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Session programme

TS2

TS – Tectonics & Structural Geology

Programme group chairs: Andrea Argnani, Magdalena Scheck-Wenderoth, Olivier Lacombe, Claudio Rosenberg, Florian Fusseis, Rebecca Bell, Lucilla Benedetti

TS2 – Brittle Deformation and Fault-related Processes

TS2.1

In regions of active tectonics, the knowledge of fault evolution, dynamics and kinematics plays a key role in understanding the nature of the tectonic setting. This is of utmost importance, for example, for exploration of geothermal energy, safe CO2 sequestration and nuclear waste depositories. Nevertheless, we see tantalising very little of the faults that are so important for these topics. In geophysics, faults are only visible above the resolution of the method, in outcrop it is often the case that they have been exhumed and are now inactive. We need more information about all stages of faulting; why and when they occur, how they move, and how and why they keep on moving. We solicit novel and illuminating abstracts from analogue experiments, numerical models, and geophysical and or geological observations dealing with fault evolution, dynamics of faulting or kinematic behaviour.

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Convener: David Tanner | Co-conveners: Christian Brandes, Jennifer Ziesch
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room K2
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2
TS2.2

The advent of novel technologies have boosted our capability of acquiring new evidences that faults behavior is various and extremely sensitive to a large number of parameters. These evidences are supported in natural earthquakes by the occurence of a large pletora of events spanning from slow to fast earthquakes, precursory slips, non volcanic tremors and low frequency earthquakes. The aim of this session is to convey interdisciplinary studies on fault behaviour and processes controlling the propagation of slip instabilities in rocks, granular materials and/or laboratory analogs; we invite contributions at the frontiers between Rock Mechanics, Models, Seismology, Tectonics and Mineralogy dealing with either slow, fast or transient evolution of earthquakes and earthquake sequences in shallow and deep environments; we welcome studies performed at the laboratory and field scale, providing insights on earthquake evolution and/or constraining observed seismological statistical laws like Omori’s and Gutenberg-Richter’s; we welcome innovative techniques that help the observations and take advantage of high-speed imaging and continuous acoustic emission streaming data.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.9/GMPV7.25/SM2.9
Convener: Marco Maria Scuderi | Co-conveners: Giulio Di Toro, Pierre Dublanchet, Francois Passelegue, Elena Spagnuolo
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room K2
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X2
TS2.3

In the last few decades, there has been an increasing need to understand the interaction between Fluid Flow (F2), and Pore Pressure Prediction (P3) in Sedimentary Basins. Other than the environmental reasons (underground water quality, nuclear waste storage, CO2 sequestration…) behind this growing interest, there are many economic applications, which bring significant contributions from both academia and industry to better constrain this F2 P3 relationship. Indeed, the petroleum (overpressure constraint, hydrocarbon migration…), mining (dissolution and precipitation of minerals and transport of solids in solution…) and geothermal (heat transport…) industries are all eager to determine to what extent fluid flow and/or pore pressure prediction are important to constrain fluid migration and fluid rock interaction.
The development of advanced models, especially related to diagenetic reactions, has led to an increasing understanding of the interactions between the fluid and the rock. Yet our understanding of the interaction between F2, P3 and brittle deformation is still limited and very few studies have attempted to decipher the relationship between dynamic permeability (related to brittle deformation), pore pressure and the fluid flow in Sedimentary Basins.
Therefore, we encourage submissions of studies from a range of fields that can help to improve our understanding of interactions between Fluid Flow, Pore Pressure and Brittle Deformation in Sedimentary Basins. These can include, but are not limited to, analogue models, numerical modelling, geophysical data, and field data.
The participants to this session will be invited to submit their work to the special issue “Fluid Flow, Pore Pressure and Brittle Deformation” on the Geofluids Journal.

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Convener: Khalid Amrouch | Co-conveners: Nicolas Beaudoin, Jean-Paul Callot, Philippe Robion, Abderrahmane Soulaimani
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2
ERE6.4

The presence of fractures, whether natural or induced, has become increasingly important in recent years in the exploitation of Earth’s natural resources. Especially in rocks that have a low matrix permeability, the presence of fractures is critical for reaching flow rates sufficient for economic hydrocarbon production and heat extraction for geothermal reservoirs. Better prediction of subsurface fracture arrangements and their mechanical and flow response have become an increasingly relevant field of research.
We propose here a multi-disciplinary session on the arrangement and mechanical evolution of natural and induced fracture networks and their response to fluid flow in low-permeability rocks on a multitude of scales (from pore-scale to basin-scale). We encourage submissions from experimental, numerical and field studies on fracture network formation and control on fluid flow of naturally and hydraulically fractured systems. Also studies that address the role of fractures on both shale gas and tight geothermal reservoir application cases are welcomed. We especially encourage early-career scientists to present their work in this session.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.71/TS2.5
Convener: Richard Bakker | Co-conveners: Auke Barnhoorn, Jan Borgomano, Ismay Vénice Akker
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X1