Orals

CL1.15

The millennial-scale variability associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles during the last glacial is known to have affected the climate system on a global scale. New high-resolution sediment and ice core proxy records document in increasing detail local and global variability of ice sheets, sea ice, as well as oceanic and atmospheric circulation during the D-O cycles. In addition, insights into the dynamics of the coupled ocean-cryosphere-atmosphere system during the millennial-scale climate cycles are emerging from improved model simulations. Documenting the precise timing and sequence of events in proxy records and capturing the processes responsible for the global pattern of rapid climate changes, which stretch from Greenland to Antarctica, remains a major challenge. However, understanding the underlying dynamics will provide fundamental information on the stability of the global climate system. In this interdisciplinary session, we welcome proxy- and model-based research that tests hypotheses on causes and processes behind the D-O events and helps understanding past, present and future changes to the climate system. The session is hosted by the ERC synergy project ice2ice.

Solicited talks include:
Oeschger medal lecture by Edward Brook, Oregon State University
Marlene Klockmann, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht Centre
Bradley Markle, University of Washington

Share:
Co-organized as CR1.9/OS1.25
Convener: Kerim Nisancioglu | Co-conveners: Camille Li, Emilie Capron, Margit Simon, Jonathan Rheinlænder
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room F2
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X5

Tuesday, 9 April 2019 | Room F2

Chairperson: Margit Simon & Helle Kjær
14:00–14:15 |
EGU2019-14252<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"><span title="Early career scientist: an ECS is an undergraduate or postgraduate (Masters/PhD) student or a scientist who has received his or her highest degree (BSc, MSc, or PhD) within the past seven years. Provided parental leave fell into that period, up to one year of parental leave time may be added per child, where appropriate.">ECS</span></span>
Bradley Markle
14:15–14:30 |
EGU2019-15109<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"></span>
Eystein Jansen and the ice2ice Team members
14:30–14:45 |
EGU2019-12852<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"><span title="Early career scientist: an ECS is an undergraduate or postgraduate (Masters/PhD) student or a scientist who has received his or her highest degree (BSc, MSc, or PhD) within the past seven years. Provided parental leave fell into that period, up to one year of parental leave time may be added per child, where appropriate.">ECS</span></span>
Mari F. Jensen and Kerim H. Nisancioglu
14:45–15:00 |
EGU2019-38<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"></span>
Richard Peltier, Yuchen Ma, and Guido Vettoretti
15:00–15:15 |
EGU2019-11463<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"></span>
Guido Vettoretti, Joel Pedro, Sune Rasmussen, Søren Nielsen, Markus Jochum, and Kerim Nisancioglu
15:15–15:30 |
EGU2019-10157<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"><span title="Early career scientist: an ECS is an undergraduate or postgraduate (Masters/PhD) student or a scientist who has received his or her highest degree (BSc, MSc, or PhD) within the past seven years. Provided parental leave fell into that period, up to one year of parental leave time may be added per child, where appropriate.">ECS</span></span>
Eduardo Moreno-Chamarro, David Ferreira, and John Marshall
15:30–15:45 |
EGU2019-6910<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"></span>
Denis-Didier Rousseau, Pierre Antoine, Niklas Boers, France Lagroix, Michael Ghil, Johanna Lomax, Markus Fuchs, Maxime Debret, Christine Hatté, and Olivier Moine
Coffee break
Chairperson: Jonathan Rheinlænder & Ruth Mottram
16:15–16:30 |
EGU2019-7068<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"><span title="Early career scientist: an ECS is an undergraduate or postgraduate (Masters/PhD) student or a scientist who has received his or her highest degree (BSc, MSc, or PhD) within the past seven years. Provided parental leave fell into that period, up to one year of parental leave time may be added per child, where appropriate.">ECS</span></span>
Marlene Klockmann, Uwe Mikolajewicz, Hannah Kleppin, and Jochem Marotzke
16:30–16:45 |
EGU2019-8496<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"></span>
Jens Fohlmeister, Marc Luetscher, Christoph Spötl, Andrea Schröder-Ritzrau, Birgit Plessen, Norbert Frank, René Eichstädter, and Martin Trüssel
16:45–17:00 |
EGU2019-17236<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"><span title="Early career scientist: an ECS is an undergraduate or postgraduate (Masters/PhD) student or a scientist who has received his or her highest degree (BSc, MSc, or PhD) within the past seven years. Provided parental leave fell into that period, up to one year of parental leave time may be added per child, where appropriate.">ECS</span></span>
Johannes Lohmann and Peter Ditlevsen
17:00–18:00 |
EGU2019-10334<span style="font-size: .8em!important; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: super; color: green!important;"></span>
Ed Brook