OS3.1 EDI

The net amount of CO2 that is taken up and stored by the ocean is a major driver of the rate of climate change but also affects biogeochemical stressors such as ocean acidification. Alongside the gradual increase in the ocean’s anthropogenic carbon inventory, the uptake, storage, and transformation of carbon display a large degree of spatial and temporal variability. In this session, we wish to shine a light on such trends and variability in ocean carbon dynamics, focussing on underlying processes and the consequences for marine ecosystems in the recent past, present, and future.

We are specifically interested in temporal changes in the fluxes and inventories of natural and anthropogenic inorganic carbon, as well as other marine carbonate system parameters, such as alkalinity, pCO2, and pH. We welcome contributions with a focus on the open or coastal ocean, surface, and/or ocean interior, based on observations, models, or theory and with a global or regional focus. Observational and multi-model constraints on marine carbon dynamics are particularly welcome, as are studies based on GLODAP or SOCAT data and insights from the recent Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) simulations.

Including OS Division Outstanding ECS award
Co-organized by BG4
Convener: Lydia KepplerECSECS | Co-conveners: Jens Daniel Müller, Lester Kwiatkowski

The net amount of CO2 that is taken up and stored by the ocean is a major driver of the rate of climate change but also affects biogeochemical stressors such as ocean acidification. Alongside the gradual increase in the ocean’s anthropogenic carbon inventory, the uptake, storage, and transformation of carbon display a large degree of spatial and temporal variability. In this session, we wish to shine a light on such trends and variability in ocean carbon dynamics, focussing on underlying processes and the consequences for marine ecosystems in the recent past, present, and future.

We are specifically interested in temporal changes in the fluxes and inventories of natural and anthropogenic inorganic carbon, as well as other marine carbonate system parameters, such as alkalinity, pCO2, and pH. We welcome contributions with a focus on the open or coastal ocean, surface, and/or ocean interior, based on observations, models, or theory and with a global or regional focus. Observational and multi-model constraints on marine carbon dynamics are particularly welcome, as are studies based on GLODAP or SOCAT data and insights from the recent Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) simulations.