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Session programme

OSA – Operational Systems and Applications

Programme Stream Moderators: Andrea Montani, Antti Mäkelä

OSA2 – Applications of meteorology

OSA2.1

Our European transport infrastructure is vulnerable to disruption by the weather and from other natural hazards. For example, we know that fog, snow, thunderstorms and volcanic ash all have potential to severely disrupt aviation. On land, rail and road networks may be greatly affected by factors such as snow, ice, flooding and strong winds. At sea, wind, fog, ice but also wind-driven sea motions such as waves, currents and sea ice can strongly affect traffic. Such disruptions can have significant consequences at both national and international level, and can be one of the most costly effects of bad weather.

Increasingly as transport networks expand, with climate change and as our dependence on technology increases, we see that there is a need to mitigate against the disruption of land, sea and air transport.

This session invites contributions from those involved in developing weather-based solutions for reducing risk to air, sea and/or land transport. In particular, participants are encouraged to discuss strategic risk reduction in transport at organizational or national level, perhaps achieved through engagement with the aviation or marine community, stakeholders and users in road and rail networks.

In addition, the session welcomes presentations on other aspects of transport meteorology, including impact studies and verification of forecasts, meteorological services in the cockpit, and environmental impacts of aviation and other forms of transport.

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Convener: Fraser Ralston | Co-Conveners: Ludovic Bouilloud, Christine Le Bot
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 11:00–13:00|Room S9
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 09:30–10:30 | Display Mon, 09 Sep, 09:30–Wed, 11 Sep, 12:30|Sports Hall
OSA2.2

Weather conditions directly influence agricultural yields. Hail, disease and drought can have devastating effects on crops. However meteorological-related risks can be reduced through better timing of harvests, application of pesticides or through use of irrigation systems. A clear picture of current and future weather conditions, along with appropriate farm actions, can increase the likelihood of improved yields.

Climate change also influences crop suitability in certain regions where livestock can be negatively affected by migrating diseases and available food. To complicate matters the agricultural sector is also trying to become more sustainable and environmentally friendly in an attempt to meet greenhouse gas emission targets.

This session intends to examine our increasing knowledge of agricultural meteorology, while also attempting to identify opportunities in our changing environment.

We invite presentations related but not limited to:
• Agrometeorological modelling (e.g. modelling agrometeorological related diseases, frost protection warning methods, drought indices etc.)
• Impact of weather and climate extremes on agriculture
• Methods of measurements and observations (e.g. ground based equipment, remote sensing products, citizen science, Big Data etc.)
• Decision support systems & the representation of uncertainty
• Interactions/feedback of farmers and other end users
• Use of future climate projections on agrometeorological models

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Convener: Keith Lambkin | Co-Conveners: Josef Eitzinger, Sándor Szalai
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 16:30–18:30|Room S1
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 09:30–10:30 | Display Mon, 09 Sep, 09:30–Wed, 11 Sep, 12:30|Sports Hall
OSA2.3

Renewable energy sources are currently investigated worldwide and technologies undergo rapid developments. However, further basic and applied studies in meteorological processes and tools are needed to understand these technologies and better integrate them with local, national and international power systems. This applies especially to wind and solar energy resources as they are strongly affected by weather and climate and highly variable in space and time. Contributions from all energy meteorology fields are invited with a focus on the following topics:

• Wind and turbulence profiles with respect to wind energy applications (measurements and theory) including wakes within a wind farm;
• Clouds and aerosol properties with respect to solar energy applications (measurements and theory);
• Marine renewable energy (wind, wave, tidal, marine current, osmotic, thermal);
• Meteorology and biomass for energy;
• Impact of wind and solar energy farms and biomass crops on local, regional and global meteorology;
• The use of numerical models and remote sensing (ground based and from satellites) for renewable energy assessment studies;
• Research on nowcasting, short term forecasts (minutes to day) and ensemble forecasts and its application in the energy sector;
• Quantification of the variability of renewable resources in space and time and its integration into power systems;
• Impacts of long term climate change and variability on power systems (e.g., changes in renewable resources or demand characteristics);
• Practical experience using meteorological information in energy related applications.

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Convener: Sven-Erik Gryning | Co-Conveners: Ekaterina Batchvarova, Marion Schroedter-Homscheidt, Yves-Marie Saint-Drenan
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 16:30–18:30|Glass Hall, Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:30|Glass Hall
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 09:30–10:30 | Display Mon, 09 Sep, 09:30–Wed, 11 Sep, 12:30|Sports Hall
OSA2.4

This session “Atmospheric effects on humans” deals with the interactions between atmospheric conditions and humans beings in an interdisciplinary manner. The core question is how atmospheric conditions impact the well-being and health of humans, and how to transfer such knowledge in a widely understandable way in order to ensure the appropriate use of such kind of information. Atmospheric conditions include transient ones driven by weather patterns and long-term climatology but as well how potential climate change trends may affect these interactions.

In this context, the session will address issues concerning health, warning systems and measures in place to mitigate adverse impacts, and the models used to evaluate the heat load and cold stress on organisms. This will include the thermal component from the environment, weather sensitivity, actinic and chemical components of stress factors. Modelling studies and experimental studies on how environmental management, urban planning and design or traffic regulation can improve living conditions and decrease emissions are particularly welcome.

In addition, the session will consider the impacts of weather processes on human well-being and health. Since several methods are in use to compile bio-weather forecasts, we are looking forward to discussing such approaches and the way to convey such information to the public, but also to special target groups. Another aim is to describe ways, how climate data and information should be transferred and addressed for issues on tourism, recreation and other economic sectors.

The session will also address efforts to combine different environmental impacts on humans into one single index, as it is well known that humans react to the whole mix of atmospheric stimuli. Our aim is to improve the requested information and to look for more efficient ways of conveying the message on a regular basis in order to enable citizens to make the best use of such information in their everyday activities.

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Conveners: Andreas Matzarakis, Tanja Cegnar | Co-Conveners: Fiorella Acquaotta, Sorin Cheval
Orals
| Thu, 12 Sep, 13:30–18:00|Room M1
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 13 Sep, 10:30–11:30 | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 13:30–Fri, 13 Sep, 13:30|Sports Hall

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