EGU2020-6227
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-6227
EGU General Assembly 2020
© Author(s) 2021. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Nitrous oxide production and sources in response to a simulated fall-freeze-thaw cycle

Sisi Lin1 and Guillermo Hernandez Ramirez2
Sisi Lin and Guillermo Hernandez Ramirez
  • 1Department of Renewable Resourcese, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada (slin4@ualberta.ca)
  • 2Department of Renewable Resourcese, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada (ghernand@ualberta.ca)

Thaw-induced N2O emissions have been shown to account for 30-90% of N2O emissions in agricultural fields. Due to the climate change, increased precipitatio is expected in fall and winter seasons for certain regions. As a result, this would in turn enhance the thaw-induced N2O emissions and aggravate climate change. A mesocosm study was conducted to investigate N2O production and sources from soils under elevated soil moisture contents in response to a simulated fall-freeze-thaw cycle. Treatments included two levels of N addition (urea versus control) and two different management histories [with (SW) and without (CT) manure additions]. Our results showed that at least 92% of the N2O emissions during the study were produced during the simulated thawing across all treatments. The thaw-induced N2O emissions increased with increasing soil water content. The fall-applied urea increased the soil-derived N2O emissions during thawing, indicating an excessive mineralization of soil organic N. Compared to the CT soils, the SW soils induced more soil-derived N2O emissions. This could be because the SW soil had more easily decomposable organic matter which was likely due to historical manure additions. Regarding to the daily primed N2O fluxes, different soil water contents impacted the dynamics of daily priming effect. At the high water content, the soils experienced a shift in daily primed N2O fluxes from positive to negative and eventually back to positive throughout the simulated thawing, while the soils at lower water contents underwent positive primed fluxes in general. The shift in daily primed fluxes was probably driven by the preference of soil microbes on the labile N substrates. When the microbes switched from easily to moderately decomposed substrates (e.g., from dissolved organic N to plant residuals), they started to uptake inorganic N from the soil due to a relatively high C:N ratio of plant residuals. Therefore, a net N immobilization and negative primed N2O production occur in the short term in the soils at the high water content.

How to cite: Lin, S. and Ramirez, G. H.: Nitrous oxide production and sources in response to a simulated fall-freeze-thaw cycle, EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-6227, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-6227, 2020

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Revisions in results and summary part.
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