NH4.5

Seismic hazard assessment in regions of low lithospheric strain rely on a global-analogues approach for parameterizing seismic hazard models. In this approach, seismicity rate and earthquake recurrence distributions are generated by amalgamating aerial source zones with limited seismicity data or by drawing on more far‐field analogue regions of slow lithospheric strain. The premise is that regions of low lithospheric strain have the same seismogenic potential. This session seeks to discuss new insights into this premise.

We invite contributions that (1) present new observations that place constraints on earthquake occurrence in low-strain regions, (2) explore patterns of stable or temporally varying earthquake occurrence, and (3) provide insight into the mechanisms that control earthquakes in regions of slow deformation via observation and/or modeling.

These contributions cover two different research components. The first component calls upon researchers with recently developed paleoseismic, geomorphic, geodetic, geophysical, and seismologic datasets that provide insight into the earthquake cycle in low-strain settings. The second component includes contributions that more broadly synthesize recent insights into the seismotectonics of low strain regions and/or explore the driving mechanisms for earthquakes in these regions. Collectively, these contributions provide a current view of the global-analogues premise.

Co-organized by SM7
Convener: Beau Whitney | Co-conveners: Pierre Arroucau, Stéphane Baize, Susana Custódio, Gordana Vlahovic

Seismic hazard assessment in regions of low lithospheric strain rely on a global-analogues approach for parameterizing seismic hazard models. In this approach, seismicity rate and earthquake recurrence distributions are generated by amalgamating aerial source zones with limited seismicity data or by drawing on more far‐field analogue regions of slow lithospheric strain. The premise is that regions of low lithospheric strain have the same seismogenic potential. This session seeks to discuss new insights into this premise.

We invite contributions that (1) present new observations that place constraints on earthquake occurrence in low-strain regions, (2) explore patterns of stable or temporally varying earthquake occurrence, and (3) provide insight into the mechanisms that control earthquakes in regions of slow deformation via observation and/or modeling.

These contributions cover two different research components. The first component calls upon researchers with recently developed paleoseismic, geomorphic, geodetic, geophysical, and seismologic datasets that provide insight into the earthquake cycle in low-strain settings. The second component includes contributions that more broadly synthesize recent insights into the seismotectonics of low strain regions and/or explore the driving mechanisms for earthquakes in these regions. Collectively, these contributions provide a current view of the global-analogues premise.