Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

SSP2

SSP – Stratigraphy, Sedimentology & Palaeontology

SSP2 – Stratigraphy, Earth Systems History and Climate Geology

SSP2.1

This session aims to showcase an interesting diversity of state-of-art advances in all aspects of Phanerozoic stratigraphy, paleoceanography, paleoclimatology, eustasy, and orogeny on long- and short timescales in marine and terrestrial environments. Within this broad topic, contributions include but are not limited to, case studies of organic and inorganic geochemistry, sedimentology, paleontology, and modeling, alongside integrated approaches to understanding evolving earth processes, particularly climate transitions and their consequences. The session will potentially be organized into thematic blocks to allow more in-depth exploration and discussion of topics.

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Co-organized by CL1
Convener: Jens O. Herrle | Co-conveners: David Bajnai, Sylvie Bourquin, Mike Simmons, Laurent Beccaletto, Wolf Dummann, Isabel Montañez, David Ray
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SSP2.2

Earth history is punctuated by major extinction events, by perturbations of global biogeochemical cycles and by rapid climate shifts. Investigation of these events in Earth history is based on accurate and integrated stratigraphy. This session will bring together specialists in litho-, bio-, chemo-, magneto-, cyclo-, sequence-, and chronostratigraphy with paleontologists, paleoclimatologists and paleoceanographers. An emphasis is placed upon the use of a variety of tools for deciphering sedimentary records and their stratigraphy across intervals of major environmental change. This session is organized by the International Subcommission on Stratigraphic Classification (ISSC) of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS) and it is open to the Earth science community at large.

Public information:
During the chat, on Tue 05 May, 16:15–18:00, all 10 abstracts with uploaded display material will be open for discussion. The conveners will moderate the chat discussion. We will discuss the abstracts in the order in which they appear in the program. After we call an abstract, we ask the author to provide the chat room with a 1-2 line summary of their work (best to copy-paste a pre-written sentence). Then we can proceed to Q&A. We kindly ask all chat room participants to keep the chat on subject, and not to disrupt the Q&A.

Of course, if you upload your display last-minute, we will also make time to discuss yours. Don't hesitate to share your science!

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Co-organized by CL1, co-sponsored by ICS and ISSC
Convener: David De VleeschouwerECSECS | Co-conveners: Frederik Hilgen, Werner Piller, Tiffany Rivera, Christian ZeedenECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
CL1.9

Reconstructions of past climate conditions have clearly demonstrated that the spatio-temporal variability of Earth´s climate is paced by orbital forcing and tectonic processes. However, the mechanisms that translate these forcing signals into climate changes and subsequently geoarchives continue to be debated. We invite submissions that explore the climate system response to various forcing mechanisms, and that test the stability of these relationships under different climate regimes or across evolving climate states during the Phanerozoic. A special focus is given to the Pliocene epoch between ~5.3 to 2.7 Ma, which has been proposed as an analogue for future climates, since it is characterised by CO2 concentrations which align with those recorded today and projected for the end of this century under moderate emissions scenarios.
Submissions exploring proxy data and/or modelling work are welcomed, as this session aims to bring together proxy-based, theoretical and/or modelling studies focused on global and regional climate and ecosystem responses to orbital, tectonic and ocean gateway forcing at different time scales. We also encourage contributions linked to the PAGES-PlioVAR and PlioMIP2 programmes.

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Co-organized by SSP2
Convener: Stefanie Kaboth-BahrECSECS | Co-conveners: Tijn BerendsECSECS, Anne-Christine Da Silva, Tim Herbert, Erin McClymont, Matthias SinnesaelECSECS, Antje Voelker, Christian ZeedenECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
CL1.8

Orbital forcing is the most important known external driver of the climate system. Nevertheless, resultant internal climate feedbacks that invoke different climate components across different time scales play a critical role in defining the climate response to orbital forcing. These internal climate feedbacks are particularly apparent at past climate transitions, which cannot be simply explained by orbital changes alone (e.g. glacial inception and termination, the mid-Brunhes transition, the mid-Pleistocene transition, Pliocene-Pleistocene transition).

In this interdisciplinary session, we aim to bring together studies of centennial-to-orbital scale interactions among the atmosphere-ocean system, cryosphere, and carbon cycle that advance our understanding of the climate system during climate transitions. Modeling, theoretical and proxy-based studies as well as novel methodologies that combine the above approaches are especially encouraged.

Keynote talk "Ocean carbon storage and release over a glacial cycle" by Dr. James Rae, School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of St Andrews

Public information:
In this session, online displays will be present mainly by live talks in “GoToMeeting” room (similar as Zoom). Since some of authors cannot join in online video chat room, the conveners will try to make essential information accessible in the text-based chat room. In addition, we will eventually move to the chat room after the talks in “GoToMeeting” room. Here is the room information:
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EGU2020 online session CL1.8
Fri, May 8, 2020 1:55 PM - 3:45 PM (CEST)

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/880800221

You can also dial in using your phone.
Germany: +49 892 0194 301

Access Code: 880-800-221

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Co-organized by SSP2
Convener: Xu ZhangECSECS | Co-conveners: Jesse FarmerECSECS, Gregor Knorr, Matteo WilleitECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
CL1.4

The geological record provides insight into how climate processes may operate and evolve in a high CO2 environment and the nature of the climate system during a turnover from icehouse to greenhouse state — a transition that may potentially occur in the near future. Palaeoenvironmental records and climate models are two contrasting and yet complementary sources of information on past climates. Both approaches independently generate insights into the dynamics of the climate system. However, more information can be extracted about the drivers of climate variability and change when the two approaches are combined. The aim of this session is to share progress in our understanding of global changes based on the integration of geochemical/paleobotanical/sedimentological techniques and numerical models. We invite abstracts that reconstruct Earth’s climate, investigate how the interconnections of the key surface reservoirs (vegetation-ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere-biogeochemistry) impact climate, identify tipping points and thresholds and studies that use climate model outputs to understand the physical controls of climate variability. Pertinent themes may include greenhouse-icehouse transitions and intervals testifying for extreme changes.
We are pleased to have Martin Ziegler as our invited speaker talking about "Cenozoic climate evolution revealed by clumped isotope thermometry".

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Co-organized by SSP2
Convener: Yannick Donnadieu | Co-conveners: Sietske BatenburgECSECS, Gregor Knorr, Kira Rehfeld, Bas van de Schootbrugge
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SSP2.8

Today the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) represents a crucial part of the global thermohaline circulation by acting as a low latitude heat source for the polar regions. The IPWP’s importance in deciphering past and future coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics is highlighted by the complex interactions between this region and globally significant climatic systems like the Australasian Monsoon, Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD).

This session will explore the IPWP’s role in global climate change and its emergence as a biogeographic diversity hot spot from the geological past to the present. We invite submissions on a broad range of topics in sedimentology, palaeontology, paleoclimatology/-oceanography, and data-model comparisons to assemble a comprehensive view of the Cenozoic evolution of the entire Indo-Pacific Region. We encourage submissions stratigraphically synthesising marine-terrestrial multi-proxy archives, and those investigating teleconnections between the IPWP, zonal (ENSO/IOD), and high latitude processes. Finally, this session will examine how the long-term evolution of the global monsoons and the ITCZ affected feedbacks between IPWP, Australasian hydroclimate and tectonic/weathering processes.

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Co-organized by CL1/OS1
Convener: Gerald AuerECSECS | Co-conveners: Anna Joy DruryECSECS, Or BialikECSECS, Kate Littler, Mathias Harzhauser
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
GM7.2

Mountain glaciations provide an invaluable record for past and present climate change. The utilization of this potential is, however, not trivial because of the wide diversity of formerly and currently glaciated mountain ranges. In addition to their dynamic, complex, and interacting geomorphological process-systems, the specific different climatic and glaciological conditions make any subsequent global or intra-hemispheric correlations incredibly challenging. This problem is further enhanced by ongoing specialisation within the scientific community. Working groups primarily focusing on either individual aspects or selected mountain regions often remain somewhat disconnected. Only if significant bridging between specialised research communities is guaranteed, progress with the understanding of the complex interactions within mountain ranges can be achieved.
The primary aim of this session is to evaluate the potential of mountain glaciations records and stimulate further research in this important field of research. Contributions on all relevant aspects of the topic are welcomed, for example: (a) glacial landforms and reconstruction of past glaciers, (b) dating techniques and geochronology compilations, (c) glacier dynamics and palaeoclimatic interpretations, or (d) impacts of ecosystems and human evolution/society. Submissions targeting these connections are specifically encouraged. While we encourage submitting abstracts from all abovementioned topics within the broad field of mountain glaciations, we would like to invite in particular those highlighting the specific conditions of mountain glaciations or addressing the relationship and connections between different of their aspects. To address the diversity of mountain glaciations, contributions from high-, middle-, and low-latitude mountain ranges as well as from continental to maritime regions are all welcomed. The time scale of the session will cover the whole time range from Early Pleistocene glaciations to the LGM and Holocene/modern glaciers.

Solicited talk: Ann Rowan "Accelerating recent mass loss from debris-covered Khumbu Glacier in Nepal, and projected response to climate change by 2200 CE"

The session is a platform for everyone interested in the emerging collaborative research network “The Legacy of Mountain Glaciations” and a related splinter meeting (SMP 1) is scheduled for Wednesday, May 6th at 12.45 in room: 0.51. Please use this opportunity to meet and exchange ideas and expertise.

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Co-organized by CR4/SSP2
Convener: Stefan Winkler | Co-conveners: Lauren KnightECSECS, Giovanni Monegato, Jürgen Reitner
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GM8.1

Arid to sub-humid regions contribute ca. 40 % to the global land surface and are home of more than 40 % of the world’s population. During prehistoric times many important cultures had developed in these regions. Due to the high sensitivity of dryland areas even to small-scale environmental changes and anthropogenic activities, ongoing geomorphological processes but also the Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental evolution as recorded in sediment archives are becoming increasingly relevant for geomorphological, palaeoenvironmental and geoarchaeological research. Dryland research is also boosted by methodological advances, and especially by emerging linkages with other climatic and geomorphic systems that allow using dryland areas as indicator-regions of global environmental change.
This session aims to pool contributions from the broad field of earth sciences that deal with geomorphological processes and different types of sediment archives in dryland areas (dunes, loess, slope deposits, fluvial sediments, alluvial fans, lake and playa sediments, desert pavements, soils, paleosols etc.) at different spatial and temporal scales. Besides case studies from individual regions and archives, methodical and conceptual contributions, e.g. dealing with the special role of eolian, fluvial, gravitational and biological processes in dryland environments, their preservation over time in the sedimentary records, and emerging opportunities and limitations to resolve past and current dynamics, are especially welcome in this session.

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Co-organized by CL4/SSP2
Convener: Hans von Suchodoletz | Co-conveners: Markus Fuchs, Joel Roskin, Abi Stone, Lupeng Yu
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
SSP2.13

Interactions between tectonics, climate and biotic evolution are ideally expressed in Asian orogenies. The ongoing surge of international research on Asian regions enables to better constrain paleoenvironmental changes and biotic evolutions as well as their potential driving mechanisms such as global climate, the India-Asia collision and the tectonic growth of the Himalayan-Tibetan and other Asian orogens. Together these efforts allow for a comprehensive paleogeographic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions that enable to constrain climate modelling experiments which permit validation of hypotheses on potential interactions.
The goal of this session is to assemble research efforts that constrain Asian tectonic, climate (monsoons, westerlies, aridification), land-sea distribution, surface processes or paleobiogeographic evolution at various timescales. We invite contributions from any discipline aiming for this goal including broadly integrated stratigraphy, tectonic, biogeology, climate modelling, geodynamic, oceanography, geochemistry or petrology.

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Co-organized by CL1/EMRP3/GD7/TS7
Convener: Guillaume Dupont-Nivet | Co-conveners: Frederic Fluteau, Carina Hoorn, Niels MeijerECSECS, Douwe J. J. van Hinsbergen
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SSP2.14

We are presently facing the 6th mass extinction, what can be learnt from the past ?
The session will focus on the six major Phanerozoic mass extinctions including the Anthropocene one, but contributions from other environmental crises (e.g. OAEs, PETM) are also welcome.

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Co-organized by GMPV10/NH2
Convener: Thierry Adatte | Co-conveners: David Bond, Alicia FantasiaECSECS, Nicolas Thibault
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
TS11.3

Seismic data analysis and interpretation is the key tool enabling the unravelling of the geometry and evolution of subsurface geology.
In the last decades, significant improvements in the acquisition and processing techniques have been combined with a growing coverage of high-resolution and broadband frequency seismic data, including the public release of large volumes of 2D-3D hydrocarbon industry-sourced data. This led to shedding genuine new light on the subsurface geology of large portions of the Earth’s continental margins, and enabled improved quantitative rock property parametrization.
In addition, seismic reflection data have recently appealed to an ever-growing scientific audience, including exploration geoscientists, marine geologists, seismic geomorphologists, stratigraphers and structural geologists. This growing community has been collectively working towards the integrated application of seismic interpretation techniques, including seismic attribute analysis, for industrial purposes as well as for environmental and academic research studies.
In this fast-developing context, it is fundamental to share the knowledge between different research and application approaches. Therefore, the aim of this session is to provide the state-of-the-art and new prospective in seismic data analysis and quantitative subsurface characterization for structural geology and tectonics, but also for exploration seismology, marine geology, seismic geomorphology, stratigraphy, etc.
We thus invite submissions that aim to present new insights in the seismic interpretation of: i) shallow high-resolution seismic data; ii) deep industrial subsurface data (e.g., for hydrocarbon exploration); and iii) ultra-deep lithospheric seismic data. Studies integrating different approaches and disciplines are particularly welcomed.

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Co-organized by GD4/SM4/SSP2
Convener: Vittorio Scisciani | Co-convener: Stefano PatrunoECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS14.2

Tectonic models represent hypothesised approximations of past geological events that best fit and explain a pre-defined collection of data points. Incorporation of geological observations with an understanding and consideration of geodynamic concepts, geological processes, and physical properties of geological materials ensures that empirical models are consistent with physics and mechanics, and that numerical models are consistent with field observations and petrological constraints. Integrating these constraints and concepts within a plate kinematic framework that considers the size, distribution and past and present motions of tectonic plates ensures that models are consistent with global plate tectonics. Incorporating this information with interpretations of the distribution of subducted slabs and plumes in the upper and lower mantle allows for construction of tectonic models that consider the global tectonic-mantle system. We welcome state-of-the-art, multi-disciplinary, and multi-scale studies that combine geological and geophysical constraints from the bedrock record with interpretations of deep mantle structure and/or plate kinematic datasets to investigate geodynamic events of past and present. These may include, but are not limited to studies of rifting and ocean spreading, subduction, orogeny and terrane accretion, and dynamic topography. We expect this session to include a diverse range of multi-disciplinary studies united by a common goal of understanding the geological evolution of our planet’s tectonic-mantle system.

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Co-organized by GD1/SM2/SSP2
Convener: Andrew ParsonsECSECS | Co-conveners: Dennis Brown, Mat DomeierECSECS, Stephen Johnston, Lucia Perez-DiazECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS6.4

The acquisition of new datasets at Continent-Ocean-Transition (COT) of rifted margins show significant variability, highlighting the diversity of parameters controlling the rift-to-drift transition during continental breakup. This session aims at gathering new observations, concepts, and techniques to investigate deformation mechanisms, dynamics of continental breakup, and generation of the first oceanic crust. We invite presentations focusing on topics from rifting up to incipient seafloor spreading, including studies discussing the structure and nature of COT, tectonic, magmatic, rheological and thermal evolution, melt initiation, sedimentary records, deformation mechanisms, and alteration processes. We encourage contributions using multidisciplinary and innovative methods including marine geosciences, seismology, sedimentology, field geology, geochemistry, thermochronology, plate reconstruction, and modelling. We welcome studies based on worldwide natural examples from active rifts, fossil and present-day rifted margins. Special emphasis will be given to presentations that integrate comparisons of tectonic and magmatic processes between continental and oceanic settings that could improve our understanding of continental breakup and mid-oceanic ridge initiation.

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Co-organized by GD6/SSP2
Convener: Michael NirrengartenECSECS | Co-conveners: Julie TugendECSECS, J. Kim Welford, James NorcliffeECSECS, Craig Magee
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.2

Foreland basins archive the evolution of mountain belts, and fold-thrust belts are the linking elements between orogens and their forelands. One of the major challenges for understanding the dynamics of mountain belts is untangling the different driving mechanisms that can be responsible for exhumation of mountain belts and foreland basin deformation. In particular, the signals of plate convergence (i.e. tectonic processes), deep seated (mantle-related) processes, or climate differ with respect to their timing and spatial extent. Ensuing foreland deformation is also influenced by heterogeneity of the deforming material. For instance, stratigraphic variations of the foreland basin fill or its substrate or inherited structures add complexity to the system.

In this session we invite contributions focusing on linking mantle and crustal tectonic processes with foreland basin dynamics. This includes addressing the interplay between plate boundary forces and of inherited structures, sediment production, transport and deposition (source to sink studies), and studies constraining timing of orogen processes at different scales (ranging from short term deformation rates to longer term rates based on cosmogenic nuclides or thermochronometry). We particularly invite contributions linking geophysical with geological data including 3-D models and addressing their respective uncertainties. We encourage the presentation of field-based studies as well as analog and numerical models highlighting the link between foreland basin deformation and mountain building processes including deformation of fold-thrust belts.

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Co-organized by GD5/SSP2
Convener: Christoph von Hagke | Co-conveners: Pablo GranadoECSECS, Matthias Rosenau, Stefano Tavani
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
SSS8.10

The dynamics of the solid Earth and its surface are strongly affected by their interplays as well as biota and climate. These constant feedback systems operate at a variety of spatial and temporal scales that are regulated in a complex system of interactions. For instance, in the critical zone -the terrestrial surface environment ranging from the lower atmosphere to the solid parent material- interplays not only regulate manifold ecosystems and bio-geochemical cycles, but also shape the Earth’s surface at the interface between atmosphere and lithosphere, where soils develop. At much larger scales, plate tectonics and global geodynamics control the physiography, climate and hydrosphere, which in turn strongly affect the surface feedback processes via tectonic, biological, geochemical and hydrological processes. Ultimately, climate and tectonics are prominent macro-ecological drivers of landscape development. But even though the underlying geology and tectonic processes have long been recognized as driving parameters, this is much less so for biological processes. The driving force of microorganisms, plants and animals on the shape of land surfaces is still poorly understood.
Understanding the links between the solid Earth and the external spheres of the Earth has experienced a recent upswing due to advanced analytical techniques, but also thanks to fostered interactions between researchers from different disciplines. This session aims to bring together geoscientists, soil scientists, climatologists and biologists working at different spatial and temporal scales on the feedback interactions between geology, topography, soils, climate and biosphere at the surface of the Earth. The session covers a multitude of topics from the microbial to the geodynamics time and space scales.

Solicited speakers are:
Carina Hoorn, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Alexia Stokes, French National Institute for Agricultural Research – INRA, France
Veerle Vanacker, University of Louvain, Belgium

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Co-organized by BG1/CL4/GD1/GM4/SSP2
Convener: Steffen SeitzECSECS | Co-conveners: Laurent Husson, Annegret LarsenECSECS, Carsten W. Mueller, Pierre Sepulchre, Kirstin ÜbernickelECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)