Union-wide
Community-led
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions

SM – Seismology

Programme group chairs: Philippe Jousset, Alice-Agnes Gabriel

DM11
Division meeting for Seismology (SM)
Co-organized by SM
Conveners: Philippe Jousset, Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS
Wed, 26 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Wed, 12:45

SM1 – General Seismology

Programme group scientific officer: Philippe Jousset

SM1.1

The session General Contributions on Earthquakes, Earth Structure, Seismology features a wide range of presentations on recent earthquakes and earthquake sequences of local, regional, and global significance, as well as recent advances in characterization of Earth structure using a variety of methods.
We will have a special section this year about challenges associated to monitoring seismology in volcanic islands.

Convener: Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS | Co-conveners: João Fontiela, Philippe Jousset, Joana Carvalho
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
SM1.2 EDI

Assessing the uncertainty in observations and in scientific results is a fundamental part of the scientific process. In principle uncertainty estimates allow data of different types to be weighted appropriately in joint interpretations, allow existing results to be tested against new data, allow potential implications of the results to be tested for relative significance, allow differences between best-fit model estimates to be explained, and allow quantitative risk assessments to be performed. In practice, uncertainty estimation can be theoretically challenging, computationally expensive, model-dependent and subject to expert biases. This session will explore the value or otherwise of the significant effort that is required to assess uncertainty in practice.

We welcome contributions from the solid Earth sciences for and against the calculation and use of uncertainties. We welcome those that extend the use of subsurface model uncertainties for important purposes, and which demonstrate the value of uncertainties. We also welcome contributions which argue against the value of uncertainties, perhaps particularly given the cost of their assessment. Uses of uncertainties may include value of information (VOI) calculations, the use of models for forecasting new qualities that can be tested, the reconciliation of historically diverse models of the same structures or phenomena, or any other result that fits the overall brief of demonstrating value. Arguments against the value of uncertainty may include anything from pragmatic uses of uncertainty estimates that have demonstrably failed to be useful, to philosophical issues of how it is possible even to define uncertainty in model-based contexts. All pertinent contributions are welcome, as is a lively discussion!

Co-organized by EMRP2/GI6
Convener: Andrew Curtis | Co-conveners: Alison Malcolm, Klaus Mosegaard, Andreas Fichtner, Xin Zhang
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 14:00
TS3.10

The Eastern Mediterranean is an actively deforming region where three major tectonic plates interact: the African, the Arabian and the Eurasian plates. The Cenozoic geodynamic framework of the Eastern Mediterranean region consists of subduction, collision, strike-slip kinematics, extrusion of crustal blocks and slab deformation.

This session focuses on three aspects of the Eastern Mediterranean geodynamics:
(1) Which geodynamic mechanisms define the key active structures and how do they operate?
(2) How is surface deformation being accommodated over a range of temporal and spatial scales? How individual earthquakes accrue on faults to account for their long-term kinematics? Which is the impact of deep-seated processes on surface deformation?
(3) How did the geodynamic evolution through the Cenozoic lead to present day tectonic deformation?

We welcome contributions from a wide range of disciplines including, but not limited to, neotectonics, seismology, tectonic geodesy (e.g. GNSS, InSAR), paleoseismology, tectonic geomorphology, remote sensing, structural geology, and geodynamic modeling.

We strongly encourage the contribution of early career researchers.

Co-organized by GD9/SM1
Convener: A. Ozgun Konca | Co-conveners: Seda Özarpacı, Bernhard Grasemann, Sylvain Barbot
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–11:55 (CEST)
 
Room K1
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall TS/EMRP
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 16:15
GD9.1 EDI

We invite contributions based on geological, tectonic, geophysical and geodynamic studies of the Tethyan Belt, Central Asia, and the Circum Pacific margins. We particularly invite interdisciplinary studies, which integrate observations and interpretations based on a variety of methods. This session will include a suite of studies of these regions with the aim of providing a comprehensive overview of their formation and evolution, influence of the tectonic features on climate, biodiversity, human habitat, and topographic change.
The Tethyan Belt is the most prominent collisional zone on Earth, covering the vast area between far eastern Asia and Europe. The geological-tectonic evolution of the belt has led to significant along-strike heterogeneity in its various regions, including the SE-Asian subduction-collision system, the Tibetan-Himalayan region, the Iranian Plateau, Anatolia, and the Alpine orogen. The Tethyan Belt is the result of subduction of the Tethyan Oceans, including significant terrane amalgamation, and collisional tectonics along the whole belt. The belt is today strongly affected by the ongoing collision of Eurasia with the African, Arabian and Indian plates and the large-scale geometry of the Cenozoic mountain ranges is often determined by inherited features. The long formation history and the variability of tectonic characteristics and deep structure of the region make it a natural laboratory for understanding the accretion processes that have shaped the Earth through its history and have led to the formation of vast resources in the crust.
The circum-Pacific domain has been undergoing multiple re-orientations in subduction and given rise to basin-mountain systems in both the eastern and western Pacific continental margins since the late Mesozoic. We welcome contributions on (1) the formation/origin and evolution of lithosphere architecture, (2) spatial-temporal evolution of Earth’s surface topography, (3) evolution of basin-mountain systems, and (4) 4-D geodynamic models of eastern and western Pacific continental margins.

Co-organized by ERE1/GMPV10/SM1/TS6, co-sponsored by ILP
Convener: Hans Thybo | Co-conveners: Shaofeng Liu, Lingxiao Gong, Nalan Lom, Johannes RembeECSECS, Bo Wan, Chengfa LinECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 08:30
SM1.6 EDI

On February 6, 2023, two powerful earthquakes of magnitude 7.8 and 7.7 rocked south-central Türkiye and northern Syria, strongly affecting the regions around Gaziantep, Kahramanmaraş, Malatya, and Hatay. The epicenter of the first mainshock (37.288 N, 37.043 E, 8.6 km depth, origin time 01:17 AM UTC) is located close to the East Anatolian Fault (EAF). The second large earthquake (38.089°N, 37.239°E, 7.0 km depth, origin time 10:24 AM UTC) occurred only 9 hrs later, about 90 km north of the first mainshock on the east-west trending Sürgü Fault, at a time when the local population had already begun to rescue survivors and their belongings. The aftershock sequences delineate fault lengths of ~360 km and ~180 km for the M 7.8 and M 7.7 ruptures, respectively, rendering these earthquakes among the longest continental strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded. A basin-wide tsunami alert was issued by the NEAMTWS Tsunami Service Providers, and a small tsunami was generated which was measured in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

This session solicits contributions from all disciplines of Earth sciences, engineering, social sciences, disaster management, and policy making to glean a first-order interdisciplinary understanding of the causes and consequences of this devastating double earthquake event. We invite presentations that address the tectonic context of the EAF and large historical earthquakes in the region, measurements and inferences from earthquake geology and space imagery, studies on the coseismic rupture process of the two events and their physical connection, assessment of ground-shaking levels and strong-motion properties, site effects, damage and risk assessment, as well as tsunami forecasting and warning, and the societal implications of these devastating earthquakes.

Notes:
1. The Abstract Processing Charge (APC) for Turkish/Syrian scientists will be waived.
2. A regular APC rate of 50EUR will apply for all other scientists who are to submit an abstract for this late-breaking session.
3. The deadline for submitting an abstract to this session is 19.02.2023.
4. Please contact Philippe Jousset, sm@egu.eu, if it happens you already have submitted an abstract and yet want to submit an additional abstract to this session.

Co-organized by NH0
Convener: P. Martin Mai | Co-conveners: Y. Klinger, Stefano Lorito, Sezim Ezgi Guvercin, ‪Alice-Agnes Gabriel, A. Ozgun Konca, Jorge Jara
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room E1
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Thu, 14:00

SM2 – Seismic Instrumentation and Infrastructure

Programme group scientific officer: Damiano Pesaresi

SM2.1 EDI

Fibre optic based techniques allow probing highly precise direct point and distributed sensing of the full ground motion wave-field including translation, rotation and strain, and environmental parameters such as temperature and even chemicals at a scale and to an extent previously unattainable with conventional geophysical methods. Considerable improvements in optical and atom interferometry enable new concepts for inertial rotation, translational displacement and acceleration sensing. Laser reflectometry using both fit-to-purpose and commercial fibre optic cables have successfully detected a variety of signals including microseism, local and teleseismic earthquakes, volcanic events, ocean dynamics, etc. Significant breakthrough in the use of fibre optic sensing techniques came from the new ability to interrogate telecommunication cables at high precision both on land and at sea, as well as in boreholes and at the surface. Applications of the resulting new type of data are manifold: they include seismic source and wave-field characterization with single point observations in harsh environments like active volcanoes, the ocean bottom, the correction of tilt effects, e.g. for high performance seismic isolation facilities, as well as seismic ambient noise interferometry and seismic building monitoring.

We welcome contributions on developments in instrumental and theoretical advances, applications and processing with fibre optic point and/or distributed multi-sensing techniques, light polarization and transmission analyses, using standard telecommunication and/or engineered fibre cables. We seek studies on theoretical, observation and advanced processing in fields, including seismology, volcanology, glaciology, geodesy, geophysics, natural hazards, oceanography, urban environment, geothermal applications, laboratory studies, large-scale field tests, planetary exploration, gravitational wave detection, fundamental physics. We encourage contributions on data analysis techniques, machine learning, data management, instrumental performance and comparison as well as new experimental, field, laboratory, modeling studies in fibre optic sensing studies.

We are happy to announce Prof. Martin Landrø, Prof. Kuo-Fong Ma and Dr. David Sollberger as invited speakers!

Co-organized by ERE1/OS4/TS2
Convener: Philippe Jousset | Co-conveners: Gilda Currenti, Zack Spica, Stefanie Donner, Shane Murphy, Yara Rossi, Marc-Andre Gutscher
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
SM2.4 EDI

The oceans cover about 71% of the Earth's surface, yet our current picture of the structure and dynamics of the oceanic crust and mantle is mainly based on seismic data recorded in islands or in the continents.

Detailed seismic observations of the sub-oceanic Earth’s interior require the use of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS), but large OBS deployments - both in numbers of instruments and area covered - remain a major endeavour due to technical, logistical and financial challenges.

A zoo of OBS arrays and other passive ocean-bottom geophysics (e.g., geodesy, magnetotelluric) has been deployed in the last two decades, which led to fascinating new discoveries about the crust and mantle beneath the seafloor in many regions worldwide. Despite great technological advances and improved data processing procedures, some challenges persist.

OBS deployments and recovery are more demanding than anticipated by (first-time) PIs and consist of many challenges obscured by a lack of communication between scientists. Recurring issues include missing or erroneous response files or the challenge of systematically exploring the wealth of information recorded by the OBS datasets. Most processed data sets are not released for several years (if at all). This stagnates the exploration of OBS datasets in the community and reduces its usage to just a few research groups.

We invite contributions from the global ocean-bottom geophysics community to share knowledge, experience, lessons learned and scientific achievements from OBS experiments. We welcome reflections on all aspects, from early stage planning, different kinds of OBS or amphibian devices, experiment design, deployment and recovery tactics, pre- and post-data processing and analysis (e.g., software), to publishing data reports and final scientific outputs (e.g., tomography, receiver functions, ambient noise studies, earthquake source analysis, etc). We also encourage contributions beyond seismology, such as from seafloor environmental sensors (e.g., using submarine cables), magnetotellurics, geodesy, ocean acoustics and marine mammals studies.

Convener: Maria TsekhmistrenkoECSECS | Co-conveners: Ana MG Ferreira, Janneke de LaatECSECS, Afonso LoureiroECSECS, Stephen Hicks
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 08:30
SM2.5

We welcome contributions from all aspects of modern seismic network deployment, operation, management, and delivery of downstream waveform data products, at local, regional and global level: best practice for seismic data management (site selection, equipment testing and installation, planning and telemetry, policies for redundancy in data acquisition, processing and archiving, data and metadata QC, data management and dissemination policies); integration of new data types and communities (DAS systems, large-N instrumentation, OBS, GNSS, gravity, infrasound instruments, rotational sensors, etc.); development, testing, comparison of emerging strategies (e.g. machine learning) and software tools for earthquake monitoring including real-time applications (e.g., source imaging, earthquake early warning, rapid shaking assessment); delivery of technical and scientific seismological and multidisciplinary data products; facilitating the integration of recorded seismological data in computational workflows and digital twins. Promoted by EGU SM-SII and ORFEUS, this session facilitates seismological data discovery and promotes open and FAIR data policies.
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Four decades of globally distributed and openly available very broadband seismic recordings have enabled significant advances in characterizing earthquake sources, mapping the deep structure of the Earth, and understanding the behavior of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and cryosphere. Long-term deployment has illuminated time-dependent processes and allowed subtle signals to be enhanced and utilized through stacking. Real-time telemetry has revolutionized the monitoring capability for large and potentially destructive earthquakes. Central to these activities have been the international partnerships, infrastructure investments, and technological developments that have facilitated, grown, and maintained the availability of low-noise and high-fidelity seismic recordings worldwide. This session focuses on impactful current science being done with globally distributed real-time networks, to understand how technological developments can optimize existing resources, to share ideas for expanding global networks (e.g., Global Seismographic Network, GeoScope) to include other geophysical and environmental observations, to recognize how increased partnerships and collaboration can further grow high-quality station coverage, and to reflect on the common challenges to operating and sustaining these scientific resources.

Convener: Carlo Cauzzi | Co-conveners: Frederik J. Simons, Christos Evangelidis, Damiano Pesaresi, Angelo Strollo, Frederik Tilmann, Martin Vallée
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 14:00
GI2.3 EDI

Research in Earth and environmental sciences benefits from interdisciplinary approaches (e.g. to understand and model multi-scale processes). The study of complex environmental processes may involve diverse collections of samples and associated field or laboratory measurements, sensors, remote sensing data, across international dimensions. Research benefits from practices that use easily-portable and reproducible tools and techniques. Best practices of sharing our data and software are now well-established and the earth science community needs to move forward with generally accepted methodologies of software and data distribution that can expand easily to include complex system and multi-domain challenges.

This session seeks innovative presentations for interdisciplinary research and applications, including but not limited to, on Earth Science data and service activities. Presentations addressing the specific societal needs, best practices, learned lessons and new challenges in data provenance, information access, visualization, and analysis, are highly encouraged, as well as presentation on the ways to adopt FAIR data principles towards sustainable solutions in Earth Science and the path to open science are . Discussion of challenges for future data services or European infrastructure are also welcome.

Co-organized by EMRP2/ESSI3/SM2
Convener: Sebastien Payan | Co-conveners: Hela Mehrtens, Wolfgang zu Castell, Frederic Huynh
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall ESSI/GI/NP
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 14:00
ITS1.5/GI1.5 EDI

Need for Smart Solutions in earth, environmental and planetary sciences: Tackling data challenges and incorporating applied earth and planetary sciences into artificial intelligence (AI) models opened a new avenue for creating comprehensive methodologies and strategies to answer a wide variety of theoretical and practical questions from detecting, modelling, interpreting and predicting changes in the earth and environment’s ecosystems in response to climate change to understanding interactions among the ocean, atmosphere, and land in the climate system. Therefore, AI and Data Science (DS) in earth, environmental and planetary sciences are one of the fastest growing areas. The performance of the AI/DS models improves as it gains experience over time. Various mathematical and statistical models need to be investigated to determine the performance of AI models. Once the learning process is completed, then the model can then be used to make an assumption, classify and test data. This is achieved after gaining experience in the training process. This session aims to make available to the world community of earth, environment and planetary sciences-related professionals a collection of scientific papers on the current state of the art and recent developments of AI and DS applications in the field. This session will shed light on many recent research activities on applying AI/DS techniques into a single comprehensive document to address engineering, social, political, economic, safety, health, and technological issues of earth, environment and planetary sciences challenges and opportunities. The purpose of this session is to improve and facilitate the application of intelligent systems for the earth, environmental and planetary sciences to highlight new insight for creating comprehensive methodologies for analyzing/processing/predicting/management strategies in the fields of fundamental and applied sciences problems through the decision-making abilities of artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques.

Co-organized by ESSI2/SM2
Convener: Silvio GumiereECSECS | Co-conveners: Hossein BonakdariECSECS, Paul CelicourtECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:20 (CEST)
 
Room 0.94/95
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall ESSI/GI/NP
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00

SM3 – Real-time and time dependent seismology

Programme group scientific officer: Aldo Zollo

SM3.1

Interferometric techniques turn seismic networks into continuous observation devices for (time-varying) Earth structure, volcanic and hydrologic processes, ocean - solid Earth interactions and many more phenomena. Increasingly, seismic interferometry is applied to signals beyond ocean microseismic noise, such as earthquake coda and anthropogenic seismic signals.

Great strides have been taken in obtaining high-resolution images of seismic velocity and other properties, in observing and quantifying the sources of various ambient noise wave types, and in inferring seismic property variations. Current challenges include the interpretation of signals from opportunistic sources, e.g. in the context of traffic noise interferometry or ambient noise body waves from localized storms; the interpretation of ambient noise amplitudes for elastic effects and anelastic attenuation; and the spatial localization of seismic property changes.

This session offers a broad space for discussing recent advances in ambient noise seismology and seismic interferometry. We invite abstracts on theoretical and numerical developments as well as novel applications. Topics may include, but are not limited to, studies of ambient seismic sources; ocean wave quantification through ambient noise; urban seismic noise; interferometric imaging; monitoring subsurface properties and quantifying the response of seismic velocity to various stresses and strains; studies of the spatial sensitivity for imaging and monitoring under various source conditions; quantification of site effects, amplification and attenuation; improvements in processing and retrieval of high-quality interferometry observations, and interdisciplinary applications of seismic interferometry.

Convener: Sven SchippkusECSECS | Co-conveners: Yesim Cubuk SabuncuECSECS, Yang Lu, Peter MakusECSECS, Qing-Yu WangECSECS
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST), 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 14:00
NH4.1

From the real-time integration of multi-parametric observations is expected the major contribution to the development of operational t-DASH systems suitable for supporting decision makers with continuously updated seismic hazard scenarios. A very preliminary step in this direction is the identification of those parameters (seismological, chemical, physical, biological, etc.) whose space-time dynamics and/or anomalous variability can be, to some extent, associated with the complex process of preparation of major earthquakes.
This session wants then to encourage studies devoted to demonstrate the added value of the introduction of specific, observations and/or data analysis methods within the t-DASH and StEF perspectives. Therefore, studies based on long-term data analyses, including different conditions of seismic activity, are particularly encouraged. Similarly welcome will be the presentation of infrastructures devoted to maintain and further develop our present observational capabilities of earthquake related phenomena also contributing in this way to build a global multi-parametric Earthquakes Observing System (EQuOS) to complement the existing GEOSS initiative.
To this aim this session is not addressed just to seismology and natural hazards scientists but also to geologist, atmospheric sciences and electromagnetism researchers, whose collaboration is particular important for fully understand mechanisms of earthquake preparation and their possible relation with other measurable quantities. For this reason, all contributions devoted to the description of genetic models of earthquake’s precursory phenomena are equally welcome.

Co-organized by EMRP1/GI6/SM3, co-sponsored by JpGU and EMSEV
Convener: Valerio Tramutoli | Co-conveners: Pier Francesco Biagi, Carolina Filizzola, Nicola Genzano, Iren Moldovan
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall NH
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 14:00

SM4 – Deformation, Faulting, and Earthquake Processes (incl. seismotectonics, geodynamics, earthquake source physics)

Programme group scientific officer: Henriette Sudhaus

SM4.1

This session will focus on three approaches for investigating the physics of earthquakes: imaging, numerical simulations, and machine learning. We solicit abstracts on works to image rupture kinematics, simulate earthquake dynamics using numerical methods, and those using Machine Learning (ML) to improve understanding of the physics of earthquakes. We invite in particular works that aim to develop a deeper understanding of earthquake source physics by linking novel laboratory experiments to earthquake dynamics, and studies on earthquake scaling properties. We also encourage works that illuminate the physics behind and transferability to Earth of studies showing that acoustic emissions can be used to predict characteristics of laboratory earthquakes and identify precursors to labquakes. Other works show progress in imaging earthquake sources using seismic data and surface deformation measurements (e.g. GPS and InSAR) to estimate rupture properties on faults and fault systems.

We want to highlight strengths and limitations of each data set and method in the context of the source-inversion problem, accounting for uncertainties and robustness of the source models and imaging or simulation methods. Contributions are welcome that make use of modern computing paradigms and infrastructure to tackle large-scale forward simulation of earthquake process, but also inverse modeling to retrieve the rupture process with proper uncertainty quantification. We also welcome ML-based works on a broad range of issues in seismology and encourage seismic studies using data from natural faults, lab results and numerical approaches to understand earthquake physics.

Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Henriette Sudhaus | Co-conveners: Chris Marone, Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS, Elisa Tinti, Paul Johnson, P. Martin Mai
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 14:00
SM4.2 EDI

Slow earthquakes are widely observed in subduction zones, where they episodically release the tectonic strain built-up in the brittle-ductile transition zone. Given their proximity to the seismogenic megathrust, a comprehensive understanding of slow earthquakes may shed light on the stress condition of the megathrust fault. With improved quantities of data and advanced technologies, the nature of slow earthquakes has been intensively investigated in a variety of tectonic environments over the past decades. This session aims to offer a broad space for discussion of the recent advances in slow earthquakes.
We seek studies ranging from lab to volcanic and tectonic scales and from diverse geological and geophysical (including but not limited to seismic and geodetic) observations to imaging and modeling. We welcome abstracts focused on earthquake detection, scaling, source, rupture process, and fluid or/and heterogeneity effects. Within the larger context of this session, we also seek abstracts illuminating the connection between slow and fast earthquakes.

Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Qing-Yu WangECSECS | Co-conveners: Shunsuke TakemuraECSECS, Mariano Supino, Natalia Poiata, Kate Huihsuan Chen
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.16
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Thu, 08:30
TS3.7 EDI

During the last decades, methods have significantly improved in geophysics, geodesy, and in paleoseismology-geomorphology. Hence, on one hand the number of earthquakes with well-documented rupture process and deformation pattern has increased significantly. On the other hand, the number of studies documenting long time series of past earthquakes, including quantification of past deformation has also increased. In parallel, the modeling community working on rupture dynamics, including earthquake cycle is also making significant progresses. Thus, this session is the opportunity to bring together these different contributions to foster further collaboration between the different groups focusing all on the same objective of integrating earthquake processes into the earthquake cycle framework. In this session we welcome contributions documenting earthquake ruptures and processes, both for recent or ancient events, from seismological, geodetic, or paleoseismological perspective. Contributions documenting deformation during pre-, post-, or interseismic periods, which are highly relevant to earthquake cycle understanding, are also very welcomed. Finally, we seek for any contribution looking at the earthquake cycle from the modeling perspective, especially including approaches mixing data and modeling.

Co-organized by G3/SM4
Convener: Y. Klinger | Co-conveners: Magali RizzaECSECS, Harsha Bhat, Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–17:25 (CEST)
 
Room K1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall TS/EMRP
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 16:15
TS3.9

Tectonic faults accommodate plate motion through various styles of seismic and aseismic slip spanning a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. Understanding the mechanics and interplay between seismic rupture and aseismic slip is central to seismotectonics as it determines the seismic potential of faults. In particular, unraveling the underlying physics controlling these styles of deformation bears a great deal in earthquakes hazards mitigation especially in highly urbanized regions. We invite contributions from observational, experimental, geological and theoretical studies that explore the diversity and interplay among seismic and aseismic slip phenomena in various tectonic settings, including the following questions: (1) How does the nature of creeping faults change with the style of faulting, fluids, loading rate, and other factors? (2) Are different slip behaviors well separated in space, or can the same fault areas experience different failure modes? (3) Is there a systematic spatial or temporal relation between different types of slip?

Co-organized by EMRP1/SM4
Convener: Audrey Bonnelye | Co-conveners: Jorge Jara, Luca Dal Zilio, Sylvain Michel
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall TS/EMRP
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 10:45
GD5.1

It is becoming increasingly apparent that continental rifting, breakup, and ocean spreading involve complexities not easily explained by standard models, especially in oblique and transform settings. The unexpected discovery of continental material far offshore, e.g. at the Rio Grande Rise, and realisation of the importance of obliquity and time-dependence in rifting, challenge conventional tectonic models. This session aims to bring together new observations, models, and ideas to help us understand the complex factors influencing continental rifting, breakup and ocean spreading, including oblique and transform settings. Works investigating time-dependant controls on rifting mechanisms, plate kinematics, strain localisation, obliquity, plate interior deformation, inherited lithospheric structures, interaction and feedbacks of rift processes, lithospheric and mantle derived driving forces, magmatism, syn-rift sedimentation, and other controls on rifting, are therefore welcomed to this session. Contributions from any geoscience discipline, including marine geophysics, seismology, ocean drilling, geochemistry, petrology, plate kinematics, tectonics, structural geology, numerical and analogue modelling, sedimentology and geochronology etc., are sought. We particularly encourage cross-disciplinarity, the spanning of spatio-temporal scales, and thought-provoking studies that challenge conventions from any and all researchers.

Co-organized by SM4/SSP1/TS5
Convener: Jordan J. J. Phethean | Co-conveners: Patricia Cadenas Martínez, Alexander L. Peace, Christian SchifferECSECS, Frank Zwaan
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 14:00
EMRP1.2

Earthquake mechanics is controlled by a spectrum of processes covering a wide range of length scales, from tens of kilometres down to few nanometres. The geometry of the fault/fracture network and its physical properties control the global stress distribution and the propagation/arrest of the seismic rupture. At the same time, earthquake rupture nucleation, rupture and arrest are governed by fracture propagation and frictional processes occurring within extremely localized sub-planar slipping zones. The co-seismic rheology of the slipping zones themselves depends on deformation mechanisms and dissipative processes active at the scale of the grain or asperity. The study of such complex multiscale systems requires an interdisciplinary approach spanning from structural geology to seismology, geophysics, petrology, rupture modelling and experimental rock deformation. In this session we aim to convene contributions dealing with different aspects of earthquake mechanics at various depths and scales such as:

- the thermo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with co-seismic fault weakening based on rock deformation experiments, numerical simulations and microstructural studies of fault rocks;
- the study of natural and experimental fault rocks to investigate the nucleation mechanisms of intermediate and deep earthquakes in comparison to their shallow counterparts;
- the elastic, frictional and transport properties of fault rocks from the field (geophysical and hydrogeological data) to the laboratory scale (petrophysical and rock deformation studies);
- the internal architecture of seismogenic fault zones from field structural survey and geophysical investigations;
- the modeling of earthquake ruptures, off-fault dynamic stress fields and long-term mechanical evolution of realistic fault networks;
- the earthquake source energy budget and partitioning between fracture, friction and elastic wave radiation from seismological, theoretical and field observations.
- the interplay between fault geometry and earthquake rupture characteristics from seismological, geodetic, remote sensed or field observations;

We particularly welcome novel observations or innovative approaches to the study of earthquake faulting. Contributions from early career scientists are solicited.

Co-organized by SM4/TS2
Convener: Stefano AretusiniECSECS | Co-conveners: Matteo DemurtasECSECS, Michele Fondriest, Gina-Maria GeffersECSECS, Francois Passelegue, Berit Schwichtenberg
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room K1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Tue, 10:45

SM5 – Seismic Imaging Across Scales (from near-surface to global scale, incl. methodological developments)

Programme group scientific officer: Cedric Schmelzbach

SM5.1 EDI

This session will cover applied and theoretical aspects of
geophysical imaging, modeling and inversion using active- and
passive-source seismic measurements as well as other geophysical
techniques (e.g., gravity, magnetic, electromagnetic) to
investigate properties of the Earth’s lithosphere and asthenosphere,
and explore the processes involved. We invite contributions focused on
methodological developments, theoretical aspects, and applications.
Studies across the scales and disciplines are particularly welcome.

Among others, the session may cover the following topics:
- Active- and passive-source imaging using body- and surface-waves;
- Full waveform inversion developments and applications;
- Advancements and case studies in 2D and 3D imaging;
- DAS imaging;
- Interferometry and Marchenko imaging;
- Seismic attenuation and anisotropy;
- Developments and applications of multi-scale and multi-parameter inversion; and,
- Joint inversion of seismic and complementary geophysical data.

Convener: Laura Gómez de la PeñaECSECS | Co-conveners: Milena Marjanovic, Andrzej GórszczykECSECS, Pascal Edme, Kevin Growe, Alexandra Moshou
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 08:30
SM5.2 EDI

Geophysical imaging techniques are widely used to characterize structures and processes in the shallow subsurface. Methods include imaging using P-wave seismic but also S-wave and multi-component techniques, (complex) electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar methods, as well as passive monitoring based on ambient noise or electrical self-potentials. Advances in experimental design, instrumentation, data acquisition, data processing, numerical modelling, and inversion constantly push the limits of spatial and temporal resolution. Despite these advances, the interpretation of geophysical images and properties often remains ambiguous. Persistent challenges addressed in this session include optimal data acquisition strategies, (automated) data processing and error quantification, appropriate spatial and temporal regularization of model parameters, integration of non-geophysical measurements and geological realism into the imaging process, joint inversion, as well as the quantitative interpretation of tomograms through suitable petro-physical relations.

In light of these topics, we invite submissions concerning a broad spectrum of near-surface geophysical imaging methods and applications at different spatial and temporal scales. Novel developments in the combination of complementary measurement methods, machine learning, and process-monitoring applications are particularly welcome.

Co-organized by EMRP2/GM2
Convener: Florian WagnerECSECS | Co-conveners: Ellen Van De VijverECSECS, James Irving, Frédéric Nguyen, Sonja Halina WadasECSECS, Cesare Comina, Thomas Burschil
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room G2
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 08:30
SM5.4 EDI

We invite contributions that address the present and past structure and dynamics of the Alpine orogens and the back-arc basins of the Mediterranean area, which in the last decades has been the target of broadband large-scale passive experiments. The TopoIberia-Iberarray project, carried out in the 2000s in the Iberian Peninsula, is a successful example of the scientific progress that these experiments allow. More recently, the international AlpArray mission and related projects have generated a large amount of new data, not only seismic, to test the hypothesis that mantle circulation driving plates’ re-organization during collision has both immediate and long-lasting effects on the structure, motion, earthquake distribution and landscape evolution in mountain belts. Links between Earth’s surface and mantle have been forged by integrating 3D geophysical imaging of the entire crust-mantle system, with geologic observations and modelling to provide a look both backwards and forwards in time, the 4th dimension. This integrated 4D approach, initially focused on the Alps, has been expanded to the Pannonian-Carpathian region, with the ongoing PACASE experiment. A new initiative, AdriaArray, based on the deployment of the extensive AdriaArray Seismic Network, is underway to cover the Adria plate on both sides, including the Apennines and Dinarides-Hellenides, to shed light on plate-scale deformation and orogenic processes in this dynamic part of the Alpine-Mediterranean chain. This session provides an interdisciplinary platform for highlighting the newest results and open questions of the aforementioned projects, regions and themes.

Co-organized by GD9/TS6
Convener: Claudia Piromallo | Co-conveners: Petr Kolínský, Gergana Georgieva, Iva DasovićECSECS, Jordi Diaz
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 0.16
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 14:00
Thu, 14:00
GD8.1 EDI | PICO

Understanding the structures and dynamics of the core of a planet is essential to constructing a global geochemical and geodynamical model, and has implication on the planet's thermal, compositional and orbital evolution.

Remote sensing of planetary interiors from space and ground based observations is entering a new era with perspectives in constraining their core structures and dynamics. Meanwhile, increasingly accurate seismic data provide unprecedented images of the Earth's deep interior. Unraveling planetary cores' structures and dynamics requires a synergy between many fields of expertise, such as mineral physics, geochemistry, seismology, fluid mechanics or geomagnetism.

This session welcomes contributions from all the aforementioned disciplines following theoretical, numerical, observational or experimental approaches.

Co-organized by EMRP1/SM5
Convener: Jerome Noir | Co-conveners: Santiago Triana, Sébastien Merkel, Arwen Deuss, Daria Holdenried-Chernoff
PICO
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 2
Thu, 10:45
GD7.1 EDI

Many regions of the Earth, from crust to core, exhibit anisotropic fabrics which can reveal much about geodynamic processes in the subsurface. These fabrics can exist at a variety of scales, from crystallographic orientations to regional structure alignments. In the past few decades, a tremendous body of multidisciplinary research has been dedicated to characterizing anisotropy in the solid Earth and understanding its geodynamical implications. This has included work in fields such as: (1) geophysics, to make in situ observations and construct models of anisotropic properties at a range of depths; (2) mineral physics, to explain the cause of some of these observations; and (3) numerical modelling, to relate the inferred fabrics to regional stress and flow regimes and, thus, geodynamic processes in the Earth. The study of anisotropy in the Solid Earth encompasses topics so diverse that it often appears fragmented according to regions of interest, e.g., the upper or lower crust, oceanic lithosphere, continental lithosphere, cratons, subduction zones, D'', or the inner core. The aim of this session is to bring together scientists working on different aspects of anisotropy to provide a comprehensive overview of the field. We encourage contributions from all disciplines of the earth sciences (including mineral physics, seismology, magnetotellurics, geodynamic modelling) focused on anisotropy at all scales and depths within the Earth.

Co-organized by EMRP1/SM5
Convener: Manuele Faccenda | Co-conveners: Tuna Eken, Judith Confal
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–17:35 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 08:30
TS2.1

Imaging and characterization of both seismogenic structures and elastic/anelastic properties of the surrounding medium play a key role in the understanding of the deformation processes from regional to small scale. The presence of fluids and crustal heterogeneity makes analysis by geophysical methods challenging. In these conditions, fluids interact with seismic sources caused by deformation, affecting the genesis and growth of seismic sequences. Nowadays also for many green energy applications, it is crucial to comprehend the geometry and kinematics of crustal-scale faults from field measurements (e.g., geothermal energy, CO2 storage, mining for minerals important for battery production) with the goal of minimizing the related risks to geo-resources exploitation.

This session is designed to propose a discussion about cutting-edge seismic techniques with the aim of imaging and characterizing seismically active and ancient faults in tectonic and volcanic areas. Contributions to the session may include challenging applications, where the joint inversion of both active and passive seismic data are employed to shed light on not-straightforward complexities in different geological contexts, even integrated by the results derived from other geophysical investigations.

We welcome contributions from velocity tomography, attenuation tomography (coda, t* method, direct wave attenuation), source imaging and characterization (absolute and relative location techniques, focal mechanism and stress drop analysis, receiver functions), active-source seismic techniques (reflection, refraction, integrated drilling data, seismic attributes), along with multidisciplinary studies. As a final issue, other geophysical data (e.g. potential methods like gravimetric, magnetic, or geo-electric studies) could also provide further helpful information, to better constrain the interpretation of seismological data. We particularly encourage contributions from early-career researchers and those using novel techniques (e.g., data mining and machine learning).

Co-organized by SM5
Convener: Ferdinando NapolitanoECSECS | Co-conveners: Simona Gabrielli, Ortensia Amoroso, Leonardo ColavittiECSECS, Sergio GammaldiECSECS
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room K1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 16:15
GD6.4 EDI

We invite, in particular multidisciplinary, contributions which focus on the structure, deformation and evolution of the continental crust and upper mantle and on the nature of mantle discontinuities. The latter include, but are not limited to, the mid-lithosphere discontinuity (MLD), the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), and the mantle transition zone, as imaged by various seismological techniques and interpreted with interdisciplinary approaches. Papers with focus on the structure of the crust and the nature of the Moho are also welcome.
The session topic is interpretation and modelling of the geodynamic processes in the lithosphere-asthenosphere system and the interaction between crust and lithospheric mantle, as well as the importance of these processes for the formation of the discontinuities that we today observe in the crust and mantle. We aim at establishing links between seismological observations and process-oriented modelling studies to better understand the relation between present-day fabrics of the lithosphere and contemporary deformation and ongoing dynamics within the asthenospheric mantle. Methodologically, the contributions will include studies based on application of geochemical, petrological, tectonic and geophysical (seismic, thermal, gravity, electro-magnetic) methods with emphasis on integrated interpretations.

Co-organized by SM5/TS11, co-sponsored by ILP
Convener: Alexey Shulgin | Co-conveners: Ehsan Qorbani Chegeni, Xiaoqing ZhangECSECS, Ana MG Ferreira, Jaroslava Plomerova, Lev Vinnik, Hans Thybo
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room M1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
GD4.4 EDI

Convergent plate boundaries can result in a wide variety of tectonic feature from collisional orogens (e.g. the Himalaya or Pyrenees) through subduction orogens (e.g. the Andes or Taiwan) to arc-back-arc systems (e.g. Sea of Japan or the Aegean). These tectonic settings might transition from one to another like in Southeast Asia, where there is geodynamic inversion of the east dipping Manila oceanic subduction South of Taiwan, that evolves northward, first, into a Continental Subduction (collision) onshore Taiwan, then secondly, east of Taiwan, into the north dipping Ryukyu arc/continent subduction.

Recently a large volume of high quality and high resolution geophysical and geological data had been acquired that could help us better understand the processes that govern subduction, collision and back-arc extension. Our session has a special focus on overriding plate deformation as it shows a great variety between different systems from extension dominated settings to compression dominated ones.

In this session authors are encouraged to share their work on the tectonic or magmatic features convergent plate boundary settings, as well as on the study of the processes contributing to the formation, evolution, and shaping of such systems. The conveners encourage contributions using multi-disciplinary and innovative methods from disciplines such as, but not restricted to, field geology, thermochronology, geochemistry, petrology, seismology, geophysics and marine geophysics, and analogue/numerical modelling.

Co-organized by SM5/TS6
Convener: Zoltán Erdős | Co-conveners: Attila BalázsECSECS, Shu-Kun Hsu, Benoit Deffontaines, Valentina Magni, Julia Ribeiro, Camilla Palmiotto
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 08:30
GM2.2 EDI

Our planet is shaped by a multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes. Most of these processes and their effect on the ground’s properties can be sensed by seismic instruments – as discrete events or ongoing signatures. Seismic methods have been developed, adopted and advanced to study those dynamics at or near the surface of the earth, with unprecedented detail, completeness and resolution. The community of geophysicists interested in earth surface dynamics and geomorphologists, glaciologists, hydrologists, volcanologists, geochemists, biologists and engineering geologists interested in using arising geophysical tools and techniques is progressively growing and collaboratively advancing that emerging scientific discipline.

When you are interested in contributing to or getting to know about the latest methodological and theoretical developments, field and lab scale experimental outcomes, and the broad range of applications in geomorphology, glaciology, hydrology, meteorology, engineering geology, volcanology and natural hazards, then this session would be your choice. We anticipate a lively discussion about standing questions in earth surface dynamics research and how seismic methods could help solving them, we will debate about community based research opportunities and are looking forward to bringing together transdisciplinary knowledge and mutual curiousity.

Topical keywords: erosion, transient, landslide, rockfall, debris flow, fracturing, stress, granular flow, rock mechanics, snow avalanche, calving, icequake, basal motion, subglacial, karst, bedload, flood, GLOF, early warning, coast, tsunami, eruption, tremor, turbidity current, groundwater, soil moisture, noise, dv/v, HVSR, fundamental frequency, polarisation, array, DAS, infra sound, machine learning, classification, experiment.

We are happy to announce Agnes Helmstetter as invited speaker!

Co-organized by CR2/GI5/SM5
Convener: Josefine UmlauftECSECS | Co-conveners: Michael Dietze, Małgorzata ChmielECSECS, Ugo Nanni
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:05 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
GD1.3 EDI

Vertical motions of the Earth’s lithosphere act as a powerful lens into the dynamic behavior of the asthenosphere and deeper mantle. Surface observations, therefore, provide important constraints on mantle convection patterns through space/time and constitute important constraints for theoretical models and numerical simulations. The asthenosphere is a crucial layer in Earth system.  Its structure and dynamics control processes such as postglacial rebound and dynamic topography, and it plays a crucial role in facilitating plate-like surface motions by reducing horizontal shear dissipation of mantle flow. Vertical motions can now be monitored geodetically with unprecedented precision. At the same time, geological records provide invaluable spatial-temporal information about the deeper history of vertical motion of the lithosphere.  For instance: thermochronological methods, studies of river profiles, sediment provenance, landform analysis, or hiatus mapping at interregional and continental scale. The challenges of using Earth's surface records to better understand asthenospheric and deep Earth processes involve (1) signal separation from other uplift and subsidence mechanisms, such as isostasy and plate tectonics; (2) different spatial resolutions and scales between models and observables; and (3) The challenges of recognizing on what (intercontinental) scales to compile geologic and stratigraphic data.

This session will provide a holistic view of the surface expression of the asthenosphere and deep Earth processes from geodetic to geological time scales using multi-disciplinary methods, including (but not limited to) geodetic, geophysical, geochemical, geomorphological, stratigraphic, and other observations, as well as numerical modeling. Thus, it will provide opportunities for presenters and attendees from a range of disciplines, demographics, and stages of their scientific career to engage in this exciting and emerging problem in Earth science.

Co-organized by GMPV2/SM5
Convener: Ingo L. StotzECSECS | Co-conveners: Simon StephensonECSECS, Yi-Wei ChenECSECS, Megan Holdt, Audrey MargirierECSECS, Roland Pail, Sergei Lebedev
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 14:00

SM6 – Crustal Fluids & Seismic Activity (incl. induced & triggered seismicity, volcano seismology

Programme group scientific officer: Philippe Jousset

SM6.1 EDI

Fluids permeate and diffuse within the crust being originated by internal or external natural sources or by industrial activities for modern energy exploitation and production. Fluids are involved in several geological processes occurring within the seismogenic crust. Fluid-induced stress changes (seasonal forcing due to surface water redistribution, overpressure within the natural reservoirs and/or along the fault planes, industrial wastewater injection, etc.) can reactivate faults and generate deformation and earthquakes. In volcanic environments, fluids play a key role in governing the evolution of magmatic processes and eruption. In this view, it becomes crucial to reliably image fluid storages and track their movement through the crust. New and innovative methodologies and technologies permit 1) to reconstruct the 4D (space and time) variations of rock physical and geochemical properties in a fluid-filled porous medium, 2) detecting and tracking fluids migration, and 3) studying fluid-related effects (such as induced microseismicity, electric properties changes and surface ground deformation). Hence the scientific communities have a new generation of powerful tools for seismic, volcanic and industrial hazard assessment.
This session focuses on main results obtained within the project FLUIDS funded by the Italian Ministry for Research, which was aimed at developing and applying an integrated multi-parametric and multi-disciplinary approach to image and track crustal fluids at selected test-sites in volcanic, tectonic and industrial exploitation environments. The session focuses also on latest research, field studies, modelling aspects, theoretical, experimental and observational advances on detection and tracking of fluid movements and/or pore fluid-pressure diffusion in different environments worldwide, and on the analysis of their correlation with the induced/triggered seismicity.
We welcome contributions on advances in seismic, geochemical and deformation monitoring; multidisciplinary studies combining different data types and observations; characterization and space-time variations of electrical and seismic elastic/anelastic crustal properties, including stress and pressure changes; and physical and/or statistical analyses for the recognition of peculiar seismicity patterns. The session also encourages contributions from early career scientists.

Co-organized by ERE5/GMPV5
Convener: Grazia De LandroECSECS | Co-conveners: Tony Alfredo Stabile, Jean Vandemeulebrouck, Nicola DAgostino, Michele Paternoster
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 14:00
SM6.2 | PICO

Volcanic seismicity is fundamental for monitoring and investigating volcanic systems, their structure and their underlying processes. Volcanoes are very complex objects, where both the pronounced heterogeneity and topography can strongly modify the recorded signals for a wide variety of source types. In source inversion work, one of the challenges is to capture the effect of small scale heterogeneities in order to remove complex path effects from seismic data. This requires high resolution imagery, which is a significant challenge in heterogeneous volcanoes. In addition, the link between the variety of physical processes beneath volcanoes and their seismic response (or lack of) is often not well known, leading to large uncertainties in the interpretation of volcano dynamics based on the seismic observations. Taking into account all of these complexities, many standard techniques for seismic analysis may fail to produce breakthrough results.

In order to address the outlined challenges, this session aims to bring together seismologists, volcano and geothermal seismologists, wave propagation and source modellers, working on different aspects of volcano seismology including: (i) seismicity catalogues, statistics and spatio-temporal evolution of seismicity, (ii) seismic wave propagation and scattering, (iii) new developments in volcano imagery, (iii) seismic source inversions, and (iv) seismic time-lapse monitoring. Contribution on controlled geothermal systems in volcanic environments are also welcome. Contributions on developments in instrumentation and new methodologies (e.g. Machine Learning) are particularly welcome.
By considering interrelationships in these complementary seismological areas, we aim to build up a coherent picture of the latest advances and outstanding challenges in volcano seismology.

Co-organized by GMPV9
Convener: Ivan Lokmer | Co-conveners: Chris Bean, Kristín Jónsdóttir, Arthur Jolly
PICO
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 3a
Tue, 14:00
SM6.3 EDI

Earthquake swarms are characterized by a complex temporal evolution and a delayed occurrence of the largest magnitude event. In addition, seismicity often manifests with intense foreshock activity or develops in more complex sequences where doublets or triplets of large comparable magnitude earthquakes occur. The difference between earthquake swarms and these complex sequences is subtle and usually flagged as such only a posteriori. This complexity derives from aseismic transient forcing acting on top of the long-term tectonic loading: pressurization of crustal fluids, slow-slip and creeping events, and at volcanoes, magmatic processes (i.e. dike and sill intrusions or magma degassing). From an observational standpoint, these complex sequences in volcanic and tectonic regions share many similarities: seismicity rate fluctuations, earthquakes migration, and activation of large seismogenic volume despite the usual small seismic moment released. The underlying mechanisms are local increases of the pore-pressure, loading/stressing rate due to aseismic processes (creeping, slow slip events), magma-induced stress changes, earthquake-earthquake interaction via static stress transfer or a combination of those. Yet, the physics behind such transients, seismo-genesis and the ultimate reasons for the occurrence of swarm-like rather than mainshock-aftershocks sequences, is still far beyond a full understanding.

This session aims at putting together studies of swarms and complex seismic sequences driven by aseismic transients in order to enhance our insights on both the physics of such transients and the earthquake source properties. Contributions focusing on the characterization of these sequences in terms of spatial and temporal evolution, source and scaling properties, and insight on the triggering physical processes are welcome. Multidisciplinary studies using observation complementary to seismological data, such as fluid geochemistry, deformation, and geology are also welcome, as well as laboratory and numerical modeling simulating the mechanical condition yielding to swarm-like and complex seismic sequences.

Co-organized by ERE5/TS3
Convener: Luigi Passarelli | Co-conveners: Dino Bindi, Simone Cesca, Francesco Maccaferri, Maria MesimeriECSECS, Matteo Picozzi, Daniele Spallarossa
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room 0.16
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 08:30
GMPV8.7 EDI

After over 800 years of quiescence, the Fagradalsfjall eruptions in 2021 and 2022 may mark the onset of a new cycle of volcanism and unrest across the Reykjanes Peninsula in SW-Iceland. The eruptions followed periods of intense seismicity and deformation triggered by the injection of feeder dikes. The compositions of the erupted lava, melt inclusions, and gas emissions suggested pre-eruption storage from near-moho depths. Over the course of the eruption, the lava composition displayed significant compositional change over time that suggested the rapid mixing of melt batches of different source depth and affinity. Variably pulsating effusion and degassing behavior challenges the traditional views of volcanic plumbing systems. The eruptions were, and still are, popular tourist attractions, posing challenges to safe crowd management in active volcanic areas. Now we ponder: what's next?

We welcome submissions on volcanic systems of the Reykjanes Peninsula; their plumbling systems, eruptive products, and impacts. We particularly encourage comparative studies across different regions and disciplines.

Topics may include, for example: physical volcanology of eruptive products and eruptive behavior; lava flow modeling; acoustic studies; petrology; geochemistry and interaction with groundwater; studies of volcanic gases; crustal deformation; seismology; volcano monitoring; social effects; health effects; hazard mitigation; tectonic implications; volcano-tectonic interactions; atmosphere-climate interactions, etc.

Co-organized by EOS1/NH7/SM6/TS10
Convener: Halldór Geirsson | Co-conveners: Kristín Jónsdóttir, Edward W. Marshall, Sara Barsotti, Sigríður María Aðalsteinsdóttir
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.14
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 10:45
CR2.2 | PICO

Geophysical and in-situ measurements provide important baseline datasets, as well as validation for modelling and remote sensing products. They are used to advance our understanding of firn, ice-sheet and glacier dynamics, sea ice processes, changes in snow cover and snow properties, snow/ice-atmosphere-ocean interactions, permafrost degradation, geomorphic mechanisms, and changes in en-glacial and sub-glacial conditions.

In this session, we welcome contributions related to a wide spectrum of methods, including, but not limited to, advances in radioglaciology, active and passive seismology, geoelectrics, acoustic sounding, fibre-optic sensing, GNSS reflectometry, signal attenuation, and time delay techniques, cosmic ray neutron sensing, ROV and drone applications, and electromagnetic methods. Contributions can include  field applications, new approaches in geophysical or in-situ survey techniques, or theoretical advances in data analysis processing or inversion. Case studies from all parts of the cryosphere, including snow and firn, alpine glaciers, ice sheets, glacial and periglacial environments, permafrost and rock glaciers, or sea ice, are highly welcome.

The focus of the session is to share  experiences in the application, processing, analysis, and interpretation of different geophysical and in-situ techniques in these highly complex environments. We have been running this session for more than a decade and it always produces lively and informative discussion.

Co-organized by CL5/GI5/HS13/SM6
Convener: Emma C. SmithECSECS | Co-conveners: Franziska KochECSECS, Winnie ChuECSECS, Polona Itkin
PICO
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 3a
Fri, 14:00
GD4.2 EDI

Subduction drives plate tectonics, generating the major proportion of subaerial volcanism, releasing >90% seismic moment magnitude, forming continents, and recycling lithosphere. Numerical and laboratory modeling studies have successfully built our understanding of many aspects of the geodynamics of subduction zones. Detailed geochemical studies, investigating compositional variation within and between volcanic arcs, provide further insights into systematic chemical processes at the slab surface and within the mantle wedge, providing constraints on thermal structures and material transport within subduction zones. However, with different technical and methodological approaches, model set-ups, inputs, and material properties, and in some cases conflicting conclusions between chemical and physical models, a consistent picture of the controlling parameters of subduction-zone processes has so far not emerged.

This session aims to follow subducting lithosphere on its journey from the surface down into the Earth's mantle and to understand the driving processes for deformation and magmatism in the over-riding plate. We aim to address topics such as: subduction initiation and dynamics; changes in mineral breakdown processes at the slab surface; the formation and migration of fluids and melts at the slab surface; primary melt generation in the wedge; subduction-related magmatism; controls on the position and width of the volcanic arc; subduction-induced seismicity; mantle wedge processes; the fate of subducted crust, sediments and volatiles; the importance of subducting seamounts, LIPs, and ridges; links between near-surface processes and slab dynamics and with regional tectonic evolution; slab delamination and break-off; the effect of subduction on mantle flow; and imaging subduction zone processes.

With this session, we aim to form an integrated picture of the subduction process, and invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines, such as geodynamics, modeling, geochemistry, petrology, volcanology, and seismology, to discuss subduction zone dynamics at all scales from the surface to the lower mantle, or in applications to natural laboratories.

Co-organized by GMPV2/SM6/TS6
Convener: Ágnes Király | Co-conveners: Patricia Cadenas Martínez, Jeroen van Hunen, Oğuz H Göğüş, Taras Gerya, Brandon ShuckECSECS, César R. Ranero
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 08:30

SM7 – Seismic Hazard Assessment (earthquake forecasting, engineering seismology, seismic and/or multihazard probabilistic assessment)

Programme group scientific officer: Fabrice Cotton

SM7.2

Damaging earthquakes create massive devastation in two ways: the loss of property and the loss of human life, out of which loss of human life can be easily reduced by interventions from earthquake early warning systems. Therefore, along with hazard, risk, and mitigation planning, earthquake prevention, prediction, early warning, and probability monitoring are crucial. Early warning systems have been deployed and are in operation in many nations including China, Taiwan, Japan, the USA, and Chile etc. Most of the systems work on classical regression equations and due to their inability to produce reliable data, old methodologies are no longer employed in the contemporary hazard assessment, earthquake early waring and monitoring of earthquakes. AI/ML techniques have made in roads for better understanding the nonlinear behavior and are capable of relatively more realistic predictions of the attributes, more so when data paucity has gone. The most recent method for earthquake prediction, probability evaluation and earthquake early warning is machine learning. Machine learning (ML) techniques have been extensively used in recent years to monitor earthquakes and analyze seismic data, including seismic detection, seismic classification, seismic denoising, phase picking, phase association, earthquake location, magnitude estimation, ground motion prediction, earthquake early warning, source inversion, and subsurface imaging. Due to its impressive accuracy and efficiency, ML-based phase picking has received a lot of interest and has been widely used for earthquake monitoring at local and regional scales, although global and regional ML phase pickers have received less attention.
This session appreciates contributions on the recent advancement in seismic hazard and risk assessment and earthquake early warning methods. We also, welcome the contribution on the application of ML in earthquake source dynamics, wave attenuation characterization and Seismic tomography.

Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Prof. M.L. Sharma | Co-conveners: Rohtash KumarECSECS, Dr. Ranjit Das, Mr. Lalit Arya
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:10 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 10:45
NH4.2 EDI

Earthquake disaster mitigation involves different elements, concerning identification, assessment and reduction of earthquake risk. Each element has various aspects: a) analysis of hazards (e.g. physical description of ground shaking) and its impact on built and natural environment, b) vulnerability and exposure to hazards and capacity building and resilience, c) long-term preparedness and post-event response. Due to the broad range of earthquake disaster mitigation various seismic hazard/risk models are developed at different time scales and by different methods, heterogeneous observations are used and multi-disciplinary information is acquired.
We welcome contributions about different types of seismic hazards research and assessments, both methodological and practical, and their applications to disaster risk reduction in terms of physical and social vulnerability, capacity and resilience.
This session aims to tackle theoretical and implementation issues, as well as aspects of communication and science policy, which are all essential elements towards effective disasters mitigation, and involve:
⇒ the development of physical/statistical models for the different earthquake risk components (hazard, exposure, vulnerability), including novel methods for data collection and processing (e.g. statistical machine learning analysis)
⇒ earthquake hazard and risk estimation at different time and space scales, verifying their performance against observations (including unconventional seismological observations);
⇒ time-dependent seismic hazard and risk assessments (including contribution of aftershocks), and post-event information (early warning, alerts) for emergency management;
⇒ earthquake-induced cascading effects (e.g. landslides, tsunamis, etc.) and multi-risk assessment (e.g. earthquake plus flooding).
The interdisciplinary session promotes knowledge exchange, sharing best practices and experience gained by using different methods, providing this way opportunities to advance our understanding of disaster risk in "all its dimensions of vulnerability, capacity, exposure of persons and assets, hazard characteristics and the environment", while simultaneously highlighting existing gaps and future research directions.

Co-organized by SM7/TS3
Convener: Antonella Peresan | Co-conveners: Alik Ismail-Zadeh, Katerina Orfanogiannaki, Katalin GribovszkiECSECS, Elisa Varini
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.17
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall NH
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 16:15
NH5.1 EDI

Tsunamis can produce catastrophic damage on vulnerable coastlines, essentially following major earthquakes, landslides, extreme volcanic activity or atmospheric disturbances.
After the disastrous tsunamis in 2004 and 2011, tsunami science has been continuously growing and expanding its scope to new fields of research in various domains, and also to regions where the tsunami hazard was previously underestimated.

The tsunami following the eruption of Hunga Tonga - Hunga Ha'apai in January 2022 provided a new and urging challenge, being an event with an extremely complicated source process and a consequently non-trivial global propagation, posing new questions in terms of modeling, hazard assessment and warning at different scales and evidencing the need for a closer cooperation among different research communities.

The spectrum of topics addressed by tsunami science nowadays ranges from the “classical” themes, such as analytical and numerical modelling of different generation mechanisms (ranging from large subduction earthquakes to local earthquakes generated in tectonically complex environments, from subaerial/submarine landslides to volcanic eruptions and atmospheric disturbances), propagation and run-up, hazard-vulnerability-risk assessment, especially with probabilistic approaches able to quantify uncertainties, early warning and monitoring, to more “applied” themes such as the societal and economic impact of moderate-to-large events on coastal local and nation-wide communities, as well as the present and future challenges connected to the global climate change.

This session welcomes multidisciplinary as well as focused contributions covering any of the aspects mentioned above, encompassing field data, geophysical models, regional and local hazard-vulnerability-risk studies, observation databases, numerical and experimental modeling, real time networks, operational tools and procedures towards a most efficient warning, with the general scope of improving our understanding of the tsunami phenomenon, per se and in the context of the global change, and our capacity to build safer and more resilient communities.

Co-organized by GM6/OS2/SM7
Convener: Alberto Armigliato | Co-conveners: Ira Didenkulova, Hélène Hébert, Lyuba DimovaECSECS
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–12:40 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 14:00

SM8 – Computational, Theoretical Seismology and Big Data

Programme group scientific officer: Heiner Igel

SM8.1 EDI

Computational earth science often relies on modelling to understand complex physical systems which cannot be directly observed. Over the last years, numerical modeling of earthquakes provides new approaches to apprehend the physics of earthquake rupture and the seismic cycle, seismic wave propagation, fault zone evolution and seismic hazard assessment. Recent advances in numerical algorithms and increasing computational power enable unforeseen precision and multi-physics components in physics-based simulations of earthquake rupture and seismic wave propagation but also pose challenges in terms of fully exploiting modern supercomputing infrastructure, realistic parameterization of simulation ingredients and the analysis of large synthetic datasets while advances in laboratory experiments link earthquake source processes to rock mechanics. This session aims to bring together modelers and data analysts interested in the physics and computational aspects of earthquake phenomena and earthquake engineering. We welcome studies focusing on all aspects of seismic hazard assessment and the physics of earthquakes — from slow slip events, fault mechanics and rupture dynamics, to wave propagation and ground motion analysis, to the seismic cycle and inter seismic deformation — and studies which further the state-of-the art in the related computational and numerical aspects.

Co-organized by NH4/NP4
Convener: Luca Dal Zilio | Co-conveners: William FrazerECSECS, Casper PrangerECSECS, Jonathan WolfECSECS, Elisa Tinti, ‪Alice-Agnes Gabriel, Jean Paul Ampuero
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room G2
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 16:15
NH4.3 EDI

New physical and statistical models based on observed seismicity patterns shed light on the preparation process of large earthquakes and on the temporal and spatial evolution of seismicity clusters.

As a result of technological improvements in seismic monitoring, seismic data is nowadays gathered with ever-increasing quality and quantity. As a result, models can benefit from large and accurate seismic catalogues. Indeed, accuracy of hypocenter locations and coherence in magnitude determination are fundamental for reliable analyses. And physics-based earthquake simulators can produce large synthetic catalogues that can be used to improve the models.

Multidisciplinary data recorded by both ground and satellite instruments, such as geodetic deformation, geological and geochemical data, fluid content analyses and laboratory experiments, can better constrain the models, in addition to available seismological results such as source parameters and tomographic information.

Statistical approaches and machine learning techniques of big data analysis are required to benefit from this wealth of information, and unveiling complex and nonlinear relationships in the data. This allows a deeper understanding of earthquake occurrence and its statistical forecasting.

In this session, we invite researchers to present their latest results and findings in physical and statistical models and machine learning approaches for space, time, and magnitude evolution of earthquake sequences. Emphasis will be given to the following topics:

• Physical and statistical models of earthquake occurrence.
• Analysis of earthquake clustering.
• Spatial, temporal and magnitude properties of earthquake statistics.
• Quantitative testing of earthquake occurrence models.
• Reliability of earthquake catalogues.
• Time-dependent hazard assessment.
• Methods and software for earthquake forecasting.
• Data analyses and requirements for model testing.
• Machine learning applied to seismic data.
• Methods for quantifying uncertainty in pattern recognition and machine learning.

Co-organized by SM8
Convener: Stefania Gentili | Co-conveners: Rita Di Giovambattista, Álvaro González, Filippos Vallianatos
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:40 (CEST)
 
Room 2.17
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall NH
Orals |
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 16:15
TS8.2 EDI | PICO

Geologic processes are generally too slow, too rare, or too deep to be observed in-situ and to be monitored with a resolution high enough to understand their dynamics. Analogue experiments and numerical simulation have thus become an integral part of the Earth explorer's toolbox to select, formulate, and test hypotheses on the origin and evolution of geological phenomena.

To foster synergy between the rather independently evolving experimentalists and modellers we provide a multi-disciplinary platform to discuss research on tectonics, structural geology, rock mechanics, geodynamics, volcanology, geomorphology, and sedimentology.

We therefore invite contributions demonstrating the state-of-the-art in analogue and numerical / analytical modelling on a variety of spatial and temporal scales, varying from earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions to sedimentary processes, plate tectonics and landscape evolution. We especially welcome those presentations that discuss model strengths and weaknesses, challenge the existing limits, or compare/combine the different modelling techniques to realistically simulate and better understand the Earth's behaviour.

Co-organized by GD10/GM9/SM8
Convener: Frank Zwaan | Co-conveners: Ágnes Király, Valentina Magni, Riccardo Reitano, Michael Rudolf
PICO
| Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST), 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 3b
Wed, 08:30
GI2.1

Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods are employed in a variety of engineering and geosciences applications and their stand-alone use has been greatly investigated to date. New theoretical developments, technological advances and the progress achieved in surveying, data processing and interpretation have in fact led to a tremendous growth of the equipment reliability, allowing outstanding data quality and accuracy.

Nevertheless, the requirements of comprehensive site and material investigations may be complex and time-consuming, involving multiple expertise and equipment. The challenge is to step forward and provide an effective integration between data outputs with different physical quantities, scale domains and resolutions. In this regard, enormous development opportunities relating to data fusion, integration and correlation between different NDT methods and theories are to be further investigated.

This Session primarily aims at disseminating contributions from state-of-the-art NDT methods and new numerical developments, promoting the integration of existing equipment and the development of new algorithms, surveying techniques, methods and prototypes for effective monitoring and diagnostics. NDT techniques of interest are related–but not limited to–the application of acoustic emission (AE) testing, electromagnetic testing (ET), ground penetrating radar (GPR), geoelectric methods (GM), laser testing methods (LM), magnetic flux leakage (MFL), microwave testing, magnetic particle testing (MT), neutron radiographic testing (NR), radiographic testing (RT), thermal/infrared testing (IRT), ultrasonic testing (UT), seismic methods (SM), vibration analysis (VA), visual and optical testing (VT/OT).

The Session will focus on the application of different NDT methods and theories and will be related –but not limited to– the following investigation areas:
- advanced data fusion;
- advanced interpretation methods;
- design and development of new surveying equipment and prototypes;
- real-time & remote assessment and monitoring methods for material and site inspection (real-life and virtual reality);
- comprehensive and inclusive information data systems for the investigation of survey sites and materials;
- numerical simulation and modelling of data outputs with different physical quantities, scale domains and resolutions;
- advances in NDT methods, numerical developments and applications (stand-alone use of existing and state-of-the-art NDTs).

Co-organized by EMRP2/ESSI1/SM8
Convener: Andrea Benedetto | Co-conveners: Morteza (Amir) Alani, Andreas Loizos, Francesco Soldovieri, Fabio Tosti
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 0.51
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall ESSI/GI/NP
Orals |
Tue, 14:00