Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

SSP3

SSP – Stratigraphy, Sedimentology & Palaeontology

Programme group chair: Marc De Batist

SSP3 – Sedimentology: processes, products, diagenesis

Programme group scientific officers: Stephen Lokier, Guilhem Amin Douillet

SSP3.1

During the past decades numerous sediment records have become available from lakes and paleolakes through shallow and (ICDP) deep drilling. These records have proven to be valuable archives of past climate and environmental change, human activities as well as tectonic and volcanic activity. We invite contributions emphasizing quantitative and spatial assessments of rates of change, causes and consequences of long- and short-term climate variability, impact, magnitude, and frequency of tectonic and volcanic activity as deduced from sedimentological, geochemical, biological, and chronological tools.

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Convener: Hendrik Vogel | Co-conveners: Charline Giguet-Covex, Marta MarchegianoECSECS, Jasper Moernaut
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SSP3.2

Carbonate sediments have formed in a wide range of marine and non-marine settings through the complex interplay of biological, chemical and physical processes. Precisely-constrained high-resolution stratigraphic records are important for determining past global change and understanding the complex interactions between climatic processes, oceanographic and environmental changes, the biosphere, stratigraphic architecture and subsequent diagenesis. The complementary study of Recent carbonate depositional systems is crucial to the interpretation of these systems. This session invites contributions from general and interdisciplinary topics within the diverse fields of Carbonate Sedimentology, Stratigraphy and Diagenesis, the session will explore a broad range of geochemical, biological and stratigraphic proxies and their applications to understanding Earth history.

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Co-sponsored by IAS
Convener: Stephen Lokier | Co-conveners: Chelsea PedersonECSECS, Cees van der Land
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SSP3.5

Sedimentary features are the result of a complex interplay between the erosion, transport and deposition of grains under the action of a current - unidirectional, oscillatory, combined or multidirectional. Each sedimentary structure represents a palaeo-surface expression, and therefore they contain a record of the geomorphology driven by the flow conditions, provided that one understands how to invert and read this history. Evidence for sedimentary processes have been identified on Earth but also on other planetary bodies, based on observations of geomorphic features and stratigraphy.

Bedforms and other sedimentary features are generated in a wide variety of environments, including: aeolian wind-driven transport, rivers, estuarine, lacustrine and deltaic settings, pyroclastic currents, sub- and pro-glacial environments, shorelines and continental shelves, offshore storms, turbidity currents and subaqueous mass flows, deep-sea currents and extra-terrestrial bodies.

This session will host contributions regarding many aspects of the complex interaction between flow, bedforms and sedimentary structures on Earth and planetary surfaces, from their description to interpretation, and from modelling to experiments to field quantification, with studies ranging across differing spatial and temporal scales, from large-scale organisation patterns down to the grain-scale, as well as the palaeo-dynamic and morphodynamic aspects of control and feedback between flow, sediment transport and bedform evolution, on Earth and on Mars.

The varied contributions from field, laboratory, theoretical, and numerical approaches are intended to advance our knowledge of how to decipher the information contained in terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sedimentary bedforms, and help foster fruitful discussions between sedimentologists, geomorphologists, hydrologists, physicists and all researchers working on understanding bedform dynamics and their sedimentary products.

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Co-organized by GM5/HS13, co-sponsored by IAS
Convener: Anne BaarECSECS | Co-conveners: Maria Azpiroz-ZabalaECSECS, Guilhem Amin Douillet, Alice Lefebvre, Thaiënne van Dijk, Francesco SaleseECSECS, Steven BanhamECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
AS3.8

The interactions between aerosols, climate, and weather are among the large uncertainties of current atmospheric research. Mineral dust is an important natural source of aerosol with significant implications on radiation, cloud microphysics, atmospheric chemistry and the carbon cycle via the fertilization of marine and terrestrial ecosystems.
In addition, properties of dust deposited in sediments and ice cores are important (paleo-)climate indicators.

This interdivision session is open to contributions dealing with:
(1) measurements of all aspects of the dust cycle (emission, transport, deposition, size distribution, particle characteristics) with in situ and remote sensing techniques,
(2) numerical simulations of dust on global and regional scales,
(3) meteorological conditions for dust storms, dust transport and deposition,
(4) interactions of dust with clouds and radiation,
(5) influence of dust on atmospheric chemistry,
(6) fertilization of ecosystems through dust deposition,
(7) any study using dust as a (paleo-)climate indicator including investigations of Loess, ice cores, lake sediments, ocean sediments and dunes.

We especially encourage to submit papers on the integration of different disciplines and/or modeling of past, present and future climates.

Public information:
Please be aware that there are a number (N=3) changes in the order in which the presentations will be discussed. Please have a look at the provided session materials for the final program.

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Co-organized by BG1/CL4/GM8/SSP3, co-sponsored by ISAR
Convener: Jan-Berend Stuut | Co-conveners: Paola Formenti, Joanna Nield, Claire Ryder, Mingjin TangECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS9.1

The consideration of entire “Source to Sink" systems is one of the most recent and challenging advance in earth surface dynamics and sedimentary geology. To understand S2S systems it is necessary to promote and enhance sharing of knowledge and concepts between previously separated disciplines that are involved in the analysis of S2S systems. In particular, studying S2S systems implies knowledge and skills from (1) geomorphology, which focuses on the understanding of erosion processes driving landform evolution and sediment fluxes, (2) stratigraphy/sedimentology, which focuses on the nature of sedimentary deposits and their distribution in time and space, and (3) tectonics and structural geology, which set the dimensions, geometry and dynamics of source/transfer areas and sedimentary basins (the sink). Understanding S2S systems also involves other Geosciences disciplines such as paleoclimatology and geochemistry, because they allow quantifying the factors controlling S2S systems dynamics (climatic controls on erosion, solid vs solute fluxes, etc.). The sedimentary record captures Earth’s environmental evolution through interactions with humans. Developing innovative strategies for shaping a sustainable future and responsible growth requires a holistic understanding of Earth’s resources and our impact on the environment that can be informed by the sedimentary archives.
The aim of this general session is to invite contributions from all S2S-related research fields in order to foster connections around a central theme and kickstart the emergence of a European S2S research community. In addition, we propose to use this session to initiate discussion on developing a strategy for S2S training of early-stage researchers to enable them to address the sedimentary system from source to sink and inform them of potential career opportunities in both the academic and non-academic sectors. We welcome all S2S-related and environmental signal propagation contributions, and in particular those addressing 1) perennial S2S dynamics in response to long-term tectonic and climatic signals in deep time, 2) transient S2S dynamics in response to short-term signals and extreme events, 3) generic S2S models inspired by nature, 4) relationships and feedbacks between human and S2S systems, 5) global to regional scale source-to-sink systems and the economic benefits of thinking in this mindset, and 6) innovative S2S training in academia and industry.

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Co-organized by GM4/SSP3, co-sponsored by IAS
Convener: Francois Guillocheau | Co-conveners: Jean Braun, Charlotte FillonECSECS, Benjamin Gréselle, Tor Somme
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GM3.7

The erosion, transport, temporary storage, and deposition of sediment govern the fluxes and distribution of solid mass on the surface of the Earth. The rate and extent of these mass fluxes is controlled by the complex interplay of surface processes that act across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Understanding these processes and their dependence on external forcing (e.g. climate, tectonics) and internal feedbacks (autogenic dynamics) is instrumental for constraining the cycling of sediment from source-to-sink, and to invert sedimentary archives for past environments.
A growing body of studies continues to develop a process-based understanding of the coupling between climate, tectonics, erosion, and the transport of solids across large catchments. Important insights into sediment recycling and residence time have been provided by recent advances in geochemical and geophysical techniques, highlighting the dynamic nature of sediment transport. However, many challenges remain including; (1) fully quantifying the time- and spatial scales of sediment transport, (2) tracking signals across catchments and inverting sedimentary records, and (3) assessing the importance of large and infrequent events in controlling erosion and sediment transport.
In this session we welcome field-based, experimental, and modelling studies, that (1) constrain mechanisms, rates, and scales of erosion, transport, and deposition processes, (2) analyse the influence of internal and external forcing on these processes, (3) investigate the propagation of geochemical or physical signals across the earth surface (such as changes in sedimentary fluxes, grain size distributions, cosmogenic nuclide concentrations) and (4) invert sedimentary archives to learn about past environments. Contributions across all temporal and spatial scales are welcome. We particularly encourage early career scientists to apply for this session.

Solicited presenter: Elizabeth Dingle (Simon Fraser University)

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Co-organized by BG4/HS13/SSP3
Convener: Oliver FrancisECSECS | Co-conveners: Aaron BufeECSECS, Lisa HarrisonECSECS, Stefanie TofeldeECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GM3.6

Hydro-geomorphic connectivity has emerged as a significant conceptual framework for understanding the transfer of surface water and materials (e.g., sediment, plant propagules, and nutrients) through landscapes. The concept has had particular success in the field of catchment hydrology and fluvial geomorphology, but has also been employed in, for example, studies of soil erosion and hydrochory, and in neurosciences and social sciences. Connectivity as applied in various disciplines can be a transformative concept in understanding complex systems, allowing analyses of how such systems behave in terms of scaling, catastrophic/phase transitions, critical nodes, emergence and self-organization. However, recent research also highlights the widespread nature of natural longitudinal disconnectivity in river systems, such as beaver dams, log jams, lakes and wetlands. These and other forms of natural disconnectivity can have large spatial and temporal implications on ecological, geomorphic, hydrological and biogeochemical processes through buffering water and material fluxes. We aim to create a diverse interdisciplinary session that reflects a broad range of research seeking to illustrate the role of connectivity on various spatial scales as well as implications of and temporal and spatial variability of disconnectivity. We hope to use the session to develop a discussion of the dual roles of connectivity and disconnectivity to generate a basis for an integrated framework to be applied across the sciences in hydro-geomorphic systems and for managing complex systems and guiding river restoration.

Public information:
CHAT PROGRAMME

1) General introduction by the conveners (“setting the context”) – 5 min

2) ‘Mentimeter’ poll (conveners, authors, audience) – 5 min

3) Displays (max. 7 min per display):

• Invited “speakers” first (Gordon Grant, Ellen Wohl, Rebekah Levine)
• Then following the order as shown in the official EGU session programme (and in your panel to the right of the chat window)

Procedure: Each display will be announced by the session moderators asking the “speakers” to post key messages related to their display material. Then the audience is kindly asked to post questions/statements for discussion.

4) Concluding remarks (conveners) – 5 min

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Co-organized by HS13/SSP3, co-sponsored by IAG
Convener: Ronald PöpplECSECS | Co-conveners: Lina Polvi Sjöberg, Laura Turnbull-Lloyd, Manuel López-Vicente, Jantiene BaartmanECSECS, Lovisa Eirell, Anthony Parsons
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
ITS2.4/HS12.1

This session provides a platform for cross-disciplinary science that addresses the continuum of the river and its catchment to the coastal sea. We invite studies across geographical borders; from the source to the sea including groundwater, and across the freshwater-marine water transition. The session welcomes studies that link environmental and social science, address the impacts of climate change and extreme events, and of human activities on water and sediment quality and quantity, hydromorphology, biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services of River-Sea systems, and that provide solutions for sustainable management of the River-Sea social-ecological system.
We need to fully understand how River-Sea-Systems function. How are River-Sea-Systems changing due to human pressures? What is the impact of processes in the catchment on marine systems function, and vice versa? How can we discern between human-induced changes or those driven by natural processes from climate-induced variability and extreme events? What will the tipping points of socio-ecologic system states be and what will they look like? How can we better characterise river-sea systems from the latest generation Earth observation to citizen science based observatories. How can we predict short and long term changes in River-Sea-Systems to manage them sustainably? What is the limit to which it is possible to predict the natural and human-influenced evolution of River-Sea-Systems? The increasing demand to jointly enable intensive human use and environmental protection in river-sea systems requires holistic and integrative research approaches with the ultimate goal of enhanced system understanding.

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Co-organized by BG4/GM6/NH5/OS2/SSP3, co-sponsored by IAS
Convener: Jana Friedrich | Co-conveners: Debora Bellafiore, Dietrich Borchardt, Andrea D'Alpaos, Michael Rode
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GM4.2

Physical erosion and chemical weathering dominate the evolution of surface and subterranean mountain landscapes over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Signals from processes such as glacial and periglacial erosion, chemical and mechanical weathering, rockfall, debris flow, and hillslope failure are preserved in downstream patterns of river and/or valley aggradation and incision as well as in the development of karst systems and their sediment deposits. These processes react to a wide spectrum of external and internal forcings (e.g. climatic variability, tectonic activity, spatial patterns of vegetation or sudden internal failure) often making it difficult to relate these records back to specific causal mechanisms.

Measuring the dynamical interplay of erosion, weathering and sedimentation as well as quantifying the rates and fluxes associated with the evolution of mountainous landscapes, is a crucial but challenging component of source-to-sink sediment research. Many of these processes also pose serious threats to the biosphere, mountain settlements and infrastructure. Understanding and quantifying these processes from both a societal and engineering point of view will lead to better preparation and responses to such threats.

We welcome contributions that (1) investigate the processes of production, mobilisation, transport, and deposition of sediment in mountain landscapes, (2) study the development of cave systems and their sedimentary archive in relation to external base-level conditions and internal dynamics (3) explore feedbacks between erosion and weathering due to natural and anthropogenic forcings, (4) address the role these processes play in the larger source-to-sink context, and (5) consider how these processes contribute to natural hazards specific to mountain landscapes. We invite presentations that employ observational, analytical or modelling approaches in mountain environments across a variety of temporal and spatial scales. We particularly encourage early career scientists to apply for this session.

Public information:
Block 1 schedule:

14:00-14:10: A bit of time to explore the displays.
14:10: Oliver Francis D1106 EGU2020-891 The fate of sediment after a large earthquake
14:20: Rachel Glade (solicited) D1107 EGU2020-12761 River canyon evolution governed by autogenic channel-hillslope feedbacks
14:35: Benjamin Campforts D1108 EGU2020-13064 To slide or not to slide: explicit integration of landslides and sediment dynamics in a landscape evolution model
14:45: Philippe Vernant D1109 EGU2020-9099 First quantitative evidences of ghost-rock karstification controlling regional karst geometry
14:55: Robert Hilton D1112 EGU2020-5624 A shifting view of erosion and the carbon cycle
15:05: Stephanie Olen D1114 EGU2020-5939 Synthetic aperture radar coherence as a proxy for geomorphic activity
15:15: Eric Deal D1115 EGU2020-5510 Analytical long-profile models of coupled glacier-fluvial systems
15:25: Anna Masseroli D1119 EGU2020-749 Differentiation among geomorphological processes in a mountain hydrographic basin by means of soils analyses
15:35: Alex Beer D1122 EGU2020-12980 Bedrock Topographic Evolution from Rockfall Erosion

Block 2 schedule:
16:20: Sharon Pittau D1123 EGU2020-10391 A multi-temporal inventory for constraining earthflow source-to-sink pathways in the Sillaro River basin, Northern Apennines
16:30: Emma Graf D1126 EGU2020-455 Where does all the gravel go? Tracking landslide sediment from the 2015 Gorkha earthquake along the Kosi River, Nepal
16:40: Paul Krenn D1127 EGU2020-13255 Analysing the impacts of extreme precipitation events on geomorphic systems in torrential catchments; a comparative study from Upper Styria, Austria
16:50: Benjamin Purinton D1129 EGU2020-3943 Multiband (X, C, L) radar amplitude analysis for a mixed sand- and gravel-bed river in the eastern central Andes
17:00: Jinyu Zhang D1131 EGU2020-12497 Reconstructing aggradation and incision of the Lancang River (Upper Mekong) at Yunlong reach, southeast Tibet
17:10: Frank Lehmkuhl D1132 EGU2020-3893 Quaternary paleoenvironmental change preserved in alluvial fans systems in semiarid to arid mountain areas: Examples from western Mongolia, western USA, and the Chilean Andes
17:20: Erica Erlanger D1134 EGU2020-12043 Partitioning the denudation flux between silicate and carbonate physical erosion and chemical weathering in the Northern Apennines
17:30: Tim Jesper Suhrhoff D1136 EGU2020-18195 Weathering signals in Lake Baikal and its tributaries
17:40: Maarten Lupker D1137 EGU2020-4480 Chemical weathering pathways in the central Himalaya – new constraints from DI14C and δ34S
17:50: Luca Pisani D1140 EGU2020-3935 Karst porosity development in layered and fractured carbonates: field evidences of structural control on sulfuric acid speleogenesis (Majella Massif, Italy)

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Co-organized by NH3/SSP3
Convener: Elizabeth DingleECSECS | Co-conveners: Luca C MalatestaECSECS, Erica ErlangerECSECS, Larissa de PalézieuxECSECS, Stefan HaselbergerECSECS, Andrea ColumbuECSECS, Jeremy Caves RugensteinECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
GM5.1

Fluvial systems cover much of the Earth’s surface; they convey water, sediments, and essential nutrients from the uplands to the sea, intermittently transferring these materials from the river channel to the adjacent floodplain. The routing of sediment and water through the channel network initiates complex process-form interactions as the river bed and banks adjust to changes in flow conditions. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the landform-driven morphodynamic interactions taking place within the channel that ultimately determine patterns of sedimentation and changes of channel form. Furthermore, an understanding of how these process-form interactions scale with the size of the fluvial system is also currently lacking. Recent technological advances now afford us the opportunity to study and to quantify these process-form interactions in detail across a range of spatial and temporal scales. This session aims to bring together interdisciplinary researchers working across field, experimental, and numerical modelling approaches who are advancing methods and providing new insights into: (i) sediment transport and morphodynamic functioning of fluvial systems, (ii) evaluating morphological change at variable spatial and temporal scales, such as at event vs. seasonal scales, and (iii) investigating the sedimentology of these river systems. We particularly welcome applications which investigate the morphodynamic response of fluvial systems in all types and sizes and we specifically would like to encourage submissions from early career researchers and students.

Public information:
To those authors (or co-authors) who wish to participate in the chat-based session, please prepare yourselves to answer the following question:
- Who are you and what are your research topic and the key message of your research? -

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Co-organized by HS13/SSP3
Convener: László BertalanECSECS | Co-conveners: Joshua Ahmed, Christopher HackneyECSECS, Eliisa Lotsari
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GM6.7

The ocean floor hosts a tremendous variety of forms that reflect the action of a range of tectonic, sedimentary, oceanographic and biological processes at multiple spatio-temporal scales. Being able to map the form and shape of the seabed and to understand the processes that shape it is a major prerequisite to ocean and coastal management, nature conservation and hazard assessment as well as a key objective of national and international research programmes and IODP expeditions.

High quality seafloor maps are integral to submarine geomorphic investigations. Acoustic remote-sensing technologies (singlebeam, multibeam, sidescan, interferometric and synthetic-aperture sonars), deployed on various platforms, are fundamental to seafloor mapping. In relatively shallow and transparent waters, optical methods such as aircraft and satellite-based remote sensing and LIDAR are being employed with increasing success. Seafloor maps, especially when combined with sub-seafloor and/or seabed measurements, provide an exciting opportunity to integrate the approaches of geomorphology and geophysics, and to extend quantitative geomorphology offshore. 3D seismic reflection data has also given birth to the discipline of seismic geomorphology, which has provided a 4D perspective to continental margin evolution. Innovative processing and classification software, image analysis, machine and deep-learning applications are advancing developments in seabed-recognition techniques.

The aim of this interdisciplinary session is two-fold: (i) to highlight recent advances in seabed mapping and classification, and (ii) to improve the understanding of the causes and consequences of geomorphic processes shaping underwater landscapes, including submarine erosion and depositional processes, submarine landslides, sediment transfer and deformation, volcanic activity, fluid migration and escape, faulting and folding, among others. Contributions to this session can include work from any physiographic region, ranging from shallow coastal settings to abyssal plains and deep-sea trenches. Datasets of any scale, from satellite-predicted depth to ultra-high resolution swath bathymetry, sub-surface imaging and sampling, are anticipated.

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Co-organized by OS4/SSP3, co-sponsored by IAG
Convener: Aaron Micallef | Co-conveners: Markus Diesing, H. Christian Hass (deceased), Sebastian Krastel, Alessandra Savini, Maria Judge, Kim Picard, Anne-Cathrin WölflECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
NH5.3

Tsunamis and storm surges pose significant hazards to coastal communities around the world. Geological investigations, including both field studies and modelling approaches, significantly enhance our understanding of these events. Past extreme wave events may be reconstructed based on sedimentary and geomorphological evidence from low and high energy environments, from low and high latitude regions and from coastal and offshore areas. The development of novel approaches to identifying, characterising and dating evidence for these events supplements a range of established methods. Nevertheless, the differentiation between evidence for tsunamis and storms still remains a significant question for the community. Numerical and experimental modelling studies complement and enhance field observations and are crucial to improving deterministic and probabilistic approaches to hazard assessment. This session welcomes contributions on all aspects of paleo-tsunami and paleo-storm surge research, including studies that use established methods or recent interdisciplinary advances to reconstruct records of past events, or forecast the probability of future events.

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Co-organized by GM6/SSP3
Convener: Ed GarrettECSECS | Co-conveners: Dominik Brill, Max Engel, Simon Matthias May, Jessica Pilarczyk
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GM6.3

Examining coastal morphodynamics from the nearshore through to inland dune systems is fundamental in understanding their short- to long-term behaviour. Coastal processes operate across large spatial and temporal scales and therefore comprehending their resulting landforms is complex.

At the coast, dunes provide the physical barrier to flooding during high energy storms, while beaches and nearshore areas help dissipate storm impact through a series of dynamic interactions involving sediment transfers and at times rapid morphological changes. Investigation of complex interactions between these three interconnected systems has become essential for understanding coastal behaviour.

This session, sponsored by the IGU-UGI Commission on Coastal Systems, welcomes contributions from coastal scientists interested in the measurement and modelling of the nearshore 25-0 m zone (waves, currents and sediment transport) and terrestrial coastal processes (on beaches and dunes) and responses within the three sub-units at various scales. The session will highlight the latest research developments in this part of the planet's geomorphic system and facilitate knowledge exchange between the submerged and sub-aerial coastal zones.

Public information:
We will be organising this session into time groupings on the day, with 5 displays in each 20 min slot according to the following order:
GROUP 1: 08:30 - 08:50
1. D986 |EGU2020-7875 Modelling nearshore sediment fluxes in embayed settings over a multi-annual timescale
Nieves Valiente, Gerd Masselink, Robert Jak McCarroll, Andy Saulter, Tim Scott, Daniel Conley, and Erin King
2. D988 | EGU2020-11236 A novel shoreface translation model for predicting future coastal change
Jak McCarroll, Gerd Masselink, Nieves Valiente, Mark Wiggins, Josie-Alice Kirby, Tim Scott, and Mark Davidson
3. D989 | EGU2020-4882 Two centuries of shoreline evolution and storm events in Dundrum Bay, Northern Ireland.
Edoardo Grottoli, Melanie Biausque, Derek W.T. Jackson, and Andrew J. G. Cooper
4. D990 | EGU2020-18730 Characteristics and dynamics of crescentic bar events at an open, Mediterranean beach
Rinse de Swart, Francesca Ribas, Daniel Calvete, Gonzalo Simarro, and Jorge Guillén
5. D991 |EGU2020-11977 Aeolian transport on a wet beach: Field observations from the swash zone
Christy Swann and sarah trimble

GROUP 2: 08:50 - 09:10
6. D992 | EGU2020-17470 Post-storm recuperation as a stepping-stone towards long-term integrated modelling in steep beaches
Katerina Kombiadou, Susana Costas, Dano Roelvink, and Robert McCall
7. D993 | EGU2020-406 Nearshore morphodynamics along the coastline of southern Sweden from detailed surficial mapping and hydrodynamic modelling
Johan Nyberg, Bradley Goodfellow, Jonas Ising, and Anna Hedenström
8. D994 | EGU2020-781 Wave, Tide and Morphological Controls on Embayment Circulation and Headland Sand Bypassing
Erin King, Daniel Conley, Gerd Masselink, Nicoletta Leonardi, Robert McCarroll, Timothy Scott, and Nieves Valiente
9. D995 | EGU2020-1407 Forecast of development of sea coasts on their morphodynamic state according to the results of space images descryption
Ruben Kosyan, Nickolay Dunaev, Tatyana Repkina, and Jose Juanes Marti
10. D996 | EGU2020-3072 Using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry for monitoring seasonal changes of barrier island in the southwestern coast of Taiwan
Hui-Ju Hsu, Shyi-Jeng Chyi, Chia-Hung Jen, Lih-Der Ho, and Jia-Hong Chen

GROUP 3: 09:10 - 09:30
11. D997 | EGU2020-4215 The Missing link between beach and clifftop dune – Landscape evolution of the climbing dune in the Feng-Chiue-Sha area of Hengchun Peninsula, Taiwan
Lih-Der Ho, Christopher Lüthgens, Chun Chen, and Shyh-Jeng Chyi
12. D998 | EGU2020-4883 Short-term morphological changes of multiple intertidal bars on macrotidal beaches: from seasonal to storm-scales.
Melanie Biausque, Edoardo Grottoli, Derek Jackson, and Andrew Cooper
13. D999 | EGU2020-2566 Databased simulation and reconstruction of the near shore geomorphological structure and sediment composition of the German tidal flats
Julian Sievers, Peter Milbradt, and Malte Rubel
14. D1000 | EGU2020-5184 The use of a low cost, time-lapse camera for high frequency monitoring of intertidal beach morphology
Emilia Guisado-Pintado and Derek W.T. Jackson
15. D1001 | EGU2020-8059 Longshore variation in coastal foredune growth on a megatidal beach from UAV measurements
Iain Fairley, Jose Horrillo-Caraballo, Anouska Mendzil, Georgie Blow, Henry Miller, Ian Masters, Harshinie Karunarathna, and Dominic Reeve

GROUP 4: 09:30 - 09:50
16. D1002 | EGU2020-8252 Spatial and temporal changes of sediment grain size along Israel’s Mediterranean cliff-dominated beaches
Onn Crouvi, Ran Shemesh, Oded Katz, Amit Mushkin, Navot Morag, and Nadav Lensky
17. D1003 | EGU2020-10010 Environmental change assesments in response to anthropogenic human footprint in the Nalón estuary (Asturias-NW Spain)
Germán Flor-Blanco, Efrén García-Ordiales, Germán Flor, Julio López Peláez, Nieves Roqueñí, and Violeta Navarro-García
18. D1004 | EGU2020-10251 Sedimentary evolution of a bedrock-conditioned incised valley since the Last Glacial Maximum: the Ría de Arousa (NW Spain)
Víctor Cartelle, Soledad García-Gil, Iria García-Moreiras, Castor Muñoz-Sobrino, and Natalia Martínez-Carreño
19. D1005 | EGU2020-10493 Sedimentary conditioning of a rocky strait during the Holocene transgression: Ría de Ferrol (NW Spain)
Soledad García-Gil, Víctor Cartelle, Castor Muñoz-Sobrino, Natalia Martínez-Carreño, and Iria García-Moreiras
20. D1006 | EGU2020-10501 A RANS numerical model for cross-shore beach profile evolution
Julio Garcia-Maribona, Javier L. Lara, Maria Maza, and Iñigo J. Losada

GROUP 5: 09:50-10:10
21. D1007 | EGU2020-11697 Coarse sediment tracing experiment at the Promenade des Anglais (Nice, France)
Duccio Bertoni, Giovanni Sarti, Giacomo Bruno, Alessandro Pozzebon, Rémi Doumasdelage, and Julien Larraun
22. D1008 | EGU2020-13206 Multiple sand bar dynamics in the macrotidal Shinduri beach, west coast of Korea
Tae Soo Chang, Hyun Ho Youn, and Seung Soo Chun
23. D1009 | EGU2020-17932 Empirical modelling of beach evolution: implementation of coupled cross-shore and longshore approaches
Teddy Chataigner, Marissa Yates, and Nicolas Le Dantec
24. D1010 | EGU2020-15230 Landscape drivers of coastal dune mobility
Thomas Smyth, Ryan Wilson, Paul Rooney, and Katherine Yates
25. D1011 | EGU2020-18568 Exploring the role of vegetation and sediment supply to coastal dune states using integrated process-based modelling
Susana Costas, Katerina Kombiadou, and Dano Roelvink

WRAP-UP 10:10 - 10:15

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Co-organized by OS2/SSP3, co-sponsored by IGU-CCS
Convener: Derek Jackson | Co-conveners: Emilia Guisado-Pintado, Irene Delgado-Fernandez
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
CL1.16

Significant advances in our understanding of the Meso- and Cenozoic development of polar regions have been made over the last two decades by studying continental shelf, slope, or deep sea sediment sequences. These include more detailed reconstructions of the climatic, oceanographic, and tectonic evolution of high northern and southern latitudes over various time scales, as well as reconstructions of past ice-sheet dynamics and studies of marine geohazards. Data have been obtained from conventional and high-resolution 2D and 3D seismic surveying, as well as from a growing number of short sediment cores and targeted high-latitude deep drilling expeditions (e.g. IODP, MeBO). The same techniques have also been applied in fjords, which link the continental margins with the interiors of landmasses and act as “miniature ocean basins”. Fjord settings allow us to study similar geological processes to those that acted on glaciated continental margins but at smaller scales. The variety of sediment inputs (e.g. glacial, fluvioglacial, fluvial, biological) to fjord basins along with relatively high sedimentation rates provides the potential for high-resolution palaeoclimatic and palaeooceanographic records on decadal to centennial timescales.

The aim of this session is to bring together researchers working on both northern and southern high latitudes processes spanning various spatio-temporal scales, to provide a multi-disciplinary picture of polar regions. We welcome submissions focussing on (but not limited to) records of past climatic change, tectonics, oceanography and ecosystems, and the associated links with ice sheets and glacier behaviour, ice-ocean interactions and glacial-marine sedimentary processes. Studies that integrate different datasets, data types, or that marry observations with numerical modelling are also encouraged.

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Session schedule:

14.00-14.02 Welcome and introduction

14.02-14.10 D3130 | EGU2020-7493 David Hutchinson et al., Arctic closure as a trigger for Atlantic overturning at the Eocene-Oligocene Transition

14.10-14.18 D3131 | EGU2020-7943 Katrien Van Landeghem et al., Relating changes in seabed properties and retreating glacier fronts in West-Antarctic fjords

14.18-14.26 D3135 | EGU2020-12484 Joe Stoner et al., Deriving paleo-perspectives on polar systems: Continued results from the 2012 Sawtooth Lake (Ellesmere Island) and 2015 Petermann (North Greenland) Expeditions

14.26-14.34 D3136 | EGU2020-768 Julia Rieke Hagemann et al., Southern Chilean continent-ocean interaction over the last glacial cycle

14.34-14.42 D3140 | EGU2020-10921 Tom Arne Rydningen et al., New results on the dynamics of the NW part of the Svalbard Ice Sheet during the deglaciation of the Woodfjorden Trough

14.42-14.50 D3142 | EGU2020-12940 Michele Rebesco et al., Multi-proxy analysis of Late Quaternary ODYSSEA Contourite Depositional System (Ross Sea, Antarctica) and the depositional record of contour current and cold, dense waters

14.50-14.58 D3143 | EGU2020-13950 Juliane Müller et al., Deglacial sea ice variability at the continental margin off western Dronning Maud Land

14.58-15.06 D3144 | EGU2020-17953 Jostein Bakke et al., Late glacial and Holocene glacier fluctuations at the Sub-Antarctic Island Kerguelen in the Southern Indian Ocean

15.06-15.14 D3145 | EGU2020-18143 Marie Protin et al., Geological, geochemical and cosmogenic nuclides constraints from the NEEM core basal sediments, Greenland

15.14-15.22 D3147 | EGU2020-19076 Kseniya Mikhailova et al., Glendonites from Mesozoic succession of eastern Barents sea: distribution, genesis and paleoclimatic implications

15.22-15.30 D3148 | EGU2020-19216 Eivind W. N. Støren et al., Reconstruction of Holocene glacier fluctuations at Kongsbreen based on sediments deposited in lake Sarsvatnet, Ossian Sarsfjellet, Svalbard

15.30-15.45 General discussion and outstanding questions

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Co-organized by OS1/SSP3
Convener: Johann Philipp KlagesECSECS | Co-conveners: Florence Colleoni, H. Christian Hass (deceased), Kelly Hogan, Michele Rebesco, Kasia K. SliwinskaECSECS, Madeleine VickersECSECS, Andrew ChristECSECS
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| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SSP3.21

Bedrock depressions are common features of past and modern glacial landscapes. They are often referred to as overdeepenings and act as important terrestrial archives. Which processes control the formation and geometry of glacial overdeepenings? How did they evolve over time? Which chronological and environmental information can be derived from the sedimentary record? These are the questions that will be addressed in this session.

The timing, extent and driving mechanisms for the last major glacial cycle are increasingly better understood but remain poorly constrained for previous cycles. The early conceptual models, initially adopted to understand older glaciations, neglected much of the spatial and temporal complexity of glaciations. Furthermore, they suffered from a lack of constraining data, which is mainly due to the surficial incompleteness of the terrestrial records.
Some of these limitations may be overcome by studying the sedimentary infill of subglacially formed basins. It is generally accepted that glacial processes, supported by subglacial water, have carved these overdeepenings. However, considerable uncertainties remain concerning the erosional mechanisms and physical constraints.
The sedimentary record in overdeepenings is diverse, including glacial, glacio-lacustrine and fluvial sediments. Investigated records suggest that many overdeepened basins contain a multi-cycle infilling and erosion history. Overdeepenings may therefore act as sediment storages on the timescale of several glacial-interglacial cycles, and provide a valuable record of a landscape’s glacial history. The combination of sedimentological, geophysical, and chronological methods together with the application of landscape evolution models provides new insights into the development of these bedrock features and allows constraining the environmental conditions in the geological past.

This session shall stimulate discussions concerning the formation of subglacial depressions and that aim at deciphering the sedimentary fill of overdeepenings. Contributions may include investigations based on field observations and/or modelling of modern, Quaternary and pre-Quaternary glacial settings. Possible topics cover: (a) glacial and interglacial stratigraphic successions preserved in overdeepenings, (b) subglacial erosion and deposition, (c) glaciation chronology, and (d) landscape evolution.

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Co-organized by CR4/GM7, co-sponsored by IAS
Convener: Michael SchwenkECSECS | Co-conveners: Marius BuechiECSECS, Thomas BurschilECSECS, Urs Fischer, Bernhard Salcher
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)