SSS – Soil System Sciences

Thursday, 18 April

SSS4.2

Soil health is the capacity of soil to function within ecosystem and land-use boundaries to sustain biological productivity, maintain environmental quality, and increase plant, animal, and human health. In the current context of global change, characterized by the convergence of extreme events and human activities such as intensive fertilization, pesticide application, mismanagement of landfills, nuclear accidents, etc., it is crucial to prioritize soil health. This explains the widespread adoption of sustainable agricultural practices aimed at preserving and/or improving the physical and chemical fertility of the soil. Furthermore, limiting the negative impacts of these practices on soil microbial communities prevents the alteration of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients.
We invite field, laboratory and modeling studies on soil health analyzing the effects of human activities on soil organic matter content and composition, microbial functions and enzymatic activities, regulation of nutrient cycles, detoxication of organic pollutants and other relevant indicators. This session considers contributions that examine how soil health influences the delivery of ecosystem services such as provisioning, regulatory, supporting, and cultural services. Contributions covering studies on soil health from a micro to a global scale are highly appreciated.

Convener: Nataliya BilyeraECSECS | Co-conveners: Laura Gismero RodríguezECSECS, Sana BoubehzizECSECS, Yakov Kuzyakov, Emmanuel Arthur, Francisco Jesús Moreno RaceroECSECS, Claudio Zaccone
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 14:00
BG3.13 EDI

The present context of accelerated changes in both climate and land use imposes an unprecedent pressure on global ecosystems. The influences of landform and land use on soil-plant relationships and related subsoil processes are crucial for ecosystem service maintenance and restoration. This understanding is necessary to develop management practices to improve climate change adaptation, food security as well as providing habitats for soil biodiversity. In particular we focus on the role of different ecosystem components such as subsoil and roots that are often neglected.
The purpose of this session is to understand soil-plant interaction across landforms, including distribution of vegetation and coevolving soils and landforms, as well as related subsoil processes and root growths. In particular, theoretical, modelling, and empirical studies are welcome on subsoil functions, investigating root traits and rhizosphere processes on ecosystem services, degradation and biogeochemical cycling in different ecosystems and land uses. We also include studies on the implications of spatial patterns of soil-plant systems for the resilience and stability of ecosystems The session will have a particular interest on global changes effects on those processes and dynamics.

Co-organized by GM5/SSS8
Convener: Charlotte VédèreECSECS | Co-conveners: Wulf Amelung, Patricia Saco, Marie ArnaudECSECS, Cornelia Rumpel, Jose Rodriguez, Abad Chabbi
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:10 (CEST)
 
Room N1
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
SSS5.2

Soils represent a major terrestrial store of both organic and inorganic carbon. At present soils are a net carbon sink, and building soil carbon stocks holds a potential to contribute to achieving net zero carbon. Furthermore, the accrual, stability, and cycling of carbon is fundamental to the productivity and resilience of soil systems, and preserving or even increasing soil carbon stocks is critical for allowing sustainable agricultural crop production.

Avenues for organic carbon sequestration in soils include plant-based inputs, the addition of pyrogenic carbon (biochar), and addition of composts or other additives such as manures and soil conditioners as long as additionality and leakage effects are considered. Enhanced silicate weathering may hold significant potential for building up inorganic carbon stocks, while inputs from bedrock, and mediation by land use changes such as afforestation, may also increase inorganic soil carbon stocks.

This session seeks to explore how soil carbon stocks can be increased so as to simultaneously enhance agricultural productivity, mitigate negative repercussions of changing environmental conditions, and contribute to achieving carbon neutrality. Alongside this, advances in methods for monitoring and modelling rates of soil carbon loss or carbon sequestration in soils are key to inform political, agronomical, and geo-engineering approaches. Is there a threshold above which a soil profile can no longer increase its carbon stock? What determines the fate of C inputs to the soil? What are the mechanisms determining differences between soils’ capacity to stabilise C?

Including Arne Richter Awards for Outstanding ECS Lecture
Co-organized by BG8
Convener: Chris McCloskeyECSECS | Co-conveners: Felix Seidel, Laura SchneeECSECS
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 14:00
BG3.32

Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are among the most important greenhouse gases (GHG) after carbon dioxide (CO2) in accelerating global warming and deserve special attention as their concentrations increase. Forest ecosystems play an important role in the exchange of GHGs with the atmosphere. It has been shown that not only soils but also trees play a significant role in the net exchange of CH4 and N2O in forests. Trees can contribute to ecosystem exchange by uptaking and transporting soil-produced CH4 and N2O to the atmosphere, by in situ production and consumption of both gases in plant tissues, and by modifying carbon and nitrogen turnover in adjacent soils. However, the contribution of these individual processes to the net ecosystem GHG exchange is still unclear and appears to depend on many aspects such as tree species, forest ecosystem type, environmental parameters and seasonal dynamics. Soil - vegetation - atmosphere interactions play a crucial role in controlling the global budget of these gases.

This session aims to bring together scientists working on CH4 and N2O cycles in forest ecosystems across different climatic and hydrological ranges and scales, which is crucial for improving our understanding of CH4 and N2O exchange in forest ecosystems. We welcome contributions on production and consumption processes and mechanisms in soils and plant tissues, as well as on gas transport processes in the soil - tree - atmosphere continuum. Gas flux measurements from forest soils, cryptogams, tree stems, leaves or canopies measured with chamber systems, or integrated ecosystem approaches (flux tower with Eddy covariance, satellite or modelling) would be very appreciated.

Co-organized by SSS9
Convener: Katerina Machacova | Co-conveners: Laëtitia Brechet, Sylvia Toet, Josep Barba
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room N1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Thu, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
BG3.35 EDI

Managed agricultural ecosystems (grassland and cropland) are an important source and/or sink for greenhouse gases (GHG) as well as for reactive trace gases. Representative measurements and modelling under typical conditions as well as for potential mitigation options are necessary as a basis for recommendations to policy makers and farmers.
Due to the simultaneous influence of various environmental drivers and management activities (e.g. fertilizer application, harvest, grazing) the flux patterns are often complex and difficult to attribute to individual drivers. Moreover, management related mitigation options may often result in trade-offs between different GHG or between emission of GHG and reactive gases like NH3, NOx, or VOCs. To investigate these interactions, the session addresses experimentalists and modelers working on carbon and nitrogen cycling processes and related fluxes on plot, field, landscape, and regional scale. It is open to a wide range of studies including the development and application of new devices, methods, and model approaches as well as field observations and process studies. Particularly welcome are studies on multiple gases and on the full carbon, nitrogen or GHG budgets. We also encourage contributions about the applicability and overall potential of mitigation options.

Co-organized by SSS9
Convener: Christof Ammann | Co-conveners: Christian Brümmer, Eliza HarrisECSECS, Alexander Moravek, Alex Valach
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.17
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 14:00
HS6.9 EDI

Agriculture is the largest consumer of water worldwide and at the same time irrigation is a sector where huge differences between modern technology and traditional practices do exist. Furthermore, reliable and organized data about water withdrawals for agricultural purposes are generally lacking worldwide, thus making irrigation the missing variable to close the water budget over anthropized basins. As a result, building systems for improving water use efficiency in agriculture is not an easy task, even though it is an immediate requirement of human society for sustaining the global food security, rationally managing the resource and reducing causes of poverties, migrations and conflicts among states, which depend on trans-boundary river basins. Climate changes and increasing human pressure together with traditional wasteful irrigation practices are enhancing the conflictual problems in water use also in countries traditionally rich in water. Hence, saving irrigation water improving irrigation efficiency on large areas with modern techniques is an urgent action to do. In fact, it is well known that agriculture uses large volumes of water with low irrigation efficiency, accounting in Europe for around 24% of the total water use, with peak of 80% in the Southern Mediterranean part and may reach the same percentage in Mediterranean non-EU countries (EEA, 2009; Zucaro 2014). North Africa region has the lowest per-capita freshwater resource availability among all Regions of the world (FAO, 2018).
Several studies have recently explored the possibility of monitoring irrigation dynamics and by optimizing irrigation water management to achieve precision farming exploiting remote sensing information combined with ground data and/or water balance modelling.
In this session, we will focus on: the use of remote sensing data to estimate irrigation volumes and timing; management of irrigation using hydrological modeling combined with satellite data; improving irrigation water use efficiency based on remote sensing vegetation indices, hydrological modeling, satellite soil moisture or land surface temperature data; precision farming with high resolution satellite data or drones; farm and irrigation district irrigation management; improving the performance of irrigation schemes; estimates of irrigation water requirements from ground and satellite data; ICT tools for real-time irrigation management with remote sensing and ground data coupled with hydrological modelling.

Co-organized by SSS10
Convener: Chiara Corbari | Co-conveners: Francesco Morari, Jacopo DariECSECS, kamal Labbassi
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room 2.23
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall A
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 10:45
SSS4.4 EDI

The physical environment of soils is continuously changing. Soil biota, root growth, land management practices like tillage and abiotic drivers lead to a constant evolution of the arrangement of pores, minerals and organic matter and herewith to modifications in the soil physical functions and chemical properties. Especially in regions with high biological activity, soil organisms induce remarkable alterations to soil structure and functions to optimize growth and reproductive conditions. Resolving the underlying mechanisms forcing such adaptive modifications and exploring the feedbacks between the drivers including the impact of management practices offers an exceptional opportunity to advance our understanding of fundamental physical and biological processes across scales.
We seek contributions linking biological processes and soil physics at any spatial and temporal scale. For example, insights on how the rhizosphere and its microbiome control fluxes beyond the pore scale; on how management practices affect soil structure and functions; on the role of biological soil curst in modifying infiltration and limiting soil erosion across vast areas of the earth’s surface; on how bioturbation shapes soil hydraulic characteristics over years and decades;

Topics of the Soil Biophysics session include but are not limited to:
1. Root growth
2. Microbial activity
3. Bioturbation
4. Virus dispersal
5. Resource allocation
6. Soil water dynamics
7. Soil structure formation
8. Biological soil crusts
9. Rhizosphere interactions
10. EPS (incl. mucilage)

The aim of this session is to highlight the potential of interdisciplinary approaches to address current and future challenges in soil science and to foster scientific exchange across disciplines.

Convener: Pascal BenardECSECS | Co-conveners: Ophélie Sauzet, Frederic Leuther, Samuel BickelECSECS, Sara BonettiECSECS, Dani Or
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Wed, 10:45
SSS7.1

Disturbance or insufficient rebuilding of the soil physicochemical and biological characteristics can modify the ecosystem functions and services. In the absence of appropriate restoration, soils and ecosystems would remain in a disturbed state or continue to decline. Therefore, restoration and rehabilitation of degraded soils is critical to create healthy and functional ecosystems that support essential functions and services.
In particular, soil contamination is one of the main transnational concerns of modern society and companies from different economic sectors. The high concentrations of potentially hazardous substances (e.g. metals/metalloids, radionuclides and organic compounds) resulting of natural sources, anthropic activities and inadequate soil management affect soil health, biogeochemical and edaphic processes, water quality and microorganisms-plant systems, crops productivity, food chain and, finally, Human health. The spatial and temporal variability of soil contamination, combination with other soil degradation factors (e.g. erosion, salinization and loss of fertility) and linking of the soil with other components from the ecosystem increase the complexity of the assessment of the environmental problem as well as design and implementation of rehabilitation strategies. A multidisciplinary approach and the linking of studies and projects are needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and EU’s Green Deal.
This session aims to present the most relevant advances in: Environmental health, Assessment of contaminated areas and their risk by classical techniques, digital tools and remote sensing; Environmental responses after implementation of rehabilitation techniques; Monitoring of mitigation of contaminating processes; Modelling the behaviour of potential hazardous substances in contaminated and recovered soils; Interactions between potential hazardous substances and soil components; and other complimentary studies.
In this session, we welcome contributions covering experimental, observational, and theoretical studies this area of research. Topics of interest (although not limited to) are causes and impacts of land degradation and remedial actions and strategies for soil restoration and rehabilitation at local, regional or global scales.
We invite colleagues to present works to create multidisciplinary strategies and new partnerships that can help assess and rehabilitate contaminated areas.

Co-organized by BG8
Convener: Miriam Muñoz-Rojas | Co-conveners: Erika SantosECSECS, Thomas Baumgartl, Diego AránECSECS, Maria Manuela Abreu, Rubén Forján CastroECSECS
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
SSS9.5

In an era defined by climate change and surging global food demands, modern agriculture faces a profound challenge such as how to achieve increased productivity without compromising environmental sustainability. The heart of this challenge lies at soil biodiversity, which is a complex web of microorganisms, fungi, and fauna that support essential ecosystem services.
The interactions within soil biodiversity give rise to fundamental ecological functions such as nutrient cycling, organic matter decomposition, soil structure upkeep, and disease suppression. These functions ripple through agriculture, affecting plant growth, yield stability, and the crucial process of soil carbon sequestration. However, the pursuit of higher agricultural yields through intensive farming practices often upsets this delicate equilibrium.
Agro-ecological methods, such as intercropping, crop rotation, cover crops, and integrated pest management, offer a promising solution. By emulating nature's intricate equilibrium through diverse plantings, these practices foster soil health, biodiversity, and overall ecosystem enhancing nutrient availability, disease control, disease suppression, while reducing chemical inputs. Moreover, they promote accumulation of soil organic matter, which not only enriches soil structure and fertility but also contributes to carbon sequestration, thereby mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.
In tandem, a variety of tools including metagenomic approaches, soil microscopy and imaging, soil ecology softwares, biomarker and stable isotope analysis, remote sensing and geographic information systems, among others, propel precision agriculture by providing real data on soil conditions and optimizing resource utilization and minimizing the carbon footprint of agriculture.
This holistic synergy among soil biodiversity, agricultural productivity and climate resilience seeks to harmonize agricultural progress with ecological balance, to establish sustainable and secure food systems in an era of increasing global challenges.
Session sponsored by the LEGUMINOSE project (Horizon Europe Grant agreement ID: 101082289).

Convener: María José Carpio Espinosa | Co-conveners: Shamina Imran Pathan, Magdalena Frac
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:05 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
ITS4.6/SSS0.1.5 EDI

Nature-based Solutions (NbS) are actions to protect, conserve, restore, sustainably use and manage natural or modified ecosystems, that address socio-economic and environmental challenges, while simultaneously providing human well-being, resilience and biodiversity benefits (UNEA, 2022). Within the framework of a global ecosystem approach, NbS must encompass ecological, societal, political, economic and cultural issues at all levels, from the individual to the collective, from local to national, from the public or private sphere.

As recently highlighted by IPCC and IPBES, climate change and biodiversity degradation cannot be separated, and must be considered together. For this reason, this session is especially focused on the way NbS can act as climate change adaptation solutions. Considering various ecosystems (marine and coastal, urban, cropland, mountainous, forest, rivers and lakes,.,), NbS as interventions for climate adaptation includes the adaptation to: sea level rise (flooding and erosion), changes of the water regime (floods, droughts, water quality and availability), rise in temperatures (heat waves, forest fires, drought, energy consumption), plant stress and increase of pests (variation of yields, forest dieback), to minimize their associated social and economic negative impacts.

Therefore, this session aims to promote interdisciplinary research related to ecosystem restoration, preservation and management, to put forward the complexity that is often hidden by simplifying hypotheses and approaches (sector-based silo approach, homogeneity of environments, ...).

Specific topics of interest are the followings:
- Complexity: nature of ecosystems and the risk of oversimplification, interconnection between NbS and complementary areas, consideration of uncertainties (future climate and associated impacts...)
- Scales: spatial scales with the integration of NbS in their environment, and temporal scales considering sustainability over time, variability of bio-physical processes and climate change effects
- Ecosystem services: understanding the bio-geophysical processes, spatial shift between the location of NbS and the location of beneficiaries, modification under climate change (threshold, inflection point), co-benefits or on the contrary degradation and negative effects
- Assessment and indicators: measurement and modelling protocols to evaluate NbS performances, capacity to measure the complexity, resilience and stability of the solutions.

Convener: Pierre-Antoine VersiniECSECS | Co-conveners: Natalia Rodriguez-Ramirez, Daniela Rizzi, Amy Oen
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.24
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 14:00
HS8.2.13 EDI

This session deals with the use of geophysical methods for the characterization of subsurface properties, states, and processes in contexts such as hydrology, ecohydrology, contaminant transport, reactive media, etc. Geophysical methods potentially provide subsurface data with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution in a non-invasive manner. However, the interpretation of these measurements is far from straightforward in many contexts and various challenges remain. Among these are the need for improved quantitative use of geophysical measurements in model conceptualization and parameterization, and the need to move quantitative hydrogeophysical investigations beyond the laboratory and field scale towards the catchment scale. Therefore, we welcome submissions addressing advances in the acquisition, processing, analysis and interpretation of data obtained from geophysical and other minimally invasive methods applied to a (contaminant) hydrological context. In particular, we encourage contributions on innovations in experimental and numerical methods in support of model-data fusion, including new concepts for coupled and joint inversion, and improving our petrophysical understanding on the link between hydrological and geophysical properties.

Co-organized by SSS6
Convener: Remi Clement | Co-conveners: Nolwenn Lesparre, Damien Jougnot, Ulrike Werban
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.17
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall A
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
HS8.1.1 EDI

Multiphase flows are central to a broad range of natural and engineered processes, including nutrient cycles and contaminant remediation in soils, geological storage of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in deep reservoirs, and electrochemical applications such as fuel cells. Emerging contaminants (e.g., PFAS, pharmaceuticals, microplastics, natural toxins) and climate change pose new challenges to our already fragile ecosystems. The vadose zone is a dynamically-changing heterogeneous system that plays a key role in regulating exchanges between the atmosphere, vegetation, and groundwater and hosts a large portion of subsurface biochemical reactions. Deeper subsurface systems in turn represent potential reservoirs for underground storage of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Understanding the interrelation between hydrological, physicochemical, and biological processes in multiphase systems across scales is therefore paramount to developing sustainable management strategies for water resources as well as energy and climate concerns.

The presence of multiple fluid phases enhances heterogeneity at the level of flow, mixing, and reaction in structurally heterogeneous media. This impacts the transport of dissolved substances and fundamentally changes mixing patterns and effective reaction rates, posing major challenges for predictive modeling. Recent theoretical, experimental, and numerical advances provide unprecedented insights into the pore-scale mechanisms governing these processes and open new opportunities to tackle these challenges.

This session aims to bring together researchers working on fundamental and applied aspects of hydrobiogeochemical processes in the vadose zone and other multi-phase systems. In particular, we encourage submissions relating to experimental, numerical, and theoretical contributions pertaining to the following topics:

• Monitoring and modeling of flow, transport, and biochemical reactions from the pore to the field scale.
• Influence of static and dynamical medium properties (e.g., soil structure) on water flow and reactive transport.
• Mixing and reaction of emerging contaminants and other substances in variably-saturated porous media.
• Flow, transport, and reaction in the rhizosphere and plants.
• Model appraisal techniques, including calibration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, and surrogate-based modeling for partially-saturated systems.
• Deep geological storage.
• Fuel cells and other electrochemical applications.

Co-organized by ERE5/SSS6
Convener: Tomas Aquino | Co-conveners: Efstathios Diamantopoulos, Insa Neuweiler, Christopher Vincent Henri, Gaute LingaECSECS, Giuseppe Brunetti, Jiri Simunek
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 3.16/17
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall A
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
SSS5.3 EDI

Regulation of the cycles of carbon (C) and nutrients (N, P, S) in soils and ensuring their linkage and retention are recognized as major challenges, especially under shifts in environmental factors (warming, drought, N deposition, overfertilization, salinization, alterations of landscapes, biodiversity loss, invasion of species and intensification of land use). The processes underlying C and nutrient cycling in soils are difficult to evaluate and separate since multiple factors can shift process rates and directions, as well as determine pool sizes. Factors also frequently have an interactive effect. Estimating the magnitude of C and nutrient pool response and the temporal scale of reactions to land use change or shifts of environmental factors remains a major challenge. Thus, this session invites contributions focused on evaluating the soil C, N, P, and S pools and process responses under global change scenarios at the local and larger scales. Studies that combine short-term laboratory observation focused on process rate estimation with long-term field experiments and evaluation of pools are highly welcome. Studies that focus on the effect of soil chemistry, including an application of isotopes to investigate the process rates, mineralogy, as well as the transition from conventional to organic agriculture/land restoration, are also highly relevant.

Co-sponsored by IUSS
Convener: Anna GuninaECSECS | Co-conveners: Claudio Zaccone, Beatrice GiannettaECSECS, Marco Keiluweit, Tonu Tonutare, Viia Lepane, Manfred Sager
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Fri, 10:45
SSS5.6 EDI

Soil is the largest carbon (C) reservoir in terrestrial ecosystems and soil organic carbon (SOC) is the basis for soil’s biodiversity, health and fertility. The sustainable management of ecosystems to enhance both, soil and subsoil organic C storage is one strategy to mitigate climate change and to provide soil-related ecosystem services. However, long-term C sequestration is critically dependent on short-term and long management, including the input of other nutrients, soil intrinsic characteristics and land use.
Investing in productive, highly resilient and sustainable ecosystems, based on appropriate land and soil management requires the knowledge base on drivers and processes controlling soil C storage and cycling.
Thus, this session will provide knowledge about the key mechanisms and proxies controlling physico-chemical and microbial dynamics of soil Carbon-Nitrogen-Phosphorus (CNP) (both organic and inorganic) to foster higher soil C sequestration and enhance the sustainability of agricultural and (semi-)natural systems.
Studies, opinions and other contributions in this session will aim to a wide range of topics related to SOC and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and the relationship between them. These topics may also include soil fertility, provision of ecosystem services, and their changes. Ultimately, approaches informing management strategies in agricultural and natural systems will be summarised to help the translation of scientific knowledge into policy frameworks.
Types of contribution appreciated include, but are not limited to, definitive and intermediate results; project outcomes; proposal of methods or sampling and modelling strategies, and the assessment of their effectiveness; projection of previous results at the light of climate change and climatic extremes; literature surveys, reviews, meta-analysis; and opinions. These works will be evaluated at the light of the organization of a special issue in an impacted journal.

Co-organized by BG3
Convener: Sergio Saia | Co-conveners: Giulia Bondi, Vanessa Wong, Jorge Alvaro-Fuentes, David Wall, Parag BhopleECSECS, Alina Premrov
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–17:50 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Thu, 16:15
SSS9.10

In the context of global change, modern farming systems should become resilient to the risks of hydro-climatic extreme events (e.g. drought) and anthropogenic disturbances. These threats can have impacts, even significant ones, on the natural and social systems of an area being related to the degradation of functions and services offered by an agroecosystem. Therefore, soil and water resources need to be increasingly managed with the support of the most advanced tools offered by technological innovation.
This session aims at exploring how the linkages between observations and models are effectively utilized to assess the impact of global change on the provision of agroecosystem functions and services, and help develop reliable scenarios for resilience, adaptive capacity, and future risks under different climates, landscapes, and spatial extents.
Specific topics include, but are not limited to:
- Links or networks of agro-hydrological observatories;
- Living labs and lighthouses as innovative tools for soil health assessment;
- Development of single and compound indicators to capture the vulnerability of soil and water resources to environmental changes;
- Use of Nature-based Solutions (NbSs) to protect the environment and enhance agroecosystem resilience.

Convener: Nunzio Romano | Co-conveners: Harry Vereecken, Layla Höckerstedt
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Thu, 16:15
MAL32-SSS
Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture by Jan Willem van Groenigen
Convener: Heike Knicker
Abstract
| Thu, 18 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room K2
Thu, 19:00