ITS4.6/SSS0.1.5 | Nature-based Solutions for climate change adaptation
EDI
Nature-based Solutions for climate change adaptation
Convener: Pierre-Antoine VersiniECSECS | Co-conveners: Natalia Rodriguez-Ramirez, Daniela Rizzi, Amy Oen
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.24
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 14:00
Nature-based Solutions (NbS) are actions to protect, conserve, restore, sustainably use and manage natural or modified ecosystems, that address socio-economic and environmental challenges, while simultaneously providing human well-being, resilience and biodiversity benefits (UNEA, 2022). Within the framework of a global ecosystem approach, NbS must encompass ecological, societal, political, economic and cultural issues at all levels, from the individual to the collective, from local to national, from the public or private sphere.

As recently highlighted by IPCC and IPBES, climate change and biodiversity degradation cannot be separated, and must be considered together. For this reason, this session is especially focused on the way NbS can act as climate change adaptation solutions. Considering various ecosystems (marine and coastal, urban, cropland, mountainous, forest, rivers and lakes,.,), NbS as interventions for climate adaptation includes the adaptation to: sea level rise (flooding and erosion), changes of the water regime (floods, droughts, water quality and availability), rise in temperatures (heat waves, forest fires, drought, energy consumption), plant stress and increase of pests (variation of yields, forest dieback), to minimize their associated social and economic negative impacts.

Therefore, this session aims to promote interdisciplinary research related to ecosystem restoration, preservation and management, to put forward the complexity that is often hidden by simplifying hypotheses and approaches (sector-based silo approach, homogeneity of environments, ...).

Specific topics of interest are the followings:
- Complexity: nature of ecosystems and the risk of oversimplification, interconnection between NbS and complementary areas, consideration of uncertainties (future climate and associated impacts...)
- Scales: spatial scales with the integration of NbS in their environment, and temporal scales considering sustainability over time, variability of bio-physical processes and climate change effects
- Ecosystem services: understanding the bio-geophysical processes, spatial shift between the location of NbS and the location of beneficiaries, modification under climate change (threshold, inflection point), co-benefits or on the contrary degradation and negative effects
- Assessment and indicators: measurement and modelling protocols to evaluate NbS performances, capacity to measure the complexity, resilience and stability of the solutions.

Orals: Thu, 18 Apr | Room 2.24

Chairpersons: Pierre-Antoine Versini, Natalia Rodriguez-Ramirez
14:00–14:05
14:05–14:15
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EGU24-19213
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ECS
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On-site presentation
Giorgiana-Raluca Barbu and Mihai-Răzvan Niță

The main concern with public policies and strategies for integrating nature-based solutions is to facilitate access to innovative interventions to reach cities and communities that are more sustainable and climate resilient. However, there is an impediment to linking information on the results of projects and the expected impact of the European Commission in the framework programmes for research funding. Here we show how projects targeting nature-based solutions help to implement and review public policies under the EU Strategy for Adaptation to Climate Change 2013 – 2020 and European Green Deal. These policies have a positive impact in various areas, especially in green transition, with the potential to analyse the link between the scientific results of nature-based projects and the strategic orientations of research and innovation. We focused on the evaluation of 150 projects funded at the Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe level, within three main programmes that provide funding for projects based on nature, resilience and adaptation to climate change: (1) Climate action, Environment, Resource Efficiency  and Raw Materials, (2) Climate, Energy and Mobility and (3) Food, Bioeconomy, Natural Resources, Agriculture and Environment. The main analyzed elements are the number and type of partners, the level of funding, the main objectives of the projects, types of nature-based solutions and their distribution by geographical regions in Europe. This analysis leads to the filling in the existing knowledge of the results that produce science, so that it can be exploited throughout the community. Our results consist in (1) overview of climate challenges in EU R&I framework programmes Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe, (2) Main NBS designed by European R&I organizations, (3) NBS for climate resilience implemented through EU R&I funding in Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe, (4) NBS for climate resilience – key pathways of knowledge valorization for ecosystem restoration, preservation and management. Overall, they show that the aspects analyzed in the selected funded projects support the development of nature-based solutions and what are the main actions that lead to long-term impact.

How to cite: Barbu, G.-R. and Niță, M.-R.: Nature-based solutions for climate resilience in EU R&I framework programmes Horizon 2020 and Horizon Europe, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-19213, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-19213, 2024.

14:15–14:25
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EGU24-18701
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Emma Ramsay, Leanne Tan, Yuan Wang, and Perrine Hamel

Nature-based solutions are an important tool to adapt to climate change in cities. Green spaces including nature reserves, parks and green streetscapes are essential to mitigate urban heat and also provide important recreation opportunities that benefit peoples physical and mental health. Effectively planning climate resilient and liveable cites thus requires quantitative, spatially explicit information about these ecosystem services. Such data are especially important in dense cities where vacant land is limited and trade-offs must be made to prioritise certain services. Here we present a multi-ecosystem service assessment for Singapore using the urban InVest models to evaluate urban cooling and urban nature access. We generate future greening scenarios based on policy targets to plant one million trees and increase the land area of parks by 50% by 2030 and compare ecosystem service provision for each scenario when either cooling or nature access is maximised in the spatial configuration of scenarios. We compare the benefits and trade-offs achieved by each scenario and explore the potential to quantify these through health indicators. Finally, we discuss how multi-ecosystem service assessment cans be integrated into urban planning and the implications for cities in an uncertain climate future.

How to cite: Ramsay, E., Tan, L., Wang, Y., and Hamel, P.: A multi-ecosystem service assessment for urban climate adaptation in Singapore , EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-18701, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-18701, 2024.

14:25–14:35
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EGU24-6169
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ECS
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On-site presentation
Aurélien Mirebeau, Cécile de Munck, Stephan Weber, Aude Lemonsu, and Valéry Masson

To mitigate climate change impacts in cities, nature-based solutions are broadly promoted due to their supposed benefits for biodiversity, rainwater management, evaporative cooling, and sequestration of carbon. Among existing solutions, green roofs show the advantage of tackling the lack of space available for greening in urban areas. But green roofs are still underdeveloped due to their cost and the lack of scientific knowledge around their potential, especially for carbon sequestration. Quantifying the various contributions of green roofs using reliable scientific approaches is a major challenge. Thus, it is essential to build a numerical model capable of simulating green roofs development and functioning at city scale in order to provide information to decision-makers with relevant indicators.

 

Here, the urban canopy model Town Energy Balance (TEB) with the module TEB-GREENROOF is used to model green roofs. The TEB-GREENROOF model, evaluated in previous study for heat and water transfers, is improved by activating the photosynthesis model ISBA-A-gs in order to represent the CO2 exchanges of the vegetation implemented on the green roof. The modelling is informed by 6 years of continuous CO2 flux data on a non-irrigated extensive green roof located in Berlin (Germany) in partnership with the Technische Universität Braunschweig. In order to evaluate and improve the thermal, hydrological and respiration characteristics of the ISBA-A-gs model on a green roof, an initial simulation is carried out by forcing the monthly evolution of the leaf area index (LAI) by LAI data estimated experimentally. The model is then applied with a dynamic calculation of LAI in order to enable it for simulations of roof greening scenarios on a city-wide scale under any climate with no information on the LAI.

 

Results show that the model is able to estimate the annual net ecosystem exchange of the Berlin green roof and to correctly reproduce the CO2 fluxes for both diurnal cycles and annual variation under climate variability, with drier years showing less carbon sequestration.

How to cite: Mirebeau, A., de Munck, C., Weber, S., Lemonsu, A., and Masson, V.: Modelling CO2 flows from extensive green roofs within the TEB (town energy balance) urban canopy model, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-6169, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-6169, 2024.

14:35–14:45
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EGU24-10201
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ECS
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On-site presentation
A computational approach for urban heat island mitigation through nature-based solutions modelling.
(withdrawn)
Francesca Mosca, Maria Sole Calbi, Enrica Roccotiello, and Katia Perini
14:45–14:55
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EGU24-8806
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ECS
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Virtual presentation
Muhammad Rayan, Dietwald Gruehn, and Umer Khayyam

The proliferation of climate-induced stressors has deterred countries' green spaces (GS), which in turn degrade and deplete natural green barriers. Hence, Urban Green Infrastructure (UGI) modelling is grabbing global attention perceiving it as a nature-based mitigation/adaptation strategy to enhance the resilience of urban areas to fight climatic risks. UGI protects and improves the socio-ecological wellness of urban and rural regions. This research intends to investigate thirteen sustainable UGI indicators and their functional linkage with the five vital taxonomies of nature-based green solutions (at the neighborhood level) under a community participatory (CP) approach; out of ten GS elements and twenty-two sustainable UGI indicators developed by the author in his earlier research study [2-5]. It is to develop a sustainable UGI indicator-based framework (tailored to the native-built context) for climate-resilient urbanisation.

The results of the in-depth household survey (192 questionnaires), executed in three KP districts, Charsadda, Peshawar, and Mardan, and results were generated through Relative Importance Index (RII) and Interquartile Range Technique (IQR) show a very good level of coefficient alpha (α) value, (α = 0.7) — an acceptable threshold level [6, 7]. Furthermore, this study acknowledges key GS taxonomies that have achieved RII value ≥ 0.72. This performs a pivotal role in quality improvement and strengthening the resilience (health) of the respective UGI indicators. This scientific research study provides a foundation for an eco-regional paradigm in KP territory that paves the way for an effective implementation of green urbanism to naturally ameliorate the vulnerability to potential climatic stresses (like flooding, drought, the UHI effect) and disastrous impacts on the socio-ecological wellness.

Keywords: sustainable green infrastructure (GI) indicators; participatory planning (PP); nature-based green initiatives; climate change (CC); socio-ecological wellness; KP, Pakistan

References

1. Mell, I. C., Henneberry, J., Hehl-Lange, S., & Keskin, B. (2013). Promoting urban greening: Valuing the development of green infrastructure investments in the urban core of Manchester, UK. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 12(3), 296–306. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ufug.2013.04.006

2. Rayan, M., Gruehn, D., Khayyam, U., (2021b). Green infrastructure planning. A strategy to safeguard urban settlements in Pakistan. In: Jafari, M., Gruehn, D., Sinemillioglu, H., Kaiser, M. (Eds.), Planning in Germany and Iran. Responding Challenges of Climate Change through Intercultural Dialogue. Mensch und Buch Verlag. Berlin, pp. 197–220.

3. Rayan, M., Gruehn, D., & Khayyam, U. (2021a). Green infrastructure indicators to plan resilient urban settlements in Pakistan: Local stakeholder’s perspective. Urban Climate, 38, 100899. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1016/j.uclim.2021.100899

4. Rayan, M.; Gruehn, D.; Khayyam, U (2022a). Frameworks for Urban Green Infrastructure (UGI) Indicators: Expert and Community Outlook toward Green Climate-Resilient Cities in Pakistan. Sustainability 2022,14, 7966. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14137966.

5. Rayan, M.; Gruehn, D.; Khayyam, U (2022b). Planning for Sustainable Green Urbanism: An Empirical Bottom-Up (Community-Led) Perspective on Green Infrastructure (GI) Indicators in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), Pakistan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 11844. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191911844

6. Cortina, J. M. What is coefficient alpha? An examination of theory and applications. J. Appl. Psychol (1993).

7. Peterson, R. A. A Meta-analysis of Cronbach’s Coefficient Alpha. J. Consum. Res (1994).

8. Wu, J., & Wu, T. (2012). Sustainability indicators and indices: an overview. Handbook of Sustainability Management, 65–86. http://dx.doi.org/10.1142/9789814354820_0004

How to cite: Rayan, M., Gruehn, D., and Khayyam, U.: Community-driven sustainable green infrastructure (GI) indicators to plan an eco-friendlier and climate-resilient city-state in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), Pakistan., EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-8806, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-8806, 2024.

14:55–15:05
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EGU24-20974
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On-site presentation
Jagdish Krishnaswamy, Kiran Chandrasekharan, Dhananjayan Mayavel, and Ravi Jambhekar

Cities and urbanizing spaces combine heat stress from both heat island effect due to the built environment as well as global warming.  India with its high rate of urbanization is no exception. However, many Indian cities have blue and green spaces with various levels of protection from land-use and land-cover change. 

Blue and green spaces (BGS) are potentially nature-based solutions for mitigating heat stress through evaporation and transpiration besides sequestering carbon and as a habitat for urban biodiversity.  The effectiveness of BGS in mitigating heat stress depends on size, shape, weather, and climate variables, especially humidity.  

We use satellite derived land surface temperature (LST) to quantify and map negative temperature anomalies (cooling) with respect to spatial average across the city in years with different levels of summer temperature, especially due to El Nino.   We analyse the diverse types of blue and green spaces in three metropolitan cities in India and classify them in terms of biodiversity value (using e-bird data and other published sources). 

Cooling more than few degrees Celsius with respect to city wide averages from blue and green infrastructure has been observed and is much higher if compared to nearby built areas.  The geometry and landscape ecology of existing urban blue and green infrastructure can help inform future planning for blue and green spaces as adaptation in a warming urban environment. 

How to cite: Krishnaswamy, J., Chandrasekharan, K., Mayavel, D., and Jambhekar, R.: Role of blue and green spaces in mitigating heat stress and providing biodiversity co-benefits in India’s cities , EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-20974, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-20974, 2024.

15:05–15:15
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EGU24-11439
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Cristiano Gala, Gabriele Curci, Loretta Pace, Alessandro Marucci, and Dina Del Tosto

Nature-based solutions are now a key part in climate change adaptation, particularly for urban environments. The integration of natural systems within the urban fabric has the potential to increase cities’ resilience to the predicted changes in climate. Urban forests are one of the most used methods for adding ecosystem services to an urban environment and at the same time address urban-specific climate change challenges such as heat-island effect, intense rainfall and water management. However, the effects of climate change in the long-term on urban forests are not often taken into account when planning interventions such as afforestation. Species selection for urban forests should, among other factors, be based on an assessment of local future climatic conditions, so to ensure the long-term viability of the project. Here we propose a methodology easily applicable to any place in Europe. We use data from interpolated publicly available climate datasets and species distribution data from the European Tree Atlas in order to analyse climatic niches for tree species in Italy. These climatic ranges are then compared to local climatic data, obtained from homogenised time-series measured by a weather station in the city of L’Aquila. The results are summarised in a suitability matrix providing vulnerability scores for each species based on predicted climate changes for the local area. The analysis ranks the species which are less vulnerable to projected future climate conditions. The application to the pilot area of L’Aquila suggests that some species already present will still be suitable also in future climate (e.g. Quercus pubescens) while others will not (e.g. Quercus petraea), and species not traditionally present may become suitable (e.g. Quercus ilex). The importance of obtaining accurate local climate data from observations is a key aspect for municipalities to consider as results of this analysis are greatly dependent on this.

How to cite: Gala, C., Curci, G., Pace, L., Marucci, A., and Del Tosto, D.: Assessing the vulnerability to climate change of tree species for urban afforestation, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-11439, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-11439, 2024.

15:15–15:25
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EGU24-20731
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ECS
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Highlight
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On-site presentation
Marina d'Avdeew

Nature-Based Solutions as a tool to reduce coastal risks have gained in popularity in the last 10 years. However, in France, their development still faces some limits and oppositions from local populations and stakeholders. The main reasons for this are the lack of knowledge and feedback, and the fear of being less protected with against floods with Nature-Based Solutions than with sea walls. This work will present the example of Criel-sur-Mer, in the North of France, where a project of restoration of intertidal habitats to reduce coastal risks is currently discussed and capitalize on feedbacks from three finalized projects from the Netherlands and England.

This study is part of a PhD work on the mobilization of Nature-Based Solutions in coastal protection projects. This presentation is based: on field trips conducted between March and April in the Netherlands and England, on the sites of Hedwige & Prosperpolder (Netherlands, Belgian border), Freiston Shore and Abbotts Hall (England), and in September 2022 and March 2024 in Criel-Sur-Mer (France); on semi-structured interviews conducted with stakeholders on those sites; on semi-structured interviews conducted with 39 coastal engineers and environmentalists between June and August 2023 in Artelia, the engineering firm in charge of the project of intertidal habitats restoration in Criel-sur-Mer; and on observative participation to a public consultation workshop with local actors and stakeholders for the project of Criel-sur-Mer.

The cross-study of the three Dutch and English projects gives us useful examples of the effectiveness of Nature-Based Solutions used as a tool to reduce coastal risks, that can be reused to enrich the project of Criel-sur-Mer. As the two English projects have been finalized in 2002, they are a source of extensive feedback on the evolution of intertidal ecosystems with managed realignment and their efficiency facing storms. The Dutch example started in 2005, but was finalized only in 2023, as it faced numerous social and political oppositions. These projects can thus be used as feedback on governance, project structuration and finding the right balance between different interests for the Criel-sur-Mer example.

How to cite: d'Avdeew, M.: Nature-Based Solutions for coastal risks protection: lessons learned from Dutch and English examples, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-20731, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-20731, 2024.

15:25–15:45
Coffee break
Chairpersons: Daniela Rizzi, Amy Oen
16:15–16:20
16:20–16:30
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EGU24-9173
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ECS
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On-site presentation
Maria Makaronidou, Vito Emanuele Cambria, Evangelia Korakaki, Christos Georgiadis, and Nikos Petrou

Coastal zone ecosystems’ global importance is the primary driver of the wide scientific efforts for their restoration and protection. Over the past three decades, there has been a growing global momentum in the pursuit of initiatives aimed at conserving nature. Regardless of the wide scientific interest, and despite the notable exposure of these ecosystems to degradation and deterioration, numerous habitats, and species, in Europe, have 'vulnerable', or 'near threatened' conservation status. Even in the most favourable circumstances, factors including strong human pressure, urbanization and agriculture, and climate change, exhilarate the current, already, negative trends indicators, related to biodiversity and their associated ecosystem functions and services provision. This project proposes a set of existing and emerging methodologies and solutions for the restoration, conservation, and management practices, which are crucial to improving these profoundly delicate ecosystems in the Mediterranean and similar environmental contexts.

Traditional and innovative ecological restoration solutions have been designed and applied in two such areas along the Greek and Italian coasts, ‘Nestos Delta’ and ‘Bosco di Palo Laziale’, respectively, to improve the conservation status of 'Pannonian-Balkanic turkey oak-sessile oak forests' (habitat 91M0), ‘Alluvial forests with Alnus glutinosa and Fraxinus excelsior’ (habitat 91E0), and 'Mediterranean temporary ponds' (*3170) that have been increasingly exposed to climate change and inappropriate forest and water management.

Analogous, ecological restoration practices include selective trimming of encroaching shrub vegetation (and alien invasive shrubs in the Nestos area), remote-controlled irrigation system, origin-controlled and pathogen-free forestry nursery, ex-situ micro-propagation and in-situ reinforcement of keystone plant populations. An in-depth assessment and quantification of abiotic and biotic factors of the sites' ecosystems were preliminarily conducted to tailor these interventions to the habitats' geo-morphological, climatic, pedological, and physiological conditions.

The EU project LIFE PRIMED (LIFE17 NAT/GR/000511), operates at the Delta of River Nestos in Greece, and the Forest of Palo Laziale in Italy. The results in both areas, thus far, have demonstrated that the collaborative development of innovative water harvesting systems, coupled with adaptation measures, has the potential to enhance water resilience in already degraded forest ecosystems. To date, the project has successfully tackled the effects of escalating irregular rainfall patterns on Mediterranean coastal habitats by implementing a hydraulic system and a wellpoint-based water distribution network in Palo Laziale and Nestos Delta, respectively.

Monospecific approaches for climate and human-related phenomena, such as extreme weather events and agriculture pressure, are disfavoured. Therefore, the LIFE PRIMED project, comprised of an interdisciplinary team of Botanists, Zoologists, Foresters, and Environmental Engineers, has developed and delivered Nature-based transnational, ecosystem-oriented holistic solutions that will have the potential to be replicable and transferable with the greatest aim to recover dysfunctional, poorly managed coastal forest areas, across the Mediterranean region.

How to cite: Makaronidou, M., Emanuele Cambria, V., Korakaki, E., Georgiadis, C., and Petrou, N.: Opportunities to Restore and Protect Coastal Ecosystems with Enhanced Interdisciplinary Management - The Mediterranean Model., EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-9173, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-9173, 2024.

16:30–16:40
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EGU24-467
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Virtual presentation
Matt Chambers, Dave Crane, Charles van Rees, Matt Shudtz, Craig Landry, Susana Ferreira, Don Nelson, Burton Suedel, Brock Woodson, and Brian Bledsoe

Climate driven changes in hydrologic regimes are increasing riverine flood risks in many parts of the world. Societies that have historically relied on structural flood management infrastructure, e.g., levees and dams, may face significant challenges as these types of infrastructure can be expensive and politically difficult to retrofit for non-stationary and uncertain future flood hazards. Hybridizing conventional infrastructure systems with nature-based solutions (NbS) can help communities adapt to non-stationarity and improve flood resilience. However, despite advances in the academic literature, NbS have failed to become mainstream in many societies. The United States (US) is no exception and has an extensive history of engineering rivers with structural systems to support immediate-term economic growth and with limited consideration for non-stationarity. For example, there are thousands of kilometers of continuously leveed river corridors in the US and many of these levees were built as close to river banks as possible to maximize the commercial prospects of flood protected land use. Such levees are relatively sensitive to non-stationarity and the communities they protect are becoming increasingly vulnerable to climate change-driven flooding. Our research focuses on how to bridge the gap between the scientific development of NbS and implementation in professional practice. We are doing so by example, with levee setbacks on America’s longest river -- the Missouri -- and in collaboration with the US’s primary action agency of flood risk management -- the US Army Corps of Engineers. Setbacks are implicitly an adaptation strategy that buffer a community against uncertainty and non-stationarity by providing additional room for floodwater conveyance. Unfortunately, they are fraught with social and political challenges because -- as a form of managed retreat -- they require some community members to relinquish private property rights so that the broader community can have greater flood protection. Critical to bridging the gap between levee setback research and implementation is understanding the performance of setbacks at scale and the development of simple and repeatable methods for designing setbacks to successfully deliver multiple ecosystem services. The most fundamental of which is how to “size” a setback – in other words – how big of a floodplain reconnection is required to achieve a desired improvement in flood protection services? In this talk, we will discuss sizing methodologies for achieving multiple services, as well as practical engineering, social, ecological, and administrative constraints that have arisen in the process of translating NbS research to practice. The example of levee setbacks on American rivers is particularly useful because it affords experimentation with repeatability (given the thousands of kilometers of continuously leveed river corridors) and the spatial scale of reconnection required to achieve multiple benefits (given the massive size of many levees and floodplains). The results of which may be relatable to many engineered river corridors around the world and will hopefully support mainstreaming NbS in other social and political contexts.

How to cite: Chambers, M., Crane, D., van Rees, C., Shudtz, M., Landry, C., Ferreira, S., Nelson, D., Suedel, B., Woodson, B., and Bledsoe, B.: Nature-based solutions for leveed river corridors, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-467, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-467, 2024.

16:40–16:50
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EGU24-6018
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On-site presentation
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Robert Zomer, Jianchu Xu, Donatella Spano, and Antonio Trabucco

The recently released IPCC Mitigation report placed agroforestry as one of the top three Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU) mitigation pathways, noting that it delivers multiple biophysical and socioeconomic co-benefits such as increased land productivity, diversified livelihoods, reduced soil erosion, improved water quality, and more hospitable regional climates, concluding there is ‘high confidence’ in agroforestry’s mitigation potential at field scale. As such, agroforestry is one of the most cited nature-based solutions in development strategies and in reporting of nationally determined contributions (NDC),  both for its potential mitigation benefits, but not least for the adaptation, resilience and livelihood benefits it can provide, across scales from agro-industrial farming to small farmer holdings. Here we present recent global and regional estimates of above- and below-ground biomass on agricultural land based upon IPCC Tier 1 estimates and compare results with an updated carbon density map based on remote sensing, with results indicating the methodology and initial estimations are robust. Two future scenarios are evaluated to estimate carbon sequestration potential of increasing tree cover on agricultural land: 1.) incremental change and 2.) systematic change to agroforestry. Estimates of above- and below ground biomass carbon were combined with a remote sensing-based tree cover analysis to estimate the increase in biomass. Global increases (4-6 Pg C for incremental change; 12-19 Pg C for systematic change) highlight substantial mitigation potential. Increasing global tree cover on agricultural land by 10% would sequester more than 18 Pg C over a decade. South America has the highest potential, followed by Southeast Asia, West and Central Africa, and North America. Brazil, Indonesia, Philippines, India, the United States and China are among the top countries. Additionally, we provide an overview and analysis of the unique and significant contribution agroforestry can provide in mountainous regions and in reducing pressure on irrecoverable carbon.

How to cite: Zomer, R., Xu, J., Spano, D., and Trabucco, A.: Nature-Based Solutions: Evaluating the global carbon sequestration potential of agroforestry and increased tree cover on agricultural land., EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-6018, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-6018, 2024.

16:50–17:00
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EGU24-18875
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On-site presentation
Milica Vranešević, Milica Knežević, Radoš Zemunac, and Maja Meseldžija

The introduction of Natural Based Solution (NBS) into sustainable agricultural practices is a key issue on which the balancing of intensive agricultural activities with environmental protection depends. In lowland areas with intensive agricultural production, occurrences of extreme amounts of excess water, caused by climate change, increase the need for efficient drainage systems. Within the comprehensive framework of drainage system improvement, NBS are emerging as key and versatile interventions. The principal challenge lies in reconciling these solutions with the prevalent technical paradigms in both land reclamation and agriculture. The most important change is the strategic integration of the use of riparian buffers as supplementary melioration measures in delineated areas, especially aimed at reducing the inflow of excess water into the canal network. Deciding where to implement NBS for better drainage systems comes down to assessing the risks that may occur as a consequence to natural resources such as water and soil. When the implementation of NBS determines the crucial factors and evaluates them effectively, then it can categorize and map the optimal places where improvement of the drainage system is possible and efficient. In this study the aim was to delineate suitable zones for implementing nature-based solutions along watercourses through the application of Geographic Information System (GIS) methodology. By overlaying different layers, including pedological and geomorphological maps, digital terrain models indicating land slope, land use classifications, and drainage classes, it is intended to analyze and identify optimal locations. Some of the characteristic drainage systems in Vojvodina have been selected to provide a relevant case study illustrating how GIS can be applied to demonstrate the potential of nature-based solutions in improving drainage systems. This approach not only enhances the efficiency of the existing drainage systems. It also provides insights for strategic afforestation and the increase of biodiversity in agricultural areas.

How to cite: Vranešević, M., Knežević, M., Zemunac, R., and Meseldžija, M.: Suitability assessment of the location for the Natural Based Solution application on drainage systems, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-18875, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-18875, 2024.

17:00–17:10
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EGU24-6608
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On-site presentation
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Veerle Vanacker, Armando Molina, Miluska Rosas, Vivien Bonnesoeur, Francisco Román-Dañobeytia, Boris Ochoa-Tocachi, and Wouter Buytaert

The Andes Mountains stretch over about 8900 km and cross tropical, subtropical, temperate and arid latitudes. More than 85 million people lived in the Andean region by 2020, with the northern Andes being one of the most densely populated mountain regions in the world. The demographic growth and a stagnating agricultural productivity per hectare led to an expansion of the total agricultural land area, either upward to steep hillsides at high elevations covered by native grassland-wetlands ecosystems, or downward to lands east and west of the Andes covered by tropical and subtropical forests. Land use and management have significantly altered the magnitude and frequency of erosion events. 

This study systematically reviews the state of evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to mitigate soil erosion by water and is based on Andean case studies published in gray and peer-reviewed literature. After screening 1798 records, 118 empirical studies were eligible and included in the quantitative analysis on soil quality and soil erosion. Six indicators were pertinent to study the effectiveness of natural infrastructure: soil organic carbon and bulk density of the topsoil, soil loss rate and run-off coefficient at the plot scale, and specific sediment yield and catchment-wide run-off coefficient at the catchment scale. The protection and conservation of natural vegetation has the strongest effect on soil quality, with 3.01 ± 0.893 times higher soil organic carbon content in the topsoil compared to control sites. Soil quality improvements are significant but lower for forestation and soil and water conserva- tion measures. Soil and water conservation measures reduce soil erosion to 62.1 % ± 9.2 %, even though erosion mitigation is highest when natural vegetation is maintained.

Further research is needed to evaluate whether the reported effectiveness holds during extreme events related to, for example, El Niño–Southern Oscillation.

 

 

 

How to cite: Vanacker, V., Molina, A., Rosas, M., Bonnesoeur, V., Román-Dañobeytia, F., Ochoa-Tocachi, B., and Buytaert, W.: Nature-based solutions for erosion mitigation : insights from a systematic review for the Andean region, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-6608, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-6608, 2024.

17:10–17:20
|
EGU24-13018
|
ECS
|
On-site presentation
Tessa Maurer, Patricia Manley, Christopher Anderson, Nicholas Povak, Philip Saksa, Anu Kramer, and Zachary Peery

In fire-adapted forests around the world, nature-based solutions (NbS) are increasingly used as a tool to promote resilience to catastrophic fire through actions like fuels reduction and prescribed burning. This work also has many potential co-benefits, including climate change mitigation through stable carbon storage and biodiversity through habitat protection. One key mechanism for realizing both of these co-benefits is the protection of large and ancient trees, keystone components that sequester a disproportionate amount of carbon and serve as unique habitat for old forest associated species, many of which are declining or at risk of extinction. However, climate change poses a substantial risk to both tree recruitment and survival, either directly (temperature and drought tolerance) or indirectly (wildfire and insect occurrence). These impacts are not fully understood in the scientific literature nor, as a result, fully accounted for in the design of NbS management projects.

Therefore, to help inform near-term NbS restoration priorities, we investigated how a changing climate will impact the retention of large trees on the landscape and the ecosystem functions they support. Focusing on the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, a biophysically diverse and at-risk mountain ecoregion, we evaluated the intersection of current and future climate with large tree occurrence and two critical functions: carbon storage and habitat for the California spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis; CSO), an old growth associated species whose core population is limited to the Sierra Nevada and that requires large trees for nesting habitat. We mapped large trees across the Sierra Nevada, evaluated the climatic drivers of large tree biogeography, and forecasted how conditions supportive of large tree populations might shift geographically in the future under two emission levels (RCP 4.5 and 8.5). Using a bivariate fuzzy logic approach, we mapped the joint probability of current CSO occupancy and carbon storage and then evaluated future climate vulnerabilities and associated management strategies. We found that carbon and CSO occupancy corresponded closely with the current distribution of large trees in the Sierra, primarily at mid-elevations in the central Sierra. Similarly, we found that these mid-elevation montane forests are likely to continue to support large trees and CSO habitat and carbon storage through mid-century (e.g., consistent with "monitor" and "protect" climate-informed management strategies). Conversely, climate conditions in the southern Sierra and the upper elevations of the central Sierra are likely to constrain the persistence and recruitment of large trees, affecting the potential to recruit CSO habitat and enhance the carbon storage of higher elevation forests. 

We hope these findings will encourage the design of and investment in climate-informed NbS projects, and we propose that this method could be used in other ecosystems to jointly assess the climate change mitigation and biodiversity impacts of NbS-based management.

How to cite: Maurer, T., Manley, P., Anderson, C., Povak, N., Saksa, P., Kramer, A., and Peery, Z.: Leveraging the co-benefits of large tree protection to inform nature-based management of a forest ecosystem, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-13018, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-13018, 2024.

17:20–17:30
|
EGU24-19067
|
ECS
|
On-site presentation
Combining modeling and expert-based approaches to reduce uncertainties related to climate change impacts on the protective service of forests
(withdrawn)
Christine Moos, Benoît Loup, Estelle Noyer, and Heike Lischke
17:30–17:40
|
EGU24-2883
|
ECS
|
On-site presentation
Roberto Ingrosso and Francesco SR Pausata

The Great Green Wall (GGW) is a multibillion-dollar African initiative to combat desertification in the Sahel by restoring 100 million hectares of degraded land. The idea of a physical green wall of trees has now been developed into the implementation of scattered green zones throughout arid areas, providing sustainable reforestation, revegetation, and land management. In West Africa, the most important climate feature is the West African Monsoon (WAM), which brings rainfall over the Sahel during the Northern Hemisphere summer. Climate dynamics associated with WAM changes could also play a role on the Atlantic Tropical Cyclones (ATCs) formation and variability. The potential climate impacts of the most recent GGW plan on northern Africa and tropical Atlantic have not yet been adequately evaluated, raising concerns about unforeseen climate ramifications that could affect stability in northern Africa and impact on the ATC variability. Here, we use a high-resolution (~13 km) regional climate model to evaluate the climate impacts of four GGW scenarios with varying vegetation densities under two extreme emission pathways (low and high). Higher vegetation density GGW scenarios under both emission pathways show enhanced rainfall, reduced drought lengths and decreased summer temperatures beyond the GGW region relative to the cases with no GGW. However, all GGW scenarios show more extreme hot days and heat indices in the pre-monsoonal season. Furthermore, in spite of a strong variation in the African Easterly Waves activity, no significant changes are found in terms of ATCs frequency, intensity, meridional motion and translation speed over the North Atlantic area. Small changes in the TC densities are found in front of the cost of West Africa,  in the eastern side of the Main Development Region. These findings highlight the GGW's contrasting climatic effects, emphasizing the need for comprehensive assessments in shaping future policies.

 

How to cite: Ingrosso, R. and Pausata, F. S.: On the climate impacts of four different Great Green Wall scenarios on the northern Africa and the Atlantic Tropical Cyclones variability., EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-2883, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-2883, 2024.

17:40–18:00

Posters on site: Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 | Hall X2

Display time: Wed, 17 Apr 14:00–Wed, 17 Apr 18:00
Chairpersons: Pierre-Antoine Versini, Daniela Rizzi
X2.108
|
EGU24-1019
|
ECS
Roberta D'Ambrosio and Antonia Longobardi

As urbanization and climate change continue to pose significant challenges for cities worldwide, green roofs (GRs) has emerged as a viable sustainable solution for supporting traditional infrastructure in managing stormwater runoff. Although their hydrological behavior has been sufficiently documented in literature, conflicting results emerge regarding the potential variations in their retention capacity (RC) over the medium and long-term. Based on preliminary investigations, this research aimed at assessing medium-term changes in the hydrological performance of two experimental GRs (GR1 and GR2), further investigating the potential role played by precipitation severity. The GRs, located in Southern Italy and consisting of three layers (vegetation, substrate and drainage), were set up in 2017 and monitored for two operational periods, 2017-2019 and 2022-2023. The measurements gathered between 2017 and 2019 provide valuable insights into the initial performance of the GRs and their ability to retain water during the early years of operation. Data collected in 2022 and 2023 instead reflect the retention capacity of the GRs after a few years of operation. A total of 29 mild precipitation events were collected during both periods and for both GRs, detecting from the monitoring data their cumulative precipitation (P) and runoff (R) with the objective of assessing the RC (RC = 1 - R/P). Based on the preliminary findings, it appears that there is an overall decline in the RC for both GR1 and GR2, without significant differences between the two. The Aging Indexes (AI) were calculated for GR1 and GR2, representing the average reduction of the runoff coefficient (RC) over time. GR1, which has a drainage layer composed of expanded clay, exhibited an AI of 12%. On the other hand, GR2, characterized by a drainage layer made of MODI' plastic panel filled with expanded clay, exhibited a slightly higher AI of 13%. Further analysis revealed that within each dataset, two groups were identified based on a threshold determined by the growth coefficient g(T) of the precipitation events. For the group of events with g(T) values above 0.12 (sample size of 14), the AI values were 15% and 16% for GR1 and GR2, respectively. On the other hand, the group of events with g(T) values equal to or lower than 0.12 (sample size of 15) experienced AI values of 10% and 11% for GR1 and GR2, respectively. These findings suggest that as the growth coefficient g(T) increases, indicating higher return periods T, the AI and consequently the reduction in hydrological performance of GRs also increase. The highly possible increase in the future of extreme precipitations would pose a considerable limit to the spread of this kind of sustainable drainage infrastructures. However, additional modeling investigations focused at detecting the effects of alternative GRs designs and materials on their long-lasting average hydrological performance would be essential for making informed decisions and investments.

How to cite: D'Ambrosio, R. and Longobardi, A.: Assessing the Medium-Term Changes in Hydrological Performance of Green Roofs: The Influence of Precipitation Severity, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-1019, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-1019, 2024.

X2.109
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EGU24-1035
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ECS
|
Highlight
Lou Valide, Pierre-Antoine Versini, and Olivier Bonin

Nature-based Solutions, even if not identified as such, are becoming more and more popular in land planning, especially in cities. Conserving and restoring green infrastructure in urban context is now recognised as being a good practice in the face of climate change adaptation: ecosystem services provided by green spaces can help reduce urban heat island effect and risks of flood, improve resilience of ecosystems to preserve biodiversity and enhance human well-being through access to nature. Simultaneously, cities have to face another challenge: containing land take and urban expansion. The European Commission, in its Roadmap to a Resource Efficient Europe (2011), claimed the “aim to achieve no net land take by 2050”, a goal already transcribed in French law since 2021. Hence, the competition for land use which already existed between housing, industry, roads and recreational purposes will only become fiercer and have to include a new competitor: Nature-based Solutions. In this context, the ability of optimizing the implementation of such solutions – through the different scales at which they provide ecosystem services (building, neighbourhood, city and landscape) – is becoming primordial. Where should we conserve or restore green spaces in priority to ensure the providing of the ecosystem services needed for urban climate change adaptation? This question implies a multi-scale spatial analysis of the impact of green infrastructures on cities. To do so, the question of urban form is tackled by focusing on what is between buildings and streets, where green infrastructure can be deployed and woven into the urban fabric. To establish a multi-scale typology of green infrastructures based on their morphologies, classical approaches are combined with mathematical tools such as fractal analysis for characterizing their dispersion or graph theory for characterizing their connections, essential when studying biodiversity issues. This typology, associated with ecosystem services and biodiversity assessment for different French case studies (including the conurbations of Niort and Dijon), could help understand how to spatially implement Nature-based Solutions within cities, and be integrated into land-planning scenarios.

How to cite: Valide, L., Versini, P.-A., and Bonin, O.: Multi-scale analysis of green infrastructure morphology for climate change adaptation, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-1035, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-1035, 2024.

X2.110
|
EGU24-2018
|
ECS
Jéssica Uchôa, Catarina Fonseca, Rafaela Tiengo, Bruna Almeida, and Artur Gil

As the global community grapples with the complex challenges of climate change, the integration of nature-based solutions (NBS) has emerged as a critical strategy. This work introduces a Web Geographic Information System (WebGIS) designed to showcase and communicate the results of initiatives focused on NBS within the scope of the Marine Coastal Ecosystems Biodiversity and Services in a Changing World (MaCoBioS) project. The platform serves as an interface for decision-makers and stakeholders, providing a spatially contextualized visualization of geospatial data related to marine and coastal ecosystems, climate risks, and adaptation. The MaCoBioS webGIS is based on an open-source platform, using JavaScript and the Leaflet map library to showcase key scenarios developed for case study ecoregions. The platform allows remote access to data irrespective of geographical constraints and is capable of integrating multidisciplinary data, ensuring a comprehensive and up-to-date view of evolving climate-related scenarios. The MaCoBioS webGIS not only facilitates the identification, evaluation, and direction of potential solutions to extant and emergent issues but also affords public access and participation. It serves as a foundational platform for prospective local and regional areas monitoring and management. By integrating qualitative information with scientific data, the aim is to present the results clearly and in a straightforward language, to reach a broader audience, including those who may not have specialized expertise. In so doing, it establishes the groundwork for future initiatives, promoting collaboration and leveraging cutting-edge technology for the betterment of coastal communities and ecosystems. In summary, the webGIS not only serves as a powerful tool for visualizing geospatial data but also acts as an effective means of communication and collaboration. By promoting informed decision-making, and supporting initiatives related to climate change and NBS, the platform contributes to the collective effort in addressing the complexities of our changing climate.

How to cite: Uchôa, J., Fonseca, C., Tiengo, R., Almeida, B., and Gil, A.: WebGIS for Marine Coastal Ecosystems: A Dynamic Interface for Communicating and Collaborating on Nature-Based Solutions in Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-2018, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-2018, 2024.

X2.111
|
EGU24-7898
|
ECS
Marion Wallner, Thomas Thaler, Arthur Schindelegger, and Katharina Gugerell

To tackle hydrometeorological extreme events and adapt to climate change, Nature-based Solutions (NbS) are widely considered a promising approach. Yet, their implementation remains challenging. One key reason is that NbS require a lot more land than grey infrastructure – making their implementation dependent on privately owned land and prone to cause or exacerbate conflicts of interest over land use. This request of privately owned land widens the numbers of actors involved in the decision-making process. For this very reason, the realisation of NbS highlights the necessity of meaningful stakeholder engagement. However, in the past, technical mitigation measures were traditionally enforced top down by engineers within the public administration at national or regional level. Stakeholder engagement thus fundamentally changes the way how risk managers and citizens collaborate and is often reported to not live up to its expectations. Therefore, this study will address the role of stakeholder engagement as a decisive factor for the implementation of NbS on privately owned land. More specifically, it aims (i) to analyse what approaches to stakeholder engagement are currently employed on the side of flood risk authorities and (ii) to evaluate how stakeholder engagement processes account for conflicts of interest over land use. For this purpose, a qualitative research design approach will be exerted. This will involve desk research to identify areas in Austria where NbS on privately owned land have already been (and will be) implemented, semi-structured interviews with public water authorities and workshops in our case study site – the Lafnitz catchment in Austria. Lessons learnt will be compared with those of five other regions across Europe, as our study is embedded in the EU Horizon Project “Land4Climate” (Utilization of private land for mainstreaming Nature-based Solutions in the systemic transformation towards a climate-resilient Europe, HORIZON-MISS-2022-CLIMA-01-06). By doing so, our research will provide hands-on knowledge on NbS implementation and foster its mainstreaming across the European Union.

How to cite: Wallner, M., Thaler, T., Schindelegger, A., and Gugerell, K.: Nature-based Solutions on privately owned land: Stakeholder engagement matters, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-7898, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-7898, 2024.

X2.112
|
EGU24-8691
|
ECS
Els Ribbers, Hanna Lee, Priscilla Mooney, Helene Muri, Lei Cai, Jin-Soo Kim, and Lars Nieradzik

Afforestation has long been discussed as a nature-based climate mitigation solution. Although it could be an economic, green, and safe climate mitigation method, several studies suggest the possibility of unforeseen consequences depending on how it is implemented. An important aspect to be taken into account when designing af- and reforestation plans is the risk of damage to the new forest system in the face of climate warming. Recent studies have already shown an increase in both wind and fire damage risks in northern latitudinal forests related to climate warming, with strong winds leading to breakage of individual branches as well as in the knock-over of individual trees or even entire forest areas.

However, the forest system is complex, with a high number of feedback loops between different types of damage and between forest structure and ecological parameters. A few examples: Trees that are weakened by damage from pest outbreaks and snowfall are more susceptible to damage from wind and fire; Gaps in the forest that are created by management or damage both increase wind flow due to an eddy effect and create new forest edges with poorly adapted trees, increasing the risk of wind-throw.

Due to this complexity, the resilience to damage and therefore ability of forests to mitigate climate on a regional scale are still poorly understood. Understanding this complexity requires model work and extensive literature research, as most studies only focus on a few aspects of the forest system, such as the management type or wind effects. The aim of the study is therefore to develop adequate and future-proof wind- and fire risk indices that boreal forest managers can use to improve management strategies to make climate-mitigation forests more effective, resilient and damage resistant.

To do this, output from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in combination with data on damage, forest management and forest structure to shed some light on possible feedbacks between forest systems and climate on a small-scale basis, in this case 3kmx3km. This information is then used to expand the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) to include ecological, management-related and forest structural parameters. As the structure of the existing FWI is climate-based, the wind risk index will be based on the developed fire risk index.

Our preliminary results show that wind damage was most common and extensive in the south-western coastal area of Norway over the last two decades. In contrast, fire damage was most prevalent in the south, with increased damage extent in the south-west of the country. Furthermore, the FWI shows that under an afforestation scenario in Norway, the mountainous region will have the highest frequency of days with medium to high danger of forest fires under climate warming. In this presentation we will discuss these preliminary results, as well as the methodology we will be using to develop the risk indices. Policymakers and forest owners alike will be able to use the risk indices to make the climate-mitigation forests more resilient against damage in a warming climate.

How to cite: Ribbers, E., Lee, H., Mooney, P., Muri, H., Cai, L., Kim, J.-S., and Nieradzik, L.: Development of wind and fire risk indices for climate-mitigation forestry, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-8691, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-8691, 2024.

X2.113
|
EGU24-18619
|
ECS
Ismael Ávila Vasconcelos, Pierre-Antoine Versini, and Igor da Silva Rocha Paz

Over the last few decades, the urban hydrological cycle has undergone significant changes due to the influence of the built environment, resulting in rapid runoff and increased risk of flooding. Faced with these challenges, nature-based solutions (NBS) are emerging as an appropriate response, especially in densely populated areas, facing the impacts of climate change and biodiversity loss. The application of green infrastructures, as evidenced by Parc Molière in Les Mureaux, France, with its 700 trees, 11,500 m² of flowerbeds, 8,700 m² of grassland and 5,000 m² of gardens, represents a sustainable approach to urban stormwater management. By reintroducing extensive impermeable areas to the open air, Parc Molière strengthens biodiversity, facilitates animal movement, promotes air cooling and reduces urban heat islands, while also modifying hydrological behavior. Carried out in the framework of the LIFE ARTISAN project, this study uses the Multi-Hydro software, developed at the École des Ponts ParisTech, to computationally model the Parc Molière area in two different scenarios: before and after the creation of the green spaces. Based on a fully distributed and physical hydrological model, Multi-Hydro is able to illustrate the influence of NBS by comparing the obtained simulations with instrumented hydrological data. The results should demonstrate that the NBS have a significant impact on peak flow and total runoff volume, mitigating the negative effects in an urban hydrological scenario.

How to cite: Ávila Vasconcelos, I., Versini, P.-A., and da Silva Rocha Paz, I.: Nature-Based Solutions for stormwater management: A case study with Multi-Hydro in Parc Molière, France, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-18619, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-18619, 2024.

X2.114
|
EGU24-7963
|
ECS
Luca Sumfleth, Sebastian Scheuer, Long Nguyen, and Dagmar Haase

Idea and Objectives: The health and well-being of urban populations are increasingly under pressure from climate change, for example, due to temperature extremes resulting in heat stress. The demand for heat mitigation is particularly high for urban areas in humid, tropical climates, as they are affected by heat stress already today, and for which a further amplification of heat stress is expected. For the case of Hue, a humid tropical Central-Vietnamese city, based on a typology of selected green-blue infrastructure elements, potential benefits for the regulation of outdoor temperature and outdoor thermal comfort are systematically virtually implemented and modelled. In order to promote acceptance of greening interventions by the public in Hue, citizen demands and preferences towards urban green elements, including potential co-benefits, are considered in this study, and in so-doing, best practices for local action shall be identified.

 

Background: Vietnam is a country that faces multiple challenges. Climate change is anticipated to exacerbate natural hazard risks, i.e., of flooding, storms, and prolonged periods of extreme heat, which are known to increase the risk of mortality, particularly among vulnerable groups. This is compounded by ongoing, rapid urban growth, that urgently necessitates safeguarding urban ecosystem services to facilitate climate change adaptation, and to support human health and well-being. Elements of the urban green-blue infrastructure are typically regarded as efficient nature-based interventions for the delivery of often multiple ecosystem services, including benefits for urban heat mitigation, i.e., the improvement of outdoor thermal comfort. Accordingly, such measures are increasingly being funded, politically recognised and implemented in Southeast Asian countries, including Vietnam. However, specifically for Vietnam, certain knowledge gaps remain with respect to the effectiveness of greening interventions for heat mitigation under local conditions, as well as in regard to ensuring the implementation of locally relevant and thus sustainable and resilient nature-based solutions.

How to cite: Sumfleth, L., Scheuer, S., Nguyen, L., and Haase, D.: Urban green-blue infrastructure as nature-based solutions for urban heat adaptation in Hue city, Central Vietnam – Potential impacts in contrast to citizen demands for urban greenery, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-7963, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-7963, 2024.

X2.115
|
EGU24-8709
|
Highlight
The flood protection benefits provided by beaches
(withdrawn)
Alexandra Toimil, Iñigo Losada, Moisés Álvarez-Cuesta, and Gonéri Le Cozannet
X2.116
|
EGU24-12477
|
ECS
Teng: Indigenous-Nature-Based Solutions for Sand Mitigation in Sistan Region, Iran - A Comprehensive Approach to Climate Resilience and Sustainable Development
(withdrawn after no-show)
Mohammadreza Jarkeh, Ali Shahriari, Abbas Miri, Saghar Ahmadian, and Nicholas Middleton
X2.117
|
EGU24-14833
|
ECS
Evaluating and Standardizing Nature-Based Solutions: A Comprehensive Review for Climate Change Adaptation
(withdrawn)
Sara Miñarro, Sara Maestre-Andrés, and Johannes Langemeyer
X2.118
|
EGU24-5034
Urban water challenges in Chinese cities – Sponge City program: initiatives, progress, challenges and opportunities on NBS and urban agriculture
(withdrawn after no-show)
Faith Ka Shun Chan, Yong-Guan Zhu, Gang Li, Meili Feng, Mengxia Xu, Linjun Xie, Xiaohui Lu, Zhe Zhu, Jiayu Wang, Lingwen Lu, Sitong Liu, Zilin Wang, and Wei-Qiang Chen
X2.119
|
EGU24-17239
|
ECS
Pauline Louis, Laurent Lassabatère, Arnold Imig, and Rémi Clément

Wastewater management and treatment are key points in maintaining the quality and the sustainability of water resources. To preserve receiving  water environments, efforts are being conducted to improve the  treatment efficiency . Soil infiltration can therefore be used as a  nature-based solution tertiary treatment, in some areas without surface  water available, or with supplementary water bodies’ protection  regulations. Secondary wastewater effluents (SWE) infiltration surfaces mainly consist of infiltration trenches or flood-meadows. Among the main issues encountered with soil infiltration, two can be highlighted:  the possible low hydraulic conductivity induced by soil clogging, on the  one hand, and the use of non-renewable draining materials such as  pebbles or gravel to ensure the distribution of water in trenches, on  the other hand. In France, in order to overcome those issues,  stakeholders are now considering the replacement of the gravel with  woodchips, a renewable biodegradable material, also prone to  biodiversity in soils. It has been demonstrated through a previous field study that the use of woodchips in infiltration trenches helps maintain infiltration over time, and even improves their performance. However, understanding the underlying mechanisms remains a significant scientific challenge. To better understand the soil and woodchip evolution processes, four columns were set up in a laboratory and fed with secondary treated effluents from a wastewater treatment plant.

 These four columns (with a diameter of 37 cm) are composed as follows:

  • a) Column #1: 80 cm of soil,
  • b) Column #2: 40 cm of wood chips and 40 cm of soil,
  • c) Column #3: 80 cm of soil inoculated with a selection of earthworms ,
  • d) Column #4: 40 cm of wood chips and 40 cm of soil, inoculated with a selection of earthworms .

During the presentation, hydraulic monitoring of the columns will be presented (inlet and outlet flow, column weight monitoring), showing the evolution of the infiltration rate. To analyze the evolution of physical properties within the columns, including parameters like saturated hydraulic conductivity, a modeling study was carried out using Comsol Multiphysics. Specifically, the Richards model (van Genuchten-Mualem) was employed to simulate and understand the changes occurring over time. The models fit the data well. They mainly show that the soil columns (1 and 3) tend to clog early if the hydraulic loads are too excessive. This is reflected by a reduction of hydraulic conductivity at saturation and porosity. In comparison, columns with wood chips seem to maintain their properties, with no major difference between columns with or without earthworms, after two years of monitoring. These results will be compared to the monitoring of physicochemical parameters of the inflow and outflow waters from the columns, allowing for a better understanding of the processes involving woodchips, soil, and macrofauna.

How to cite: Louis, P., Lassabatère, L., Imig, A., and Clément, R.: NBS for secondary wastewater effluents infiltration based on soil and woodchips as drainage material: laboratory study   , EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-17239, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-17239, 2024.

X2.120
|
EGU24-8569
|
ECS
Reference evapotranspiration sensitivity to climatic variables in Genoa, Italy. 
(withdrawn after no-show)
Komal Jabeen and Anna Palla

Posters virtual: Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 | vHall X2

Display time: Wed, 17 Apr 08:30–Wed, 17 Apr 18:00
Chairpersons: Natalia Rodriguez-Ramirez, Amy Oen, Pierre-Antoine Versini
vX2.5
|
EGU24-3616
alice severi

Given the local pollution near the school in Follonica(Gr)-Italy, specifically at the Gora river’s mouth, students have designed a study (IBSE method) of the chemical and ecological indicators of the river's situation. Analyzing the city's history about climate, the changes of the water regime and the shape of the river during the XX century, they have measured the indicators (physical and chemical parameters of the water, Extended Biotic Index). Creating a website and an interactive map of the river, they have communicated the situation to the local authorities, so the school has become involved in the "Pecora River Agreement", a local project aiming to the redevelopment of the river ecosystem. Students make proposal: plants in the riverbank, activities to sensitize local community and monitoring through ecological index for the future of the city.

How to cite: severi, A.: Requalify our river: from a school project to a city project, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-3616, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-3616, 2024.

vX2.6
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EGU24-19504
|
ECS
|
Sana Jajeh, Carl C. Anderson, and Christian Albert

Rural European landscapes are increasingly faced with the interlinked and cascading hazards of flooding and drought, exacerbated by both unsustainable land use practices and climate change. Sponge measures are particularly promising for addressing such multi-hazard risk from a participatory and social-ecological perspective. Sponge measures are nature-based solutions (NbS) that preserve, restore, enhance or create ecosystems to increase landscape and soil water retention while providing co-benefits for people and nature through biodiversity and ecosystem services. As NbS, they interact in complex ways with the socio-ecological systems (e.g. watershed boundaries) in which they are implemented. Thus, participatory processes are needed to ensure a systemic and interdisciplinary understanding of impacts while capturing diverse stakeholder values and interests. NbS design and planning often lacks 1) a shared understanding of the spatially-explicit impacts of NbS on the social-ecological system among stakeholders; 2) consideration of a broad spectrum of impacts as (co-)benefits and trade-offs; and 3) consideration of scales beyond the immediate measure and within diverging future scenarios.

As a promising approach to address these shortcomings, we propose the use of geodesign - an iterative framework for multidisciplinary, stakeholder-driven, and context-sensitive spatial decisions based on the integration of stakeholder inputs, geospatial data, and technology to generate real-time feedbacks and inform smart decision-making. This process also can support participation through fostering shared understandings and reconciling stakeholder conflicts. Despite promising applications in urban and landscape planning, knowledge is lacking on how and with what impacts geodesign can be applied to facilitate the planning of sponge measures at landscape scale. The aim of our research is to assess the utility of geodesign in the context of adaptive sponge measures by combining a systematic literature review with practical application of geodesign in two European catchments faced with increasing risk of hydrometeriological extremes. The review will quantify the adoption and past effectiveness of geodesign practices in similar landscape planning contexts. Based on these insights, a geodesign approach will be developed and implemented within the EU SpongeScapes project (spongescapes.eu) in selected case studies to generate future scenarios to increase landscape resilience against climate change. We present the research plan, including initial hypotheses and preliminary findings as conducted within the context of ongoing PhD research. With the increasing implementation of NbS in Europe in response to unfolding climate change and its consequences, our research will provide insights into the potential benefits and limitations of geodesign to improve their co-design, support policy creation, and inform decision-making.

How to cite: Jajeh, S., Anderson, C. C., and Albert, C.: Collaborative planning of nature-based solutions for climate resilience at landscape scale: exploring the potential of geodesign, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-19504, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-19504, 2024.

vX2.7
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EGU24-13070
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Grzegorz Budzik, Tomasz Kowalczyk, Piotr Krajewski, Monika Lebiedzińska, and Agnieszka Soszyńska

Modern cities are highly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change, primarily due to the escalating frequency of extreme weather events, including heatwaves. The current state of knowledge leaves no doubt that these effects are exacerbated by ongoing urbanization, leading to the continuous sealing of surfaces and a decrease in green areas in urbanized regions, contributing to the formation of Urban Heat Islands (UHI). These phenomena result in urban space degradation, causing economic, environmental, and demographic losses. Consequently, implementing solutions to enhance cities' resilience to climate threats should be a priority for local governments. Crucial in this context is the development of blue-green infrastructure, with a specific emphasis on micro-retention and the improvement of biologically active surfaces and vegetation habitat conditions. The implementation of such solutions, especially in the face of increasing extreme weather events, is essential for ensuring the sustainable development of smart cities.

This paper will present the results of research on the spatiotemporal distribution of the effectiveness of various components of blue-green infrastructure on a city-wide scale (including: river valleys, forests, urban parks, squares, pocket parks, and larger water bodies) in mitigating the UHI phenomenon in Wrocław, Poland. The study assesses the potential of blue-green infrastructure to mitigate the impact of heatwaves on the population most vulnerable to such threats. As an indicator of urbanized areas' vulnerability to the negative health effects of UHI, we focused on the population aged over 65. The research aims to provide crucial insights into how blue-green infrastructure can be optimized to effectively reduce UHI impacts and minimize health risks, especially within the most vulnerable age groups. This operation constitutes one of the initial stages in creating a prototype of a digital twin of the urban environment of Wrocław. The ultimate goal is to model information about blue-green infrastructure for the purpose of optimizing spatial policy in the context of adapting urbanized areas to climate change. This approach aligns with the Destination Earth initiative developed within the framework of the European Green Deal and EU Digital Strategy.

In the research, data integration was performed using various sources, including multispectral imagery from PlanetScope SuperDove, thermal data from ECOSTRESS LST, point clouds from airborne laser scanning (ALS), Topographic Objects Database (BDOT10k), and demographic data from municipal databases. Importantly, the utilized data are openly accessible and free of charge under the principles of Open Science, enabling the replication of procedures in other cities in Poland and, after identification and adjustment of relevant local data, numerous cities worldwide. In Wrocław, the project aims to provide support in creating and modifying existing and new planning documents, including local spatial development plans, the general plan, and the commune development strategy. This action supports the adaptation of local spatial policy to the growing needs of adaptation to climate change. The research is conducted within the program "Implementation Doctorate – 6th edition" by the Ministry of Education and Science.

How to cite: Budzik, G., Kowalczyk, T., Krajewski, P., Lebiedzińska, M., and Soszyńska, A.: Assessing spatiotemporal distribution of the effectiveness of Blue-Green Infrastructure in mitigating the Urban Heat Island phenomenon in Wroclaw, Poland under the Digital Twin concept for spatial policy optimization, EGU General Assembly 2024, Vienna, Austria, 14–19 Apr 2024, EGU24-13070, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu24-13070, 2024.