4-9 September 2022, Bonn, Germany

PSE.cc.1

PSE.cc
Strategic Lectures: Connecting communities to deliver seamless products and services 

“Connecting communities to deliver seamless weather and climates science and services” - The additional focus of this year’s EMS Annual Meeting addresses the needs, challenges and benefits from seamless inter- and transdisciplinary interactions within and between communities’ respective objectives, methodologies and partnerships.

As a kick-off of the week’s theme, a prominent opening discussion event is planned on Monday forenoon, with the ultimate objective to lead to general and concrete recommendations towards communities associated with meteorology and climatology for improving its growing role within and in engaging with society.

At first, a short round of introductions will take place. Each invited speaker will answer the same three questions that address current and future activities as well as value chain priorities in relation to the focus topic, with a specific focus on co-design and communication. These statements and outlooks will prepare the follow-up panel discussion moderated by a professional science journalist - focussing on challenges and strategic visions for “connecting communities” towards future seamless actions and research in Europe. Afterwards, a broader discussion will close the high-level opening event, where the audience is actively involved.

A broad palette of high-level speakers from different communities related to weather and climate has been invited – DWD, WMO, ECMWF, EUMETSAT, Public-Private Partnerships among them. Please find more information on our speakers at https://www.emetsoc.org/ems2022-plenary-speakers/

Convener: Sylvain M. Joffre | Co-conveners: France-Audrey Magro, Matthieu Masbou, Karolin Eichler
Orals
| Mon, 05 Sep, 10:00–12:30 (CEST)|Room HS 2

Session assets

Session materials

Orals: Mon, 05 Sep | Room HS 2

Chairpersons: Roland Wengenmayr, France-Audrey Magro
Introduction
10:00–10:10
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EMS2022-724
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solicited
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Onsite presentation
Sarah Jones

The German Weather Service, DWD, is the national meteorological and climatological service that provides products and services based on advanced scientific and operational expertise to address present and future societal challenges. Through targeted research we enhance the information content, relevance, utility and acceptance of weather and climate products and services.

Our motto is "Weather and Climate from one hand". Through our strategy for probabilistic seamless prediction we develop observing and prediction systems for weather, climate and atmospheric composition. We interact closely with different user communities to understand their needs, help them understand our capabilities, and develop tailored products and services. All georeferenced data from our observations and models is available as Open Data. Through our WarnWetter App we provide the general public and civil protection personnel with warnings and information on the current weather situation. Together with our partners we provide user-oriented climate information relating to sectors such as health, agriculture, tourism or water resources management through the German Climate Portal. Currently we are working with different national and regional institutions to develop a natural hazards portal.

For effective service delivery we must bridge the gap between different communities. We connect the operational and academic communities through the Hans Ertel Centre, our extramural research programme, and engagement in major national and international research programmes. We connect governmental research with stakeholders through the expert network of our ministry and through co-design with stakeholders such as the regional flood forecasting authorities and renewable energy providers. We connect with our international partners to advance seamless earth system prediction worldwide. Key aspects to connecting communities are to support, nurture and promote a transdisciplinary workforce, to build sustainable and long-term transdisciplinary cooperations in natural, social and behavioural science with the academic community, to make operational tools, data and infrastructure available for external partners, and to help potential users find, understand and use our data and services.

How to cite: Jones, S.: Added value for science and society through connecting communities at DWD, EMS Annual Meeting 2022, Bonn, Germany, 5–9 Sep 2022, EMS2022-724, https://doi.org/10.5194/ems2022-724, 2022.

10:10–10:20
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EMS2022-702
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solicited
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Onsite presentation
Celeste Saulo

Service delivery is at the heart of our mission as National Meteorological Services (NMS) and one of my main concerns since I became the Director of Argentina's NMS. Meeting societal needs under an everchanging context and limited resources demands partnerships and collaborations. My former career as a researcher at the University of Buenos Aires allowed me to build bridges between the operational and the academic sectors, which historically have had barriers to setting up constructive teamwork. Developing a common language, understanding different expectations, and respecting diversity has been critical to establishing effective collaborations towards achieving goals that could not be undertaken by the operational or the academic communities in isolation. In particular, I will focus on the impact of our relatively new Meteorology and Society department. This unit co-led the development of a new early warning system, our first fully co-designed product, with the participation of decision-makers, social and natural scientists, and an international private company.

How to cite: Saulo, C.: Transdisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and interinstitutional work as the building blocks for effective service delivery, EMS Annual Meeting 2022, Bonn, Germany, 5–9 Sep 2022, EMS2022-702, https://doi.org/10.5194/ems2022-702, 2022.

10:20–10:30
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EMS2022-715
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solicited
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Onsite presentation
Phil Evans and Paul Counet

Increasing society’s resilience to high-impact natural events and climate change requires coordinated research and new investments in earth observation and prediction. EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), together with its international partners provides the backbone of the global meteorological space based observing system.

In the next five years, EUMETSAT will launch the new generation of its main geostationary and polar systems as well as several new missions of the Copernicus Programme on behalf of the European Union, meeting the requirements for a vast set of applications, including global and regional numerical weather prediction, nowcasting, atmospheric composition and ocean monitoring as well as climate.

Those systems will bring an unprecedented observational capacity benefiting the full weather/climate value chain. We would present an overview of the main applications to key sectors, ranging from nowcasting to long term climate record and CO2 monitoring. 

In the near future, additional polar missions could complement the mandatory programs with specific focus on wind measurements and microwave soundings. Socio-economic impact assessment could be presented as a guidance for future studies and programmes.

With the objective to get these new observations made available as widely as possible, and to generate maximum impact on economies and societies, EUMETSAT is also embarked in the development of a set of innovative big data services, making use of latest IT, AI and ML technologies. These efforts are developed in close coordination with European National Meteorological Services, EUMETNET and ECMWF.

How to cite: Evans, P. and Counet, P.: How EUMETSAT connects communities to deliver products and services seamlessly, EMS Annual Meeting 2022, Bonn, Germany, 5–9 Sep 2022, EMS2022-715, https://doi.org/10.5194/ems2022-715, 2022.

10:30–10:40
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EMS2022-687
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solicited
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Onsite presentation
Florence Rabier

ECMWF is both a research institute and a 24/7 operational service centre, producing global numerical weather predictions and other data for European Members and Co-operating States as well as the broader meteorological and environmental community. ECMWF develops and operates a global Earth-System model and cutting-edge data assimilation system. Its ensemble forecasts extend from the medium range to the seasonal scales. ECMWF also operates two of the European Union’s Copernicus Earth observation programme services, the Atmosphere Monitoring (CAMS) and the Climate Change (C3S) Services, and contributes to the Copernicus Emergency Management Service (CEMS) as computational centre for the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS) and the Forest fire and wildfire information system (FIRE). Finally, ECMWF partners with ESA and EUMETSAT to deliver the European Union’s Destination Earth project, creating digital twins of the Earth.

The science required to make ECMWF’s vision of accurate weather forecasting, reliable data on climate change and usable information about the quality of the air we breathe, the risk of flooding or of forest fires relies on the best science in the world, a science which is developed by our scientists working in close partnership with scientists in all our member states. This collaboration takes place primarily within the national meteorological services, and through academic partnerships which we are developing around the world.

Another key aspect of our scientific developments is that they do not happen in silos, they rely on computing science and computing technology. This has always been the case at ECMWF, but the past decade has seen an increased role within ECMWF for computing science and more importantly for a closer relationship between environmental and computing sciences which now work hand in hand. Our experts work with the industry to customise the machines so that they best suit our purposes. For example, a partnership has been established by the creation of a Centre of Excellence between the ECMWF and the company Atos and partners, with joint projects on optimizing the NWP code, using graphics processing units (GPU) and AI.

The interaction between ECMWF and its Member States is of prime importance. An example of linking with a community of meteorological services is the fact that ECMWF is supporting and co-developing the South‐East European Multi‐Hazard Early Warning Advisory System (SEE‐MHEWS‐A) project initiated by WMO in 2016 to strengthen the existing early warning capacities in South-East Europe. In the pilot phase of the project, ECMWF contributions to the operational work of several Members and Co‐operating States was instrumental, and it continues to be so in the operationalization phase.

Through these various partnerships and collaborations, ECMWF is able to make the most of the expertise available in different communities for the benefit of all.

How to cite: Rabier, F.: ECMWF: a collective endeavour to serve our communities, EMS Annual Meeting 2022, Bonn, Germany, 5–9 Sep 2022, EMS2022-687, https://doi.org/10.5194/ems2022-687, 2022.

10:40–10:50
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EMS2022-207
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solicited
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Onsite presentation
Isla Finney

Lake Street's aim is to help companies 'work with the weather'.  Put another way, we aim to translate the user's question into scientific terms, find the best answer available, and translate it into information useful to the user in decision-making.  Along the way, we have come across a host of challenges, which have encouraged public private partnerships, and inter- and transdisciplinary collaboration, to enable progress. 

Using a simple example from agriculture, we will demonstrate how such interactions can enable one to see the differing perspectives of a forecast challenge.  From this new perspective come new ideas, giving potential for both better numerical weather prediction models, and better crop yields.  Whilst the process may seem easy given a theoretical example, the reality is that partnerships and collaborations usually come with a host of challenges, which can seem daunting. 

Trust, open mindedness, acceptance that there is room for improvement are three traits that help - on both sides.  We will mention some practical changes within the weather and climate research communities that we believe would lead to improved engagement with society.  Meanwhile, especially as a small company, Lake Street know that collaboration enable us to both keep delivering quality products, and to feedback to the research community what questions users want answers to.

How to cite: Finney, I.: How public private partnerships can enable better end user forecasts, EMS Annual Meeting 2022, Bonn, Germany, 5–9 Sep 2022, EMS2022-207, https://doi.org/10.5194/ems2022-207, 2022.

Chairpersons: Roland Wengenmayr, France-Audrey Magro
11:30–12:00
12:00–12:30

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