Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

TS7

TS – Tectonics & Structural Geology

Programme group chair: Claudio Rosenberg

TS7 – Convergent tectonic settings

Programme group scientific officer: Bernhard Grasemann

TS7.1

The evolution of the Apennines is framed between the fragmentation of Pangea and the development of the Tyrrhenian Basin, thus carrying the memory from the Permian and Triassic rifting, to the Oligocene-Miocene collision, and finally to the Miocene-Present coexistence between extension and shortening, in the western and eastern sector respectively.
In this session, we aim to discuss: (a) deformation and metamorphism developed in the different tectonic environments, from rifting to subduction, exhumation and late-orogenic stages; (b) the sedimentary evolution, from Permian to Present, and its relation with tectonics; (c) the Mesozoic carbonate platform evolution and its role in the Apennines; (d) magmatism in space and time and its connection with the geodynamic evolution, from the mountain chain to the Tyrrhenian Basin; (e) processes forming geological resources, from oil to ore deposits and geothermal fields; (f) recent tectonics, as reconstructed through seismological and paleo-seismological studies; (g) the crustal structure, as derived by geophysical methods and their interpretation.
The final goal is to have a thorough and fruitful discussion through a multidisciplinary and integrated approach, improving our capability to define the interconnection between structural heritage and the different processes defining the Apennines evolution.

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Convener: Domenico Liotta | Co-convener: Giancarlo Molli
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| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS7.2

Foreland basins archive the evolution of mountain belts, and fold-thrust belts are the linking elements between orogens and their forelands. One of the major challenges for understanding the dynamics of mountain belts is untangling the different driving mechanisms that can be responsible for exhumation of mountain belts and foreland basin deformation. In particular, the signals of plate convergence (i.e. tectonic processes), deep seated (mantle-related) processes, or climate differ with respect to their timing and spatial extent. Ensuing foreland deformation is also influenced by heterogeneity of the deforming material. For instance, stratigraphic variations of the foreland basin fill or its substrate or inherited structures add complexity to the system.

In this session we invite contributions focusing on linking mantle and crustal tectonic processes with foreland basin dynamics. This includes addressing the interplay between plate boundary forces and of inherited structures, sediment production, transport and deposition (source to sink studies), and studies constraining timing of orogen processes at different scales (ranging from short term deformation rates to longer term rates based on cosmogenic nuclides or thermochronometry). We particularly invite contributions linking geophysical with geological data including 3-D models and addressing their respective uncertainties. We encourage the presentation of field-based studies as well as analog and numerical models highlighting the link between foreland basin deformation and mountain building processes including deformation of fold-thrust belts.

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Co-organized by GD5/SSP2
Convener: Christoph von Hagke | Co-conveners: Pablo GranadoECSECS, Matthias Rosenau, Stefano Tavani
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.4

The Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt is one of the largest and most prominent suture zones on Earth. The belt ranges from the Mediterranean in the west to Indonesia in the east. It results from the subduction and closing of different branches of the Tethyan Oceanic Realm and the subsequent collision of the African, Arabian and Indian continental plates with Eurasia. Its long-lasting geological record of complex interactions among major and smaller plates, featuring the presence of subduction zones at different evolutionary stages, has progressively grown as a comprehensive test site to investigate fundamental plate tectonics and geodynamic processes with multi-disciplinary studies. Advances in a variety of geophysical and geological fields provide a rich and growing set of constraints on the crust-lithosphere and mantle structure, as well as tectonics and geodynamic evolution of the entire mountain belt

We welcome contributions presenting new insights and observations derived from different perspectives like geology (stratigraphy, petrology, geochronology, geochemistry, tectonics and geomorphology), geophysics (seismicity, seismic imaging, seismic anisotropy, gravity), geodesy (GPS, InSAR), modelling (numerical and analogue), risk assessment (earthquake, volcanism), as well as from multi-disciplinary studies.

Keynote presentation by Boris Kaus (University of Mainz)

Public information:
The discussion during the chat sessions will follow an order based on location (from East to West), and divide the abstracts such that in the first block we will go from the Himalaya region to Turkey-Anatolia-Cyprus and the East Mediterranean Basin, and in the second block, we will cover the Mediterranean from the Western side of the Black Sea (i.e. Bulgaria) to the Westernmost Mediterranean. The preliminary order (hoping that authors upload their display) is:
14:00-15:45
1· Jatupohnkhongchai et al.
2· Bai et al.
3· Chen et al.

4· Knight et al.
5· Stoner et al.
6· Wei Li et al.

7· Barbero et al.
8 Lom et al.
9· Simmonds et al.
10· Mahleqa Rezaei et al.

11· Sağlam et al.
12· Mueller et al.
13· Gürer et al.
14· Nirrengarten et al.

BREAK (30 minutes)

16:15-18:00
1· de Leeuw et al.
2· Balkanska and Georgiev (?)

3· Faucher et al.
4· Molnár et al.
5· Stanković et al.

6· Schneider and Balen
7· Chang et al.
8· Kaus et al.
9· El-Sharkawy et al.
10· Agostini et al.

11· Gimeno et al.
12· de la Peña et al.
13· Negredo et al.
14· Jiménez-Munt et al.
15· Kumar et al.

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Co-organized by GD7/GMPV11/SM2
Convener: Ágnes KirályECSECS | Co-conveners: Derya GürerECSECS, Marc Hässig, Claudia Piromallo
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), Attendance Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.5

The prominent morphological features in central Asia are the mountain ranges of the Pamir, Tian Shan, and the Himalaya-Tibetan orogen. The present-day morphology is the result of uplift related to the Cenozoic India-Asia collision. However, this is built upon a long-lasting and complex pre-Cenozoic history of ocean closures (Proto- and Paleo-Tethys, Paleo-Asian), accretion of terranes and related reorganization of Asia´s southern margin. This long-lasting history of consecutive accretionary events left behind a complex mosaic of high- and low-strain domains, allochthonous blocks (terranes) and intervening suture zones. A significant challenge is to correlate and date those domains, which are often used as large scale structural markers for e.g. the Cenozoic indentation of the Pamirs. Both the pre-Cenozoic history and the timing and kinematics of young deformation have to be well-constrained in order to reconstruct the pre-Cenozoic configuration and understand how it conditioned Asia´s response to India´s collision.

As all the above mentioned mountain ranges record stages in the pre-Cenozoic evolution of Asia´s southern margin, it is necessary to compare and correlate these evolutionary stages in time and space. Therefore we invite contributions from geoscientists who are working on various aspects of the geologic evolution of Central Asia, including structural geology, geochemistry and sedimentology as well as geophysical or modeling studies.

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Convener: Johannes RembeECSECS | Co-conveners: Jonas Kley, Yani Najman, Rasmus Thiede
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.6

The Alps have been intensively studied by geologists for more than a century, providing a unique natural laboratory to deepen our understanding of orogenic processes and their relationship to mantle dynamics. Although most concepts that underlie current studies of mountain belts and convergence dynamics were born in the Alps, the belt is now being examined with renewed vigour in the AlpArray project. This project involves a large number of European institutions, with efforts focused on the AlpArray Seismic Network to provide homogeneous seismological coverage of the greater Alpine area at unprecedented aperture and station density, both on land and sea. New data is being recorded in a multidisciplinary research effort, and other projects are being planned in the immediate and mid-term future.
Within this context, we invite contributions from the Earth Science community that highlight new results in AlpArray and that identify and solve key open questions of the present and past structure and dynamics of the Alps and neighbouring orogens. Both disciplinary and multi-disciplinary contributions are welcome from geophysical imaging, (seismo)tectonics, structural geology, gravimetry, geodesy, geodynamics, petrology, geochronology and other allied fields, combined with various modelling approaches. Scales of interest range from crustal to upper mantle, in the Alps and neighbouring mountain belts such as the Apennines, the Carpathians and the Dinarides.

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Co-organized by GD7/SM4
Convener: Anne Paul | Co-conveners: M. R. Handy, György Hetényi, Marco Giovanni Malusa', Irene Molinari
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS7.8

In the past years, there have been major breakthroughs in the understanding of the evolution of Pyrenean orogenic belt and related basins, incorporating new concepts of rifted margins and hyperextension. This is leading to a new generation of lithospheric-scale models addressing the role of tectonic inheritance and the application of the Wilson cycle. Models are being populated with rich new databases on structural geology, paleothermal analysis, low-temperature geochronology and detrital geochronology, mainly applied to the provenance and sediment routing signature of preorogenic and synorogenic basins, all supported by recent collaborative programs like Orogen and other French, Spanish and international projects. We invite contributions that address these points, from diverse and multidisciplinary perspectives.

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Convener: Antonio Teixell | Co-convener: Raphaël Pik
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS7.9

Subduction zones are one of the key players in driving plate tectonics. They are also the locus of most mineral and rock transformations, mass/fluid transfer and seismicity. Understanding initiation, development and closure of subduction zones -including their evolution into collisional systems- is therefore a challenge facing Earth sciences. This session aims at covering the tectonic and metamorphic evolution from nascent to mature convergent systems in both space and time as well as studying the complex feedbacks of processes related to the thermo-mechanical history of subducted and exhumed rocks. This includes studies focusing on tectonic processes in oceanic and continental subduction setting over space and timescales (e.g. mechanical (de)coupling, rock accretion and exhumation...) in active and ancient convergent settings. We welcome contributions from a wide range of disciplines such as structural geology, tectonics, petrology, geophysics, experimental deformation and numerical modelling, with particular emphasis on the rock record.

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Co-organized by GD5/GMPV7
Convener: Mathieu SoretECSECS | Co-conveners: Samuel Angiboust, Hugues Raimbourg, Zoe BradenECSECS, Vincent RocheECSECS, Jiří Konopásek
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
TS7.10

Orogenic plateaus and their margins are integral parts of modern mountain ranges and offer unique opportunities to study the feedback between tectonics and climate through the Earth’s surface. Complex interactions and feedbacks occur among a wide range of parameters, including crustal and deep-seated deformation, basin growth, uplift, precipitation and erosion, landscape and biological change; and lead to (i) the growth, recycling, and destruction of the lithosphere; (ii) shifts in surface elevation; and (iii) high topography that can affect atmospheric circulation. These controlling factors result in plateau lateral growth and its characteristic morpho-climatic domains: humid, high-relief margins that contrast with (semi-)arid, low-relief plateau interiors.

This session aims at creating a discussion forum on the complex interactions and feedbacks among climatic, surficial and geodynamic processes that challenge the notion of a comprehensive mechanism for surface uplift and topographic growth in orogenic plateaus and their margins. To fuel the exchange, we welcome studies of orogenic plateaus worldwide at various scales, from the Earth’s mantle and crust to its surface and atmosphere. We particularly encourage contributions that aim at bridging temporal and spatial gaps between datasets using an interdisciplinary approach or novel techniques.

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Co-organized by CL4/GD5/GM9/SSP1
Convener: David Fernández-Blanco | Co-conveners: Maud J.M. Meijers, Alexander RohrmannECSECS, Flora BajoletECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SSP2.13

Interactions between tectonics, climate and biotic evolution are ideally expressed in Asian orogenies. The ongoing surge of international research on Asian regions enables to better constrain paleoenvironmental changes and biotic evolutions as well as their potential driving mechanisms such as global climate, the India-Asia collision and the tectonic growth of the Himalayan-Tibetan and other Asian orogens. Together these efforts allow for a comprehensive paleogeographic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions that enable to constrain climate modelling experiments which permit validation of hypotheses on potential interactions.
The goal of this session is to assemble research efforts that constrain Asian tectonic, climate (monsoons, westerlies, aridification), land-sea distribution, surface processes or paleobiogeographic evolution at various timescales. We invite contributions from any discipline aiming for this goal including broadly integrated stratigraphy, tectonic, biogeology, climate modelling, geodynamic, oceanography, geochemistry or petrology.

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Co-organized by CL1/EMRP3/GD7/TS7
Convener: Guillaume Dupont-Nivet | Co-conveners: Frederic Fluteau, Carina Hoorn, Niels MeijerECSECS, Douwe J. J. van Hinsbergen
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD5.2

Subduction zones are arguably the most important geological features of our planet, where plates plunge into the deep, metamorphic reactions take place, large earthquakes happen and melting induces volcanism and creation of continental crust. None of these processes would be possible without the cycling of volatiles, and this session aims to explore their role in convergent margins. Questions to address include the following. Do Atlantic and Pacific subduction zones cycle volatiles in different ways? What dynamic or chemical roles are played by subducted fracture zones and plate bending faults? How do fluids and melts interact with the mantle wedge and overlying lithosphere? Why do some of the Earth’s largest mineral resources form in subduction settings? We aim to bring together geodynamicists, geochemists, petrologists, seismologists, mineral and rock physicists, and structural geologists to understand how plate hydration/slab dynamics/dehydration, and subsequent mantle wedge melting/fluid percolation, and ultimately melt segregation/accumulation lead to the diverse range of phenomena observed at convergence zones around the globe.

Includes Augustus Love Medal by Harro Schmeling
Invited Speaker: Nestor Cerpa (University of Montpellier, France)

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Co-organized by GMPV2/SM6/TS7
Convener: Jeroen van Hunen | Co-conveners: Jenny Collier, Colin Macpherson, Andreas Rietbrock, Jamie Wilkinson
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD5.1

Subduction drives plate tectonics, generating the major proportion of subaerial volcanism, releasing >90% seismic moment magnitude, forming continents, and recycling lithosphere. Therefore, it is the most important geodynamical phenomenon on Earth and the major driver of global geochemical cycles. Seismological data show a fascinating range in shapes of subducting slabs. Arc volcanism illustrates the complexity of geochemical and petrological phenomena associated with subduction.

Numerical and laboratory modelling studies have successfully built our understanding of many aspects of the geodynamics of subduction zones. Detailed geochemical studies, investigating compositional variation within and between volcanic arcs, provide further insights into systematic chemical processes at the slab surface and within the mantle wedge, providing constraints on thermal structures and material transport within subduction zones. However, with different technical and methodological approaches, model set-ups, inputs and material properties, and in some cases conflicting conclusions between chemical and physical models, a consistent picture of the controlling parameters of subduction-zone processes has so far not emerged.

This session aims to follow subducting lithosphere on its journey from the surface down into the Earth's mantle, and to understand the driving processes for deformation and magmatism in the over-riding plate. We aim to address topics such as: subduction initiation and dynamics; changes in mineral breakdown processes at the slab surface; the formation and migration of fluids and melts at the slab surface; primary melt generation in the wedge; subduction-related magmatism; controls on the position and width of the volcanic arc; subduction-induced seismicity; mantle wedge processes; the fate of subducted crust, sediments and volatiles; the importance of subducting seamounts, LIPs, and ridges; links between near-surface processes and slab dynamics and with regional tectonic evolution; slab delamination and break-off; the effect of subduction on mantle flow; and imaging subduction zone processes.

With this session, we aim to form an integrated picture of the subduction process, and invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines, such as geodynamics, modelling, geochemistry, petrology, volcanology and seismology, to discuss subduction zone dynamics at all scales from the surface to the lower mantle, or in applications to natural laboratories.

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Co-organized by GMPV2/SM2/TS7
Convener: Oğuz H Göğüş | Co-conveners: Taras Gerya, Ágnes KirályECSECS, Wim Spakman
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)