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GM5.1/TS4.9

Tectonic Geomorphology and Landscape Evolution (co-organized)
Convener: Todd A. Ehlers  | Co-Conveners: Andrew Carter , Frédéric Herman 
Oral Programme
 / Mon, 04 Apr, 08:30–12:00  / 13:30–17:00  / Room 6
 / Tue, 05 Apr, 08:30–10:00  / Room 22
Poster Programme
 / Attendance Mon, 04 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30  /  / Attendance 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30
 / Attendance Mon, 04 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30  /  / Attendance 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30
 / Attendance Mon, 04 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30  /  / Attendance 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30
 / Attendance Mon, 04 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30  /  / Attendance 17:30–19:00  / Display Mon, 04 Apr, 08:00–19:30  / Hall A
This session addresses how observational and modelling studies can be used to quantify landscape evolution and/or rates of tectonic processes in active mountain belts. The types of questions addressed in this session include (but are not limited to): (1) How do tectonic processes and faulting influence the development of topography and rates of erosion and sedimentation? (2) How can landscapes and sedimentary deposits best be used to infer the history of past tectonic events? (3) How do transients in tectonics and/or climate influence landscape evolution? and (4) How does mountain building influence climate (orography). Temporal scales of interest range from the earthquake cycle to landscape change over millions of years. Spatial scales of interest range from individual catchments or fault trenches to entire orogens. Studies using the following techniques are welcome: (1) geo- and thermochronology techniques such as cosmogenic radionuclides, short lived nuclides, OSL, fission track, and (U-Th)/He dating; (2) field observations from fault trenches, geodesy, geomorphology, sediment flux measurements, etc; (3) geochemical studies investigating variations in chemical weathering during mountain building; (4) remote sensing and digital elevation model (DEM) analysis of tectonic, surface, and atmospheric processes (e.g. Lidar, InSAR, and TRMM data); and (5) numerical modelling studies that quantify linkages between tectonics, topography, and climate.
Public information: This session addresses how observational and modelling studies can be used to quantify landscape evolution and/or rates of tectonic processes in active mountain belts. The types of questions addressed in this session include (but are not limited to): (1) How do tectonic processes and faulting influence the development of topography and rates of erosion and sedimentation? (2) How can landscapes and sedimentary deposits best be used to infer tectonic processes? (3) How do transients in tectonics and/or climate influence landscape evolution? and (4) How does mountain building influence climate (orography). Temporal scales of interest range from the earthquake cycle to landscape change over millions of years.
Related events: GM2.5 – Simplicity and complexity in evolution of coupled geomorphologic systems: concepts, models and applications
Oral Programme
 / Tue, 05 Apr, 13:30–17:00  / Room 21
Poster Programme
 / Attendance Tue, 05 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Display Tue, 05 Apr, 08:00–19:30  / Hall A
GM1.2/SSP3.7 – Teleconnections: Far-field links in sedimentary source-to-sink systems (GSL/GSA Session) (co-organized)
Oral Programme
 / Thu, 07 Apr, 10:30–12:00  / Room 21
Poster Programme
 / Attendance Thu, 07 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Display Thu, 07 Apr, 08:00–19:30  / Hall A
GD1.2/TS9.2 – Recent advances in modelling of tectonic processes (including Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture) (co-organized)
Oral Programme
 / Tue, 05 Apr, 15:30–17:00  / Room 22
 / Fri, 08 Apr, 15:30–17:00  / Room 41
Poster Programme
 / Attendance Tue, 05 Apr, 17:30–19:00  / Display Tue, 05 Apr, 08:00–19:30  / Hall A
Poster Summaries & DiscussionsPSD59  / Tue, 05 Apr, 13:30–14:15  /