Session 2 | Fibre as a sensor for geo-hazards and geo-energy systems Monitoring

Session 2

Fibre as a sensor for geo-hazards and geo-energy systems Monitoring
Convener: Regina Maass | Co-coveners: Evgeniia Martuganova, Jean-Philippe Metaxian

According to the World Bank report “Natural Disaster Hotspots: A Global Risk Analysis”, about half of the world’s population lives in geographic regions prone to geohazards. In addition, fast rates of urbanisation and population growth increase the number of people settled in these high-risk areas. Therefore, monitoring for risk mitigations becomes increasingly important.

Additionally, the expanding exploitation of sustainable energy sources (such as geothermal energy) requires a comprehensive understanding of geological structures and stress conditions in the subsurface, in order to correctly assess the social and environmental impacts of subsurface-related operations.

Tackling challenges related to monitoring geohazards and sustainable usage of the subsurface requires obtaining large datasets in a cost-effective manner. Fibre optical cables offer a low-cost solution for sustainable monitoring of the subsurface. This session invites contributions showcasing the diverse applications of fibre optic technologies in addressing natural hazards related to earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, glaciers, and tsunamis, as well as in the context of monitoring and managing geo-energy systems. The purpose of this session is to collect a broad range of showcases of the successful usage of fibre optic methods, highlight existing problems, and facilitate the discussion to resolve potential bottlenecks.

Invited speaker: Zhongwen Zhan (Caltech, USA)

According to the World Bank report “Natural Disaster Hotspots: A Global Risk Analysis”, about half of the world’s population lives in geographic regions prone to geohazards. In addition, fast rates of urbanisation and population growth increase the number of people settled in these high-risk areas. Therefore, monitoring for risk mitigations becomes increasingly important.

Additionally, the expanding exploitation of sustainable energy sources (such as geothermal energy) requires a comprehensive understanding of geological structures and stress conditions in the subsurface, in order to correctly assess the social and environmental impacts of subsurface-related operations.

Tackling challenges related to monitoring geohazards and sustainable usage of the subsurface requires obtaining large datasets in a cost-effective manner. Fibre optical cables offer a low-cost solution for sustainable monitoring of the subsurface. This session invites contributions showcasing the diverse applications of fibre optic technologies in addressing natural hazards related to earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, glaciers, and tsunamis, as well as in the context of monitoring and managing geo-energy systems. The purpose of this session is to collect a broad range of showcases of the successful usage of fibre optic methods, highlight existing problems, and facilitate the discussion to resolve potential bottlenecks.

Invited speaker: Zhongwen Zhan (Caltech, USA)