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One of the consequences of global warming is the increase, in number and intensity, of extreme weather events. The character and severity of its impact depends not only on the nature of the hazards but also on the vulnerability and exposure of communities to climate threats.
The Mediterranean is considered as a climate change hotspot in terms of observed and projected magnitude as well as frequency of extreme events, such as hot extremes, droughts, intense cyclones, which are often responsible of heavy rainfalls and floods. In terms of severe convective events, the observed trends show more uncertainties; however, some studies show indications of increased severity/frequency.
The purpose of this session is to present novel research studies, covering different temporal (from weather to climate) and spatial scales (from local to continental scale). The session will include both current day analysis (numerical simulations of individual case studies, reanalysis data, machine learning approaches), climate change assessment (including climate model simulations) and attributions (pseudo-global warming simulations). The session also welcomes contributions aiming at improving our physical understanding of severe weather in a changing climate, through improved parameterization schemes and numerical weather and climate modeling.

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Conveners: Mario Marcello Miglietta, Vassiliki Kotroni, Jose Luis Sanchez, Chantal Claud

One of the consequences of global warming is the increase, in number and intensity, of extreme weather events. The character and severity of its impact depends not only on the nature of the hazards but also on the vulnerability and exposure of communities to climate threats.
The Mediterranean is considered as a climate change hotspot in terms of observed and projected magnitude as well as frequency of extreme events, such as hot extremes, droughts, intense cyclones, which are often responsible of heavy rainfalls and floods. In terms of severe convective events, the observed trends show more uncertainties; however, some studies show indications of increased severity/frequency.
The purpose of this session is to present novel research studies, covering different temporal (from weather to climate) and spatial scales (from local to continental scale). The session will include both current day analysis (numerical simulations of individual case studies, reanalysis data, machine learning approaches), climate change assessment (including climate model simulations) and attributions (pseudo-global warming simulations). The session also welcomes contributions aiming at improving our physical understanding of severe weather in a changing climate, through improved parameterization schemes and numerical weather and climate modeling.