Session 3 | Fibre optic sensing in extreme environments

Session 3

Fibre optic sensing in extreme environments
Convener: Arantza Ugalde | Co-coveners: Fatih Yaman, Sergio Diaz-Meza

Fibre optic sensing has proved to be efficient, even in harsh environments. The physical properties of the fibre glass and the protecting layers covering the fibre allow the cables to be deployed in difficult-to-reach locations (e.g., oceans, space, boreholes) and with extreme conditions (e.g., extreme temperatures, high pressures, acidic surroundings). Within these environments, fibre optic deployment also outperforms conventional sensors. This is due to the instrumental integrity and logistical advantages of fibre optic deployment, which allow for the acquisition of new data from regions and places that were previously difficult to access.

Despite the improvements, harsh environments also pose a challenge within the fibre optic sensing technology in many aspects, beyond material properties. Possible cable arrangements can be limited to the morphology of the region of interest (e.g., topography, ground coupling), which ultimately affects the quality of the data and the information that can be retrieved from it. Therefore, researchers in the field must also consider deployment, coupling, and cable arrangement to obtain as much information as possible from these unexplored regimes.

In this session, we welcome contributions that involve fibre optic sensing applications in extreme environments such as boreholes, deep ocean, acidic soil, space, and exoplanets. Contributions that explain the technical challenges of extreme locations, request solutions, and highlight the benefits of the existing, offering solutions for reducing costs and solving technical challenges, are particularly welcome.

Invited speaker: Marc-André Gutscher (Geo-Ocean, France)

Fibre optic sensing has proved to be efficient, even in harsh environments. The physical properties of the fibre glass and the protecting layers covering the fibre allow the cables to be deployed in difficult-to-reach locations (e.g., oceans, space, boreholes) and with extreme conditions (e.g., extreme temperatures, high pressures, acidic surroundings). Within these environments, fibre optic deployment also outperforms conventional sensors. This is due to the instrumental integrity and logistical advantages of fibre optic deployment, which allow for the acquisition of new data from regions and places that were previously difficult to access.

Despite the improvements, harsh environments also pose a challenge within the fibre optic sensing technology in many aspects, beyond material properties. Possible cable arrangements can be limited to the morphology of the region of interest (e.g., topography, ground coupling), which ultimately affects the quality of the data and the information that can be retrieved from it. Therefore, researchers in the field must also consider deployment, coupling, and cable arrangement to obtain as much information as possible from these unexplored regimes.

In this session, we welcome contributions that involve fibre optic sensing applications in extreme environments such as boreholes, deep ocean, acidic soil, space, and exoplanets. Contributions that explain the technical challenges of extreme locations, request solutions, and highlight the benefits of the existing, offering solutions for reducing costs and solving technical challenges, are particularly welcome.

Invited speaker: Marc-André Gutscher (Geo-Ocean, France)