Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

OS3

OS – Ocean Sciences

Programme group chair: Karen J. Heywood

OS3 – Ocean Biogeochemistry and Biology

Programme group scientific officer: William Austin

OS3.1

Ocean oxygen loss is one of the key consequences of climate change and has the potential to critically impact marine biogeochemical cycles and ecology. Current time series projections and climate models identify an unusually rapid decline in oxygen concentrations, particularly in tropical regions. However, our understanding of how stable this trend is over longer time scales, how adaptable ecosystems are, and if negative or positive feedback mechanisms exist is insufficient.

We seek to identify major gaps in knowledge helping to quantify the rate of ocean deoxygenation and its impact on both biogeochemistry and marine life. To do so, this session aims to bring together scientists from across disciplines including physical oceanography, climate modeling, biogeochemistry, and deep time experts. Our aim is not only to bring our results together but to conclude on what changes in ocean oxygen content can be identified across different ocean areas and different geological timescales.

We invite contributions that investigate ocean deoxygenation in the past, present and future ocean, and its physical, chemical and/or biological drivers, using observational or model-based approaches at regional or global scales.

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Co-organized by BG4
Convener: Bastien QuesteECSECS | Co-convener: Carolin LöscherECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
OS3.5

Due to the growing pressures on marine resources and the ecosystem services demand, the interest of scientific and politic world is moving to ensure marine ecosystems conservation and environmental sustainable development providing policies to meet the UN 2030 Agenda Goal 14 in order to “Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development”. To act against the decline of the ocean health and to create a framework of stakeholders, the UN proposed the establishment of the “Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development” able to bring regional knowledge and priorities together in an international action plan. Anthropogenic activities could have an impact on the marine environment and affect the ecosystem equilibrium. The marine environment is a dynamic, sensitive and fragile area in which it is advantageous to apply new methodologies and observing methods to increase the quantity and quality of the data. Since ocean dynamical affect the dispersion of pollutants such as chemicals, plastics, noise and invasive species, the ecosystems status should be analyzed through the study of abiotic variables distribution at a proper spatio-temporal scale. To analyze the ocean environmental quality, a large amount of data obtained by global observation systems (e.g. GOOS, EMODNET) is needed, which requires the development of cost-effective technologies for integrated observing systems and to support the study of, e.g., biological variables. The session focuses on marine ecosystems and biogeochemistry, technological developments for the study of abiotic and biotic factors, with a focus on anthropogenic impacts. Multidisciplinary approaches using data coming from multiple sources are encouraged. Integration of mathematical models, in-situ and remote observations is suggested with the aim to develop methods, technologies and best practices to maintain, restore and monitor biodiversity and to guarantee sustainable use of marine resources. The following topics will be discussed: effects of pollution on biota considering their natural and anthropogenic sources; short-term and long-term impact of economic activities on the seabed; potential remediation of diverse anthropogenic alterations on the seafloor; global change effects on marine ecosystem; new technology development; advanced methods for collection, data processing, and information extraction; benthic and pelagic community dynamics; economic evaluation of natural capital.

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Co-organized by BG4
Convener: Marco Marcelli | Co-conveners: Paola Del Negro, Roberta FerrettiECSECS, Xiaoxia Sun, Markus Weinbauer, Sebastiaan van de VeldeECSECS, Sarah ParadisECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), Attendance Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
OS3.8

Marine biogeochemical cycles regulate air-sea CO2 exchanges and oceanic carbon sequestration that, ultimately, controls the Earth’s climate. Key actors of these cycles are marine particulate and dissolved organic matter (OM) whose comprehension of the dynamics is one of the most pressing issue in marine science. However, marine biogeochemical cycles are impacted by anthropogenic pollution and there is an urgent need of quantifying sources and fluxes of the contaminants to the marine environment as well as to analyse and understand their possible effects on marine ecosystems and human health.
This session opens to in-field, laboratory and biogeochemical modelling studies that can help to understand where we are and what future directions must be taken to get insights into organic matter and pollutants cycle. The mechanisms of OM production, removal and accumulation, and correlation with optical properties are far from being unravelled. Limited knowledge exists on the impact of phytoplankton metabolism and environmental conditions on OM production as well as on the mechanisms determining its biological lability.
We would like to share the current research on how the multiple sources of anthropogenic pollution impact marine biogeochemical cycles, such as pollutant leaching from plastics and direct contamination of the water by contaminated rivers, aerosols, or submarine groundwater. In this session we aim at discussing mechanisms driving OM dynamics, transfer of pollutants through the marine trophic web, the effects of climate change on OM and pollutants cycle as well as scenarios of mitigation and adaptation to mercury and POP’s pollution.
We encourage submissions dealing with in-situ and space-based observational studies about OM dynamics, at the global as well as at the regional scale Inter-disciplinary studies are strongly encouraged. The session welcomes direct measurements of contaminant fluxes, isotopic or other approaches to tracing contamination, modelling, experimental incubations with contaminants, mesocosm studies and toxicity assessments, with particular attention to Hg and POP (persistent organic pollutants) cycles in the estuarine, coastal and ocean environments.
Thanks to this session we aim to gather together experts in physical, biogeochemical, optical and satellite oceanography. Other compartments of the earth system, and related societal, ecosystem and human health impact studies are welcome as well.

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Convener: Emanuele Organelli | Co-conveners: Donata Melaku Canu, Camille RichonECSECS, Chiara Santinelli, Lars-Eric Heimburger, Paolo Lazzari
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
CR7.1

Decreasing sea-ice coverage, increasing permafrost-derived inputs and increasing ice sheet and glacier discharge will continue to affect high latitude environments in the coming decades under all future climate scenarios. Such changes at the interface between the ocean and the cryosphere raise questions about the downstream effects in marine ecosystems, as increased meltwater discharge is likely to impact not only coastal hydrology but also biogeochemistry, sediment transport and ecosystem services such as fisheries and carbon sequestration. However, the impact of increasing melt on fjord and coastal environments is poorly constrained, impacting our ability to make predictions regarding the consequences of future climate change. In order to understand the effect of changing cryosphere-derived inputs on high latitude fjords and marine coastal environments, knowledge concerning the physical and biochemical perturbations occurring in the sea ice and water column and the structure, function and resilience of affected ecosystems must be integrated. In this session we explicitly welcome cross-disciplinary attempts to understand how far reaching the effects of sea-ice, permafrost derived material and glacial changes are on marine biogeochemistry, productivity, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Topics may include, yet are not limited to, the effect of sea-ice, permafrost, and glacier discharge on sea-ice and water column structure, primary and secondary production, community structure, macronutrient and micronutrient availability, microbial processes, the carbonate system, and the biological carbon pump. Modelling experiments, and studies based on long-term observational records including sediment traps and proxy reconstructions from marine sediment cores are also welcome.

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Co-organized by BG4/CL4/OS3
Convener: Sofia Ribeiro | Co-conveners: Jade HattonECSECS, Mark HopwoodECSECS, Letizia Tedesco, Anna Pienkowski, Jonathan HawkingsECSECS, Susann Henkel, Hong Chin NgECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
BG2.7

A remote sensing signal acquired by a sensor system results from electromagnetic radiation (EM) interactions from incoming or emitted EM with atmospheric constituents, vegetation structures and pigments, soil surfaces or water bodies. Vegetation, soil and water bodies are functional interfaces between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The physical types of EM used in RS has increased during the years of remote sensing development. Originally, the main focus was on optical remote sensing. Now, thermal, microwave, polarimetric, angular and quite recently also fluorescence have been added to the EM regions under study.
This has led to the definition of an increasing number of bio-geophysical variables in RS. Products include canopy structural variables (e.g. biomass, leaf area index, fAPAR, leaf area density) as well as ecosystem mass flux exchanges dominated by carbon and water exchange. Many other variables are considered as well, like chlorophyll fluorescence, soil moisture content and evapotranspiration. New modelling approaches including models with fully coupled atmosphere, vegetation and soil matrices led to improved interpretations of the spectral and spatio-temporal variability of RS signals including those of atmospheric aerosols and water vapour.
This session solicits for papers presenting methodologies and results leading to the assimilation in biogeoscience and atmospheric models of cited RS variables as well as data measured in situ for RS validation purposes. Contributions should preferably focus on topics related to climate change, food production (and hence food security), nature preservation and hence biodiversity, epidemiology, and atmospheric chemistry and pollution (stratospheric and troposphere ozone, nitrogen oxides, VOC’s, etc). It goes without saying that we also welcome papers focusing on the assimilation of remote sensing and in situ measurements in bio-geophysical and atmospheric models, as well as the RS extraction techniques themselves.
This session aims to bring together scientists developing remote sensing techniques, products and models leading to strategies with a higher (bio-geophysical) impact on the stability and sustainability of the Earth’s ecosystems.

Public information:
BG2.7
Remote Sensing applications in the Biogeosciences

Chairperson: Frank Veroustraete & Willem Verstraeten
10:45
Welcome
1
D530 | EGU2020-5174
10:50
Potential of LiDAR for species richness prediction at Mount Kilimanjaro
Alice Ziegler and the Research Group at the Kilimanjaro
2
D512 | EGU2020-288
10:57
Understanding wetland dynamics using geostatistics of multi-temporal Earth Observation datasets
Manudeo Narayan Singh and Rajiv Sinha
3
D515 | EGU2020-5421
11:04
Twelve years of SIFTER Sun-Induced Fluorescence retrievals from GOME-2 as an independent constraint on photosynthesis across continents and biomes
Maurits L. Kooreman, K. Folkert Boersma, Erik van Schaik, Anteneh G. Mengistu, Olaf N. E. Tuinder, Piet Stammes, Gerbrand Koren, and Wouter Peters
4
D516 | EGU2020-6674
11:11
Evaluation of understory LAI estimation methodologies over forest ecosystem ICOS sites across Europe
Jan-Peter George Jan Pisek and the Tobias Biermann (2), Arnaud Carrara (3), Edoardo Cremonese (4), Matthias Cuntz (5), Silvano Fares (6), Giacomo Gerosa (7), Thomas Grünwald (8) et al.
5
D517 | EGU2020-8263
11:18
Probing the relationship between formaldehyde column concentrations and soil moisture using mixed models and attribution analysis
Susanna Strada, Josep Penuelas, Marcos Fernández Martinez, Iolanda Filella, Ana Maria Yanez-Serrano, Andrea Pozzer, Maite Bauwens, Trissevgeni Stavrakou, and Filippo Giorgi
6
D518 | EGU2020-9071
11:25
Validation of seasonal time series of remote sensing derived LAI for hydrological modelling
Charlotte Wirion, Boud Verbeiren, and Sindy Sterckx
7
D519 | EGU2020-12000
11:32
Potassium estimation of cotton leaves based on hyperspectral reflectance
Adunias dos Santos Teixeira, Marcio Regys Rabelo Oliveira, Luis Clenio Jario Moreira, Francisca Ligia de Castro Machado, Fernando Bezerra Lopes, and Isabel Cristina da Silva Araújo
8
D528 | EGU2020-4418
11:39
Comparison of the Photochemical Reflectance Index and Solar-induced Fluorescence for Estimating Gross Primary Productivity
Qian Zhang and Jinghua Chen
9
D529 | EGU2020-4582
11:46
Weed-crop competition and the effect on spectral reflectance and physiological processes as demonstrated in maize
Inbal Ronay, Shimrit Maman, Jhonathan E. Ephrath, Hanan Eizenberg, and Dan G. Blumberg
10
D531 | EGU2020-6059
11:53
Remote sensing-aid assessment of wetlands in central Malawi
Emmanuel Ogunyomi, Byongjun Hwang, and Adrian Wood
12:00
Open discussion
12:30
End morning session

Chat time: Wednesday, 6 May 2020, 14:00–15:45
Chairperson: Willem Verstraeten Frank Veroustraete
14:00
Welcome back!
1
D534 | EGU2020-10014
14:05
On the surface apparent reflectance exploitation: Entangled Solar Induced Fluorescence emission and aerosol scattering effects at oxygen absorption regions
Neus Sabater, Pekka Kolmonen, Luis Alonso, Jorge Vicent, José Moreno, and Antti Arola
2
D536 | EGU2020-15832
14:12
Evaluating the impact of different spaceborne land cover distributions on isoprene emissions and their trends using the MEGAN model.
Beata Opacka, Jean-François Müller, Jenny Stavrakou, Maite Bauwens, and Alex B. Guenther
3
D537 | EGU2020-10633
14:19
Application of Copernicus Global Land Service vegetation parameters and ESA soil moisture data to analyze changes in vegetation with respect to the CORINE database
Hajnalka Breuer and Amanda Imola Szabó
4
D538 | EGU2020-13332
14:26
How valuable are citizen science data for a space-borne crop growth monitoring? – The reliability of self-appraisals
Sina C. Truckenbrodt, Friederike Klan, Erik Borg, Klaus-Dieter Missling, and Christiane C. Schmullius
5
D539 | EGU2020-18493
14:33
Learning main drivers of crop dynamics and production in Europe
Anna Mateo Sanchis, Maria Piles, Julia Amorós López, Jordi Muñoz Marí, and Gustau Camps Valls
6
D540 | EGU2020-19003
14:40
Modelling understory light availability in a heterogeneous landscape using drone-derived structural parameters and a 3D radiative transfer model
Dominic Fawcett, Jonathan Bennie, and Karen Anderson
7
D543 | EGU2020-5151
14:47
Global assimilation of ocean-color data of phytoplankton functional types: Impact of different datasets
Lars Nerger, Himansu Pradhan, Christoph Völker, Svetlana Losa, and Astrid Bracher
8
D544 | EGU2020-5251
14:53
PROSPECT-PRO: a leaf radiative transfer model for estimation of leaf protein content and carbon-based constituents
Jean-Baptiste Féret, Katja Berger, Florian de Boissieu, and Zbyněk Malenovský
9
D547 | EGU2020-13447
15:00
Inverting a comprehensive crop model in parsimonious data context using Sentinel 2 images and yield map to infer soil water storage capacity.
André Chanzy and Karen Lammoglia
10
D550 | EGU2020-18798
15:07
Study on The Extraction Method and Spatial-temporal Characteristics of Irrigated Land in Zhangjiakou City
Zijuan Zhu, Lijun Zuo, Zengxiang Zhang, Xiaoli Zhao, Feifei Sun, and TianShi Pan
11
D551 | EGU2020-19953
15:14
Remote sensing and GIS based ecological modelling of potential red deer habitats in the test site region DEMMIN (TERENO)
Amelie McKenna, Alfred Schultz, Erik Borg, Matthias Neumann, and Jan-Peter Mund
15:21
Open discussion
15:45
End afternoon session

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Co-organized by AS5/ESSI1/HS6/NH6/OS3
Convener: Frank Veroustraete | Co-convener: Willem Verstraeten
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
AS2.14

Over the past decades, emission reductions for air pollution abatement resulted in changes in precipitation, cloud and aerosol chemical composition, and in atmospheric deposition of anthropogenically derived nutrients to the ocean, affecting atmospheric acidity and atmospheric deposition to ecosystems.
Atmospheric acidity is central to many processes in the atmosphere and the Earth system: atmospheric chemistry, biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric deposition, ecosystems, human health, and climate. Atmospheric deposition impacts on marine productivity, oceanic carbon dioxide uptake and emissions to the atmosphere of climate active species. These oceanic emissions of reactive species and greenhouse gases influence atmospheric chemistry and global climate, and induce potentially important chemistry-climate feedbacks. Thus, air-sea fluxes of biogeochemically active constituents have significant impacts on global biogeochemistry and climate.
Despite the wide range of important effects of atmospheric acidity and air-sea exchanges, scientific knowledge gaps remain. Understanding atmospheric acidity’s levels, its spatial and temporal variability and controlling factors in the precipitation and the suspended atmospheric media, aerosols and clouds, and its multiple impacts, is an open scientific topic for research. We also still lack understanding of many of the physical and biogeochemical processes linking atmospheric deposition, atmospheric acidity, nutrient availability, marine biological productivity, and the biogeochemical cycles governing air-sea fluxes of these climate active species. Atmospheric inputs of other toxic substances, e.g., lead, cadmium, copper, and persistent organic pollutants, into the ocean are also of concern.
To address these current knowledge gaps, in this session we welcome new findings from laboratory, in-situ and remote sensing observations and atmospheric and oceanic numerical models, on the status of atmospheric acidity, the factors that affect its levels, its wide range of impacts, on atmospheric deposition of nutrients and toxic substances to the ocean, their impacts on ocean biogeochemistry, on the air-sea fluxes of climate active species and potential feedbacks to climate.
This session is jointly sponsored by GESAMP Working Group 38 on ‘The Atmospheric Input of Chemicals to the Ocean’, the Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS), and the International Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution (iCACGP).

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Co-organized by BG4/OS3, co-sponsored by SOLAS and GESAMP WG38
Convener: Parvadha Suntharalingam | Co-conveners: Maria Kanakidou, Nicole Riemer, Arvind SinghECSECS, Andreas Zuend
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
AS3.10

This symposium seeks to bring together environmental and atmospheric photochemists to help bridge the topics of aquatic photochemistry and aerosol photochemistry. The field of aquatic photochemistry seeks to understand the photochemical properties of dissolved organic matter which lead to the degradation of pollutants, particularly in the context of water treatment. On the other hand, the field of aerosol photochemistry seeks to understand the properties of the organic fraction in atmospheric aerosol capable of impacting climate through aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions. Both fields have similar goals of characterizing the response of organic matter whether it be in lakes, rivers and oceans or in the atmosphere to sunlight exposure. This symposium will facilitate these two fields coming together to share techniques, sampling protocols and chemical insights. The symposium will gather field and laboratory researchers, environmental engineers, aerosol scientists, and atmospheric chemistry modelers with the goal of discussing emerging research in photochemistry of organic matter both in the aquatic and aerosol phases.

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Co-organized by OS3
Convener: Nadine Borduas-DedekindECSECS | Co-conveners: Nir BluvshteinECSECS, Ulrich Krieger
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)