EGU2020-22552
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-22552
EGU General Assembly 2020
© Author(s) 2021. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

High-Quality Global Data Management Framework for Climate: A Collaboration Framework for Assessing, Validating and Sharing Datasets for Climate Monitoring

William Wright1, Christina Lief1, Ge Peng2, Omar Baddour3, Peter Siegmund4, Dominique Berod3, Robert Dunn5, Anny Cazenave6, and Manola Brunet7
William Wright et al.
  • 1International Expert Group on Climate Data Modernization (IEG-CDM)
  • 2North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies, NC State University, Asheville, NC, USA
  • 3World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
  • 4Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI)
  • 5Met Office Hadley Centre, UK
  • 6Laboratoire d'Etudes en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiale (LEGOS) at Observatoire Midi-Pyrénée, France
  • 7University Rovira i Virgili, Spain

In recognition of the need for data used in climate-related activities to be reliably and transparently managed, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO[1]) Congress adopted a High-Quality Global Data Management Framework for Climate (HQ-GDMFC) at its eighteenth session in June 2019. The HQ-GDMFC enables effective standards-based development and exchange of high-quality climate data.  The scope of the HQ-GDMFC includes all of the Essential Climate Variables under WMO auspices, as described in WMO Resolution 60 (Cg-17).  This includes observational data as well as data derived from climate analysis, reanalysis, predictions and projections.  The framework of collaboration incorporates the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services’ Data Management units, Regional Climate Centers, international data centers, climate research bodies, certain Government agencies, academia and any other institution dealing with climate data archival, management, analysis and exchange. An International Expert Group on Climate Data Modernization (IEG-CDM2) was established in 20183, involving subject matter experts from several WMO programs and international data centers to guide the development of practical tools required for assessing data maturity for climate purposes.

We present here the structure, elements and associated guidance and tools of the HQ-GDFMC. The essential components are: (1) The standards and recommended best practices for climate data management and stewardship are encapsulated in a regulatory manual called the Manual on HQ-GDMFC (WMO-No 1238). (2) A guidance booklet provides guidance on maturity assessment of climate datasets that contribute to the computation and analysis of climate indicators supporting climate policy-relevant information. (3) A climate data catalogue in support of climate change monitoring has been established, with the aim of providing a living list of datasets, with a primary focus on climate indicators. It is recommended that the maturity of such datasets be assessed; a maturity rating provides users with information on the level of maturity in documentation, archival, access, data quality assurance, data integrity and more, for each of the datasets.


[1] The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is a United Nations’ specialized agency in the field of weather, water and climate. As part of its activities, WMO fosters international collaboration to develop technical guidance and standards for the collection, processing, and management of data and forecast products.

 

2 The International Expert Group on Climate Data Modernization (IEG-CDM) is an Ad-Hoc group run with the support of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

 

3 The participants of the 2018 workshop implicitly formed the membership of the Ad-Hoc IEG-CDM team. (Reference report)

 

 

 

How to cite: Wright, W., Lief, C., Peng, G., Baddour, O., Siegmund, P., Berod, D., Dunn, R., Cazenave, A., and Brunet, M.: High-Quality Global Data Management Framework for Climate: A Collaboration Framework for Assessing, Validating and Sharing Datasets for Climate Monitoring , EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-22552, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-22552, 2020.

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  • CC1: Comment on EGU2020-22552, Emma Woolliams, 04 May 2020

    Thanks for this. I'd like to know more. Are you aware of the work for the Copernicus Climate Change Service of a similar quality scheme around a maturity matrix? I didn't work on it myself, but I have colleagues who did. There is some information about that in this paper:

    I am interested in this as Chair of the European Metrology Network for Climate and Ocean Observation (see earlier presentation) and I am particularly interested in how you see metrology (science of measurement) in this field. I searched your document for uncertainty and saw that you are expecting uncertainty analysis and I'm wondering whether it would be worth a discussion on how that might be implemented?

    • AC1: Reply to CC1, William Wright, 04 May 2020

       

      Thank you, Emma, for your very good and important questions. Short response: We are indeed aware of the Maturity Matrix developed for the C3S data store, based on the Core Climax MM. We based our SMM-CD model on existing MMs, but with the understanding that all such Models are designed to assess the maturity of datasets and product sets at different stages of their life-cycle. The SMM-CD in fact adopted some of the criteria from the Core Climax MM, and Copernicus was represented on the project team that developed the SMM-CD.

      As to Uncertainty – the reference in the SMM-CD refers to whether an uncertainty analysis and/or quality control, has been carried out, whether for measurements (observations) or derived products; and if so, whether it is documented, available publicly, and peer-reviewed. It is not necessarily the same as uncertainty in the metrology context, which as I understand it, refers to the uncertainty of measurement. Nevertheless,  greater collaboration on metrology in the context of overall improvement in climate data quality must surely pay dividends for the climate science community.


      We believe there is plenty of scope for WMO interaction with C3S to ensure there is synergy between scientific quality and that of stewardship quality for climate data products: both are critical to provide high quality products that are also well-managed. 

    • AC2: Reply to CC1, William Wright, 04 May 2020

       

      Thank you, Emma, for your very good and important questions. Short response: We are indeed aware of the Maturity Matrix developed for the C3S data store, based on the Core Climax MM. We based our SMM-CD model on existing MMs, but with the understanding that all such Models are designed to assess the maturity of datasets and product sets at different stages of their life-cycle. The SMM-CD in fact adopted some of the criteria from the Core Climax MM, and Copernicus was represented on the project team that developed the SMM-CD.

      As to Uncertainty – the reference in the SMM-CD refers to whether an uncertainty analysis and/or quality control, has been carried out, whether for measurements (observations) or derived products; and if so, whether it is documented, available publicly, and peer-reviewed. It is not necessarily the same as uncertainty in the metrology context, which as I understand it, refers to the uncertainty of measurement. Nevertheless,  greater collaboration on metrology in the context of overall improvement in climate data quality must surely pay dividends for the climate science community.


      We believe there is plenty of scope for WMO interaction with C3S to ensure there is synergy between scientific quality and that of stewardship quality for climate data products: both are critical to provide high quality products that are also well-managed.