TS4.3 EDI

It is over a hundred years since Reid’s elastic rebound theory of faulting was defined following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and this principle is still a key factor in understanding how faults move during earthquakes and in interseismic periods. But with the benefits of a hundred years of field observations and technological progress, there are many questions still to be answered about the seismic cycle. How consistent is the seismic cycle on individual faults or across a whole fault system? How much deformation is plastic rather than elastic? How can we reconcile slip rates on faults measured from geodesy and geology?

We invite abstracts that look at the seismic cycle on individual faults or in fault systems, and particularly studies that investigate the spatial and/or temporal variability of the seismic cycle. These questions may be answered using a range of different disciplines, including field observations, geodesy, numerical modelling and seismology. This session is organised by the INQUA-funded EDITH interest group and will bring together a diverse range of topics on this central theme of the seismic cycle and elastic rebound theory.

Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Zoe MildonECSECS | Co-conveners: Franz Livio, Sambit NaikECSECS, Shalev Siman-TovECSECS, Pia Victor

It is over a hundred years since Reid’s elastic rebound theory of faulting was defined following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and this principle is still a key factor in understanding how faults move during earthquakes and in interseismic periods. But with the benefits of a hundred years of field observations and technological progress, there are many questions still to be answered about the seismic cycle. How consistent is the seismic cycle on individual faults or across a whole fault system? How much deformation is plastic rather than elastic? How can we reconcile slip rates on faults measured from geodesy and geology?

We invite abstracts that look at the seismic cycle on individual faults or in fault systems, and particularly studies that investigate the spatial and/or temporal variability of the seismic cycle. These questions may be answered using a range of different disciplines, including field observations, geodesy, numerical modelling and seismology. This session is organised by the INQUA-funded EDITH interest group and will bring together a diverse range of topics on this central theme of the seismic cycle and elastic rebound theory.