EOS3.1 | Promoting and supporting equality, diversity and inclusion in the geosciences
EDI
Promoting and supporting equality, diversity and inclusion in the geosciences
Co-organized by AS6/BG1/GM12/SSS1, co-sponsored by AGU and JpGU
Convener: Claudia Jesus-Rydin | Co-conveners: Pallavi Anand, Alberto Montanari, Hori, S. Rie, Billy Williams
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
Following the success of previous years, this session will explore reasons for the under-representation of different groups (gender identities, sexual orientations, racial and cultural backgrounds, abilities, religions, nationality or geography, socioeconomic status, ages, career stages, etc.) by welcoming debate among scientists, decision-makers and policy analysts in the geosciences.

The session will focus on both obstacles that contribute to under-representation and on best practices and innovative ideas to remove those obstacles. Contributions are solicited on the following topics:

- Role models to inspire and further motivate others (life experience and/or their contributions to promote equality)
- Imbalanced representation, preferably supported by data, for awards, medals, grants, high-level positions, invited talks and papers
- Perceived and real barriers to inclusion (personally, institutionally, culturally)
- Recommendations for new and innovative strategies to identify and overcome barriers
- Best practices and strategies to move beyond barriers, including:
• successful mentoring programmes
• networks that work
• specific funding schemes
• examples of host institutions initiatives
- COVID-related data, discussions and initiatives

This session is co-organised with the EGU early career scientists (ECS) and the European Research Council (ERC).

Orals: Fri, 19 Apr | Room 1.15/16

The oral presentations are given in a hybrid format supported by a Zoom meeting featuring on-site and virtual presentations. The button to access the Zoom meeting appears just before the time block starts.
Chairpersons: Hori, S. Rie, Alberto Montanari
10:45–10:50
10:50–11:00
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EGU24-12182
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EOS3.1
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Sílvia Poblador, Maria Anton-Pardo, Mireia Bartrons, Xavier Benito, Susana Bernal, Eliana Bohorquez Bedoya, Miguel Cañedo-Argüelles, Núria Catalán, Isabel Fernandes, Anna Freixa, Ana Genua-Olmedo, Elisabeth León-Palmero, Anna Lupon, Clara Mendoza-Lera, Ada Pastor, Pablo Rodríguez-Lozano, Aitziber Zufiaurre, and María del Mar Sánchez-Montoya

The study of inland waters - Limnology - is full of fascinating women who have vastly contributed to our understanding of these valuable ecosystems. Although women’s visibility was low during the early years of Limnology, it has increased over time. Nowadays, women represent half of the early-career limnologists in Europe. However, as in many other fields, their scientific contributions have been traditionally neglected from schools to universities (i.e., the Matilda effect). The project “Gender LimnoEdu”, developed by the Gender&Science AIL group and funded by EGU (2020), aims to increase the visibility of women in Limnology and related subjects - such as Ecology, Hydrology or other Geosciences - in academic courses and lectures. We have created a set of online ready-to-use resources: (1) a self-evaluation form to detect gender biases and raise self-awareness for teachers of Limnology and Geosciences courses (the form is applicable to a wide range of courses and disciplines), (2) teaching nutshells highlighting key female limnologists (and their history) to help lecturers to acknowledge the role of women in Limnology in their courses, and (3) a complete teaching unit about the past and present situation of women in the field of Limnology. All these resources are freely available (https://www.genderlimno.org). Here, we will present this toolbox of resources and guide you on how to use them for your teaching needs. Moreover, we will share the preliminary results of the self-evaluation form to showcase how gender-fair Limnology lessons in high-education courses are. We welcome everybody to take it! https://www.genderlimno.org/gender-fair-lessons.html

How to cite: Poblador, S., Anton-Pardo, M., Bartrons, M., Benito, X., Bernal, S., Bohorquez Bedoya, E., Cañedo-Argüelles, M., Catalán, N., Fernandes, I., Freixa, A., Genua-Olmedo, A., León-Palmero, E., Lupon, A., Mendoza-Lera, C., Pastor, A., Rodríguez-Lozano, P., Zufiaurre, A., and Sánchez-Montoya, M. M.: Is my teaching gender-fair? A self-assessment questionnaire., EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-12182, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-12182, 2024.

11:00–11:10
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EGU24-9435
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EOS3.1
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Diana Spieler, Lina Stein, and Rodolfo Nóbrega

Combining an academic career with caretaking responsibilities is an often-overlooked challenge. Juggling the workload, conference attendance, or the potential requirement to move to a new job all become more demanding when children or other caretaking responsibilities are a part of your life. We, members of the Young Hydrology Society (YHS), wanted to hear some views from academic parents in hydrology. What are the challenges they face, what is their advice to other parents and what systematic changes would they like to see? This non-scientific initiative gathered responses from academics within the hydrology community from different parts of the world at different career stages, including PhD candidates, postdoctoral researchers, assistant professors, and group leaders. The survey revealed diverse challenges and strategies employed by academic parents to balance their professional and personal lives. We identified a complex interplay of personal, institutional, and cultural factors that influence these experiences in academia. A common theme across responses was the strategic timing of parenthood, often aligned with phases of planning security, such as after having won a longer-term grant. Despite the varying international backgrounds, many responses highlighted the supportive role of national policies, particularly in countries like Sweden, which offer substantial parental support and flexible work arrangements. However, challenges such as reduced research productivity, lack of support to attend conferences, and the need to relocate were frequently mentioned as limiting factors for career development and progression. Among the strategies employed to minimise these challenges, we highlight adjusting work schedules, reducing workloads, and relying on support from partners and extended family. Childcare distribution varied, with many striving for an equitable split between partners, though this was often influenced by career demands and cultural standards or expectations. The responses also contained suggestions for systemic improvement, including extended childcare facilities at conferences, more flexible job contracts, and institutional support for parents, particularly during fieldwork and conferences. While there are notable advancements in some areas, there remains a significant need for systemic changes to better support academic parents and ensure a more inclusive and equitable academic environment. It is fundamental to highlight, however, that the results of this initiative do not capture the entire spectrum of experiences faced by those with caretaking responsibilities, and that our survey is likely to be biased towards ECS who still were engaged and successful in their work. We aim to release these results as a series of blog posts on the YHS webpage (https://younghs.com/blog/) to disseminate this topic with the main aim of offering valuable reassurance to current and future parents in academia facing similar challenges.

How to cite: Spieler, D., Stein, L., and Nóbrega, R.: Navigating parenthood as an early career scientist: insights and challenges from hydrological sciences, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-9435, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-9435, 2024.

11:10–11:20
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EGU24-11929
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EOS3.1
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Luka Vucinic, Viviana Re, Barbara Zambelli, Theresa Frommen, Fatima Ajia, and Shrikant Limaye

The International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) is a scientific and educational charitable organisation for scientists, engineers, water managers and other professionals working in the fields of groundwater resources planning, management and protection. Comprising various commissions and networks, IAH engages in activities such as contributing to groundwater science, outreach, education, and training. While IAH takes meaningful steps towards equity, diversity, inclusion, and accessibility, recognising the importance of putting these principles into practice, it is essential to acknowledge that there are still numerous challenges and barriers that need to be addressed. It is worth noting that IAH shares similar challenges with many other organisations and associations in navigating the path towards greater equity, diversity, and inclusion. Therefore, the establishment of a dedicated working group became imperative to address and overcome these challenges effectively.

The Socio-Hydrogeology Network (IAH-SHG), an official IAH network, aims to integrate social sciences into hydrogeological research, and has two active working groups: the Working Group on Groundwater and Gender, and the newly established Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Accessibility (EDIA) Working Group. This group is designed to further enhance the EDIA landscape within the IAH and beyond. It is the result of collaborative endeavours, extensive discussions, and productive meetings within the IAH and IAH-SHG, and it builds on the work and experience of the Working Group on Groundwater and Gender and the IAH-SHG in general. We will showcase the key insights gained from our IAH-SHG experiences and demonstrate how we applied these lessons to facilitate the establishment of the EDIA Working Group.

By harnessing the power of collective effort, the EDIA Working Group aims to foster a positive impact that resonates throughout the IAH and wider hydrogeological community. We will present our experience regarding the pivotal role of networks, such as IAH-SHG, in advancing equity, diversity, inclusion, and addressing barriers within the geosciences. We will also share our plans for collaboration with other IAH commissions, networks, IAH members, and other individuals (i.e. membership in the IAH is not a prerequisite for individuals interested in joining the IAH-SHG or any of its working groups), as well as ideas and recommendations for new and innovative strategies to identify and overcome barriers. Furthermore, we will share the EDIA Working Group's experience so far, providing insights that may be valuable for other associations, organisations, and groups facing similar challenges.

How to cite: Vucinic, L., Re, V., Zambelli, B., Frommen, T., Ajia, F., and Limaye, S.: Promoting and Supporting Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Accessibility: A Collaborative Approach in the Hydrogeological Community and Beyond, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-11929, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-11929, 2024.

11:20–11:30
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EGU24-9557
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EOS3.1
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On-site presentation
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Alice Lefebvre and Renée Bernhard

Conferences are places where intellectual and communication standards are shown. Ultimately, they can contribute to create a sense of belonging or inadequateness. However, several analyses of specific diversity measures have demonstrated that large conferences often lack diversity in terms of gender, geographic location or race. The present contribution presents an analysis of the gender, country of affiliation and student status of the participants and presenters during four instances of a small European geoscience conference, as well as the length of presentation and number and tone of questions of the latest instance of this conference. We found that women make up about one-third of participants, session chairs, invited keynote speakers, and presenters (oral and poster) on average, but percentages vary greatly from one year to the next. Students represent around 30% of participants, but over 40% of poster presenters and 28% of long presentations. In total, only half of the participants asked a question, and most of the questions were asked by senior men. Around 25% of the questions were asked with a friendly tone; the remainder were neutrally asked. Friendly questions were asked more frequently after keynote lectures and long presentations than following short talks. We suggest concrete actions that can be taken to promote the development of an inclusive and supportive environment at small conferences.

How to cite: Lefebvre, A. and Bernhard, R.: Diversity at a Small Geoscience Conference, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-9557, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-9557, 2024.

11:30–11:40
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EGU24-12643
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EOS3.1
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On-site presentation
Scott Jess, Emily Heer, and Lindsay Schoenbohm

Many universities openly pledge commitments to improving diversity, with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields receiving significant attention. Despite these efforts, geoscience remains one of the least diverse fields in STEM. This recognition has prompted an increase in studies stressing the systemic lack of representation across the field and the barriers that exist for those within. However, much of this work has been limited by the use of demographic datasets that have been either passively collected or derived from government sources. Constraints include country-specific data collection policies, failures to collect field-specific data, and the absence of additional information necessary for intersectional analysis. Advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in our field requires meaningful datasets that clearly identify social inequalities. Limited, incomplete, or anecdotal data are too easily dismissed by those in power, stalling constructive efforts.

In Canada, demographic data is not regularly collected at academic institutions and is seldom field-specific. This absence of data undermines efforts to identify the current state of diversity in the field and prioritise initiatives for improvement. Collecting comprehensive demographic data is a crucial step in determining whether progress is evident. It can also help to highlight areas of concern, especially in fields lacking in diversity, such as geoscience. To address this absence of data, we disseminated a 22-question demographic survey to 35 academic geoscience departments across Canada in late 2022.

We received 482 eligible responses to the survey, accounting for approximately 20% of the research population. Overall, men make up a slight majority across all respondents (53%), and the percentage of individuals who identify as white (73%) is greater than the national average (67%). Additionally, results shows that research students (MSc and PhD) are a diverse group, while salaried positions (postdoc, research staff and faculty) lack diversity in a wide range of categories including, gender, race, LGBTQ+, Indigeneity, and disability. Moreover, tenured positions are overwhelmingly occupied by white men, with racial inequalities prominent in the data.

These data highlight several areas of concern in the academic career path. The transition from research student to salaried research remains a clear area of concern, while the tenure process appears to continually favour white able-bodied cisgender men. Moreover, the representation of Indigenous persons and those with self-identified disabilities remains very low. Solutions require institutional changes to recruitment, tenure applications, postdoctoral hiring, field work design, and mentoring practices. Importantly, they also require changes to how we collect and analyse demographic datasets in geoscience, as a continued reliance on data that is passively collected or obtained from government sources will continue to limit our abilities to identify areas of concern and create effective strategies.

How to cite: Jess, S., Heer, E., and Schoenbohm, L.: Active demographic data collection in geoscience: results, implications, and recommendations from a survey of Canadian academia  , EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-12643, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-12643, 2024.

11:40–11:50
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EGU24-13028
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EOS3.1
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On-site presentation
Matthew Giampoala, Mia Ricci, and Paige Wooden

The American Geophysical Union understands an expansive and inclusive geoscience community is key to furthering knowledge about the Earth and the universe and finding solutions to current societal challenges. Though the geosciences have historically been dominated by a few homogenous groups, the collaborative and global nature of our science impels us to change our systems to include historically marginalized voices. Supported by AGU’s 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan, in 2023, AGU Publications signed the Joint Commitment for Action on Inclusion and Diversity in PublishingSignatories agree to collect self-reported gender and race/ethnicity data, develop baselines, and set minimum standards for inclusion. We provide a demographic overview of our authors, reviewers, and editors over time, detail how we collect data while following privacy laws, and discuss how data informs our DEIA strategies. We provide reports to our journal editors who set baselines and develop journal goals. We launched various initiatives to increase diversity and equity and decrease bias in peer review processes, and used the data to assess outcomes of these initiatives. In addition, we present examples of policy and structural changes we have implemented to weave DEIA in the scientific publishing environment, including our equitable approach to Open Access, our Community Science Exchange, and the recently launched Inclusion in Global Research policy to improve equity and transparency in research collaborations.

How to cite: Giampoala, M., Ricci, M., and Wooden, P.: Embedding EDI in Geoscience Publications – Examples from the AGU , EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-13028, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-13028, 2024.

11:50–12:00
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EGU24-17197
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EOS3.1
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ECS
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On-site presentation
Marina Cano, Iris van Zelst, and Hinna Shivkumar

Science Sisters is a YouTube interview series and podcast hosted by Dr. Iris van Zelst. Lighthearted in tone, it explores different career paths, academic life, and science communication in the planetary and geosciences. The majority of the guests on the episodes are female and/or non-white to show a diverse range of role models in STEM and celebrate women in science. Together with the guest, Iris goes into the highs and lows of being a researcher and discusses issues in academia, such as the lack of permanent jobs in science and sexism. So far, two seasons of Science Sisters have been produced with topics including ethical fieldwork, switching careers, science communication, postdoc life, leadership, women in science, job applications, postdoc hopping, outreach, publishing, feeling incompetent, astronaut training, toxic academia, and how to build a research group.

Here, we present the project and some of the choicest nuggets of wisdom from the guests about academic life and careers. We also discuss the production phase of the series, highlighting for instance the considerations that go into selecting topics and guests, and the postproduction phase of editing and uploading the videos.

In addition, we present how we use Science Sisters as a way to start conversations in our own institutes. We organise a parallel seminar series where we watch the premieres of the episodes live on YouTube and afterwards have a discussion on the episode topic with the episode guest attending online. This has resulted in a greater understanding of each other and more cohesion within the institute. Early career scientists in particular say that Science Sisters is extremely useful to learn about life as a researcher and they enjoy the chatty, entertaining quality of the interviews.

How to cite: Cano, M., van Zelst, I., and Shivkumar, H.: Science Sisters: Interviews with diverse role models on career paths and academic life, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-17197, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-17197, 2024.

12:00–12:10
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EGU24-20027
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EOS3.1
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On-site presentation
Aileen Doran, Victoria Dutch, Bridget Warren, Robert A. Watson, Kevin Murphy, Angus Aldis, Isabelle Cooper, Charlotte Cockram, Dyess Harp, Morgane Desmau, and Lydia Keppler

Over the last decade, the way we communicate and engage with one another has changed on a global scale. It is now easier than ever to network and collaborate with colleagues worldwide. But, the COVID-19 pandemic led to a rapid and unplanned move to virtual platforms, resulting in several accessibility challenges and the inadvertent exclusion of several people during online events. While virtual/hybrid events have strong potential to facilitate new opportunities and networks for everyone, they are also greatly positioned to increase the inclusion of groups traditionally excluded from purely in-person conferences. However, early and careful planning is needed to achieve this, with inclusion and accessibility considered from the start. Including a virtual element in a conference does not automatically equal inclusion or accessibility. Without effective planning, virtual and hybrid events will replicate many biases and exclusions inherent to in-person events.

This presentation will share lessons learned from previous events’ successes and failures, based on the combined experiences of several groups and individuals who have planned and run such events. This presentation is based on an EGU Sphere article, of the same title, that aims to provide guidance on planning online/hybrid events from an accessibility viewpoint based on the authors experiences. The goal of this presentation is to initiate discussion on event accessibility and inclusion and to help generate new ideas and knowledge from people outside of the authors network. Every event is unique and will require its own accessibility design, but early consideration is crucial to ensure everyone feels welcome and included. Our suggested accessibility considerations have been broken down into three stages of event planning: 1) Pre-event planning, 2) on the day/during the event, and 3) after the event.

Ensuring accessibility and inclusivity in designing and running virtual/hybrid events can help everyone engage more meaningfully, resulting in more impactful discussions including groups with limited access to in-person events. However, while this article is intended to act as a starting place for inclusion and accessibility in online and hybrid event planning, it is not a fully comprehensive guide. As more events are run, it is expected that new insights and experiences will be gained, helping to continually update standards.

How to cite: Doran, A., Dutch, V., Warren, B., Watson, R. A., Murphy, K., Aldis, A., Cooper, I., Cockram, C., Harp, D., Desmau, M., and Keppler, L.: Planning virtual and hybrid events: steps to improve inclusion and accessibility, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-20027, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-20027, 2024.

12:10–12:20
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EGU24-410
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EOS3.1
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Elena Päffgen, Leonie Esters, and Lisa Schielicke

Participation in (inter-) national conferences, seminars, and workshops such as the EGU General Assembly is important for professional exchange and personal networking, especially for early career scientists. Enabling scientists with family obligations to take part in conferences will increase gender equity and diversity, as women remain to be the main caregivers in most families.

The questions of family planning and kickstarting a professional career arise simultaneously in almost any field. What makes this particularly challenging for young families in academia is that this line of work frequently requires for parents to move, making traditional forms of supportive caregiving by extended family members often unavailable. The vital role conference attendance plays for an academic career only aggravates that challenge. Therefore, a lack of opportunities to attend conferences and workshops clearly puts young parents at a disadvantage, especially young women in academia.

The Project for Family-Friendly Conferences has been initiated by Leonie Esters and Lisa Schielicke from the Department of Geosciences at the University of Bonn in April 2023. Elena Päffgen joined as a research assistant (WHK) later the same year. With an initial duration of one and a half years the project is funded by the Gleichstellungsbüro (office for equal opportunities) of the university. Our principal goal is to find out, how conference and workshop participation can be made more family-friendly.

The present work analyses an online survey with 245 participants who were interviewed on the topic of family-friendly conferences. The survey was addressed to all scientists with a focus on geosciences, 58% of all participants claimed to have children, while 42% were childless. 61 comments expressing wishes and needs of parents and guardians we received from the participants underscore the urgency of the matter. Key concerns of the participants were clear communication (e.g., whether children could be brought along to the events in question), awareness among event-organizers, and easy access to financial assistance (e.g. for babysitting). For instance, more hybrid events, on-site childcare and designated family-friendly activities at conferences were named as possible improvements. However, considering that families and their challenges are diverse, a wide array of offers and flexibility are required to address their needs.

Our project aims to educate the wider academic community on family-specific challenges. Based on the results of this survey, we will provide conference organizers with guidelines to improve family-friendliness of conferences and facilitate their exchange among each other. Additionally, we want to keep parents informed about the offers for families that are already in place at conferences in our field of study. Overall, we are convinced that outcomes of our project will be beneficial for conference and workshop organizers likewise as for researchers who are parents and will contribute to gender equity and diversity in academia.

Children, parents and guardians are particularly welcome to the poster presentation and discussion.

If you would like to participate in our survey: https://www.empirio.de/s/VxLGGLxWv2

 

 

How to cite: Päffgen, E., Esters, L., and Schielicke, L.: Family-Friendly Conferences in the Geosciences, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-410, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-410, 2024.

12:20–12:30
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EGU24-18544
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EOS3.1
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ECS
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On-site presentation
Manon Verberne, Jana R. Cox, Frances E. Dunn, Merel Postma, and Tina Venema

Young Women of Geoscience (YWOG) is a group of young professionals (PhDs, postdocs, assistant professors and supporting staff) at Utrecht University with the aim to inspire, connect and support women and historically underrepresented groups in the field of geosciences, by creating an equal and inclusive working environment. We do this by opening up conversations and creating a safe and positive space for discussion. Now in our seventh year, the committee has established itself as a constant and stable presence within the faculty with regular events and initiatives that can easily be organized from our reputable base.

Our regular events consist of meet-and-greet sessions with senior staff members, that are well-attended by a variety of colleagues, which result in inspiring conversations. Additionally, book give-aways combined with book discussions are a recurring event, where books on diversity, inclusions and climate change are used to open conversations. These events often engage individuals who may not have initially identified with the committee's target audience, but afterwards their interest was sparked. In recent years we also organized successful events due to requests from staff members. Parenting during COVID was a successful online event with a panel discussion consisting of colleagues sharing tips and struggles. Additionally, this year we organized an event on pronouns, reaching a wide audience, from PhDs to supporting staff, professors and the faculty dean. It was also this session, with informative presentations and lively discussion, that led to immediate action from higher level staff on practical matters concerning pronouns in the workplace.

Our experience highlights the importance of a bottom-up approach in instigating meaningful change. The pronouns event is a prime example of this, opening the eyes of many attendees and making people feel the urgency for action. The event stemmed from a need within the faculty. However, to be able to organize such an event there must be a platform to do so. We have the opportunity to organize many events helped by funding through an Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) scheme and an internal award won by the committee. We aim to continue with the regular events like the meet-and-greets and book shares, and hope to organize more events that are based on the needs in the faculty to open conversations. YWOG's experience demonstrates the efficacy of a bottom-up approach, emphasizing the importance of diverse perspectives in fostering substantial changes toward a more inclusive working environment. The committee looks forward to sharing its experiences, connecting with other faculties and universities, and inspiring collective efforts to promote diversity and inclusion within geosciences.

How to cite: Verberne, M., Cox, J. R., Dunn, F. E., Postma, M., and Venema, T.: Time’s up, bottom-up! A successful bottom-up approach for diversity and inclusions at Utrecht University, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-18544, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-18544, 2024.

Posters on site: Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 | Hall X1

The posters scheduled for on-site presentation are only visible in the poster hall in Vienna. If authors uploaded their presentation files, these files are linked from the abstracts below, but only on the day of the poster session.
Display time: Wed, 17 Apr 08:30–Wed, 17 Apr 12:30
Chairpersons: Daniel Conley, Holly Stein
X1.62
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EGU24-16168
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EOS3.1
Claudia Jesus-Rydin, Luis Fariña-Busto, and Eystein Jansen

The European Research Council (ERC), Europe’s premiere funding agency for frontier research, views equality of opportunities as an essential priority and a vital mission to ensure fairness in the review process. The ERC monitors various demographic data yearly on every call and has taken actions to tackle imbalances and potential implicit and explicit biases.

The presentation focuses on ERC general historical data for the three individual funding schemes: Starting Grant, Consolidator Grant and Advanced Grant. Demographic geosciences data of proposals and grants, disaggregated by gender and country, is presented. After more than 14 years of existence and various specific actions to tackle societal imbalances, ERC data provides an insight of the impact of various actions.

In the first framework programme (FP7, 2007-2013), 25% of applicants were women. In the last years (Horizon 2020, 2014-2020), this percentage increased by 4%, with 29% of women applying for ERC grants. In the same periods of time, the share of women as grantees has also increased from 20% to 29%. In the last years, men and women enjoy equal success rates (data for non-binary applicants is also presented).

The most recent actions taken by the ERC to address gender and diversity (including disabilities and neo-colonialism) in its operations and processes are also presented.

The ERC knows that work to ensure inclusive excellence and equality of opportunities is never-ending. This presentation analyses the institutional efforts critically and discusses possible steps to consolidate the accomplished results.

How to cite: Jesus-Rydin, C., Fariña-Busto, L., and Jansen, E.: Inclusive excellence at the ERC: latest actions and results of sustained measures, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-16168, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-16168, 2024.

X1.63
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EGU24-1620
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EOS3.1
Thomas Blunier

The European Geosciences Union (EGU) is the leading organisation supporting Earth, planetary and space science research in Europe, upholding and promoting the highest standards of scientific integrity, open science and open access research. EGU’s vision is to realise a sustainable and just future for humanity and the planet through advances in Earth, planetary and space sciences.

The EGU awards and medals programme acknowledges distinguished scientists every year for their exceptional research contribution to the Earth, planetary and space sciences. Furthermore, it recognises the awardees as role models for the following generation of early-career scientists, encouraging geoscience research. 

Except for EGU council and award committee members everyone (including non-EGU members) is eligible for receiving an EGU award. Nominations need to be submitted by EGU members online by 15 June every year. Each EGU medal or award is selected through a rigorous assessment of the candidates and their merits through the respective committee. The procedures for nomination, selection of candidates and the time schedule are described in detail on the EGU website. 

EGU is committed to recognizing scientific excellence providing equal opportunities. The processes and procedures that lead to the recognition of excellence must be transparent and free of biases. However, establishment of clear and transparent evaluation criteria and performance metrics to provide equal opportunities to researchers across gender, continents and ethnic groups can be challenging since the definition of scientific excellence is often elusive. 

The purpose of this presentation is to share the experiences and efforts of the European Geosciences Union to ensure equal opportunities. The presentation will showcase data and statistics to provide constructive directions towards the objective of offering equal opportunities to researchers from diverse demographic backgrounds.

How to cite: Blunier, T.: Equality of opportunities in EGU recognitions: The EGU Awards Committee experience, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-1620, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-1620, 2024.

X1.64
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EGU24-10508
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EOS3.1
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ECS
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Highlight
Blair Schneider, Christine Bell, Stefanie Whitmire, Horinek Hannah, Meredith Hastings, Rebecca Barnes, Allison Mattheis, Billy Williams, and Erika Marin-Spiotta

The ADVANCEGeo Partnership program, funded by a National Science Foundation ADVANCE award in 2017, was designed to empower geoscientists to transform workplace climate, and has been recently adapted to other STEMM disciplines as well. To date, the ADVANCEGeo Partnership has led over 230 workshops to institutions across the USA and Europe, in both virtual and in-person formats. A main strategy of ADVANCEGeo for organizational climate change is to enact interventions at the individual and collective level through behavior change education informed by intersectionality and ethics of care frameworks. The program uses a community-based model for bystander intervention and workplace climate education designed to give members of the academic community the knowledge and tools to identify, prevent, and mitigate harm from exclusionary behaviors that directly affect the retention of historically excluded groups in STEMM. 

Evaluation data from 81 workshops held between 2018-2022 were analyzed using a transtheoretical framework of behavioral change. All of these workshops used a consistent structure and length of presentation (averaging 2.5 hours overall). Thirty six workshops were conducted in-person (44%) and forty five workshops were conducted virtually (56%) using the Zoom platform. The workshops were conducted for a variety of audiences, including institutional leadership, academic departments, professional societies, research groups, and student groups. Each workshop included the same core components, though some materials in the presentation portion were tailored to the needs of the audience as requested. Evaluation results show positive increases in participant knowledge, satisfaction, and intent to change behavior directly after the workshop. An additional follow up survey that was disseminated approximately 6 months after the workshop provides evidence of longitudinal behavior change. These results demonstrate that the ADVANCEGeo Bystander Intervention model design successfully shifts behaviors in workshop participants, with an aim to create more positive workplace climates for all seeking to be a part of STEMM.

How to cite: Schneider, B., Bell, C., Whitmire, S., Hannah, H., Hastings, M., Barnes, R., Mattheis, A., Williams, B., and Marin-Spiotta, E.: An Evaluation of the ADVANCEGeo Partnership Bystander Intervention Model, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-10508, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-10508, 2024.

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EGU24-14684
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EOS3.1
Katja Anniina Lauri, Xuefei Li, Paulina Dukat, Nahid Atashi, Laura Karppinen, Katrianne Lehtipalo, Anna Lintunen, Dmitri Moisseev, Janne Mukkala, Tuomo Nieminen, Rosa Rantanen, Timo Vesala, Ilona Ylivinkka, and Hanna Vehkamäki

The equality and work well-being group at the Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR) at the University of Helsinki conducted a survey about academic household work (AHW) tasks among the institute’s staff in autumn 2023. The main aim of the survey was to find out how different AHW tasks are divided among the staff members and how the staff members consider these tasks.

Before the actual survey, we asked the staff to list tasks they consider AHW (nakkihomma in Finnish; direct translation: Frankfurter task). A few examples of AHW tasks we got: sending calendar invitations for meetings, making coffee for others, helping to organize social events at the institute, emotional service work (being involved in discussion with colleagues or students about their personal affairs or problems). For the survey, we grouped the proposed tasks in three categories (number of tasks in parentheses): research-related tasks (3), society-related tasks (4) and community-related tasks (29). The last category was further divided into four subcategories: tasks related to meetings (7), social events (6) and facilities (9), and miscellaneous (7). We asked which tasks the staff members consider as AHW, and how frequently they are committed to each task.

We received a total of 91 answers to the survey. This corresponds to 33% of our staff, but according to the background information we collected, the different groups in terms of gender, career stage, language status (Finnish/non-Finnish speaker) and staff group (research/technical/administrative) were represented well.

The general attitude towards AHW was surprisingly positive: 57% of respondents had a positive attitude while 35% had a neutral attitude. Senior research staff members use a considerable amount of time participating in different committee meetings while early-career researchers do not so much; however, they do a great deal of practical duties related to meetings. Furthermore, we found out that a lot of emotional service work is being done. Interestingly, early career researchers do not consider this generally as AHW while senior researchers do. Male staff members contribute more to technical writing and guiding tasks while female staff use more of their time in emotional service work and general collective AHW tasks. Finnish speakers contribute more to writing and guiding tasks while non-Finnish speakers are more frequently committed in “catering” AHW like making coffee. Technical and administrative personnel generally contribute more to AHW than research staff.

We hope that the results of this survey will help us developing a more equitable and inclusive atmosphere in our institute by enabling us to pay more attention in distributing AHW tasks in a more equal and just manner.

How to cite: Lauri, K. A., Li, X., Dukat, P., Atashi, N., Karppinen, L., Lehtipalo, K., Lintunen, A., Moisseev, D., Mukkala, J., Nieminen, T., Rantanen, R., Vesala, T., Ylivinkka, I., and Vehkamäki, H.: Nakkihomma: attitudes towards and distributions of academic household work, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-14684, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-14684, 2024.

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EGU24-22185
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EOS3.1
Johanna Stadmark, Alberto Montanari, and Caroline Slomp

The EGU recognises the importance of equality, diversity, and inclusion as a crucial foundation for scientific research to address fundamental scientific questions and societally relevant environmental challenges. The increasing diversity of our membership in all its facets fosters collaborative research and discovery that benefits humanity and our planet.

Since its founding, the EGU has worked to ensure equitable treatment for everyone in the community with the goal of increasing diversity. In autumn 2018, the EGU Council established a working group whose aim is to promote and support equality, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences, with a focus on EGU activities. Less than three years later, the EDI group was upgraded into a committee and has delivered numerous actions.

The most recent achievements of EDI@EGU are the Champion(s) for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Award that is bestowed to recognize excellent contributions to put into exemplary practice the principles of EDI. Furthermore, the EDI Committee is currently working on a new travel support scheme to promote diversity at the EGU General assemblies.

The above actions resulted in a more diverse attendance at EGU General Assemblies along the years. The total number of presenters has increased over the time period 2015-2023, and this increase was observed throughout all career stages. The proportion of women presenters has increased from 2015 to 2023. A similar trend was observed for the convenors, an increase in total numbers over the years and a higher proportion of women in 2023 than in 2015.

In the hybrid meeting in 2023 both early career scientists and more senior scientists to a higher extent participated physically in the meeting than online. While there were no differences in how women and men participated (online or physically), there are differences connected to the country affiliations. More than half of participants from countries in most of western Europe attended in Vienna, while participants from North America and Asia attended online.

Since EGU General Assembly is the largest geosciences conference in Europe understanding the demographic evolution and their participation to EGU activities, including the GA, of various groups is an important tool for EGU governing body to draw targeted actions to ensure that the current procedures are fair and that all in the community are being and feeling included. We therefore aim to analyse the changes in demographics with regards to gender, career stage as well as to geographical distribution of the presenters and convenors also in coming years to better understand the potential impacts of meetings organized online or physically, or as a combination of both these modes.

How to cite: Stadmark, J., Montanari, A., and Slomp, C.: Signatures of Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity at EGU General Assemblies, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-22185, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-22185, 2024.

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EGU24-20337
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EOS3.1
Rie Hori and Chiaki Oguchi

The percentage of female scientists in Japan is 17.5% in the 2021 survey. This percentage is the lowest among OECD countries. The percentages of female doctoral students in science and engineering graduate programs nationwide are 21.0% and 19.2%, indicating a gap between the percentage of female prospective researchers and the percentage of women actually employed. It is pointed out that this is due to gender bias at the time of recruitment. On the other hand, the percentage of female members of JpGU remains around 20%, which is higher than the average in Japan, but still low compared to the percentage of female geoscientists in EGU and AGU. One of the reasons for the low number of female scientists in Japan is the low percentage of female students entering science and engineering fields in Japan (27% in science and 16% in engineering). The Science Council of Japan's Subcommittee on Gender and Diversity in Science and Engineering analyzed this problem and pointed out that its cause lies in the environment of education system during elementary and junior high schools (Opinion of SCJ, 2023). In Japan, the following factors are considered to have contributed to the decline in the number of female students going on to study science and engineering, even though surveys such as PISA (2018) and TIMSS (2019) show that both male and female 15-year-olds have equal academic achievement and interested in science and mathematics in the early education stage. (1) The percentage of female science teachers in junior high school and above is significantly lower than in the OECD countries → Few role models. (2) Often exposed to obvious “implicit bias” that has no evidence to support it (for example, girls are not good at mathematics. Science and engineering professions are not suitable for girls).

JpGU and Japanese universities actively conduct outreach programs for female junior igh and high school students every year to foster future female scientists. However, only a small percentage of them in whole Japan participate in such events, and these initiatives does not give us a full solution.

How to cite: Hori, R. and Oguchi, C.: The stagnation of low percentage of female scientists in Japan and JpGU's initiatives, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-20337, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-20337, 2024.