Session 4

Despite powerful tracer tools for deciphering water sources, flow paths and transit times, hydrology remains a discipline that is measurement limited. With global change likely triggering increasingly intense hydro-meteorological events in the near future, there is a pressing need for new observational tools that collect data at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. Recently, new momentum has come through the advent of novel geophysical field scale sensing technologies and field deployable high-resolution isotope and geochemical measurement systems. The emergence of such novel measurements has the potential for serving as a catalyst in critical zone process analyses – ultimately delivering entirely new datasets for model calibration and validation. In this session, we encourage submissions dealing with new types of sensing methods and data to investigate and model processes within and between the various compartments of the critical zone (e.g. wireless distributed sensors, novel use of hydro-geophysical methods, cosmic-ray neutron probes, high frequency hydro-chemical measurements, etc.). Submissions leveraging approaches from data science, including new methods to analyse (big) datasets and those that provide new insights based on established types of data are also welcome.

Keynote speakers: Dr. Rafael Rosolem (University of Bristol) and Dr. Matthias Sprenger (IDAEA-CSIC and North Carolina State University)

Share:
Conveners: Laurent Pfister, Ilja van Meerveld

Despite powerful tracer tools for deciphering water sources, flow paths and transit times, hydrology remains a discipline that is measurement limited. With global change likely triggering increasingly intense hydro-meteorological events in the near future, there is a pressing need for new observational tools that collect data at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. Recently, new momentum has come through the advent of novel geophysical field scale sensing technologies and field deployable high-resolution isotope and geochemical measurement systems. The emergence of such novel measurements has the potential for serving as a catalyst in critical zone process analyses – ultimately delivering entirely new datasets for model calibration and validation. In this session, we encourage submissions dealing with new types of sensing methods and data to investigate and model processes within and between the various compartments of the critical zone (e.g. wireless distributed sensors, novel use of hydro-geophysical methods, cosmic-ray neutron probes, high frequency hydro-chemical measurements, etc.). Submissions leveraging approaches from data science, including new methods to analyse (big) datasets and those that provide new insights based on established types of data are also welcome.

Keynote speakers: Dr. Rafael Rosolem (University of Bristol) and Dr. Matthias Sprenger (IDAEA-CSIC and North Carolina State University)