ERE2.4 | Pumped Hydropower Storage and Energy System Modelling.
EDI
Pumped Hydropower Storage and Energy System Modelling.
Co-organized by ESSI4
Convener: Bjarnhéðinn GuðlaugssonECSECS | Co-conveners: Thomas Kempka, Konstantina PyrgakiECSECS, Emanuele Quaranta, Rebecca Ellis, David C. Finger
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.16
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00
Pumped Hydropower Storage (PHS) already provides significant contributions to flexibly storing excess energy from intermittent renewable sources and the electric grid in the context of the energy transition to renewable sources.
The objective of the PHS sub-session is to determine the potentials for a further development and expansion of PHS applications by:
• Integration and hybridisation of intermittent renewable energy sources with PHS
• Potentials for reusing and modernising existing facilities in the water sector, existing reservoirs and sea water plants, open-pit and underground mines
• Concepts for rural and decentralised PHS implementation
• Environmental and social impacts of PHS resulting from its integration with new conceptual approaches
• Additional social and environmental benefits of PHS, including irrigation and drinking water provision, flood and drought risk management, etc.
• Economic drivers and market-dependent requirements for additional benefits and to increase technology export potentials
• Impacts of climate change on the availability of water and the technological mitigation of reservoir volume losses due to sedimentation and evaporation
• Legal considerations and accelerating approval processes
• Attraction of young professionals to maintain engineering knowledge

Energy system modelling (ESM) is a critical tool for understanding and optimizing the complex interactions within modern energy systems. EMS provides framework and modelling techniques to analyses the intricate interplay between various energy sources, system infrastructure, technologies, and policies.

The ESM sub-session aims to explore the significance of EMS in facilitating sustainable energy transitions by discussing:
- Key components and areas of energy system modelling, including integrating renewable sources like solar, wind, hydroelectric power, and geothermal combined with energy storage, small-scale energy generation technologies, and grid management systems.
- Various modelling techniques, from optimization and simulation to scenario analysis, including forecasting energy demand, evaluating infrastructure requirements, and assessing the effects of policy interventions.
- The role of stakeholders in the energy system modelling process, from modelling framing and data collection to influences on modelling analysis and selection of modelling parameters.

Orals: Thu, 18 Apr | Room -2.16

Chairpersons: Bjarnhéðinn Guðlaugsson, Thomas Kempka, Emanuele Quaranta
14:00–14:05
14:05–14:15
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EGU24-1601
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ECS
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On-site presentation
Isabel C. Gil García, Ana Fernández Guillamón, Adela Ramos Escudero, and Ángel Molina García

The urgency of mitigating emissions on our planet drives the exploration of various sources of clean energy. Natural resources, such as solar radiation, wind and water, provide the opportunity to transform them into forms of sustainable energy. In recent decades, the advancement of wind technologies has led the sector to reach full maturity, encompassing both large-scale wind energy generation in marine and terrestrial environments and the implementation of mini-wind solutions. However, we often underestimate the human activities, production processes or technological innovations that generate clean resources, without fully taking advantage of their potential. In this context, the central purpose of this work is to take advantage of wind gusts caused unnaturally and, through small wind power, convert them into clean energy. The proposal is organized in three phases: in the first, a data analysis is carried out that involves taking in situ samples of wind speed and an evaluation of wind potential; In the second stage, the energy conversion is carried out, selecting the mini-wind technology through multi-criteria evaluation methods and determining the amount of electrical energy to be generated; Finally, in the third phase, an analysis of results is carried out that covers different scenarios evaluated according to indicators such as the electricity consumption to be replaced, the quantification of avoided emissions and an economic analysis.

Acknowledgements: Project PID2021-126082OB-C22 funded by MICIU/AEI/10.13039/501100011033 and FEDER, EU

How to cite: Gil García, I. C., Fernández Guillamón, A., Ramos Escudero, A., and Molina García, Á.: The exploitation of resources created by human beings, an additional alternative for reducing emissions, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-1601, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-1601, 2024.

14:15–14:25
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EGU24-20832
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Lavin (Zahra) Jafaripour and Andrew Lyden

As the global movement towards energy system decarbonisation gains traction, electrifying heating systems will emerge as a pivotal approach to reduce carbon emissions in the residential sector. Electrification promises a substantial reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, improved energy efficiency, and enhanced integration of renewable energy sources. Furthermore, electrified heating systems offer flexibility through demand response mechanisms, contributing to grid stability and resilience.

The challenges of electrifying heating systems are multifaceted, encompassing technical, economic, and societal dimensions. Technical challenges include addressing the intermittency of renewable energy sources, upgrading existing infrastructure, and ensuring grid reliability. Economic challenges involve the costs associated with technology adoption, potential impacts on energy bills, and financial considerations for both consumers and utilities. Societal challenges entail managing the transition for workers in traditional heating industries, addressing potential energy poverty concerns, and fostering public acceptance. Alongside these challenges, the transition to electrified heating has the potential to substantially influence the optimal design of the electricity market. The increased demand for electricity, particularly during peak heating periods, necessitates strategic modifications to market structure and operational frameworks. While there are numerous advantages and improvements associated with this transition, a comprehensive understanding of the impacts of the electrification of heating within the electricity market is currently lacking.

The main goal of this paper is to assess the advantages and challenges associated with electrifying heating systems, and potential changes that will take place in the electricity market as a consequence of this electrification. Through an extensive literature review, this paper seeks to contribute valuable insights for the development of strategies and policies aimed at fostering a sustainable and resilient electricity market, particularly in the evolving landscape of heating technologies.This study lays the groundwork for additional investigation into the complex relationship between heating electrification and the changing electricity market, providing important information for sustainable energy transitions.

 

How to cite: Jafaripour, L. (. and Lyden, A.: Electric Heat Revolution: Navigating the Landscape of the Future Electricity Market, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-20832, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-20832, 2024.

14:25–14:35
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EGU24-14604
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Magnus de Witt

Fossil fuels are the most common energy source for electricity generation among remote Arctic communities. Around 80% of remote Arctic communities are predominantly dependent on fossil fuels. Even if some of the region's raw oil is extracted, the processed diesel must be imported. Transport is complicated and strongly dependent on weather conditions. The harsh Arctic weather conditions make fuel transportation is complex, risky, and costly, leading to an insecure primary energy supply and high fuel prices. For many inhabitants of remote Arctic communities, the high energy costs are a significant cost burden because unemployment, temporary jobs, and a resulting low income are common issues.

This presentation will focus on implementation strategies for renewable energy sources into the energy mix or remote Arctic communities, with the aim of lowering the energy cost burden. System dynamics (SD) was used as a methodology to analyze the implementation process. SD is a powerful tool to analyse complex systems with non-linear relationships, as it is expected to find them among the policy strategies for energy transition. Investing in renewable energy technology is a high-risk investment; therefore, the effects of such an investment must be well studied to gain an optimal result. Furthermore, remote communities are often facing financial issues, which limits investments in energy infrastructure. Therefore, the model is looking for affordable ways of investing in energy infrastructure. The model aims for a sustainable performance of the utility provider, whereas the electricity cost for the consumer can be lowered and the utility provider can perform well on a non-profit base.

The research indicates that renewables have a significant cost-saving potential. Despite all the positive effects, investment in renewables can be risky and a substantial commitment for small communities. Moreover, depending on the type of renewable energy source, there can be some environmental impact that must be considered as well. With a well-structured integration process, the most can be made out of the investment, which helps lower the energy cost burden even more.

How to cite: de Witt, M.: Energy transition modelling for Arctic off-grid communities, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-14604, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-14604, 2024.

14:35–14:45
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EGU24-18880
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On-site presentation
Nikolaos Papadimitriou, Ilias Fountoulakis, John Kapsomenakis, Antonis Gkikas, Stelios Kazadzis, Christos Spyrou, Kyriakoula Papachristopoulou, and Christos S. Zerefos

The utilization of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems is pivotal towards reducing carbon dioxide emissions within the global energy infrastructure. Climate change is expected to affect atmospheric parameters such as cloudiness and aerosol, which are key drivers for the amount of solar radiation reaching the ground thus modifying solar-based power generation.

In this study, we investigate the spatial and the temporal variability of PV plant energy output at the Eastern Mediterranean during the period 1950-2100, with respect to the corresponding changes of the shortwave downwelling solar radiation, aerosols, cloudiness, and near-surface air temperature, which are crucial for estimating the solar energy production. The trends of the aforementioned variables, obtained from the analysis of gridded data retrieved from climate model projections, particularly from the “Region 4: Europe (EURO)” domain of the Coordinate Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX). Aiming to achieve an optimal approximation of the changes in aerosol concentrations, we employed the CNRM-ALADIN63 Regional Climate Model (RCM) which interactively considers them. The boundary conditions are derived from projections of the CNRM-CERFACS-CM5 Global Climate Model (GCM) within the 5th phase of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), encompassing the historical period (1951-2005) and future scenarios (2006-2100) under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 2.6, 4.5, and 8.5. For the determination of the PV energy output, we performed numerical simulations with the Global Solar Energy Estimator (GSEE), considering as input values the downwelling solar radiation, air temperature, as well as the tilt, capacity, and orientation of the hypothetical solar panels. Data from the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) datasets are also used for the intercomparison of the modelled downwelling solar radiation. Our results are in line with the findings of previous studies that assessed such changes capable of causing surplus or deficit in relation to solar energy production. Furthermore, we show that changes can vary significantly on a regional level.

Nikolaos Papadimitriou would like to acknowledge funding for the participation at EMS2023 from the COST Action HARMONIA (International network for harmonization of atmospheric aerosol retrievals from ground based photometers), CA21119. The work has been also supported by the action titled “Support for upgrading the operation of the National Network for Climate Change (CLIMPACT II)”, funded by the Public Investment Program of Greece, General Secretary of Research and Technology/Ministry of Development and Investments.

How to cite: Papadimitriou, N., Fountoulakis, I., Kapsomenakis, J., Gkikas, A., Kazadzis, S., Spyrou, C., Papachristopoulou, K., and Zerefos, C. S.: Variability in solar based power generation at the Eastern Mediterranean, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-18880, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-18880, 2024.

14:45–14:55
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EGU24-3165
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On-site presentation
Andreas Efstratiadis and Georgia-Konstantina Sakki

The electricity market across Europe, which is key driver of energy systems, has been subject to structural changes in the last years, in order to favor the penetration of renewables and foster decarbonization. A substantial guiding principle was the establishment of the Target Model, configurating a new era of the energy as a trading product. The corollary of this is that the market price became more dependent on socioeconomic disturbances and highly unpredictable events, such as financial, geopolitical and health crises. As a consequence, the variability of electricity prices has been substantially increased across all scales (intra-day, seasonal and long-run). In order to embed this major facet of uncertainty within energy systems modelling, we introduce a generic stochastic simulation framework to represent the market dynamics as a random process across scales. Key challenge is capturing the behavior of electricity prices that are characterized by significant peculiarities, such as volatility and spikes, as well as double periodicity, across seasons and within the intraday cycle. Further challenges are induced by the limited statistical information under the Target Model structure, and the need to implement within the synthetic data abnormal yet persistent shifts, as observed during the recent energy crisis. To stress-test our methodology, we simulate the quite different statistical response of the electricity prices in Greece and Portugal – two countries with similar economic conditions, fiscal compliance, and financial sector development.

How to cite: Efstratiadis, A. and Sakki, G.-K.: Driving energy systems with synthetic electricity prices, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-3165, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-3165, 2024.

14:55–14:57
14:57–15:05
15:05–15:15
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EGU24-15312
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solicited
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Highlight
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Virtual presentation
Horst Schmidt-Boecking, Gerhard Luther, and Michael Düren

A new underwater pumped storage hydropower concept (U.PSH) is described that can store electric energy by using the high water pressure on the seabed or in deep lakes to accomplish the energy transition from fossil to renewable sources. Conventional PSH basically consists of two storage reservoirs (upper and lower lake) at different topographical heights. It needs special topographic conditions, which are only limitedly available in mountain regions. Furthermore, due to the lack of acceptance and the environmental impact, new conventional PSH projects are very unlikely to be built in larger numbers in Europe in the near future. The presented solution solves these issues by placing the storage system on the seabed, thus having other geographical requirements. It operates as follows: in contrast to well-known conventional PSH plants, which use two separated water reservoirs of different heights, the U.PSH concept uses the static pressure of the water column in deep waters by installing a hollow concrete sphere in deep water. Storage of electricity is achieved by using a reversible pump in the hollow sphere. Upon opening a valve, water flows into the sphere, driving a turbine/generator, thereby discharging the storage device. In order to re-charge, the water is pumped out of the sphere against the pressure of the surrounding water. The power and energy, respectively, are proportional to the surrounding water pressure at the seabed. The amount of energy stored depends on the water depth and the volume of the spheres. The spheres need a cable connection to the shore or to a close-by floating transformer station (e.g., an offshore wind plant). No other connections such as pipes are needed. The functional principle of this energy storage technology, its state of the art, its storage capacity and the shape and size of the required spheres are discussed in this paper.

 

How to cite: Schmidt-Boecking, H., Luther, G., and Düren, M.: Renewable Electric Energy Storage Systems by Storage Spheres on the Seabed of Deep Lakes or Oceans, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-15312, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-15312, 2024.

15:15–15:25
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EGU24-3947
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ECS
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On-site presentation
Tobias Schnepper, Michael Kühn, and Thomas Kempka

Experiences with open-pit mine flooding in German lignite mining regions show that hydrogeochemical processes can become critical ecological and economic factors for the realisation of Pumped Hydropower Storage (PHS) projects. Depending on sulphide and oxygen availability as well as buffering and dilution processes, acid mine drainage and increased sulphate and metal concentrations can have negative impacts on ecosystems and groundwater resources as well as the installed PHS infrastructure. As part of the ATLANTIS project, this study aimed to quantify changes in water composition in the lower storage reservoir resulting from PHS operation under different hydrogeochemical boundary conditions.

For the present parameter study, data sets on hydrochemistry, hydrogeology and morphology of flooded German lignite mines were used to develop a numerical hydrochemical reaction path modelling framework. The chemical calculations were realised with PHREEQC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 2013), while the input and output data were managed via the Python-based simulation framework and PHREEQPY (Müller, 2022). The implemented parallelised workflow made it possible to analyse and evaluate more than 12,000 parameter combinations for various hydrogeological baseline scenarios. The influencing factors considered in these scenarios include the initial flooding of the open-pit mines, source terms due to precipitation, groundwater inflow and surface run-off, mineral availability in the sediments and the pumping cycles between the lower and upper storage reservoirs of the PHS installation.

The simulation results show that the volume of water migrating between the lower reservoir and its adjacent aquifers during the pumping cycles is too small to influence the water quality of the reservoir on the short term. The long-term availability of buffer capacities in the reservoir and the present mine waste dumps determine the eventual development of acidic or pH-neutral mine water. Sulphate concentrations are mainly influenced by dilution processes, what underlines the relevance of considering additional source and sink terms. Depending on these as well as the availability of oxygen and quantities of sulphide present in the adjacent sediments, the time required to achieve a chemical equilibrium in the lower storage reservoir varies from a few weeks to several years.

In summary, the operation of pumped storage power installations in former open-pit lignite mines can be safely realised if sufficient acid buffer capacities are available and dilution through additional water in- and outflows is sufficiently high.

The present study has received funding from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel—2020, under grant agreement No. 101034022 (ATLANTIS).

Literature

Müller, M. (2022): PhreeqPy - Python Tools for PHREEQC. https://www.phreeqpy.com/. Last accessed on 09.01.2024.

Parkhurst, D. L., & Appelo, C. A. J. (2013). Description of input and examples for PHREEQC version 3—a computer program for speciation, batch-reaction, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical calculations. US geological survey techniques and methods, 6(A43), 497.

How to cite: Schnepper, T., Kühn, M., and Kempka, T.: Pumped hydropower storage operation in open-pit lignite mines does not compromise the pit lake and groundwater chemistry, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-3947, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-3947, 2024.

15:25–15:35
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EGU24-14403
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ECS
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Virtual presentation
Nasir Jehanzeb and Majid Ali

The energy transition from fossil fuels to clean energy is inevitable to limit climate change. Pumped storage hydropower can compensate for the balancing of load, provides various ancillary services, and integrates variable renewable energy in the grid. However, uncertainties such as market structure, long-term natural gas prices, variable renewable energy penetration, government incentives, and regulatory policy, making it difficult to develop a viable business case for new pumped storage hydropower project. This research article considers improving financial viability of new pumped storage hydropower project by reducing upfront capital cost by utilizing existing conventional hydropower resources and reducing pumping/charging costs by finding a potential site where a water stream reaches the upper reservoir directly. The fast-track, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly approach investigates the true potential of this configuration for the case study of 200 MW Paras pumped storage hydropower with integrated 300 MW Balakot conventional hydropower. The article considers numerous scenarios for both closed-loop and open-loop pumped storage hydropower and calculates the levelized cost of energy storage for all scenarios. The conclusion is that utilizing existing conventional hydropower resources and considering water stream entering directly into the upper reservoir decreases the overall levelized cost of energy storage from 13.73 to 11.77 US$ cents/kWh (14% decrease). Results of the levelized cost of energy storage can help experts, regulators, power producers, and investors realize the importance of pumped storage hydropower as a reliable, cost-effective, and sustainable energy storage technology to integrate variable renewable energy.

How to cite: Jehanzeb, N. and Ali, M.: Strategy to improve financial viability of pumped storage hydropower: Techno-economic analysis of pumped storage hydropower with existing conventional hydropower, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-14403, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-14403, 2024.

15:35–15:45
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EGU24-19423
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solicited
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Alexandre Presas, David Valentin, Pedro Diogo, Alexander Jung, Greco Moraga, Monica Egusquiza, and Eduard Egusquiza

Pumped Storage Hydro (PSH) serves as a significant contributor to the transition toward net zero emissions, primarily due to its capacity to store large amounts of energy with very high round trip efficiency (RTE). This is especially important given the volatility and unpredictability associated with the current energy mix, largely influenced by sources like wind and solar. Managing these fluctuations poses operational challenges for pumped storage schemes.

 Within the EU's XFLEX Hydro project, various developments and operational strategies have been tested in one of the largest Pumped Storage Units globally, aiming to enhance actual Pumped Storage flexibility services. This paper provides an overview of the effects of some of the most demanding operations, such as fast ramps, variations in power as pumps, and hydraulic short-circuit operations in the hydraulic and mechanical components of the Pumped Storage Plant.

How to cite: Presas, A., Valentin, D., Diogo, P., Jung, A., Moraga, G., Egusquiza, M., and Egusquiza, E.: Increasing the grid flexibility with unconventional operations in one of the largest Pumped Storage Units in EU: The tests of XFLEX Hydro in Frades II, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-19423, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-19423, 2024.

Posters on site: Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 | Hall X4

Display time: Fri, 19 Apr 08:30–Fri, 19 Apr 12:30
Chairpersons: David C. Finger, Rebecca Ellis, Thomas Kempka
Pumped Hydropower Storage sub-session
X4.139
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EGU24-4728
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ECS
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solicited
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Highlight
Emanuele Quaranta and Alberto Pistocchi

Water storage is a key element in the Water-Energy-Food-Ecosystem Nexus (WEFE Nexus). Water storage systems can be designed in different ways and for serving several purposes. Water storage is also associated to energy storage, when there are turbines that can produce energy (hydropower) from the stored water. More than 95% of the current energy storage in the European Union (EU), and worldwide, is stored in artificial reservoirs behind dams. In the EU there are 4491 large dams according to the ICOLD 2023 register of dams and 40% are for multiple uses. Overall, 48% of EU’s large dams are powered. The theoretical potential of energy storage Es in hydropower reservoirs (Es = k·h·V, V=reservoir volume in m3, h=head in m, k=coefficient for the units) is some tens of TWh in the EU. The theoretical potential so calculated is 9 TWh for pumped-hydropower storage (PHS) plants. However, the real technical storage capacity is much less than the theoretical one (1200 GWh in PHSs).

As the impacts of climate change have considerable effects on people and ecosystems, which are exacerbated by a rising demand for water due to population and economic growth, higher temperatures and decrease in precipitation in certain regions, water&energy storage capacity needs to increase in the future, and should consider the interdependence of water, energy and food security and ecosystems – water, soil, and land. In this contribution, the current state-of-the art of PHSs in the EU is discussed and the challenges are presented considering the recent developments at the European Commission and the results of the Clean Energy Technology Observatory. The sustainable development opportunities for PHS are discussed also considering the recent Horizon calls for projects launched by the European Commission and the ongoing discussions on water and energy storage needs, with focus on emerging technologies and strategies, e.g. sustainable refurbishment, digitalization, new electro-mechanical equipment and reservoir interconnection.

How to cite: Quaranta, E. and Pistocchi, A.: Water and energy storage in the European Union: current situation and future challenges, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-4728, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-4728, 2024.

X4.140
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EGU24-14751
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Highlight
Thomas Kempka, Priscilla Ernst, Krzysztof Kapusta, Nikolaos Koukouzas, Jaroslaw Darmosz, Christos Roumpos, and Tomas Fernandez-Steeger and the ATLANTIS project partners

Scheduled decommissioning of lignite mining in Europe requires innovative and economic strategies to support coal regions in transition. The R&D project ATLANTIS is funded by the European Research Fund for Coal and Steel and started in late 2021, aiming at an integrated feasibility assessment on transforming open-pit coal mines into hybrid energy storage projects. Hereby, repurposing of open-pit mines for hybrid pumped hydropower storage (HPHS) of excess energy from the electric grid and renewable sources available in the vicinity of open-pit mines in abandonment will contribute to the EU Green Deal, while increasing the economic value,

stabilising the regional job market and contributing to EU energy supply security. The main objective of ATLANTIS is the elaboration of a technical and economic feasibility study on HPHS in open-pit coal mines. The present contribution will provide insights into the R&D activities within the scope of the project. For that purpose, two target open-pit mines in Greece and Poland were investigated in detail, including analyses supported by geographic information systems (GIS) based on previously defined HPHS design criteria [1] as well as hydro(geo)logical, hydrochemical and geotechnical analyses. At the Polish Szczercow mine located in the Lodz Coal Basin a HPHS capacity of 350 MW can be realised with a hydraulic head difference of approximately 240 m, able to support even more than the currently planned build-out of about 250 MW renewable energy sources made up of wind and photovoltaic parks. A total capacity of 180 MW is feasible at the Kardia mine in the Ptolemais Basin in Greece, whereby the hydraulic head difference amounts to about 100 m. Here, a photovoltaic build-out of 1.2 GW is scheduled. Potential environmental impacts were addressed via an extended risk analysis, consisting of qualitative and quantitative and components integrated by means of feedback loops and supported by the experience of multidisciplinary experts in the fields of hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, geotechnics, mining engineering and socio-economics. Based on the findings of this assessment, mitigation measures for the high-ranked risks were defined and are already considered in the course of the specific mine abandonment processes. Dynamic economic models using day-ahead energy market data were implemented to optimise the HPHS operation and support decision making related to the operational modes. Furthermore, the results of the socio-economic footprint assessment undertaken highlight the regional benefits of the HPHS implementation as alternative to the previously envisaged restoration procedure. The elaborated feasibility study on HPHS in abandoned open-pit mines is a key contribution to the industrial partner’s decision making processes and further demonstrates the potentials for application of the project’s findings at the EU level.

 

[1] Krassakis, P., Karavias, A., Zygouri, E., Roumpos, C., Louloudis, G., Pyrgaki, K., Koukouzas, N., Kempka, T., Karapanos, D. (2023): GIS-Based Assessment of Hybrid Pumped Hydro Storage as a Potential Solution for the Clean Energy Transition: The Case of the Kardia Lignite Mine, Western Greece. Sensors, 23, 2, 593. https://doi.org/10.3390/s23020593

 

The present study has received funding from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel—2020, under grant agreement No. 101034022 (ATLANTIS).

How to cite: Kempka, T., Ernst, P., Kapusta, K., Koukouzas, N., Darmosz, J., Roumpos, C., and Fernandez-Steeger, T. and the ATLANTIS project partners: An interdisciplinary feasibility study on hybrid pumped hydropower storage of excess energy in open-pit coal mines, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-14751, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-14751, 2024.

X4.141
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EGU24-16405
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ECS
Priscilla Ernst and Thomas Kempka

Decommissioning of lignite mines in the course of phasing-out electric power generation from fossil fuels in the European Union (EU) is one of the strategic key pillars to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions by 55% compared to the 1990 levels until 2030, and achieving climate-neutrality by 2050. Germany’s emission reduction targets are even more ambitious with 65% and 88% scheduled for 2030 and 2040, respectively.

Repurposing phasing-out open-pit lignite mines into Hybrid Pumped Hydropower Storage (HPHS) installations for excess energy from the electric grid and renewable sources contributes not only to the EU Green Deal and EU energy supply security, but additionally increases the regional economic value and stabilises the job market. Pumped hydropower is well established for storing excess energy from the electric grid and for load balancing with a total installed capacity of 7.89 GW in Germany and a current total share of 78.6% in the energy storage sector. Total round-trip efficiencies of up to 85% and extraordinary high storage capacities compared to battery-based solutions can be realised. Another advantage of implementing the technology in former open-pit mines is that costs of constructing the two required storage reservoirs are significantly reduced due to the presence of the open-pit hole. Multiple open-pit lignite mines were closed in Germany in the past decades, and nine are expected to cease operation by 2038.

Several studies assessing the potentials for PHS based on existing reservoirs have been undertaken, but these do not yet consider the additional potentials of open-pit mines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential theoretical and technical power production and storage capacities becoming available by repurposing open-pit mines into HPHS installations. For that purpose, a database of German open-pit lignite mines was established. An analytical model was employed to determine the power production and storage capacities of 34 German open-pit lignite mines, of which 13 meet the previously defined site selection criteria. The results of the present study show that the currently installed energy storage potentials in Germany can be extended by additional 1.42 GW (increase by >18%), increasing the installed PHS capacity by 22.9% at the same time. These findings are essential to guide policy and decision makers involved in the German and EU energy transition. The methodology will be extended to member states of the European Union in the next step.

The present study has received funding from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel—2020, under grant agreement No. 101034022 (ATLANTIS).

How to cite: Ernst, P. and Kempka, T.: Pumped hydropower storage in open-pit mines can provide substantial contributions to the EU energy transition – a case study for Germany, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-16405, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-16405, 2024.

X4.142
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EGU24-10643
Christopher Otto, Priscilla Ernst, Christos Roumpos, Georgios Louloudis, Eleni Mertiri, and Thomas Kempka

A dynamic techno-economic simulation model was developed in the present study to assess the capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX) as well as economic benefits of a prospective Hybrid Pumped Hydropower Storage (HPHS) installation to be realised in a Greek open-pit coal mine. HPHS is not only limited to store excess energy produced by local renewable energy sources, i.e. photovoltaic and wind farms, but can also be applied to store of excess energy from the grid. The model accounts for losses incurring while charging the upper reservoir with water when excess energy from renewables and the electric grid is available as well as discharging the upper reservoir for electricity generation when the national electricity demand exceeds the energy provided by the grid. A charging and discharging scheme for the HPHS installation was dynamically calibrated by means of historic energy market data, including time-dependent national energy balances and electric grid costs. Revenues, expenditures and profits of the prospective HPHS implementation were calculated, and the key economic parameters Net Present Value (NPV), Internal Rate of Return (IRR) and Discount Payback Period (DPP) determined to account for the overall system profitability during its’ entire operational time. The model’s technical implementation and applicability for system performance optimisation are discussed in detail, especially in view of a profit-maximising energy storage scheme, which was developed and applied to stochastic grid cost development predictions to account for the HPHS installation’s potential future benefits. The model can be integrated with online real-time data to economically schedule HPHS operation in highly dynamic energy systems.

The present study has received funding from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel—2020, under grant agreement No. 101034022 (ATLANTIS).

How to cite: Otto, C., Ernst, P., Roumpos, C., Louloudis, G., Mertiri, E., and Kempka, T.: Economics of hybrid pumped hydropower storage in open-pit coal mines: a case study for the Greek energy market, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-10643, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-10643, 2024.

X4.143
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EGU24-18817
Mariusz Kruczek, Krzysztof Kapusta, Thomas Kempka, Priscilla Ernst, Nikolaos Koukouzas, Jaroslaw Darmosz, Christos Roumpos, and Tomas Fernandez-Steeger and the and the ATLANTIS project partners

The transformation of coal regions into sustainable energy landscapes is a strategic aspect of the European Union's initiatives. This article is dedicated to the socio-economic impact of establishing hybrid pumped hydro storage (HPHS) systems in transitioning open-pit coal mines. The solutions analyzed are part of the ATLANTIS project, which aims to utilize the unique regional benefits these areas offer for HPHS implementation.

These coal regions, currently undergoing transformation, present distinct advantages for HPHS system deployment. Their existing infrastructure, coupled with the potential for integration with renewable energy sources, makes them ideal sites for sustainable energy projects. The ATLANTIS project enables the identification and assessment of these attributes to maximize both economic and socio-economic benefits, enhancing the value of these regions beyond their traditional mining roles.

A crucial element of this research is the quantification of the enhanced socio-economic footprint resulting from the HPHS system implementation. This includes a detailed analysis of how repurposing former coal mines into energy storage facilities can lead to broader economic revitalization and socio-economic development. The study examines the potential for job creation, stimulation of local economies, and overall improvement in community well-being.

By utilizing a comprehensive approach that incorporates regional economic, demographic, and market data, this article offers a holistic view of the socio-economic benefits of HPHS systems. It aims to provide valuable insights to policymakers, energy sector stakeholders, and affected communities, underscoring the potential of repurposed mining landscapes in the transition towards a more sustainable energy future.

The present study has received funding from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel—2020, under grant agreement No. 101034022 (ATLANTIS). 

How to cite: Kruczek, M., Kapusta, K., Kempka, T., Ernst, P., Koukouzas, N., Darmosz, J., Roumpos, C., and Fernandez-Steeger, T. and the and the ATLANTIS project partners: Analysis of socio-economic footprint for hybrid pumped hydropower storage of excess energy in open-pit coal mines, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-18817, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-18817, 2024.

X4.144
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EGU24-17781
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ECS
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Ershad Ud Dowlah Pahlowan, Anika Braun, and Tomas Manuel Fernandez-Steeger

In Europe's move towards decarbonization, renewable energy emerges as a key player, with its swift expansion crucial for cutting carbon emissions. Addressing the modern energy scenario, an innovative energy storage solution: transforming abandoned open-pit mines into large-scale facilities using pumped-hydro power storage (PHS) technology. This system operates by elevating water during periods of low demand and releasing it to produce electricity when demand peaks, mirroring the function of traditional hydropower plants.

 

A significant hurdle in this transformation is the initial flooding of the mine pit to form the lower reservoir of the PHS system. This phase is marked by complex geotechnical challenges, especially in terms of mine slope stability, influenced by the difference in water head between the groundwater and the reservoir. A key aspect is to ensure an effective hydraulic head, particularly when the upper reservoir is positioned in areas with minimal head difference from the lower reservoir. Our approach revolves around managing the head difference between lake water and groundwater effectively, safeguarding mine slope stability for PHS operations. To achieve this, we compare two different approaches to maintaining the head difference between lake water and groundwater and assess the slope stability for different stages of flooding using the Limit Equilibrium Method (LEM). These approaches are aimed at refining the hydraulic head difference, thereby maximizing the energy generation capacity and promoting efficient, sustainable energy solutions, while ensuring safe operation in terms of slope stability.

How to cite: Pahlowan, E. U. D., Braun, A., and Fernandez-Steeger, T. M.: Stability of abandoned pit slopes - how groundwater and lake water control may support safety while flooding, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-17781, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-17781, 2024.

X4.145
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EGU24-6474
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ECS
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Mikołaj Ostraszewski, Jakub Jurasz, and Bartosz Kaźmierczak

The energy transition faces key challenges, including enhancing energy storage potential due to renewable energy sources' intermittency and repurposing abandoned coal mines. An approach that addresses both of these problems comprehensively is the concept of using mine pits and mine spoil heaps as sites for the location of Pumped Hydro Energy Storage (PHES). Poland, as one of European Union's member states and one of the most coal-dependent countries in Europe, is also obliged to fulfil postulates related to the transformation of electricity system. This work focuses on use of the Bełchatów Lignite Mine (KWB-B) for construction of PHES plant. It was assumed that the pits would take over a role of lower reservoir, while heaps could be used as upper reservoirs. This should be accomplished through appropriate earthworks, construction and prior analysis in terms of soil bearing capacity. In our work GIS tools have been used to determine key parameters of the PHES system, which are reservoir volumes, usable head and land slopes. The energy losses associated with required length of a penstock have been determined for each alternative. The Colebrook-White formula has been used to calculate a pressure height losses in the pipelines. In next step, another factor affecting reduction in energy efficiency has been determined, which is a loss of water from the upper reservoir through evaporation. The evaporation model has been created based on Penman-Monteith equation, which combines water evaporation related to aerodynamics and solar radiation. Finally, process of filling the reservoirs has been analysed, which under spontaneous groundwater filling conditions is estimated to take up to 60 years. For this reason, the concept presented in this study assumes additional reservoir recharge from the Warta River, around 29 kilometres away.  According to the results of the analysis done, in the most realistic scenarios, an energy storage potential is between 16.4 and 36.2 GWh per cycle, operating at around 75% efficiency, producing between 9.7 and 13.7 TWh of electricity per year, which is around 45% of the energy produced annually by the nearby Bełchatów lignite-fired power plant. The proposed concept enables 2,5-5,5-fold increase of the closed loop PHES storage capacity in Poland. With plans to phase out this lignite-fired power plant by 2036, development of a hybrid renewable energy source is a promising alternative that could be implemented in this area, especially if the filling of reservoirs would be accelerated through additional supply from nearby rivers.

How to cite: Ostraszewski, M., Jurasz, J., and Kaźmierczak, B.: Transforming Coal Pits into Renewable Energy Sources: The Potential of Pumped Hydro Energy Storage in the Bełchatów Lignite Mine, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-6474, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-6474, 2024.

Energy System Modelling Sub-Session
X4.146
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EGU24-8940
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ECS
Ivana Stepanovic, Steven Frigerio, Bjarnhéðinn Guðlaugsson, and David Finger

Energy harvesters (EH) are devices designed to capture and convert mechanical energy from ambient sources, which can be converted into electrical energy employing piezoelectric materials. Energy harvesters can capture and convert energy from vortex-induced vibrations in water flows such as water piping, open channels, and natural streams. Harvested energy can be used or stored to power small electronic components such as wireless sensors. These renewable and environmentally friendly energy sources present a tremendous opportunity for clean, reliable off-grid energy production. In the EU–funded project H-HOPE (https://h-hope.eu/), energy harvesters are being designed and deployed for various environments to improve and enhance water and energy resilience. In Reykjavik, Iceland, EH can be implemented in geothermal pipes, providing energy for a sensor network in volcanically active areas where traditional powered sources may be unavailable. In Izmir, Turkey, EH can be implemented in the water supply systems, offering reliable electricity for monitoring drinking water quality. In Padova, Italy, EH can be installed in sewage systems, providing electricity for continuous water quality monitoring. In natural streams like fjords (West Fjords, Iceland) and lagoons (Venice, Italy), EH might be upscaled to power remote communities. However, the perceived potential for EH by local energy stakeholders is unknown. To address this, we conducted semi-structured interviews and expert surveys with relevant stakeholder groups to assess the perceived opportunities and challenges of implementing EH in the mentioned case studies. Preliminary results are visualized in causal diagrams, identifying positive and negative feedback loops of stakeholder perceptions. This analysis identifies both enablers and barriers to EH implementation. These findings will be used to develop a strategy for energy and water service providers to enhance the resilience of existing water and energy infrastructure across Europe and assess the potential uptake and validation of such technology by stakeholders.

How to cite: Stepanovic, I., Frigerio, S., Guðlaugsson, B., and Finger, D.: Mapping the perceived potential of energy harvesters to increase the resilience of European water and energy infrastructure , EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-8940, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-8940, 2024.

X4.147
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EGU24-4087
Centrifugal pumps energy efficiency examining influential parameters contribution
(withdrawn)
Mohammad Kordmahin and Shima Ebrahimghorbani
X4.148
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EGU24-2257
Influence of Impeller Design Parameters and Manufacturing Process on the Centrifugal Pump Energy Efficiency
(withdrawn)
Sima Kord Mahin and Mostafa Hajizadeh
X4.149
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EGU24-19151
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Joseph Day, Grant Wilson, and Daniel Donaldson

Electrification of presently fossil fuel-based heating and transport is recognised as a likely pathway to a net-zero energy system. However, this vector shifting will involve a significantly increased demand on the electrical network. Therefore, it is important to understand the geography of the electrical network in order to accurately anticipate where these extra demands will occur and their impact on peak demand, to in turn determine if network reinforcement or other flexibility solutions would be required.

The area served by the same piece of electrical infrastructure, such as a medium voltage substation (also known as a primary) can be visualised by a polygon drawn around all the properties which are normally connected to that substation. This is a valuable addition to the energy data landscape which can enable analysis of local area-based decarbonisation scenarios. For the first time, our research group has compiled the shapefiles from the six separate regional Distribution Network Operator companies in Great Britain, into a single map and made the data available for public download on Zenodo (it has been downloaded over 150 times as of January 2024)[1].  The methods of deriving these boundaries also differ by region (most use a Voronoi polygon algorithm), so they are critically contrasted.

The main benefit of opening this data is to allow the open modelling community and other stakeholders to conduct their own analysis and develop use cases with a geographical unit (the primary substation) which is relevant to the energy network, rather than an administrative or political boundary for which lots of energy datasets are currently aggregated to. In one example of these use cases, we have used open government data on annual domestic energy consumption to determine the mean domestic gas consumption for each of the 4436 primary substations in Great Britain, and place them in a decile. This gives insight into the scale of energy required to be provided through that part of the electrical network rather than the gas network, should heat be electrified to varying degrees. As a fundamental dataset and combined with network monitoring data, our output could ultimately enable advanced models such as digital twins, with applications for near and long-term energy forecasting could be used for system planning.


[1] https://zenodo.org/records/8335354

How to cite: Day, J., Wilson, G., and Donaldson, D.: Mapping the service areas of Great Britain's electrical infrastructure for whole systems energy decarbonisation, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-19151, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-19151, 2024.

X4.150
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EGU24-6199
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ECS
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Highlight
Floating solar power potential for the Alto Adige region of Italy
(withdrawn)
Pranav Dhawan, Daniele Dalla Torre, Andrea Menapace, and Maurizio Righetti
X4.151
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EGU24-15490
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ECS
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Highlight
Tristan Pelser, Maximilian Hoffmann, Jann Michael Weinand, Patrick Kuckertz, and Detlef Stolten

The evaluation of renewable energy potentials is growing in importance across multiple sectors, including in energy planning, industry, research, and policymaking. Despite the abundance of research into regional-scale wind and solar potentials, the lack of reproducibility and transparent workflows consistently challenges validity. Typically, various steps in renewable energy potential assessments are conducted separately, often employing various software tools. For example, data processing may be conducted in a python environment, whereas land eligibility analysis utilizes Geographic Information System (GIS) software, and wind or solar simulations rely on specialized power simulation software. This fragmentation, as well as a general trend of not making data and code openly available, impedes efficiency, and hampers scientific reproducibility and transparency. Our research introduces a novel, Python-based open-source workflow to address this issue, which employs a pipeline management module (Luigi) for handling tasks and dependencies, and Docker to facilitate deployment. The Renewable Energy workFLOW (REFLOW) encompasses the entire process of potential assessments, from data acquisition to result validation, including critical steps like land eligibility assessment, explicit turbine placement, and wind or solar simulation. The workflow’s modular nature allows for integration of various software modules and methodologies, enhancing its adaptability to various scenarios. REFLOW can be executed in multiple operating systems and requires no significant programming knowledge. We demonstrate REFLOW’s capabilities for a wind power potential assessment of the North Sea region, conducting ocean eligibility exclusions, explicit turbine placings, and a simulation of wind power generation for a period of ten years, using data from the ERA-5 reanalysis and Global Wind Atlas. The entire workflow is fully reproducible, including all data acquisition and processing steps. Thus, REFLOW constitutes a significant step towards versatile yet reproducible renewable potential analyses.

How to cite: Pelser, T., Hoffmann, M., Weinand, J. M., Kuckertz, P., and Stolten, D.: REFLOW: An Open-Source Workflow for Renewable Energy Potentials, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-15490, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-15490, 2024.

X4.152
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EGU24-22348
Fateme Dinmohammadi and Mahmood Shafiee

The residential buildings are responsible for approximately one-quarter of the world’s energy consumption and they play an important role in mitigating global climate change [1]. To improve energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions in the residential building sector, it is necessary to predict the energy consumption and thermal comfort under urban climate change. Nowadays, a large number of IoT sensors, smart devices, and controllers are employed in residential buildings to collect data in a real time and seamless way [2]. Emerging digital technologies such as digital twins and artificial intelligence (AI) have proven to be a powerful tool to provide dynamic, reliable, robust, and agile models for predicting and monitoring the energy consumption and air pollutant emission levels in industrial sectors. However, digital twins have received very little attention in the residential building sector [3]. The main aim of this study is to design and prototype a digital twin system for thermal comfort monitoring, visualization, tracking, energy management, prediction, and optimization in residential buildings under different indoor and outdoor conditions. Our digital twin model is built on the basis of a thermodynamic model incorporating building attributes such as heating methods, wall materials, etc. with real-time sensor and IoT information updates to deliver precise predictive foresight and also determine the different indoor and outdoor factors contributing the most to residential heating energy consumption and thermal comfort. The digital twin model will be tested on a dataset containing sensor data, building attribute features, and weather records during five heating seasons of residential buildings in a city in Russia that was published for the first time in 2020 by IEEE DataPort [4].

References

[1] United Nations Environment Programme (2020), The 2020 global status report for building and construction: Towards a zero-emission, efficient and resilient buildings and construction sector. https://globalabc.org/sites/default/files/inline-files/2020%20Buildings%20GSR_FULL%20REPORT.pdf.

[2] Dinmohammadi, F., Wilson, D. Understanding the End-Users and Technical Requirements for Real-Time Streaming Data Analytics and Visualisation, In: 26th International Conference on Automation and Computing (ICAC), 02-04 September 2021, Portsmouth, UK.

[3] Dinmohammadi, F., Han, Y., Shafiee, M. Predicting Energy Consumption in Residential Buildings Using Advanced Machine Learning Algorithms, Energies 16 (9), 3748.

[4] Zorin, P.; Stukach, O. Data of Heating Meters from Residential Buildings in Tomsk (Russia) for Statistical Modeling of Thermal Characteristics of Buildings. Published on 5 October 2020. Available online: https://ieee-dataport.org/documents/data-heating-meters-residential-buildings-tomsk-russia-statistical-modeling-thermal.

How to cite: Dinmohammadi, F. and Shafiee, M.: A Digital Twin for Energy Consumption Prediction and Thermal Comfort Monitoring in Residential Buildings, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-22348, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-22348, 2024.

Posters virtual: Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 | vHall X4

Display time: Fri, 19 Apr 08:30–Fri, 19 Apr 18:00
Chairpersons: Konstantina Pyrgaki, Bjarnhéðinn Guðlaugsson, Thomas Kempka
vX4.36
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EGU24-6138
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ECS
Pavlos Krassakis, Andreas Karavias, Evangelia Zygouri, Christos Roumpos, Georgios Louloudis, Konstantina Pyrgaki, Nikolaos Koukouzas, and Thomas Kempka

Energy supply security is currently a key priority for all European countries, and with a global push towards a decarbonized future, safe and reliable energy storage becomes vital. The European Union (EU) has introduced the European Green Deal, an initiative with the objective of achieving carbon neutrality by 2050, effectively reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to zero. As Europe shifts away from fossil fuels, renewable energy sources like solar, wind, and hydropower gain prominence. Hydropower, especially hybrid pumped hydropower storage (HPHS) of excess energy from the electric grid and renewable sources, can contribute to energy security. In this context, modern geospatial technologies can be utilized as promising tools at a preliminary phase by policymakers and stakeholders to support decision-making regarding the implementation of HPHS systems in terms of spatial development and design strategy. The Geographic Information System (GIS) approach can mitigate financial costs, environmental impacts, and exposure to potential hazards such as landslides, earthquakes, and floods. Additionally, advanced geospatial approaches can maximize energy storage by calculating the best-fit options according to the morphological properties of the landscape and the end-user requirements.

In the current work, selected criteria were defined and weighted based on topographic and proximity criteria, utilizing multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM), particularly the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). Regarding the abandoned Greek Kardia open-pit lignite mine, seven regions were identified and recognized as suitable for HPHS, with potential energy storage capacities ranging from 1.09 to 5.16 GWh [1]. The preliminary suitability of different areas within the mine boundaries was categorized, ranging from very low to very high scoring, providing a better understanding of the existing landscape's potential for HPHS implementation. The utilized methodology identified specific locations with the highest potential for constructing the upper reservoir of the envisaged HPHS system, introducing an innovative tool that can be applied to open pit mines globally.

The present study has received funding from the Research Fund for Coal and Steel—2020, under grant agreement No. 101034022 (ATLANTIS).

 

[1] Krassakis, P., Karavias, A., Zygouri, E., Roumpos, C., Louloudis, G., Pyrgaki, K., Koukouzas, N., Kempka, T., Karapanos, D. (2023): GIS-Based Assessment of Hybrid Pumped Hydro Storage as a Potential Solution 

How to cite: Krassakis, P., Karavias, A., Zygouri, E., Roumpos, C., Louloudis, G., Pyrgaki, K., Koukouzas, N., and Kempka, T.: An integrated GIS-based approach to support the implementation of Hybrid Pumped Hydro Storage in the abandoned Kardia open-pit lignite mine, Western Greece, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-6138, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-6138, 2024.

vX4.37
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EGU24-6875
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ECS
Chukwumaobi Kingsley Oluah, Howard.O. Njoku, and Valentine Ekechukwu

Climate change has intensified the scarcity of available drinking water, posing a critical challenge to communities, particularly in rural Africa. In response to this pressing issue, our study investigates the transient behavior of a multi-storey solar still as a sustainable solution. The research focuses on harnessing the latent heat of vaporization from the first stage to heat subsequent stages, utilizing pre-heated water from a reservoir. Mathematical models for each stage were developed, and the Numerical modeling of the system was carried out using the finite-forward discretization scheme on Scilab software. Insolation data for Nsukka (Lat = 6.8567, Lon= 7.3958) were extracted from NASA-SSC Database. Results showcase the temperature distribution and distillate output at each stage. The first stage reached an optimal temperature of 325K, while the second and third stages maintained averages of 322K and 319K, respectively. Distillate outputs for the first, second, and third stages were 7.5Kg, 5.7Kg, and 3.8Kg, respectively. An overall still efficiency of 16% was achieved, hence the multi-story solar still presents a promising avenue to address the water scarcity challenges faced by vulnerable rural communities in Africa.

How to cite: Oluah, C. K., Njoku, H. O., and Ekechukwu, V.: Numerical modeling of a multi-storey solar still in transient mode, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-6875, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-6875, 2024.