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ITS1.10/NH9.27

In this session, we invite contributions to explore diverse experiences with inter- and transdisciplinary research and practice, that is specifically applied in the mountain context. Taking mountains as complex social-ecological systems, they provide a concrete and spatially-defined contexts in which to explore how global change phenomena manifests and how it poses challenges and opportunities for communities and society in general.

Addressing societal concerns, and finding suitable solutions with regards to associated impacts of global change in mountains, requires and inter- and transdisciplinary (IT-TD) approach to research and practice. We invite contributions based on empirical research and/or practical experience with IT-TD, to critically reflect on these practices in the mountains context and learn from experiences that explicitly address societal grand challenges such as (but not limited to) climate change impacts and adaptation, transformations to sustainability, disaster risk reduction, or transitions to low carbon economies. We welcome contributions depicting research experiences in European mountain regions, other mountain regions around the world, as well as contributions from Early Career Researchers.

The session is led and coordinated by the Mountain Research Initiative (MRI) with expectations to be able to draw from this session as inputs for the formulation of future research agendas and coordination of research collaborations in mountain regions, worldwide.

www.mountainresearchinitiative.org

Public information:
In this session, we invite contributions to explore diverse experiences with inter- and transdisciplinary research and practice, that is specifically applied in the mountain context. Taking mountains as complex social-ecological systems, they provide a concrete and spatially-defined contexts in which to explore how global change phenomena manifests and how it poses challenges and opportunities for communities and society in general.

Addressing societal concerns, and finding suitable solutions with regards to associated impacts of global change in mountains, requires and inter- and transdisciplinary (IT-TD) approach to research and practice. We invite contributions based on empirical research and/or practical experience with IT-TD, to critically reflect on these practices in the mountains context and learn from experiences that explicitly address societal grand challenges such as (but not limited to) climate change impacts and adaptation, transformations to sustainability, disaster risk reduction, or transitions to low carbon economies. We welcome contributions depicting research experiences in European mountain regions, other mountain regions around the world, as well as contributions from Early Career Researchers.

The session is led and coordinated by the Mountain Research Initiative (MRI) with expectations to be able to draw from this session as inputs for the formulation of future research agendas and coordination of research collaborations in mountain regions, worldwide.

www.mountainresearchinitiative.org

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Co-organized by EOS4/CL4/CR7/GM7
Convener: Carolina Adler | Co-convener: Aino Kulonen
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| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

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Chat time: Monday, 4 May 2020, 14:00–15:45

Chairperson: Carolina Adler
D2472 |
EGU2020-6453
| Highlight
Virender Singh Negi

Himalaya presents a great range of lifestyle and livelihood base to its native communities. The extreme climatic condition imposes a restriction on the living conditions, local ownership, alternative sources of income, women's empowerment, and long-term sustainable livelihoods are main elements of community work. But improvements in communication and transportation system have improved the lifestyle of the people living in those regions. The breadth of natural biodiversity in the Himalayas is complemented by a rich mosaic of cultures, traditions and people. But the ethnic groups living in remote valleys of the Himalayan region have generally conserved their traditional cultural identities. Ancient traditions and livelihoods of many communities remain woven into the balanced use of natural resources. They depend on these resources for their livelihoods, and value ecosystem services such as freshwater, erosion control, and agricultural and subsistence harvests.

Forests are strained as demand continues to grow for timber and food crops. Himalaya’s communities have suffered a disastrous slump in production due to erratic weather in recent years, but the government is helping out with various insurance and relief scheme. For such remotely located communities of this part of Himalaya agriculture, nomadic herding, hunting and gathering are the main activities of the people who are unable to fulfil their basic requirements. The present paper investigates factors that have brought about physical and socio-economic changes in various parts of Indian region of Himalayas, interlinked with the fragile Himalayan environment by mapping, monitoring and change analysis with the help of remote sensing and GIS techniques.

How to cite: Negi, V. S.: Climate Change, Traditional Life Styles and Livelihood Questions: Socio-cultural and Physical Constraints of Remotely Located Societies of Western Himalaya., EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-6453, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-6453, 2020

D2473 |
EGU2020-9255
Christian Huggel and Veruska Muccione and the knowledgeforclimate.net

The level of already committed climate change implies massive impacts and risks to natural and human systems on the planet which probably have been underestimated so far, as recent research and science-policy assessments such as from the IPCC indicate. Scenarios with less stringent emission reduction pose even greater risks of partly unknown dimensions. Adaptation to climate change is therefore of critical importance, in particular for countries with low adaptive capacity where climate change can seriously undermine efforts for sustainable development. Mountains are among the hotspots of climate impacts and adaptation.

Climate adaptation is fundamentally an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary endeavor. Various sources of knowledge and perspectives need to be considered and integrated to produce actionable and solution-oriented knowledge. While experiences on joint knowledge production (JKP) has been increasing over recent years there is still missing clarity how to design and implement such a process in the context of climate adaptation.

Here we analyze experiences from a new initiative and network of climate adaptation in education and research with institutions from South Asia, the Andes and Central America, and Switzerland (knowledgeforclimate.net). Partners form a highly multi-disciplinary network with diverse cultural and institutional backgrounds which is both an important asset and challenge for interdisciplinary collaboration. A core of the collaboration are case studies conducted in all six countries in mountain contexts which are developed considering different disciplinary perspectives and represent the basis for both research and teaching. JKP takes place at different levels which need to be systematically and carefully analyzed. 

We find that the processes of JKP are diverse, complex, and highly dependent on the interests and roles of actors within a network. To keep such processes alive, signposts in form of analysis and intermediary products along the network lifetime should be positioned as means of stocktaking and monitoring for the future.

We suggest that existing models of JKP need to be broadened to better accommodate the high diversity and non-linearity of JKP processes. JKP does not just happen as a product of interdisciplinary collaboration but needs continuous reflection, research, update and upgrade. Trust and a range of common interests among partners in the network have been identified as key aspects in the process. A particular challenge furthermore is to dedicate enough time and resources to the framing process but then clearly moving beyond into the action and solution space. Harmonizing different forms of knowledge pertinent to climate adaptation in mountains and harvesting the diversity while accepting possibly limited consensus is essential, yet, it is not a priori predictable where this balance lies.

How to cite: Huggel, C. and Muccione, V. and the knowledgeforclimate.net: Interdisciplinary collaboration and joint knowledge production in climate change adaptation in mountain regions in South Asia, Latin America and Switzerland, EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-9255, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-9255, 2020

D2474 |
EGU2020-12840
Natalia Efimenko, Elena Chalaya, and Nina Povolotskaya

The experience of interdisciplinary studies of the impact of urbanization on the resort and recreation potential of the mountainous territories of the North Caucasus (MTNC) for the purposes of medical balneology and recreational recreation is considered.

The State Register of Natural curative resources (NCR) of MTNC includes unique mineral waters and natural peloids of various physicochemical and microbiological composition, a favorable climate, and a picturesque mountain landscape that are integrated into the existing and rapidly developing complex socio-ecological resort and recreation infrastructure and system of spa treatment and recreation. The risks of the mountain resort and recreation ecosystem include high sensitivity to climate changes and anthropogenic impacts.

High demand for resort and recreational services of MTNC and increasing urbanization initiated the development of comprehensive monitoring studies of the dynamics of the state of NCR, experimental studies on action mechanisms of natural healing factors and the development of a model for ranking mountain areas by integrated resort and recreation potential (IRRP):

 

IRRP = ∑ (IMgmr + IMbkr + IMgl) // n, where IMgmr, IMbkr, IMgl are integrated modules (indicators) of hydromineral, bioclimatic and landscape resources.

 

The model includes three large blocks of monitoring studies of many natural parameters that characterize the properties of underground mineral waters and natural peloids; bioclimatic functions (comfort degree and biotropy), topographic features, vegetation, soils, picturesque and attractive mountain landscape. The modular approach adopted in balneology of medico-biological categorization of NCR parameters established in an experiment or in experimental researches made it possible to overcome the differences in units of measurement of the results of multifactor natural monitoring [1, 2].

Conclusion - the integrative approach adopted in the work to assess the resort and recreational potential of the highlands made it possible to evaluate contractivity (comfort, health and pathogenic functions), stability, diversity, attractiveness of natural complexes of the federal resorts of the North Caucasus, to substantiate the priorities for the territorial development of resort and recreational infrastructure in the resort region of Caucasian Mineral Waters, the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, the Karachay-Cherkess Republic.

 

References

1.Resort study of Caucasian Mineralnye Vody region / Under the general edition of the prof. V.V. Uyba. Scientific publication. - Pyatigorsk. - 2011. – 368p.

2.A technique of balneological assessment of forest-park landscapes of mountain territories for climatic landscape therapy. A grant for doctors. – Pyatigorsk. - 2015. - 26p.

How to cite: Efimenko, N., Chalaya, E., and Povolotskaya, N.: An integrative approach to assessing the resort and recreation potential of the highlands of the North Caucasus of the Russian Federation in the context of global urbanization, EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-12840, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-12840, 2020

D2475 |
EGU2020-17217
Hongmin An, Cunde Xiao, and Minghu Ding

The development of ski areas would bring socio-economic benefits to mountain regions. At present, the ski industry in China is developing rapidly, and the number of ski areas is increasing dramatically. However, the understanding of the spatial pattern and driving factors for these ski areas is limited. This study collected detailed data about ski areas and their surrounding natural and economic factors in China. Criteria for classification of ski areas were proposed, and a total of 589 alpine ski areas in China were classified into three types: ski resorts for vacationing (va-ski resorts), ski areas for learning (le-ski areas) and ski parks to experience skiing (ex-ski parks), with proportions of 2.1%, 15.4% and 82.5%, respectively, which indicated that the Chinese ski industry was still dominated by small-sized ski areas. The overall spatial patterns of ski areas were clustered with a nearest neighbor indicator (NNI) of 0.424, in which ex-ski parks and le-ski areas exhibited clustered distributions with NNIs of 0.44 and 0.51, respectively, and va-ski resorts were randomly distributed with an NNI of 1.04. The theory and method of spatial autocorrelation were first used to analyze the spatial pattern and driving factors of ski areas. The results showed that ski areas in cities had a positive spatial autocorrelation with a Moran’s index value of 0.25. The results of Local Indications of Spatial Association (LISA) showed that ski areas were mainly concentrated in 3 regions: the Beijing-centered Yanshan-Taihang Mountains and Shandong Hill areas, the Harbin-centered Changbai Mountain areas and the Urumqi-centered Tianshan-Altay Mountain areas. The first location was mainly driven by socio-economic factors, and the latter two locations were mainly driven by natural factors. Ski tourism in China still faces many challenges. The government sector should strengthen supervision, develop a ski industry alliance, and promote the healthy and sustainable development of the ski industry in the future.

How to cite: An, H., Xiao, C., and Ding, M.: The Spatial Pattern of Ski Areas and Its Driving Factors in China: A Strategy for Healthy Development of the Ski Industry, EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-17217, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-17217, 2020

D2476 |
EGU2020-19480
| Highlight
Miluska A. Rosas, Veerle Vanacker, Willem Viveen, Ronald R. Gutierrez, and Christian Huggel

The global water storage capacity of hydroelectric reservoirs is decreasing annually while the economic activity, the hydropower industry and the world population continue to grow strongly. The boom in hydropower development in Andean river basins was identified as one of the top 15 global conservation issues. For this region, the electricity generation might increase by 550% from 2005 to the year 2050, thereby needing an increase in water volume from 70.5 billion m3 to 150.7 billion m³. Of the Andean countries, Peru has the highest numbers of existing and proposed hydropower projects, because of its rapidly evolving energy demands (estimated at 8% growth per year) and regulatory framework that aims at promoting renewable energy. Despite initial efforts, studies that describe the impact of changing sediment transfer due to climate change to the hydroelectric infrastructural system are still limited.

This paper evaluates the potential impact of climate variability on the water storage capacity of hydroelectric reservoirs in Andean countries, via a case study of the Cañete River in the Peruvian Coastal Range. It houses the 220 MW El Platanal hydroelectric plant and the Capillucas reservoir that provide the surrounding areas with water and energy. We used a hydrological model (HEC-HMS) coupled with a sediment transport model (HEC-RAS) to simulate future changes in river discharge and sediment load. Ten scenarios were developed, a combination of two different precipitation patterns and five different precipitation rates.

The average sediment load of the Cañete River was estimated at 981 kTon/yr upstream of the Capillucas reservoir, which is in agreement with published erosion rates for the area. Our results show that the lifespan of the Capillucas reservoir ranges from 7 years for the most pessimistic scenario to 31 years for the most optimistic scenario. This is much shorter than the projected lifespan of 50 years. This pilot study illustrates the vulnerability of Andean hydroelectric reservoirs against future climate change.

How to cite: Rosas, M. A., Vanacker, V., Viveen, W., Gutierrez, R. R., and Huggel, C.: Pilot study on the potential impact of climate variability on sedimentation in Andean reservoirs, based on data from the Cañete catchment, Peruvian Coastal Range., EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-19480, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-19480, 2020

D2477 |
EGU2020-19971
Michael Bittner, Dominik Laux, Oleg Goussev, Sabine Wüst, Jana Handschuih, Alexaner Götz, Helmut Heller, Johannes Munke, Roland Mair, Bianca Wittmann, Inga Beck, Markus Neumann, and Till Rehm

The “Alpine Environmental Data Analysis Centre” (AlpEnDAC) is a research data management and analysis platform for research facilities around the Alps and similar mountain ranges. It provides the computational infrastructure for the Virtual Alpine Observatory (VAO), which is a research network of European high-altitude research stations (http://www.vao.bayern.de).

 

Within the scope of previous work, the platform was developed with the focus on research data and metadata management as well as analysis and simulation tools. It offers the possibility to store and retrieve data securely (data-on-demand), to share it with other scientists and to interpret it with the help of computing-on-demand solutions via a user friendly web-based graphical user interface. The AlpEnDAC allows the analysis and consolidation of heterogeneous data sets from ground-based to satellite instruments.

 

In a further development phase, launched on 1 August 2019, the existing services of the AlpEnDAC will be supplemented by new components in the fields of user support and quality assurance. Furthermore, the modelling and analysis software portfolio will be extended, focusing on the development of innovative services in the fields of service-on-demand and operating-on-demand as well as the integration of new data sources and measurement instruments.

 

The AlpEnDAC helps environmental scientists to benefit from modern data management, data analysis, and simulation techniques. The VAO network, now including ten countries (Austria, France, Germany, Georgia, Italy, Norway, Slovenia, Switzerland, Bulgaria, and the Czech Republic) is an ideal and exciting context for developing the AlpEnDAC with researchers.

 

This project receives funding from the Bavarian State Ministry of the Environment and Consumer Protection.

How to cite: Bittner, M., Laux, D., Goussev, O., Wüst, S., Handschuih, J., Götz, A., Heller, H., Munke, J., Mair, R., Wittmann, B., Beck, I., Neumann, M., and Rehm, T.: The Alpine Environmental Data Analysis Centre (www.alpendac.eu) – A Component of the Virtual Alpine Observatory (VAO) (www.vao.bayern.de), EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-19971, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-19971, 2020

D2478 |
EGU2020-20460
Natalia Pardo, Miguel Cabrera, Catalina Gonzalez, Monica Espinosa, Ricardo Camacho, Nancy Palacios, Susana Salazar, Leonardo Parra, and Sonia Archila

Volcanic habitats host a dynamic environment for sudden and long-lasting relationships between nature and culture, becoming an archetypal case for the study of resilient communities. In these habitats, the study of the occurring phenomena is often addressed independently and in disciplinary isolation, focusing on the uncertainty and contingency of geohazards, the abrupt and recurrent resetting of biophysical conditions due to natural disturbances, or the intrinsic repercussions on the anthropogenic memory. Under this perspective, mass-movements within a volcanic habitat can be addressed as a complex system built over various generations of interacting and interdependent human societies, ecological systems, climate and geological processes. Understanding this multivariable and multi-scalar coexistence becomes central in how mass-movements are perceived. In this work, we propose a transdisciplinary approach for the formulation and design of alternative strategies in the mitigation of mass-movements hazards, by responsibly collaborating between geoscientists, social scientists, and local actors.
Mass-movement mitigation strategies rarely take into account the cultural relationship of the inhabitants with their territories and the complexity of the local knowledge and capabilities of the communities to resolve their condition [2]. This limits the effectiveness in the response capacity and resilience of communities and ecosystems to extreme events [2]. Through this research, we aim at finding ways to democratize knowledge, and change academic practices within a geoethical context, recognizing and valuing the local perspectives. In this work, we study an area within the Doña Juana-Cascabel volcanic-complex, located in SW Colombia, and focus on the processes in the vicinity to the Humadal stream and neighbouring communities. This stream is recognized as the main preoccupation of the inhabitants with the recent occurrence of mass-movements in its basin. We address this issue through a team consisting of key local social actors and researchers in anthropology, archaeology, biology, design, engineering, geology, pedagogy, and pedology. We collaborate within a Historical Ecology framework, aiming to the empowerment of sociological resilience-based decision making [3]. This work started with the site recognition, mapping the geological, biological, and social settings. In parallel, we listened and valued the local knowledge about physical geography, ecosystems, and mass-movements in an active volcanic habitat, and merge it with the scientific knowledge. Moreover, this local knowledge enlighted key aspects on the interaction between the inhabitants and the State’s agencies and governmental processes, which underlay the dynamics of any reliable policy and sustainibile process. 
In this particular site, we identified the organizational capacity to work on reforestation, road maintenance, and weaving as fundamental capabilities for connecting with the design, potential implementation, and sustainability of a set of potential mitigation strategies. With this case study, we invite the multiple actors involved in disaster risk reduction to find common languages beyond disciplinary boundiaries aiming to horizontalize knowledge with the local actors in risk. Through this excercise, we avoid the victimization of the communities, reduce power relationships, and empower resilience.

[1]Martin, Martin & Kent, (2009). Journal of environmental management, 91(2), 489-498.
[2]Gaillard, (2008). Journal of volcanology and geothermal research, 172(3-4), 315-328.
[3]Brierley, (2010).  Area, 42(1), 76-85.

How to cite: Pardo, N., Cabrera, M., Gonzalez, C., Espinosa, M., Camacho, R., Palacios, N., Salazar, S., Parra, L., and Archila, S.: A transdisciplinary approach to mass-movements mitigation strategies in volcanic habitats: an approach from complex systems, EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-20460, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-20460, 2020

D2479 |
EGU2020-21235
Inga Beck and Markus Neumann

The Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (UFS) is Germany’s highest research station, located at an altitude of 2650 m. For over 20 years, many different institutions have been working here on a variety of permanent studies on an inter- and trans-disciplinary basis. Eight key scientific activities were assigned in 2007. These are:

  • Satellite-based observations and early detection
  • Regional climate and atmosphere
  • Cosmic radiation and radioactivity
  • Hydrology
  • Environmental and high-altitude medicine
  • Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW)
  • Biosphere and Geosphere
  • Cloud dynamics

Beyond these permanent research activities, around 80 temporary projects have been conducted with over 13 international partners. Over 30 projects are currently running at the UFS. The ‘size’ of the projects varies from small research groups and very short-term studies, to large research consortiums and long-term projects. The UFS is, furthermore, a partner in a number of international networks of (mountain) observatories, such as the Global Atmosphere Watch program of the WMO. International exchange is therefore guaranteed.

The operating company of the UFS makes the high quality of research possible. It takes care of the needs of the researchers, such as logistics, data transfer and exchange, and outreach. The UFS also serves as a meeting and educational center for research teams, operators of other stations and early- career scientists. The UFS is easily accessible all year round: a train line runs up the mountain, directly into the UFS building and allows the transportation of heavy material and devices. A well-equipped workshop allows the in-situ repair of instruments.

Beside some general information about the UFS, the presentation will highlight some recent projects in which the UFS has been involved. It will also show how to use the UFS for your own research ideas.

How to cite: Beck, I. and Neumann, M.: The Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus, EGU General Assembly 2020, Online, 4–8 May 2020, EGU2020-21235, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu2020-21235, 2020