This page contains Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) sessions compiled by the EDI Committee Co-chairs.

GDB – Great Debates

GDB10 EDI

Intersectionality refers to a combination of identity and social factors which combine to create different modes of discrimination in the geoscience community. Factors include but are not limited to gender identity, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, disability, age, and religion. Different combinations of factors can interact to enhance (or reduce) the possibility that persons may experience discriminating behaviours such as sexism, racism, ableism, and colonialism.
In the geoscience community, where global issues require international collaboration, these factors are more likely to interact and be displayed. At all career levels, from undergraduate and postgraduate students to mid- and late-career researchers, intersectionality is present. Non-inclusive working environments ultimately create an atmosphere of discriminatory behavior which leads to abandonment of academic careers.
Institutional level initiatives that are clearly functional are key to not only promote but assure and protect inclusivity. In turn, this builds a positive and productive working environment, promotes the mental well-being of all scientists, and gives everyone the opportunity to reach their greatest potential.
In this great debate, we will address a series of intersectional factors and how they may be compounded in adverse (and positive) ways. We will discuss ways and means to invest in intersectional issues and the cost and value of promoting inclusion of all diversities with equitable initiatives.

Speakers

  • Clara Barker, University of Oxford, Northern Ireland
  • Helen Glaves, British Geological Survey, United Kingdom
  • Ivica Vilibić, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Croatia
  • Chiara Xausa, University of Bologna, Italy
Convener: Anita Di Chiara | Co-conveners: Evguenia Roussak, Helen Glaves, Ivica Vilibić
Programme
| Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room E1
Wed, 10:45
GDB8 EDI

The academic landscape consistently emphasizes the importance of mobility. Researchers, particularly those in the early stage of their careers, undergo increasing pressures as international mobility becomes a key requirement for securing academic positions. Academic mobility fosters global collaboration, enriches research perspectives, and increases the productivity of the individual and the research group, thereby accelerating innovation, but it comes with a myriad of challenges; particularly for academics in relationships (whether with other academics or partners pursuing different career paths), third-country nationals, and individuals facing social inequalities in the access to opportunities and resources.

Focusing on Europe, the EU has introduced policies to encourage and increase cross-border mobility in the European Research Area context. However, the EU's free movement policy still has gaps which can present obstacles.

Do the opportunities provided by academic mobility outweigh the challenges associated with it? How can the EU and academic institutions address the paradox of promoting academic mobility while also catering to the diverse needs and challenges faced by the modern academic, especially in light of relationship and nationality constraints? What are the challenges faced by displaced scientists and what can the scientific community do to address these challenges? In this great debate, we ask these questions and consider the perspective of different nationals, policies around researcher mobility in the EU, present and proposed institutional frameworks for inequalities we see in academic mobility and gendered implications.

Convener: Öykü KoçECSECS | Co-conveners: David Fernández-Blanco, Simon ClarkECSECS, Liliana MacotelaECSECS, Christina Anna OrieschnigECSECS
Programme
| Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room E1
Tue, 10:45

MAL – Medal & Award Lectures and Celebrations

MAL0
EGU Award & Medal Celebration
Convener: Irina M. Artemieva
Wed, 17 Apr, 17:30–19:30 (CEST)
 
Room E1
Wed, 17:30

SC – Short Courses

SC1.3 EDI

LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersexual, Asexual, plus; or LGBT for short) geoscientists are likely to have to face several obstacles throughout their career compared to their cisgender/heterosexual colleagues. These obstacles can take many forms, e.g., inflexible bureaucratic limits on name/gender marker, changes on documentation, a lack of training for cruise/field leaders on LGBT topics, a lack of support for transgender and gender non-conforming (GNC) people on field trips and research cruises, and safety and medical considerations LGBT people must account for when travelling for either field work/cruises or when moving countries for a new position. These obstacles can be abated and overcome; with adequate understanding by colleagues and initiatives, LGBT academics can thrive, allowing them to contribute to research without obstacles.

In this short course, our invited speakers will discuss some of these topics, present their experience with the obstacles they have faced in their careers, and share how they have dealt with or overcome these obstacles. We will also highlight the changes that have occurred in recent years on an institutional level and on a General Assembly level and discuss future challenges and improvements to come.

Speakers
- Sean Vrielink, University of Twente, the Netherlands
- Karsten Haustein, Leipzig University, Germany
- Louis Rivoire, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Co-organized by GM13/PS8/SSP1
Convener: Felix MüllerECSECS | Co-conveners: Hannah Sophia DaviesECSECS, Rey MourotECSECS, Eleanor PikeECSECS, Bene AschennellerECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.85/86
Tue, 14:00
SC2.8

Geoscience has a long history, wound up with the history of science itself, and thus with colonialism and colonial thinking. We see the manifestation of this colonial history in practices such as “parachute science”, where international scientists, usually from higher-income countries, conduct field work or collect data and samples in another country, usually of lower income countries, and then elaborate the data and publish scientific papers without involving local scientists and/or local communities from that nation. This is an example of scientific neo-colonialism. We see this in the exploitation of local people whose lands are visited for field work and in the exclusion or partial extractive collaboration with in-country geoscientists. Part of this disparity between researchers is also reflected in the difference in experience of access to funding, ease of mobility, issues of visa and fear of speaking out against the status quo.
Building on an EGU2023 short course and Great Debate, here we propose a more informal session to provide participants with an introduction to the colonial background of geosciences, defining the terminology and outlining efforts to decolonize geosciences. Our goal is to raise awareness among the EGU members who may unintentionally be part of neo-colonial research practices and open up a space to discuss solutions. We also aim to open up the discussion for geoscientists on the receiving end of such practices to share stories, ideas and experiences to build a more inclusive, responsive community of practice.

Co-organized by EOS4/BG1/GM13
Convener: Robyn Pickering | Co-conveners: Anouk BeniestECSECS, Wendy KhumaloECSECS, Rivoningo KhosaECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Thu, 12:45
SC4.1 EDI

Building a successful academic career is a challenge. Doing it while also building a family might push you to your limit. Many early and mid-career scientists are faced with the question of how to balance family and academic career. They are finding themselves left with a private problem, when it is actually a shared and societal issue, linking to other overarching themes of participation and diversity.
It is crucial to find support and confidence in going forward as an individual, and we as a community need to talk about parenting in academia to be able to demand and develop sustainable solutions that benefit many, instead of fighting private battles over and over again.
This short course aims to follow up on what has been discussed at the EGU General Assembly in 2023 and will (1) provide some insight into how being a parent affects your every day academic life, (2) highlight the existing support measures for parents in academia in different countries, and (3) offer some experience-based strategies that are being shared by a panel of academic parents, (4) concluding with an open discussion, touching on the public discourses on equal parenting and life-work balance. This course targets scientists who think about having a family, as well as parents in academia keen to connect, and faculty staff with responsibilities towards parenting employees.

Co-organized by GM13/PS8
Convener: Johanna KerchECSECS | Co-conveners: Rebekka SteffenECSECS, Bart RootECSECS, Gerald RaabECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.61/62
Tue, 10:45
SC4.2 EDI

Persistent issues of bullying, harassment, and other exclusionary behaviours remain prevalent in research and academic settings, disproportionately impacting underrepresented groups. Bystander intervention offers a proactive approach that enables individuals to safely counteract these instances of exclusionary behaviours and support those who are targeted.
This Short Course is facilitated by ADVANCEGeo and is designed to equip participants with the skills to be effective active bystanders. Workshop participants will be trained to: (i) discern various types of hostile behaviours such as bullying, microaggressions, and sexual harassment, (ii) identify the institutional structures and practices in research and academia that support their prevalence, and (iii) respond in a manner that's both safe and constructive.

Co-organized by AS6/GM13/PS8
Convener: Andrea PoppECSECS | Co-conveners: Simone M. PieberECSECS, Mengze LiECSECS, Anouk BeniestECSECS, Blair SchneiderECSECS
Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.61/62
Wed, 16:15

EOS – Education and Outreach Sessions

SC2.8

Geoscience has a long history, wound up with the history of science itself, and thus with colonialism and colonial thinking. We see the manifestation of this colonial history in practices such as “parachute science”, where international scientists, usually from higher-income countries, conduct field work or collect data and samples in another country, usually of lower income countries, and then elaborate the data and publish scientific papers without involving local scientists and/or local communities from that nation. This is an example of scientific neo-colonialism. We see this in the exploitation of local people whose lands are visited for field work and in the exclusion or partial extractive collaboration with in-country geoscientists. Part of this disparity between researchers is also reflected in the difference in experience of access to funding, ease of mobility, issues of visa and fear of speaking out against the status quo.
Building on an EGU2023 short course and Great Debate, here we propose a more informal session to provide participants with an introduction to the colonial background of geosciences, defining the terminology and outlining efforts to decolonize geosciences. Our goal is to raise awareness among the EGU members who may unintentionally be part of neo-colonial research practices and open up a space to discuss solutions. We also aim to open up the discussion for geoscientists on the receiving end of such practices to share stories, ideas and experiences to build a more inclusive, responsive community of practice.

Co-organized by EOS4/BG1/GM13
Convener: Robyn Pickering | Co-conveners: Anouk BeniestECSECS, Wendy KhumaloECSECS, Rivoningo KhosaECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Thu, 12:45
EOS3.1 EDI

Following the success of previous years, this session will explore reasons for the under-representation of different groups (gender identities, sexual orientations, racial and cultural backgrounds, abilities, religions, nationality or geography, socioeconomic status, ages, career stages, etc.) by welcoming debate among scientists, decision-makers and policy analysts in the geosciences.

The session will focus on both obstacles that contribute to under-representation and on best practices and innovative ideas to remove those obstacles. Contributions are solicited on the following topics:

- Role models to inspire and further motivate others (life experience and/or their contributions to promote equality)
- Imbalanced representation, preferably supported by data, for awards, medals, grants, high-level positions, invited talks and papers
- Perceived and real barriers to inclusion (personally, institutionally, culturally)
- Recommendations for new and innovative strategies to identify and overcome barriers
- Best practices and strategies to move beyond barriers, including:
• successful mentoring programmes
• networks that work
• specific funding schemes
• examples of host institutions initiatives
- COVID-related data, discussions and initiatives

This session is co-organised with the EGU early career scientists (ECS) and the European Research Council (ERC).

Co-organized by AS6/BG1/GM12/SSS1, co-sponsored by AGU and JpGU
Convener: Claudia Jesus-Rydin | Co-conveners: Pallavi Anand, Alberto Montanari, Hori, S. Rie, Billy Williams
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
EOS2.4 EDI

Fieldwork is essential in geoscience, it provides direct and practical experiences, produces valuable data, validates hypotheses, contextualizes findings, encourages discovery, and helps to understand and eventually solve real-world challenges. It is the foundation upon which a significant part of geoscience research and understanding is built. This session is dedicated to exploring the broad range of fieldwork-related topics for education and research. It also provides a safe space to exchange ideas for inclusive fieldwork.
Topics evolve around the organizational and financial aspects of fieldwork, including working with local communities and utilizing and sharing existing infrastructure and expertise both inside and outside of institutions. The session is also open to presenting novel methods for conducting and teaching fieldwork in a safe and welcoming manner. Best practices for managing the field crew, addressing stigmatized subjects (personal hygiene, safety gear, and work attire), and taking into account different needs are a few examples of this.
An additional focus is the utilisation of virtual field models such as digital Outcrop models and their evaluation showcasing features like seamless zooming, rotation, and measurement tools for geological exploration. These models enhance virtual fieldwork for education and professionals, promoting inclusivity and providing access to geological standards and conservation areas. The future focus involves integrating artificial intelligence and machine learning for advanced geological analysis.
This session invites everyone to share their insight about how to conduct scientifically relevant fieldwork in an inclusive, safe, and fun way for every scientist in geoscience.

Co-organized by CR8/GM12
Convener: Florina Roana SchalamonECSECS | Co-conveners: Michael Henry Stephenson, Maria Ansine Jensen, Hanting ZhongECSECS, Jennifer McKinley
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall A
Orals |
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00

NET – Networking

NET3
EDI Reception
Conveners: Lisa Wingate, Alberto Montanari, Caroline Slomp
Mon, 15 Apr, 18:00–19:00 (CEST)
 
EGU booth – Hall X2
Mon, 18:00
NET4

The Early Career Scientist (ECS) reception bring together ECS from across the scientific divisions with award-winning researchers, members of the EGU Union Council and Committees, sibling geoscience organisations, and selected industry partners. Participants are invited to build connections across fields of science and with senior members of the geoscience community in an informal setting with drinks and light snacks provided.

Tables will be sign-posted indicating where to go, whether you’re looking to meet fellow ECS from a particular division or join the discussion around themes like policy, publications, or science communication.

No registration is required to attend the reception. Note that the event has a maximum capacity and spaces will be filled on a first come, first served basis; attendees will not be able to join if the event is full.

Convener: Simon Clark | Co-conveners: David Fernández-Blanco, Daniel Evans
Tue, 16 Apr, 18:00–19:30 (CEST)
 
Rooftop Foyer
Tue, 18:00
NET5
Pride & Allies Reception
Convener: Anita Di Chiara
Wed, 17 Apr, 18:00–19:30 (CEST)
 
Rooftop Foyer
Wed, 18:00
NET8

Public information:

Our virtual attendees access the event via Gather.Town. Please come to the “Mentors & Mentees room” on Gather.Town.

Conveners: Solmaz MohadjerECSECS, Simona GabrielliECSECS, Christina Anna OrieschnigECSECS, Simon ClarkECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Rooftop Foyer
Tue, 12:45
NET9
Geographically Under-Represented Geoscientists' Networking Reception
Conveners: Stephen Mojzsis, Robyn Pickering, Lisa Wingate, Alberto Montanari, Caroline Slomp
Thu, 18 Apr, 18:00–19:00 (CEST)
 
EGU booth – Hall X2
Thu, 18:00

TM – Townhall Meetings

TM10

The townhall meeting informs and involves the EGU members in the educational activities undertaken by the Education, Outreach, and EDI (Equality, Diversity, and Inclusion) committee at EGU. We aim to strengthen the EGU community involvement and garner support for our ongoing and upcoming projects by presenting our achievements, challenges, and future plans. We will also present all available educational initiatives to our members to raise awareness about these exceptional resources.

Our EGU committees are driven by a deep commitment to enhancing educational opportunities in Geosciences within our community and beyond. The townhall meeting is dedicated to EGU community members, scientists, geoscience teachers and related fields in higher education, early career scientists and anyone interested in contributing to the educational growth of EGU.

Convener: Giuliana Panieri | Co-conveners: Solmaz MohadjerECSECS, Lisa Wingate, Teresita Gravina, Stavros StathopoulosECSECS
Mon, 15 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room G2
Mon, 19:00
TM19 EDI

We invite all EGU attendees to this Townhall, which is envisioned to be an authentic Meeting of the Minds across the spectrum of cultures and scientific disciplines. We seeks to foster common grounds for dialogue, exchange and connections between communities of the Collective West (Eurasia and North America; a.k.a. Global North), and the wider Global South.

EGU bills itself as a global organization, yet scientists from Africa, South America and South Asia, and those in the African, South American and South Asian Diaspora, are deeply under-represented. How shall EGU more effectively engage the Global South community? An important first step is to reach this community. Yet, a relatively low conference profile, along with Visa refusals, and limited local resources, severely hinders participation. We should highlight Global South prize winners, and invite more top speakers, as show concrete examples that creative freedom exists without boundaries. It pays to show that Virtual Attendance by Global South colleagues is a robust means to participate, too.

This will foster an atmosphere of directness, unity, community, fairness, support and friendship. For example: Why is African attendance at EGU miniscule despite being a neighboring continent to Europe? Change will not happen overnight. Highlighting personal success stories from and research opportunities with Global South scientists would do much to sow the seeds for authentic engagement.

In this Town Hall, we seek to promote mature and informative conversations by asking everyone, Global North and South (and East and West), what they have to say regarding topics such as Equality-Diversity-Inclusivity and Neocolonialism! These issues do not exist in isolation from one another, nor is the conversation a one-way street. What do colleagues from well-represented groups at EGU have to say? It would help to understand what the genuine challenges are that people face with respect to attitudes to, for example, "helicopter science". We need to hear more to begin to understand what it feels like to experience exploitation in order to fight it convincingly.

Several key issues call for convergence: What cultural perils and barriers exist, including professional dangers, to participating in political discussions at conferences? How are colleagues from under-represented nations discouraged by the ‘"savior complex" ? Ultimately, we pose the question: How can Global South scientists feel more invited at EGU?

Convener: Stephen J. Mojzsis | Co-conveners: Ruth Phoebe Tchanawandji, Jorgina Akushika
Tue, 16 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 1.85/86
Tue, 19:00

SPM – Splinter Meetings

SPM90

Meeting between the EGU Pride group, APECS Germany, Rainbow Geosciences and GayGU to share ideas and future plans on how to better promote inclusion of LBTQIA+ people at all career stages in the geosciences.

Convener: Anita Di Chiara
Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Mon, 10:45
SPM94

Here, we build on the momentum we achieved at the Town Hall Meeting (TM19) Common Grounds between the Global South and North. In this discussion, we ask: What cultural and professional perils and barriers exist that mitigate political discussions at conferences? How are colleagues from under-represented nations discouraged by some EDI initiatives? What are some examples of successful EDI? How can Global South scientists feel more invited at EGU?

Convener: Stephen J. Mojzsis | Co-conveners: Ruth Phoebe Tchanawandji, Jorgina Akushika
Fri, 19 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Fri, 12:45

ITS – Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions

ITS3.27/ERE6.6 EDI

The implementation of ambitious system-wide strategies, such as the Sustainable Development Goals or global and regional climate policies, needs to be addressed from a holistic perspective that evaluates the economy, energy, land, and water systems in an integrated manner. The dominant tools to assess these policies and their multisector implications - integrated assessment models (IAMs) - have contributed to ground-breaking science and policymaking, but suffer from limited subnational information. Gender, within-region income distribution, and other social and spatiotemporal heterogeneity are not represented well, even if we know their absence reduces insights on dynamics including the implementation of policies and consumer demand projections, and limits the analysis of equity outcomes. This session highlights subregional distributional and inequality impacts as one of the most crucial aspects in the design and implementation of transformative policies. This includes exploring different variables that are key for human development and welfare, including the implications for the labour market and supply chains, or impacts for human health attributable to air pollution or heat exposure. The connection of different multi-level models to widen the scope of the analysis is one way to provide more comprehensive and robust scientific evidence.
This transdisciplinary session encourages submissions that explore the incorporation of subnational dynamics, such as gender, education, and income inequalities, into global scenario analysis, and potential multimodel or multidisciplinary exercises that move beyond existing research paradigms and develop flexible, multiscale, and multisector frameworks that move the research focus from system-level to include human well-being.

Convener: Jon Sampedro | Co-conveners: Zarrar Khan, Shivika Mittal, Jarmo Kikstra
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.17
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
ITS3.2/ERE6.12 EDI

This session aims to bring together traditional and non-traditional perspectives on environmental change. It features contributions, collaborations, perspectives and data from geosciences, historiology, humanities, social sciences, academics, science communicators, civil society, indigenous peoples and citizens. Such a broad and interdisciplinary approach is required to address current “anthroposcenic" challenges, in particular the effective communication of research.

One such challenge we focus on is armed conflict. War is resulting in widespread environmental change in different contexts across the world, often compounding climate and biodiversity challenges. Contributions use innovative techniques and perspectives to characterise the environmental and geophysical dimensions of war, based on research methods including: satellite remote sensing, in-situ and lab-based pollution measurements, and machine learning.

We hope for the session to illustrate the role non-traditional perspectives have in geosciences to broaden and deepen our understanding of compound challenges past and present. This will help open up space for discussion and collaboration between different disciplines and actors into the future.

Convener: Wendy KhumaloECSECS | Co-conveners: Emnet NegashECSECS, Eoghan Darbyshire, Dominik Collet, Heli Huhtamaa
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.34
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 14:00

AS – Atmospheric Sciences

SC4.2 EDI

Persistent issues of bullying, harassment, and other exclusionary behaviours remain prevalent in research and academic settings, disproportionately impacting underrepresented groups. Bystander intervention offers a proactive approach that enables individuals to safely counteract these instances of exclusionary behaviours and support those who are targeted.
This Short Course is facilitated by ADVANCEGeo and is designed to equip participants with the skills to be effective active bystanders. Workshop participants will be trained to: (i) discern various types of hostile behaviours such as bullying, microaggressions, and sexual harassment, (ii) identify the institutional structures and practices in research and academia that support their prevalence, and (iii) respond in a manner that's both safe and constructive.

Co-organized by AS6/GM13/PS8
Convener: Andrea PoppECSECS | Co-conveners: Simone M. PieberECSECS, Mengze LiECSECS, Anouk BeniestECSECS, Blair SchneiderECSECS
Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.61/62
Wed, 16:15
EOS3.1 EDI

Following the success of previous years, this session will explore reasons for the under-representation of different groups (gender identities, sexual orientations, racial and cultural backgrounds, abilities, religions, nationality or geography, socioeconomic status, ages, career stages, etc.) by welcoming debate among scientists, decision-makers and policy analysts in the geosciences.

The session will focus on both obstacles that contribute to under-representation and on best practices and innovative ideas to remove those obstacles. Contributions are solicited on the following topics:

- Role models to inspire and further motivate others (life experience and/or their contributions to promote equality)
- Imbalanced representation, preferably supported by data, for awards, medals, grants, high-level positions, invited talks and papers
- Perceived and real barriers to inclusion (personally, institutionally, culturally)
- Recommendations for new and innovative strategies to identify and overcome barriers
- Best practices and strategies to move beyond barriers, including:
• successful mentoring programmes
• networks that work
• specific funding schemes
• examples of host institutions initiatives
- COVID-related data, discussions and initiatives

This session is co-organised with the EGU early career scientists (ECS) and the European Research Council (ERC).

Co-organized by AS6/BG1/GM12/SSS1, co-sponsored by AGU and JpGU
Convener: Claudia Jesus-Rydin | Co-conveners: Pallavi Anand, Alberto Montanari, Hori, S. Rie, Billy Williams
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Wed, 10:45

BG – Biogeosciences

SC2.8

Geoscience has a long history, wound up with the history of science itself, and thus with colonialism and colonial thinking. We see the manifestation of this colonial history in practices such as “parachute science”, where international scientists, usually from higher-income countries, conduct field work or collect data and samples in another country, usually of lower income countries, and then elaborate the data and publish scientific papers without involving local scientists and/or local communities from that nation. This is an example of scientific neo-colonialism. We see this in the exploitation of local people whose lands are visited for field work and in the exclusion or partial extractive collaboration with in-country geoscientists. Part of this disparity between researchers is also reflected in the difference in experience of access to funding, ease of mobility, issues of visa and fear of speaking out against the status quo.
Building on an EGU2023 short course and Great Debate, here we propose a more informal session to provide participants with an introduction to the colonial background of geosciences, defining the terminology and outlining efforts to decolonize geosciences. Our goal is to raise awareness among the EGU members who may unintentionally be part of neo-colonial research practices and open up a space to discuss solutions. We also aim to open up the discussion for geoscientists on the receiving end of such practices to share stories, ideas and experiences to build a more inclusive, responsive community of practice.

Co-organized by EOS4/BG1/GM13
Convener: Robyn Pickering | Co-conveners: Anouk BeniestECSECS, Wendy KhumaloECSECS, Rivoningo KhosaECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Thu, 12:45
EOS3.1 EDI

Following the success of previous years, this session will explore reasons for the under-representation of different groups (gender identities, sexual orientations, racial and cultural backgrounds, abilities, religions, nationality or geography, socioeconomic status, ages, career stages, etc.) by welcoming debate among scientists, decision-makers and policy analysts in the geosciences.

The session will focus on both obstacles that contribute to under-representation and on best practices and innovative ideas to remove those obstacles. Contributions are solicited on the following topics:

- Role models to inspire and further motivate others (life experience and/or their contributions to promote equality)
- Imbalanced representation, preferably supported by data, for awards, medals, grants, high-level positions, invited talks and papers
- Perceived and real barriers to inclusion (personally, institutionally, culturally)
- Recommendations for new and innovative strategies to identify and overcome barriers
- Best practices and strategies to move beyond barriers, including:
• successful mentoring programmes
• networks that work
• specific funding schemes
• examples of host institutions initiatives
- COVID-related data, discussions and initiatives

This session is co-organised with the EGU early career scientists (ECS) and the European Research Council (ERC).

Co-organized by AS6/BG1/GM12/SSS1, co-sponsored by AGU and JpGU
Convener: Claudia Jesus-Rydin | Co-conveners: Pallavi Anand, Alberto Montanari, Hori, S. Rie, Billy Williams
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Wed, 10:45

CR – Cryospheric Sciences

EOS2.4 EDI

Fieldwork is essential in geoscience, it provides direct and practical experiences, produces valuable data, validates hypotheses, contextualizes findings, encourages discovery, and helps to understand and eventually solve real-world challenges. It is the foundation upon which a significant part of geoscience research and understanding is built. This session is dedicated to exploring the broad range of fieldwork-related topics for education and research. It also provides a safe space to exchange ideas for inclusive fieldwork.
Topics evolve around the organizational and financial aspects of fieldwork, including working with local communities and utilizing and sharing existing infrastructure and expertise both inside and outside of institutions. The session is also open to presenting novel methods for conducting and teaching fieldwork in a safe and welcoming manner. Best practices for managing the field crew, addressing stigmatized subjects (personal hygiene, safety gear, and work attire), and taking into account different needs are a few examples of this.
An additional focus is the utilisation of virtual field models such as digital Outcrop models and their evaluation showcasing features like seamless zooming, rotation, and measurement tools for geological exploration. These models enhance virtual fieldwork for education and professionals, promoting inclusivity and providing access to geological standards and conservation areas. The future focus involves integrating artificial intelligence and machine learning for advanced geological analysis.
This session invites everyone to share their insight about how to conduct scientifically relevant fieldwork in an inclusive, safe, and fun way for every scientist in geoscience.

Co-organized by CR8/GM12
Convener: Florina Roana SchalamonECSECS | Co-conveners: Michael Henry Stephenson, Maria Ansine Jensen, Hanting ZhongECSECS, Jennifer McKinley
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall A
Orals |
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00

ERE – Energy, Resources and the Environment

ITS3.27/ERE6.6 EDI

The implementation of ambitious system-wide strategies, such as the Sustainable Development Goals or global and regional climate policies, needs to be addressed from a holistic perspective that evaluates the economy, energy, land, and water systems in an integrated manner. The dominant tools to assess these policies and their multisector implications - integrated assessment models (IAMs) - have contributed to ground-breaking science and policymaking, but suffer from limited subnational information. Gender, within-region income distribution, and other social and spatiotemporal heterogeneity are not represented well, even if we know their absence reduces insights on dynamics including the implementation of policies and consumer demand projections, and limits the analysis of equity outcomes. This session highlights subregional distributional and inequality impacts as one of the most crucial aspects in the design and implementation of transformative policies. This includes exploring different variables that are key for human development and welfare, including the implications for the labour market and supply chains, or impacts for human health attributable to air pollution or heat exposure. The connection of different multi-level models to widen the scope of the analysis is one way to provide more comprehensive and robust scientific evidence.
This transdisciplinary session encourages submissions that explore the incorporation of subnational dynamics, such as gender, education, and income inequalities, into global scenario analysis, and potential multimodel or multidisciplinary exercises that move beyond existing research paradigms and develop flexible, multiscale, and multisector frameworks that move the research focus from system-level to include human well-being.

Convener: Jon Sampedro | Co-conveners: Zarrar Khan, Shivika Mittal, Jarmo Kikstra
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.17
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
ITS3.2/ERE6.12 EDI

This session aims to bring together traditional and non-traditional perspectives on environmental change. It features contributions, collaborations, perspectives and data from geosciences, historiology, humanities, social sciences, academics, science communicators, civil society, indigenous peoples and citizens. Such a broad and interdisciplinary approach is required to address current “anthroposcenic" challenges, in particular the effective communication of research.

One such challenge we focus on is armed conflict. War is resulting in widespread environmental change in different contexts across the world, often compounding climate and biodiversity challenges. Contributions use innovative techniques and perspectives to characterise the environmental and geophysical dimensions of war, based on research methods including: satellite remote sensing, in-situ and lab-based pollution measurements, and machine learning.

We hope for the session to illustrate the role non-traditional perspectives have in geosciences to broaden and deepen our understanding of compound challenges past and present. This will help open up space for discussion and collaboration between different disciplines and actors into the future.

Convener: Wendy KhumaloECSECS | Co-conveners: Emnet NegashECSECS, Eoghan Darbyshire, Dominik Collet, Heli Huhtamaa
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.34
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 14:00

GM – Geomorphology

SC1.3 EDI

LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersexual, Asexual, plus; or LGBT for short) geoscientists are likely to have to face several obstacles throughout their career compared to their cisgender/heterosexual colleagues. These obstacles can take many forms, e.g., inflexible bureaucratic limits on name/gender marker, changes on documentation, a lack of training for cruise/field leaders on LGBT topics, a lack of support for transgender and gender non-conforming (GNC) people on field trips and research cruises, and safety and medical considerations LGBT people must account for when travelling for either field work/cruises or when moving countries for a new position. These obstacles can be abated and overcome; with adequate understanding by colleagues and initiatives, LGBT academics can thrive, allowing them to contribute to research without obstacles.

In this short course, our invited speakers will discuss some of these topics, present their experience with the obstacles they have faced in their careers, and share how they have dealt with or overcome these obstacles. We will also highlight the changes that have occurred in recent years on an institutional level and on a General Assembly level and discuss future challenges and improvements to come.

Speakers
- Sean Vrielink, University of Twente, the Netherlands
- Karsten Haustein, Leipzig University, Germany
- Louis Rivoire, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Co-organized by GM13/PS8/SSP1
Convener: Felix MüllerECSECS | Co-conveners: Hannah Sophia DaviesECSECS, Rey MourotECSECS, Eleanor PikeECSECS, Bene AschennellerECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.85/86
Tue, 14:00
SC2.8

Geoscience has a long history, wound up with the history of science itself, and thus with colonialism and colonial thinking. We see the manifestation of this colonial history in practices such as “parachute science”, where international scientists, usually from higher-income countries, conduct field work or collect data and samples in another country, usually of lower income countries, and then elaborate the data and publish scientific papers without involving local scientists and/or local communities from that nation. This is an example of scientific neo-colonialism. We see this in the exploitation of local people whose lands are visited for field work and in the exclusion or partial extractive collaboration with in-country geoscientists. Part of this disparity between researchers is also reflected in the difference in experience of access to funding, ease of mobility, issues of visa and fear of speaking out against the status quo.
Building on an EGU2023 short course and Great Debate, here we propose a more informal session to provide participants with an introduction to the colonial background of geosciences, defining the terminology and outlining efforts to decolonize geosciences. Our goal is to raise awareness among the EGU members who may unintentionally be part of neo-colonial research practices and open up a space to discuss solutions. We also aim to open up the discussion for geoscientists on the receiving end of such practices to share stories, ideas and experiences to build a more inclusive, responsive community of practice.

Co-organized by EOS4/BG1/GM13
Convener: Robyn Pickering | Co-conveners: Anouk BeniestECSECS, Wendy KhumaloECSECS, Rivoningo KhosaECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Thu, 12:45
SC4.1 EDI

Building a successful academic career is a challenge. Doing it while also building a family might push you to your limit. Many early and mid-career scientists are faced with the question of how to balance family and academic career. They are finding themselves left with a private problem, when it is actually a shared and societal issue, linking to other overarching themes of participation and diversity.
It is crucial to find support and confidence in going forward as an individual, and we as a community need to talk about parenting in academia to be able to demand and develop sustainable solutions that benefit many, instead of fighting private battles over and over again.
This short course aims to follow up on what has been discussed at the EGU General Assembly in 2023 and will (1) provide some insight into how being a parent affects your every day academic life, (2) highlight the existing support measures for parents in academia in different countries, and (3) offer some experience-based strategies that are being shared by a panel of academic parents, (4) concluding with an open discussion, touching on the public discourses on equal parenting and life-work balance. This course targets scientists who think about having a family, as well as parents in academia keen to connect, and faculty staff with responsibilities towards parenting employees.

Co-organized by GM13/PS8
Convener: Johanna KerchECSECS | Co-conveners: Rebekka SteffenECSECS, Bart RootECSECS, Gerald RaabECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.61/62
Tue, 10:45
SC4.2 EDI

Persistent issues of bullying, harassment, and other exclusionary behaviours remain prevalent in research and academic settings, disproportionately impacting underrepresented groups. Bystander intervention offers a proactive approach that enables individuals to safely counteract these instances of exclusionary behaviours and support those who are targeted.
This Short Course is facilitated by ADVANCEGeo and is designed to equip participants with the skills to be effective active bystanders. Workshop participants will be trained to: (i) discern various types of hostile behaviours such as bullying, microaggressions, and sexual harassment, (ii) identify the institutional structures and practices in research and academia that support their prevalence, and (iii) respond in a manner that's both safe and constructive.

Co-organized by AS6/GM13/PS8
Convener: Andrea PoppECSECS | Co-conveners: Simone M. PieberECSECS, Mengze LiECSECS, Anouk BeniestECSECS, Blair SchneiderECSECS
Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.61/62
Wed, 16:15
EOS3.1 EDI

Following the success of previous years, this session will explore reasons for the under-representation of different groups (gender identities, sexual orientations, racial and cultural backgrounds, abilities, religions, nationality or geography, socioeconomic status, ages, career stages, etc.) by welcoming debate among scientists, decision-makers and policy analysts in the geosciences.

The session will focus on both obstacles that contribute to under-representation and on best practices and innovative ideas to remove those obstacles. Contributions are solicited on the following topics:

- Role models to inspire and further motivate others (life experience and/or their contributions to promote equality)
- Imbalanced representation, preferably supported by data, for awards, medals, grants, high-level positions, invited talks and papers
- Perceived and real barriers to inclusion (personally, institutionally, culturally)
- Recommendations for new and innovative strategies to identify and overcome barriers
- Best practices and strategies to move beyond barriers, including:
• successful mentoring programmes
• networks that work
• specific funding schemes
• examples of host institutions initiatives
- COVID-related data, discussions and initiatives

This session is co-organised with the EGU early career scientists (ECS) and the European Research Council (ERC).

Co-organized by AS6/BG1/GM12/SSS1, co-sponsored by AGU and JpGU
Convener: Claudia Jesus-Rydin | Co-conveners: Pallavi Anand, Alberto Montanari, Hori, S. Rie, Billy Williams
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
EOS2.4 EDI

Fieldwork is essential in geoscience, it provides direct and practical experiences, produces valuable data, validates hypotheses, contextualizes findings, encourages discovery, and helps to understand and eventually solve real-world challenges. It is the foundation upon which a significant part of geoscience research and understanding is built. This session is dedicated to exploring the broad range of fieldwork-related topics for education and research. It also provides a safe space to exchange ideas for inclusive fieldwork.
Topics evolve around the organizational and financial aspects of fieldwork, including working with local communities and utilizing and sharing existing infrastructure and expertise both inside and outside of institutions. The session is also open to presenting novel methods for conducting and teaching fieldwork in a safe and welcoming manner. Best practices for managing the field crew, addressing stigmatized subjects (personal hygiene, safety gear, and work attire), and taking into account different needs are a few examples of this.
An additional focus is the utilisation of virtual field models such as digital Outcrop models and their evaluation showcasing features like seamless zooming, rotation, and measurement tools for geological exploration. These models enhance virtual fieldwork for education and professionals, promoting inclusivity and providing access to geological standards and conservation areas. The future focus involves integrating artificial intelligence and machine learning for advanced geological analysis.
This session invites everyone to share their insight about how to conduct scientifically relevant fieldwork in an inclusive, safe, and fun way for every scientist in geoscience.

Co-organized by CR8/GM12
Convener: Florina Roana SchalamonECSECS | Co-conveners: Michael Henry Stephenson, Maria Ansine Jensen, Hanting ZhongECSECS, Jennifer McKinley
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall A
Orals |
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00

PS – Planetary & Solar System Sciences

SC1.3 EDI

LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersexual, Asexual, plus; or LGBT for short) geoscientists are likely to have to face several obstacles throughout their career compared to their cisgender/heterosexual colleagues. These obstacles can take many forms, e.g., inflexible bureaucratic limits on name/gender marker, changes on documentation, a lack of training for cruise/field leaders on LGBT topics, a lack of support for transgender and gender non-conforming (GNC) people on field trips and research cruises, and safety and medical considerations LGBT people must account for when travelling for either field work/cruises or when moving countries for a new position. These obstacles can be abated and overcome; with adequate understanding by colleagues and initiatives, LGBT academics can thrive, allowing them to contribute to research without obstacles.

In this short course, our invited speakers will discuss some of these topics, present their experience with the obstacles they have faced in their careers, and share how they have dealt with or overcome these obstacles. We will also highlight the changes that have occurred in recent years on an institutional level and on a General Assembly level and discuss future challenges and improvements to come.

Speakers
- Sean Vrielink, University of Twente, the Netherlands
- Karsten Haustein, Leipzig University, Germany
- Louis Rivoire, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Co-organized by GM13/PS8/SSP1
Convener: Felix MüllerECSECS | Co-conveners: Hannah Sophia DaviesECSECS, Rey MourotECSECS, Eleanor PikeECSECS, Bene AschennellerECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.85/86
Tue, 14:00
SC4.1 EDI

Building a successful academic career is a challenge. Doing it while also building a family might push you to your limit. Many early and mid-career scientists are faced with the question of how to balance family and academic career. They are finding themselves left with a private problem, when it is actually a shared and societal issue, linking to other overarching themes of participation and diversity.
It is crucial to find support and confidence in going forward as an individual, and we as a community need to talk about parenting in academia to be able to demand and develop sustainable solutions that benefit many, instead of fighting private battles over and over again.
This short course aims to follow up on what has been discussed at the EGU General Assembly in 2023 and will (1) provide some insight into how being a parent affects your every day academic life, (2) highlight the existing support measures for parents in academia in different countries, and (3) offer some experience-based strategies that are being shared by a panel of academic parents, (4) concluding with an open discussion, touching on the public discourses on equal parenting and life-work balance. This course targets scientists who think about having a family, as well as parents in academia keen to connect, and faculty staff with responsibilities towards parenting employees.

Co-organized by GM13/PS8
Convener: Johanna KerchECSECS | Co-conveners: Rebekka SteffenECSECS, Bart RootECSECS, Gerald RaabECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.61/62
Tue, 10:45
SC4.2 EDI

Persistent issues of bullying, harassment, and other exclusionary behaviours remain prevalent in research and academic settings, disproportionately impacting underrepresented groups. Bystander intervention offers a proactive approach that enables individuals to safely counteract these instances of exclusionary behaviours and support those who are targeted.
This Short Course is facilitated by ADVANCEGeo and is designed to equip participants with the skills to be effective active bystanders. Workshop participants will be trained to: (i) discern various types of hostile behaviours such as bullying, microaggressions, and sexual harassment, (ii) identify the institutional structures and practices in research and academia that support their prevalence, and (iii) respond in a manner that's both safe and constructive.

Co-organized by AS6/GM13/PS8
Convener: Andrea PoppECSECS | Co-conveners: Simone M. PieberECSECS, Mengze LiECSECS, Anouk BeniestECSECS, Blair SchneiderECSECS
Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.61/62
Wed, 16:15

SSP – Stratigraphy, Sedimentology & Palaeontology

SC1.3 EDI

LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer, Intersexual, Asexual, plus; or LGBT for short) geoscientists are likely to have to face several obstacles throughout their career compared to their cisgender/heterosexual colleagues. These obstacles can take many forms, e.g., inflexible bureaucratic limits on name/gender marker, changes on documentation, a lack of training for cruise/field leaders on LGBT topics, a lack of support for transgender and gender non-conforming (GNC) people on field trips and research cruises, and safety and medical considerations LGBT people must account for when travelling for either field work/cruises or when moving countries for a new position. These obstacles can be abated and overcome; with adequate understanding by colleagues and initiatives, LGBT academics can thrive, allowing them to contribute to research without obstacles.

In this short course, our invited speakers will discuss some of these topics, present their experience with the obstacles they have faced in their careers, and share how they have dealt with or overcome these obstacles. We will also highlight the changes that have occurred in recent years on an institutional level and on a General Assembly level and discuss future challenges and improvements to come.

Speakers
- Sean Vrielink, University of Twente, the Netherlands
- Karsten Haustein, Leipzig University, Germany
- Louis Rivoire, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Co-organized by GM13/PS8/SSP1
Convener: Felix MüllerECSECS | Co-conveners: Hannah Sophia DaviesECSECS, Rey MourotECSECS, Eleanor PikeECSECS, Bene AschennellerECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.85/86
Tue, 14:00

SSS – Soil System Sciences

EOS3.1 EDI

Following the success of previous years, this session will explore reasons for the under-representation of different groups (gender identities, sexual orientations, racial and cultural backgrounds, abilities, religions, nationality or geography, socioeconomic status, ages, career stages, etc.) by welcoming debate among scientists, decision-makers and policy analysts in the geosciences.

The session will focus on both obstacles that contribute to under-representation and on best practices and innovative ideas to remove those obstacles. Contributions are solicited on the following topics:

- Role models to inspire and further motivate others (life experience and/or their contributions to promote equality)
- Imbalanced representation, preferably supported by data, for awards, medals, grants, high-level positions, invited talks and papers
- Perceived and real barriers to inclusion (personally, institutionally, culturally)
- Recommendations for new and innovative strategies to identify and overcome barriers
- Best practices and strategies to move beyond barriers, including:
• successful mentoring programmes
• networks that work
• specific funding schemes
• examples of host institutions initiatives
- COVID-related data, discussions and initiatives

This session is co-organised with the EGU early career scientists (ECS) and the European Research Council (ERC).

Co-organized by AS6/BG1/GM12/SSS1, co-sponsored by AGU and JpGU
Convener: Claudia Jesus-Rydin | Co-conveners: Pallavi Anand, Alberto Montanari, Hori, S. Rie, Billy Williams
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Wed, 10:45