This page contains Art-Science sessions compiled by the EOS Programme Group Chair.

SC – Short Courses

SC3.4 EDI

Science has long been a source of inspiration for artists, writers and other creative professionals, but as anyone who has seen a science-based film can tell you, the gap between inspiration and fact can sometimes be wide. So what do you do if you are approached by an artist or creative profession to collaborate on a project? How do you ensure that your subject is represented accurately, whilst at the same time respecting the artist’s creative freedom? And how do you find a creative professional to collaborate with you on your research?

In this short course we will explain some basic tips to help you with these issues, from the very first step of contacting, or being contacted by a creative professional, understanding the collaborative brief and how to write one, how the working styles of artists and scientists are different (and the same) and how to decide where the boundary between fact and fiction lies for you. Drawing experience from artists who have worked with scientists and scientists who have worked with artists across a range of mediums from theatre and opera, to sculpture, dance, creative writing and painting, this short course will give you the information you need to collaborate with confidence.

Co-organized by EOS1/GM13
Convener: Hazel GibsonECSECS | Co-conveners: Lucia Perez-DiazECSECS, Fabio Crameri
Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.85/86
Wed, 10:45
SC7.1

Choose a scientific paper. Now, picture it. Really, picture it in your head - if it were hanging on the wall of a museum as a painting, what would be in it? Whilst it may seem like a pointless thing to do, this exercise is more relevant than ever. From graphical abstracts to illustrated magazine covers to online article banners… eye-catching graphics open many doors when it comes to successfully communicating science, both inside and (particularly) outside specialist circles.

So, if visuals play such a significant role in drawing audiences in (pun intended), why don’t more scientists utilise illustration as a way to break the barrier between them and the public? For many, the answer simply is “I can’t really draw”. But what if you could?

Using principles and examples from stylized illustration, this hands-on short course will guide you through the process of creating a scientific illustration from start to finish, and prove to you that you can, in fact, draw. If you wish to, you will be able to use the last part of the course to work on your first scientific illustration, inspired by a piece of work chosen by you. Whilst I am a digital illustrator, you may choose any media to work with, this is not a course for learning how to draw with pixels!

At the very least, you will never lose at Pictionary again ;)

Convener: Lucia Perez-DiazECSECS | Co-convener: Kirstie Wright
Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Wed, 16:15
SC7.2

The workshop will guide participants to use the written material presented in the Assembly (e.g. research papers, abstracts, program details, or even the food menu in the Assembly café) and develop their own black-out poem(s).  

The workshop will start with the convener describing what is black-out poetry (also called erasure poetry). The convener will present some examples of black-out poetry, showing the initial document, the erasure process and the generated poem.

Following this, workshop participants will be asked to choose a document (e.g. an abstract) and experiment with it aiming to develop their own poem.

Requirements: Prior knowledge of erasure poetry isn’t required. Participants are only asked to bring their own gadget (e.g. a laptop, tablet or smartphone) with access to a writing/editing program (e.g. Microsoft Word). There will be some print outs and markers in the room too for those who prefer to experiment with a printed document. However, in this case, participants will need to work with the documents printed by the convener. If participants like to work with the documents of their choice, then they need to bring along their own gadget or printed documents.

Public information:

Prior knowledge of erasure poetry isn’t required. Participants are only asked to bring their own gadget (e.g. a laptop, tablet or smartphone) with access to a writing/editing program (e.g. Microsoft Word).

 

 

Convener: Ilias Tsagas | Co-convener: Evguenia Roussak
Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Thu, 08:30

EOS – Education and Outreach Sessions

SC3.4 EDI

Science has long been a source of inspiration for artists, writers and other creative professionals, but as anyone who has seen a science-based film can tell you, the gap between inspiration and fact can sometimes be wide. So what do you do if you are approached by an artist or creative profession to collaborate on a project? How do you ensure that your subject is represented accurately, whilst at the same time respecting the artist’s creative freedom? And how do you find a creative professional to collaborate with you on your research?

In this short course we will explain some basic tips to help you with these issues, from the very first step of contacting, or being contacted by a creative professional, understanding the collaborative brief and how to write one, how the working styles of artists and scientists are different (and the same) and how to decide where the boundary between fact and fiction lies for you. Drawing experience from artists who have worked with scientists and scientists who have worked with artists across a range of mediums from theatre and opera, to sculpture, dance, creative writing and painting, this short course will give you the information you need to collaborate with confidence.

Co-organized by EOS1/GM13
Convener: Hazel GibsonECSECS | Co-conveners: Lucia Perez-DiazECSECS, Fabio Crameri
Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.85/86
Wed, 10:45
EOS1.5 EDI

Games have the power to ignite imaginations and place you in someone else’s shoes or situation, often forcing you into making decisions from perspectives other than your own. This makes them powerful tools for communication, through use in outreach, disseminating research, in education and teaching at all levels, and as a method to train the public, practitioners, and decision-makers in order to build environmental resilience.

Games can also inspire innovative and fun approaches to learning. Gamification and game-based approaches add an extra spark of engagement and interaction with a topic. Gaming technology (e.g. virtual reality) can transport and immerse people into new worlds providing fascinating and otherwise impossible experiences for learners.

In this session we welcome contributions from anyone who has used games, gaming technology, and/or game-based approaches in their research, their teaching, or public engagement activities.

Co-organized by GM12
Convener: Christopher Skinner | Co-conveners: Rolf Hut, Elizabeth Lewis, Lisa Gallagher, Maria Elena Orduna AlegriaECSECS
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall A
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
EOS1.3 EDI

This is a merged session with 1.4 "Scientists, artists and the Earth: co-operating for the planet"

Everyday challenges such as climate change, pollution, desertification, natural hazards, and animal extinction prompt the need for urgent solutions. While science often takes the lead in providing these solutions, art is typically associated with entertainment. However, a growing community of scientists and artists is emerging to draw attention to pressing issues. Art, with its emotional engagement, becomes a powerful tool for cognitive learning and conveying messages that reawaken a sense of beauty and responsibility for the planet. The collaboration between scientists and artists facilitates the identification of more effective methods to involve people deeply in understanding Earth and encourages sustainable lifestyles. This interdisciplinary collaboration is crucial in communicating complex scientific subjects to non-experts, especially regarding topics like climate change that can be confusing to the public. Both scientific and artistic communities share an interest and responsibility in raising awareness about planetary boundaries and the Earth's fragile stability. Traditional educational methods have addressed these issues, but science-art collaborations play a vital role in co-creating new research avenues and fostering discussions with emotional and human context through the arts. The session aims to explore these dialogues by combining lectures, academic posters showcasing interdisciplinary research, and visual displays of art in action. By symbiotically blending STEM and the arts, the session encourages a discussion on how these disciplines can collaboratively explore and communicate the societal, economic, political, and environmental factors we face, driving improved communication.

Co-organized by GM12
Convener: Michael Lazar | Co-conveners: Tiziana Lanza, Elisa Vanin, George Sand França, Daniel Parsons
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 16:15

NET – Networking

NET10

Join us for an immersive evening of geoscience gaming as we delve into the depth of our planet's challenges and wonders by gaming with colleagues! This event provides games for many interests, including card games, board games, video games, and even Pictionary for you artistically inclined gamers.

The Games Night is associated with the "Games for Geoscience" session. We encourage you to explore this session as convenors and numerous presenters will have their captivating games available to play. It's also a chance to engage directly with the creators, gaining insights into the innovative approaches shaping the intersection of geoscience and gaming. We also highly recommend anyone who has developed their own game to bring it along.

This geoscience games night promises to be an unforgettable journey through the processes and decisions that shape our world, so bring your curiosity and competitive spirit as we explore the Earth in a whole new dimension!

Public information:

We will be publishing a list of games that are confirmed to appear at the Games Night. To have your game added to the list please contact Chris Skinner.

Convener: Christopher Skinner | Co-conveners: Lisa Gallagher, Maria Elena Orduna AlegriaECSECS, Rolf Hut, Elizabeth Lewis
Wed, 17 Apr, 18:00–19:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Wed, 18:00

GM – Geomorphology

SC3.4 EDI

Science has long been a source of inspiration for artists, writers and other creative professionals, but as anyone who has seen a science-based film can tell you, the gap between inspiration and fact can sometimes be wide. So what do you do if you are approached by an artist or creative profession to collaborate on a project? How do you ensure that your subject is represented accurately, whilst at the same time respecting the artist’s creative freedom? And how do you find a creative professional to collaborate with you on your research?

In this short course we will explain some basic tips to help you with these issues, from the very first step of contacting, or being contacted by a creative professional, understanding the collaborative brief and how to write one, how the working styles of artists and scientists are different (and the same) and how to decide where the boundary between fact and fiction lies for you. Drawing experience from artists who have worked with scientists and scientists who have worked with artists across a range of mediums from theatre and opera, to sculpture, dance, creative writing and painting, this short course will give you the information you need to collaborate with confidence.

Co-organized by EOS1/GM13
Convener: Hazel GibsonECSECS | Co-conveners: Lucia Perez-DiazECSECS, Fabio Crameri
Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.85/86
Wed, 10:45
EOS1.5 EDI

Games have the power to ignite imaginations and place you in someone else’s shoes or situation, often forcing you into making decisions from perspectives other than your own. This makes them powerful tools for communication, through use in outreach, disseminating research, in education and teaching at all levels, and as a method to train the public, practitioners, and decision-makers in order to build environmental resilience.

Games can also inspire innovative and fun approaches to learning. Gamification and game-based approaches add an extra spark of engagement and interaction with a topic. Gaming technology (e.g. virtual reality) can transport and immerse people into new worlds providing fascinating and otherwise impossible experiences for learners.

In this session we welcome contributions from anyone who has used games, gaming technology, and/or game-based approaches in their research, their teaching, or public engagement activities.

Co-organized by GM12
Convener: Christopher Skinner | Co-conveners: Rolf Hut, Elizabeth Lewis, Lisa Gallagher, Maria Elena Orduna AlegriaECSECS
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall A
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
EOS1.3 EDI

This is a merged session with 1.4 "Scientists, artists and the Earth: co-operating for the planet"

Everyday challenges such as climate change, pollution, desertification, natural hazards, and animal extinction prompt the need for urgent solutions. While science often takes the lead in providing these solutions, art is typically associated with entertainment. However, a growing community of scientists and artists is emerging to draw attention to pressing issues. Art, with its emotional engagement, becomes a powerful tool for cognitive learning and conveying messages that reawaken a sense of beauty and responsibility for the planet. The collaboration between scientists and artists facilitates the identification of more effective methods to involve people deeply in understanding Earth and encourages sustainable lifestyles. This interdisciplinary collaboration is crucial in communicating complex scientific subjects to non-experts, especially regarding topics like climate change that can be confusing to the public. Both scientific and artistic communities share an interest and responsibility in raising awareness about planetary boundaries and the Earth's fragile stability. Traditional educational methods have addressed these issues, but science-art collaborations play a vital role in co-creating new research avenues and fostering discussions with emotional and human context through the arts. The session aims to explore these dialogues by combining lectures, academic posters showcasing interdisciplinary research, and visual displays of art in action. By symbiotically blending STEM and the arts, the session encourages a discussion on how these disciplines can collaboratively explore and communicate the societal, economic, political, and environmental factors we face, driving improved communication.

Co-organized by GM12
Convener: Michael Lazar | Co-conveners: Tiziana Lanza, Elisa Vanin, George Sand França, Daniel Parsons
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 16:15