoring and featuring VLBI component

G2.3

EDI
Global Geodetic Observing System: The Reference for Earth System Monitoring and featuring VLBI component
Convener: Kosuke Heki | Co-conveners: Martin Sehnal, Allison Craddock, Esther AzcueECSECS, Anastasiia WalentaECSECS, Minghui Xu, Aletha de Witt

High precision modern geodetic observations enable comprehensive monitoring of multiple spheres of the Earth. They record fingerprints of changes within the Earth System, providing crucial information to address major scientific issues, e.g., natural hazards, climate changes, global water cycles. Interpreting geodetic observations requires implementation of reference frames, analysis techniques and models with accuracy comparable to or exceeding the observations. Consequently, geodesy expanded its scope from just measuring geometry, gravity, and rotation of the Earth to understanding fingerprints recorded there and has become a key science to understand the Earth System for functioning and sustainability of our society. The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) realizes the metrological basis for monitoring the Earth System. It is designed to unite individual geodetic observations and model them into one consistent frame with the highest precision available. We welcome contributions relevant to GGOS, particularly its scientific and social aspects, infrastructure, products, and activities of geodetic services.

Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a key contributor to the GGOS, primarily through the development and role-out of the VLBI Global Observing System (VGOS) by the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astronomy (IVS). VLBI stands apart as the sole method with the capability to establish and sustain the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The ICRF3 was constructed using VLBI data at the standard S/X frequencies, along with observations at K-band and X/Ka-band, making it the first multi-frequency frame. The backward compatibility with the running legacy VLBI network is to be considered as a tool to bridge nearly 40 years of legacy and last 4 years of VGOS observations. VGOS antennas were designed with two aims: to increase the measurement precision, from a cm-level to the GGOS goal of 1 mm; to increase the observational cadence, from 2-3 sessions per week to continuous observations. In this session we explicitly seek contributions to revisit the original goals and map the future VLBI contribution to GGOS. Besides this, we welcome the contributions dedicated to the satellite tracking with the fast VGOS antennas, an approach that promises to enhance and homogenize the reference frame determination.

High precision modern geodetic observations enable comprehensive monitoring of multiple spheres of the Earth. They record fingerprints of changes within the Earth System, providing crucial information to address major scientific issues, e.g., natural hazards, climate changes, global water cycles. Interpreting geodetic observations requires implementation of reference frames, analysis techniques and models with accuracy comparable to or exceeding the observations. Consequently, geodesy expanded its scope from just measuring geometry, gravity, and rotation of the Earth to understanding fingerprints recorded there and has become a key science to understand the Earth System for functioning and sustainability of our society. The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) realizes the metrological basis for monitoring the Earth System. It is designed to unite individual geodetic observations and model them into one consistent frame with the highest precision available. We welcome contributions relevant to GGOS, particularly its scientific and social aspects, infrastructure, products, and activities of geodetic services.

Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a key contributor to the GGOS, primarily through the development and role-out of the VLBI Global Observing System (VGOS) by the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astronomy (IVS). VLBI stands apart as the sole method with the capability to establish and sustain the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The ICRF3 was constructed using VLBI data at the standard S/X frequencies, along with observations at K-band and X/Ka-band, making it the first multi-frequency frame. The backward compatibility with the running legacy VLBI network is to be considered as a tool to bridge nearly 40 years of legacy and last 4 years of VGOS observations. VGOS antennas were designed with two aims: to increase the measurement precision, from a cm-level to the GGOS goal of 1 mm; to increase the observational cadence, from 2-3 sessions per week to continuous observations. In this session we explicitly seek contributions to revisit the original goals and map the future VLBI contribution to GGOS. Besides this, we welcome the contributions dedicated to the satellite tracking with the fast VGOS antennas, an approach that promises to enhance and homogenize the reference frame determination.