EGU2020-9741
https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-9741
EGU General Assembly 2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Mapping glacier lakes in Peru

Joanne Wood1, Stephan Harrison1, Ryan Wilson2, Christian Yarleque3, Georgie Bennett4, Adriana Caballero3, Janina Castromonte5, Adam Emmer6, David Garay3, Henrry Garrido7, Neil Glasser8, W. Harrinson Jara3, John Reynolds9, Sarah Shannon10, Richard Chase Smith11, Edelwis Gina Soto3, Tito Tinoco7, Juan Carlos Torres3, Efrain Turop11, Oscar Vilca3, and the Project GLOP*
Joanne Wood et al.
  • 1University of Exeter, Centre for Geography and Environmental Science, Penryn, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • 2Department of Biological and Geographical Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • 3Instituto Nacional de Investigación en Glaciares y Ecosistemas de Montaña, Lima, Perú
  • 4University of Exeter, Department of Geography, Exeter, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • 5FADV, Lima, Perú
  • 6Department of Human Dimensions of Global Change, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic
  • 7Universidad Nacional Santiago Antunez de Mayolo, Huaraz Ancash, Perú
  • 8Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • 9Reynolds International Ltd, Mold, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • 10School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • 11Instituto del Bien Común, Lima, Perú
  • *A full list of authors appears at the end of the abstract

One consequence of current and likely future melting of high mountain glaciers is the development of glacial lakes. Their evolution over time has implications for future water supplies in arid mountains and for the timing and magnitude of glacier hazards, such as Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs).

GLOF initiation depends on how lakes are connected to the glacial system, resulting from myriad processes such as the destabilisation of moraine dams and glacier front calving. To better understand these processes, we have undertaken an inventory of all glacier lakes in the Cordillera Blanca of Peru for 2019. We used manual digitisation from Landsat RGB at 30m resolution and have recorded the type of lake dam and its connection with surrounding glaciers and mountain slopes. We have also obtained lake inventories from INIAGEM (Instituto Nacional de Investigación en Glaciares y Ecosistemas de Montaña; 2016) and ANA (Autoridad Nacional del Agua; 2018), and have created an automatic inventory using the Normalised Difference Water Index and Normalised Difference Snow Index in Google Earth Engine. In this presentation we compare these different inventories and discuss both the methods and effectiveness of each for understanding GLOF hazards in the Peruvian Andes. 

Project GLOP:

Jenny Menacho; Enver Melgerejo; Carlos Poma; Efrain Turpo; Hilbert Villafane

How to cite: Wood, J., Harrison, S., Wilson, R., Yarleque, C., Bennett, G., Caballero, A., Castromonte, J., Emmer, A., Garay, D., Garrido, H., Glasser, N., Jara, W. H., Reynolds, J., Shannon, S., Smith, R. C., Soto, E. G., Tinoco, T., Torres, J. C., Turop, E., and Vilca, O. and the Project GLOP: Mapping glacier lakes in Peru, EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-9741, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-9741, 2020

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