EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2019
Centre International de Conférences de Genève (CICG) | Geneva | Switzerland
15–20 September 2019
EPSC-DPS2019
Geneva | Switzerland
15–20 September 2019
EXO1

The field of extrasolar planets is one of the most rapidly changing areas of astrophysics and planetary science. Ground-based surveys and dedicated space missions have already discovered nearly 4000 planets with many more detections expected in the near future. A key challenge is now the characterisation of their atmospheres in order to answer to the questions: what are these worlds actually like and what processes govern their formation and evolution?

To answer these questions, a broad range of skills and expertise are required, stretching from Solar System science to statistical astrophysics, from ground-based observations to spacecraft measurements, and atmospheric/interior/orbital modelling. The numerous studies conducted in the past twenty years have unveiled a large diversity of atmospheres. The next generation of space and ground based facilities (e.g. E-ELT, JWST, and ARIEL) will characterise this multifarious population in stunning detail and challenge our current understanding. Both theoretical works and experimental measurements are required to prepare for such a change of scale.

This session will focus on the atmospheric characterisation of warm planets (from ultra-hot to warm, including Super-Earths) and the conveners welcome any abstract related to this subject.

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Convener: Olivia Venot  | Co-conveners: Vivien Parmentier , Giovanna Tinetti , Martin Turbet , Ingo Waldmann 
The field of extrasolar planets is one of the most rapidly changing areas of astrophysics and planetary science. Ground-based surveys and dedicated space missions have already discovered nearly 4000 planets with many more detections expected in the near future. A key challenge is now the characterisation of their atmospheres in order to answer to the questions: what are these worlds actually like and what processes govern their formation and evolution?

To answer these questions, a broad range of skills and expertise are required, stretching from Solar System science to statistical astrophysics, from ground-based observations to spacecraft measurements, and atmospheric/interior/orbital modelling. The numerous studies conducted in the past twenty years have unveiled a large diversity of atmospheres. The next generation of space and ground based facilities (e.g. E-ELT, JWST, and ARIEL) will characterise this multifarious population in stunning detail and challenge our current understanding. Both theoretical works and experimental measurements are required to prepare for such a change of scale.

This session will focus on the atmospheric characterisation of warm planets (from ultra-hot to warm, including Super-Earths) and the conveners welcome any abstract related to this subject.