Union-wide
Cross-cutting themes
Community-led
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions

GMPV – Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

Programme Group Chair: Holly Stein

MAL22-GMPV
Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture by Kei Hirose and Arne Richter Award for Outstanding ECS Lecture by Yanhao Lin
Convener: Holly Stein
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Thu, 19:00
DM11
Division meeting for Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology (GMPV)
Convener: Holly Stein
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Thu, 12:45

GMPV1 – New and interdisciplinary approaches and applications in geochemistry

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Max Wilke, Giulia Consuma

GMPV1.2 EDI

This session offers a comprehensive perspective on the applications of geochemical data analysis, making it a valuable resource for researchers, environmental professionals, and policymakers seeking a thorough understanding of the intricate interplay between geochemistry and various aspects of human-environment interaction. Cutting-edge approaches in geochemical data analysis, covering a broad spectrum from the nanoscale to global perspectives, are welcome. The overarching goal is to contribute to environmental protection, enhance quality of life, conduct human impact assessments, and facilitate resource exploration. The analysis of geochemical data helps in monitoring and managing pollution, identifying sources of contaminants, and developing effective strategies for environmental conservation and critical raw material exploration. The pursuit of a better quality of life is examined through the lens of geochemical insights, emphasizing the interconnectedness between environmental health and human well-being. Human impact assessment is a critical focus, and the session delves into the methodologies and applications of geochemical data analysis to evaluate the repercussions of human activities on ecosystems, water resources, and air quality. This holistic approach provides a comprehensive understanding of the anthropogenic influence on the Earth's geochemical cycles. Additionally, the session addresses resource hunting, highlighting how geochemical data analysis serves as a powerful tool in exploring and exploiting natural resources. Whether it is identifying mineral deposits, evaluating groundwater quality, or assessing energy resources, the text showcases the pivotal role played by the geochemical analysis in sustainable resource management.

Convener: Orlando Vaselli | Co-conveners: Maylis Dupont de Dinechin, Chiara Telloli, Nicolas David Rividi, Stefano Albanese, Federica MeloniECSECS, Elena PavoniECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:40 (CEST), 16:15–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 14:00

GMPV2 – Experimental and analytical advances in mineralogy and rock-forming processes

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Max Wilke, David Dolejs

GMPV2.1 EDI

Mineralogy is the cornerstone of many disciplines and is used to solve a wide range of questions in geoscience. This broad session offers the opportunity to explore the diversity of methods and approaches used to study minerals and how minerals behave and evolve in their many contexts. Also, we will address issues that involve the use and development of spectroscopic techniques and the relevant ab initio simulations beyond current applications in metamorphic and magmatic petrology applied to the Earth and other planetary bodies.
We welcome contributions on all aspects of mineralogy, including environmental, soil science, metamorphic, plutonic, deep Earth, planetary, applied mineralogy, and so on. All approaches are welcome: analytical, experimental and theoretical."

Convener: Jannick Ingrin | Co-conveners: Mara MurriECSECS, Melanie J. SieberECSECS, Nicola CampomenosiECSECS, Julia SordylECSECS, Stylianos AspiotisECSECS, Marta Berkesi
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 14:00
GMPV2.3 EDI

Geochronology and geochemistry are useful tools in geoscience research, covering all geological environments in the Earth`s crust. They are giving us different information about earth surface processes (e.g., biogenic, diagenetic, sedimentary), and processes at deeper levels of earth`s crust (e.g., hydrothermal, magmatic, metamorphic). Therefore, refining our understanding of rock-forming processes can contribute towards addressing important geological and societal problems, such as the Earth`s past and present carbon cycle or the exploration of critical raw materials. Carbonates, for instance, are forming in a wide range of geological settings and are nearly ubiquitous on earth. They are capable of aiding in understanding past climate evolution, as well as tectonic or metamorphic processes by providing time and temperature constraints.
Recent analytical developments allow for the application of geochronological, trace element and isotope geochemical techniques across a wide range of scales and sample materials. Currently, we are able to analyze and date more precisely and accurately than ever before, as well as to work with isotopic systems that were unimaginable in the past. Consequently, geochronological and geochemical studies are blooming in a variety of fields and in many cases could revolutionize our understanding of rates of fundamental natural processes.
This session aims to bring together an interdisciplinary community working both on method development (sample preparation, analytical techniques, interpretation and modelling approaches) and on the application of such methods to a variety of problems across the Earth sciences, across the geological time and scales. We invite geoscientists from all fields (e.g., paleo-oceanology, economic geology, igneous/metamorphic petrology, carbon storage) to contribute to this session by presenting their research in geochronology and geochemistry.

This session is a merge of two sessions: "Carbonate Geochronology, Trace Element and Stable Isotope Geochemistry — Applications and Advances" and "Temporal Framework of Geological Processes: Methods and Applications of Geochronology"

Convener: Johannes RembeECSECS | Co-conveners: Aratz Beranoaguirre, Aileen DoranECSECS, Dawid SzymanowskiECSECS, Lorenzo TavazzaniECSECS, Caroline Lotout, Goran Andjic
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00

GMPV3 – Low-temperature metamorphism and fluid-rock interaction

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Richard Palin, Silvio Ferrero

GMPV3.2 EDI

The importance of resources in the light of the energy transition to tackle climate change is now more important than ever. Therefore, we need to understand the formation of mineral resources to identify possible ore deposits. But not only extracting resources out of our earth is important but how to responsibly dispose of them and remediate environmental damages caused. One uniting factor for resource formation and environmental remediation is the role of fluids within the Earth’s crust. Their interaction with crustal material ranges from the nano- to the macro-scale. Each interaction process exhibits distinct physiochemical conditions related to, mineral substitution, growth, and deformation patterns. Some of these features are closely linked to melting, deformation, and destruction processes leading to fluid and element transfer, and enhanced chemical reactions over different spatial scales.
Deepening our understanding of those processes and integrating scales are fundamental to adapt exploration and potential environmental remediation strategies. Therefore, re-thinking existing models and timescales of fluid percolation within the Earth’s crust to enhance knowledge of provenance of fluids, mechanisms, time- and length-scales is necessary. It will contribute to modernising exploration and the diversification of the application of our findings in the fields of for example resource formation, geothermal energies, or carbon storage.
We invite multidisciplinary contributions that investigate fluid-rock interactions throughout the entire breadth of the topic, using fieldwork, microstructural and petrographic analyses, geochemistry, rock mechanics, thermodynamic as well as numerical modelling.

Convener: Ina AltECSECS | Co-conveners: Dörte JordanECSECS, Stylianos KarastergiosECSECS, Helen King, Christine V. Putnis
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Fri, 10:45

GMPV4 – High-temperature metamorphism and orogenic processes

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Thea Hatlen Heimdal, Jörg Hermann

GMPV4.1 EDI

Metamorphic processes control the thermo-mechanical properties and dynamics of cratons, orogens and subduction zones. Although this control is exerted on geological time scales, the individual reaction processes that count towards this control are often much faster and perhaps even occur on human time scales. The effects of metamorphism and mass transfer in and across rocks is a question of "what reaction happened and where", but also of "when did a reaction occur and how long did it take?" Answers to these questions can now be obtained through the multi-method and spatially-resolved analysis that integrates metamorphic petrology, in all its diverse forms, with speedometry and geochronology.

This session celebrates new approaches and achievements in the study of metamorphic processes in time and space. We welcome presentations that use field, laboratory, numerical and (micro-)analytical techniques to obtain new insights into the timing, duration and rates of metamorphic processes across geological settings and time scales.

Convener: Francesca Piccoli | Co-conveners: Matthijs Smit, Freya George, Tom Raimondo
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 16:15
GMPV4.2

Multidisciplinary approaches are the future of solid Earth studies and include the production and interpretation of extensive datasets, including but not limited to in-situ petrochemical and geochronological data, geochemistry, thermodynamic modelling, rock properties, geophysical data and geodynamic modelling. To handle this diverse array of information, innovative computational techniques (e.g., Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence) and combined existing and novel analytical techniques (e.g., petrochronology) are being used to integrate, interpret and understand data in solid Earth sciences and are in turn introducing new ideas about processes operating in the crust. This session unites the multitude of new integrated approaches to understand the evolution of our planet from the Archean to present day. We will explore the potential of combining new and established technologies to reveal more detail about the processes operating throughout Earth’s complex history.

Convener: Renée TamblynECSECS | Co-conveners: Lotta TernietenECSECS, John M. AikenECSECS, Silvia Volante, Kathryn Cutts, Valby van Schijndel
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00
GMPV4.5

Volatiles (e.g., H2O, CO2, Cl, F, S) play a fundamental role in Earth’s dynamic systems and profoundly contribute to the well-being and sustainability of life, making our planet unique. This is largely because volatiles influence planetary scale processes, including those that connect Earth’s deep and surface systems, such as melting, mineral stability and element mass transfer. These global cycles involve an efficient transfer of volatiles from our planet’s surface to its interior via subduction zones, mobilization by melts and fluids, and eventually emission to the atmosphere via volcanism. Volatiles may also be stored in the mantle, and possibly be re-mobilized.
The investigation of volatiles in melts and fluids through novel and multi-disciplinary approaches continues to yield important insights into the inner workings of our planet. This session aims to gather contributions from scientists involved in the broad spectrum of volatile cycles, with a focus on the principal carriers of these elements: melts and fluids. We welcome contributions from the different fields of petrology and geochemistry, via investigations of natural samples and experimental studies.
We particularly invite contributions on: i) deep volatiles cycles of H2O, CO2, halogens and S; ii) volatiles mobilization and transfer during subduction in COHNS fluids and silicate melts; iii) volatiles in metasomatic processes; iv) volatiles-bearing fluids and melts properties; v) volatiles storage in the lithospheric mantle; vi) volatiles emission and storage in volcanic systems.

Convener: Alessia BorghiniECSECS | Co-conveners: Carla Tiraboschi, Sally Gibson, Jacob ForshawECSECS, Andrea MaffeisECSECS, Bruna B. Carvalho
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00
GMPV4.6 EDI

Garnet preserves and records in an exceptionally way the geochemical conditions at which it equilibrates. Because it is stable across most of the lithosphere and found in very different protoliths, garnet provides a unique perspective to track deep geochemical processes, from magmatic ones to those responsible for the formation of ore deposits. Its stability over an extremely wide range of pressure and temperature (P–T) and its durability and resilience as detrital material make garnet an invaluable archive to unravel crustal evolution and planetary processes across geological timescale. Using this mineral as an archive where one can read the history of natural rocks, petrologists can reconstruct the P-T history and evolution of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Microstructures, compositional zoning, and elastic behaviour of its inclusions are just a few of the many aspects of great interest to better comprehend the history and fate of garnet-bearing rocks. Indeed, for instance the relatively slow diffusivity of trace elements in garnet allows the preservation of growth zones resulting from complex evolutions. When detrital, meticulous work on a high number of crystals allows to discover unexpected new evidences of UHP metamorphism and/or to collect new data on the tectono-metamorphic evolution of ancient basements. Finally, recent analytical improvements in dating of individual growth zones with high resolution or in-situ provide new opportunities to date the evolution and rate of a wide spectrum of geological and tectonic processes, while stable isotope zoning in garnet is the new frontier in exploring fluid/melt-rock interactions at depth.
We invite geoscientists from all kind of geological expertise to contribute to our session with their insights and approaches to unlock the secrets of this remarkable and useful mineral. Studies of fluid, melt and mineral inclusions within garnets and the application of innovative analytical techniques methodological approaches are also welcome.

Convener: Gabriele Cruciani | Co-conveners: Silvio FerreroECSECS, Lorraine Tual, Mattia GilioECSECS, Iwona KlonowskaECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 14:00
GD4.1 EDI

Subduction drives plate tectonics, generating the major proportion of subaerial volcanism, releasing >90% seismic moment magnitude, forming continents, and recycling lithosphere. Numerical and laboratory modelling studies have successfully built our understanding of many aspects of the geodynamics of subduction zones. Detailed geochemical studies, investigating compositional variation within and between volcanic arcs, provide further insights into systematic chemical processes at the slab surface and within the mantle wedge, providing constraints on thermal structures and material transport within subduction zones. However, with different technical and methodological approaches, model set-ups, inputs, and material properties, and in some cases conflicting conclusions between chemical and physical models, a consistent picture of the controlling parameters of subduction-zone processes has so far not emerged.

This session aims to follow subducting lithosphere on its journey from the surface down into the Earth's mantle and to understand the driving processes for deformation and magmatism in the over-riding plate. We aim to address topics such as: subduction initiation and dynamics; changes in mineral breakdown processes at the slab surface; the formation and migration of fluids and melts at the slab surface; primary melt generation in the wedge; subduction-related magmatism; controls on the position and width of the volcanic arc; subduction-induced seismicity; mantle wedge processes; the fate of subducted crust, sediments and volatiles; the importance of subducting seamounts, LIPs, and ridges; links between near-surface processes and slab dynamics and with regional tectonic evolution; slab delamination and break-off; the effect of subduction on mantle flow; and imaging subduction zone processes.

With this session, we aim to form an integrated picture of the subduction process and invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines, such as geodynamics, modelling, geochemistry, petrology, volcanology, and seismology, to discuss subduction zone dynamics at all scales from the surface to the lower mantle, or in applications to natural laboratories.

Co-organized by GMPV4/SM4/TS2
Convener: Ágnes KirályECSECS | Co-conveners: Jeroen van Hunen, César R. Ranero, Oğuz H Göğüş, Taras Gerya
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
GMPV4.9 | Poster session

The Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) at the core-mantle boundary are vital structures that impact Earth's core heat flow, material and energy exchange in deep Earth layers, continental evolution, surface resources, and the environment. Understanding LLSVPs' properties, origins, and effects is crucial for comprehending Earth's internal processes and surface habitability.
Research on LLSVPs is at the forefront of international science: (1) LLSVPs exhibit lower seismic wave velocities (1-4%) and slightly higher bottom density. They are surrounded by variable-sized Ultra-Low Velocity Zones (ULVZs). (2) LLSVPs have steep lateral boundaries, covering around 30% of the core-mantle boundary with heights reaching 1000-1500 kilometers. (3) Most mantle plumes are linked to the two major LLSVPs. Over the past 540 million years, many significant features like super-deep Kimberlite pipes (carrying diamonds from deep within the mantle), high-temperature anomalies associated with Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), oceanic hotspot basalts, and long-wavelength geoid anomalies spatially overlap with LLSVPs' surface projections, suggesting these originate from mantle plumes within LLSVPs. (4) Source regions of LIPs and hotspot basalts often display primitive geochemical signals, indicating a mixture of early Earth material and subducted components in LLSVPs.
However, there are significant gaps in our understanding of LLSVPs, including the fine-scale 3D structure remains unclear, chemical composition and temporal evolution are poorly understood, theoretical calculations of material wave velocities and element distribution face major challenges, internal material's thermal conductivity and rheology lack experimental constraints, and numerical simulations of dynamic processes and surface responses are limited.
To comprehensively understand LLSVPs, a multi-faceted approach involving natural observations, experimental analyses, and physical/numerical simulations is essential. Additionally, the emerging paradigm of big data combined with artificial intelligence has played an indispensable role in recent years in advancing geoscientific research. These efforts aim to gain a more comprehensive and in-depth understanding of LLSVPs' fine structure, origins, material composition, evolutionary history, deep dynamic processes, and surface effects.

Convener: Qun-Ke Xia | Co-conveners: Baohua Zhang, Zhongqing Wu, Wei Leng, Jia LiuECSECS
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Wed, 16:15
GD7.2

The goal of this session is to reconcile short-time/small-scale and long-time/large-scale observations, including geodynamic processes such as subduction, collision, rifting, or mantle lithosphere interactions. Despite the remarkable advances in experimental rock mechanics, the implications of rock-mechanics data for large temporal and spatial scale tectonic processes are still not straightforward, since the latter are strongly controlled by local lithological stratification of the lithosphere, its thermal structure, fluid content, tectonic heritage, metamorphic reactions, and deformation rates.

Mineral reactions have mechanical effects that may result in the development of pressure variations and thus are critical for interpreting microstructural and mineral composition observations. Such effects may fundamentally influence element transport properties and rheological behavior.
Here, we encourage presentations focused on the interplay between metamorphic processes and deformation on all scales, on the rheological behavior of crustal and mantle rocks, and time scales of metamorphic reactions in order to discuss
(1) how and when up to GPa-level differential stress and pressure variations can be built and maintained at geological timescales and modeling of such systems,
(2) deviations from lithostatic pressure during metamorphism: fact or fiction?
(3) the impact of deviations from lithostatic pressure on geodynamic reconstructions.
(4) the effect of porous fluid and partial melting on the long-term strength.
We, therefore, invite the researchers from different domains (rock mechanics, petrographic observations, geodynamic and thermo-mechanical modeling) to share their views on the way forward for improving our knowledge of the long-term rheology and chemo-thermo-mechanical behavior of the lithosphere and mantle.

Co-organized by GMPV4
Convener: Yury Podladchikov | Co-conveners: Lucie Tajcmanova, Shun-ichiro Karato, Evangelos MoulasECSECS, Leni Scheck-Wenderoth
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 14:00

GMPV5 – Building economic ore deposits

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Urs Schaltegger, Mathias Burisch

GMPV5.1 EDI

Mineral deposits represent principal sources of metallic and non-metallic raw materials for our society. The implementation of new climate policies and the rise of green energy production and use will trigger an unprecedented demand increase for such resources. Formation of economic commodities requires component sequestration from source region, transport and focusing to structural or chemical barriers. These enrichment processes typically involve magmatic, hydrothermal, weathering or metamorphic events, which operate in diverse geodynamic settings and over various time scales. The scope of this session is to collect insights from diverse areas of mineral exploration, field, analytical or experimental studies of mineral deposits as well as resource characterization and extraction. We invite contributions from fields of economic geology, mineralogy and geochemistry in order to advance our understanding of ore-forming systems.

Convener: David Dolejs | Co-conveners: Katarzyna Derkowska, Matteo Luca DeiddaECSECS
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 14:00
ERE4.1 EDI

Research and innovation in exploration and mining of critical raw materials is increasingly focused on the prospect of developing new technologies and cutting-edge analytical techniques to reduce the environmental footprint of mineral exploration and extraction .
The robotization of exploration/production platforms, such as robotic autonomous explorers and miners, will allow to reconsider “non-economical” deposits (abandoned, small, ultra-depth). Technological advances in the processes, included, but not limited to, X-ray sensors, spectroscopy and hyperspectral techniques, LIBS , electromagnetic, combined with machine learning, AI models, and efficient mechatronic solutions, will pave the way to a green mining industry.

This session aims to bring together geoscientists working on applied or interdisciplinary studies associated with mining exploration, geophysics, petrology, geochemistry, metallurgy, selective mining, and remote sensing. We encourage interdisciplinary studies which use a combination of methods to solve challenges as diverse as, but not limited to:
• Field-based and analytical approaches to understand and map ore bodies at multiple scales, (e.g. geophysical and/or geochemical mapping, isotope dating, samples collection)
• Imaging
• Conceptual modelling and quantification of deposits and mineral systems
• Cost reduction in exploration and production (automated extraction planning, optimization of extraction tools, non-invasive exploration)
• Real-time selective mineralogy.
• Data-driven discovery in mineralogy and geochemistry (e.g. geostatistics)

Public information:

 

2.12.0.0
2.12.0.0
2.12.0.0
Co-organized by GMPV5
Convener: Giorgia StasiECSECS | Co-conveners: Giulia ConsumaECSECS, Michael BernerECSECS, Eva Hartai
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.16
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 14:00
ERE4.8

Pyrite is the most common sulphide in the Earth’s crust and occurs in many different types of rock. Following many decades of research, the morphology, trace element and isotopic composition of pyrite can be used to reconstruct a range of bio- and geological processes across a broad spectrum of scales.
In the oceans, pyrite is the dominant sink for reduced sulphur and is intimately connected to biological pathways of sulphate reduction, meaning the formation and isotopic composition of pyrite can be used to reconstruct the redox architecture of ancient marine environments. As a major gangue mineral phase in hydrothermal ore deposits, the formation and geochemistry of pyrite can be used to investigate and potentially detect ore forming processes. At the other end of the life-cycle, the weathering of pyrite during acid mine drainage and subsurface geological storage is a major environmental concern.
This session will bring together scientists investigating pyrite across a range of physico-chemical conditions in various earth science disciplines e.g. nuclear waste, ore deposits or acid mine drainage. Our aim is to foster intradisciplinary knowledge transfer of experiences between different research areas. We invite contributions presenting geochemical field studies, in-situ and laboratory investigations of rocks and formations as well as numerical simulation studies within the given context.

Co-organized by GMPV5/OS3
Convener: Michael Kühn | Co-conveners: Joseph Magnall, Alwina HovingECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.51
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 16:15

GMPV6 – Critical metals and minerals – formation, recovery, sustainability

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Giulia Consuma, Mathias Burisch

GMPV6.1 EDI

The production of minerals and metals is projected to increase by almost 500% by 2050 in order to meet climate targets and the growing demands of society and industry. The extraction and processing of geological resources inevitably generate a significant amount of waste throughout the extraction and processing stages. Waste from quarrying and mining contains substantial quantities of residual minerals, including critical raw materials (CRMs) such as metals and rare earth elements (REE). These waste materials have the potential to be valuable mineral resources.
In the past, the primary focus of mining and mining waste management was on addressing environmental risks and landscape degradation. However, advancements in innovative and technological processes now allow us to reduce, reuse, and recycle these industrial residues, promoting more sustainable exploitation practices. Nevertheless, there are additional challenges associated with the exploration, characterization, recovery, reprocessing, and testing of these recovered materials. Furthermore, it is crucial to develop realistic models for mining waste to accurately assess the prospects for sustainable utilization.
The main topics to be discussed in this session address, but are not limited to:
-Sustainable quarry and mine waste management strategies
-Innovative tools and enhanced methodologies in active and legacy sites for environmental/risk monitoring
-Identification of potential secondary resources (e.g., REEs, CRM)
-Characterisation of geomaterials, their environmental interactions and decay
-Technological developments for waste sampling, characterisation and environmental assessment
-Innovative mineral exploration, extraction, and (re)processing technologies, including geometallurgy
-Mine waste sites rehabilitation and repurposing

Keywords: extractive waste; circular economy; sustainable mining; raw materials and critical raw materials characterization, mine waste management

Co-organized by ERE4
Convener: Antonello AquilanoECSECS | Co-conveners: Elena Marrocchino, Giovanna Antonella Dino, Angel M Lopez-Buendia, Stefan Dirlich
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–10:10 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00

GMPV7 – Advances in igneous petrology

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Silvio Ferrero, David Dolejs

GMPV7.1 EDI

Magmatic systems are shaped by complex dynamics, including melt generation in the mantle, transport and emplacement in the crust, and volcanic extrusion to the surface. Processes such as fractional crystallization, mixing and mingling, or melt-rock reactions may lead to differentiation, emplacement, and eruption of magma, which can also generate critical mineral resources. Geophysical tomography and monitoring, as well as geochemical analyses of volcanic and plutonic materials, provide evidence for these processes. Understanding their dynamics, hazards, and resource potential is crucial for advancing our knowledge of geological processes, mitigating natural disasters, and transitioning to a sustainable economy. This session aims to bring together researchers from various disciplines to explore the multifaceted aspects of crustal igneous systems. We invite contributions that investigate these topics across all tectonic settings, including but not limited to:
1. Computational Magma Dynamics and Thermodynamics: Research utilizing computational models to explore the mechanics, thermodynamics, and fluid dynamics of igneous and volcanic processes.
2. Geochemical and Textural Studies: Contributions that investigate the evolution of magmatic and fluid processes through the analysis of igneous and volcanic materials, including melt/fluid inclusions, crystal stratigraphy, diffusion chronometry, isotopic tracing, and geochronology.
3. Experimental Petrology: We welcome contributions sharing insights gained from high-pressure, high-temperature experiments that simulate P-T-X conditions within crustal igneous systems.
4. Physical Volcanology: Studies that advance our understanding of eruption dynamics, volcano monitoring, and the interplay between subsurface processes and volcanic events.
5. Energy and Metal Resources: Contributions on the resources associated with crustal igneous activity, including geothermal energy, mineral deposits, and ore-forming processes.
6. Data Science and Machine Learning Approaches: Contributions that leverage large datasets and computational statistics to understand igneous phenomena.
We particularly encourage studies that bridge multiple disciplines, showcasing the power of collaborative efforts in advancing our understanding of crustal igneous systems.

Convener: Pascal AelligECSECS | Co-conveners: Gregor WeberECSECS, Tobias Keller, Charline LormandECSECS, Catherine BoothECSECS, Adina E. PusokECSECS, Nicolas Riel
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room G2
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 14:00
GMPV7.2 EDI

Our vision of the architecture of volcanic and igneous plumbing systems (VIPS) has been deeply modified over the last few decades. We have more and more evidence that long lived melt dominated magma bodies are difficult to form and very challenging to maintain. Instead, physical models and geophysical observations suggest the presence of local magma bodies within a larger, transcrustal magmatic system which is dominated by crystals rather than melt. Reconstruction of long-lived magmatic system is a challenging task. Challenge is to connect processes throughout the entire magmatic system, from mantle to crust to the surface (eruption). To advance our understanding of VIPS requires studying both volcanic and plutonic complexes at various scales e.g., from a whole tomographic image of VIPS to the microscopic and potentially atomic scale of a mineral or melt inclusion. We also need to be able to relate physical and chemical properties of crystal-melt-fluid segregation and differentiation, to provide quantitative data on the kinetics of the processes and on the kinematics of magma transfers, and to understand the process of melt migration, accumulation and eruption.
Advancing our studies of these magmatic systems will provide us with better constraints and understanding of volcanic eruptions, and consequently mitigation of volcanic risk, magmatic ore deposits, building of continental crust and Earth evolution. This session aims to bring together scientists working in different fields of igneous and experimental petrology and geochemistry, structural and metamorphic geology, volcano-tectonics, geodesy, geophysics and material sciences. We would like to create a multi-disciplinary session, which will hope will generate a lot of discussion, new collaborations, and interdisciplinary knowledge transfer.
This session is sponsored by the IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic and Igneous Plumbing Systems.

Co-organized by TS5
Convener: Lydéric France | Co-conveners: Uddalak BiswasECSECS, Elena Melekhova, Stefano UrbaniECSECS, Pierre Bouilhol, Nibir Mandal, Daniele Maestrelli
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 14:00
GMPV7.4 EDI

Processes occurring in magma storage regions control magma compositions and properties, which in turn affect ascent dynamics, eruptive behaviour, and emplacement mechanisms of volcanic products thus representing a paramount factor for the environmental and societal impact of volcanic eruptions.
Magma fractionation, degassing, mixing, and country-rock assimilation occur on a wide range of timescales and depths. Decompression and cooling driven by the ascent of magmas in volcanic conduits also impart their signature on eruptive products, complicating the interpretation of physico-chemical changes of the system. Indeed, during magma ascent, several physical and chemical processes are taking place, which can affect eruptive behavior and the style of activity.
Textural, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of eruptive products can be used as forensic tools to elucidate the inner workings of magmatic plumbing systems as well as pre- and syn-eruptive processes. Similarly, analytical/field observations, laboratory experiment and numerical modelling can also provide a useful tool to investigate pre- and syn-eruptive processes. Together, these information are of paramount importance for policymakers in charge of mitigating the risks associated with volcanic eruptions.
In this session we welcome a wide range of petrological, geochemical, geophysical and volcanological studies, based on natural, experimental, theoretical, or numerical-based approaches, with the scope of shedding light on magmatic processes occurring at depth and during ascent towards the surface. We also encourage submissions of contributions that deal with the mitigation of the hazards associated with volcanic activity. Interdisciplinary work considering the close and complex interplay between magmatic processes, conduit dynamics, eruptive behaviour, and emplacement mechanisms are of particular interest.

Convener: Eleonora Braschi | Co-conveners: Maren Kahl, Fabrizio Di FioreECSECS, Alessio PontesilliECSECS, Fabio Arzilli, Giuseppe La Spina, Chiara Maria Petrone
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15

GMPV8 – Physical and chemical processes in volcanic systems

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Brendan McCormick Kilbride, Thea Hatlen Heimdal

GMPV8.1

Fluid flow in the Earth’s crust is driven by pressure gradients and temperature changes induced by internal heat. The expression of crustal fluid flow is associated with a range of structural and geochemical processes in the basement and sedimentary basins. Groundwater, hydrothermal brines and gases circulating in the subsurface interact with local structures across different tectonic and geological settings. Under near-lithostatic conditions, fluids and rocks are expelled vertically to the near-surface, featuring a variety of surficial geological phenomena ranging from hydrothermal systems to sedimentary and hybrid volcanism and cold seeps onshore and offshore. These vertical fluid flow expressions and piercement structures are characterised by complex sedimentary deformation and geochemical reactions where life can adapt to thrive in extremely harsh environments, making them ideal windows to the deep biosphere. Several studies have shown that CO2- and CH4-dominated (or hybrid) vents played a key role in the evolution of our planet and the cycles of life during several geological eras. Similar structures on other planets are promising sites for exploration where habitable niches could have been present. Furthermore, the elevated pore pressures often encountered in reservoirs at depth make piercements ideal natural laboratories to capture precursors of seismic events and dynamically triggered geological processes. Yet, the geochemical and geophysical processes associated with the evolution of these vertical fluid flow features and piercements remain poorly understood.
This session welcomes contributions from the community working on magmatic and sedimentary environments and the domains where they interact on Earth and in the Universe using geophysical, geochemical, biological, microbial, geological, remote sensing, numerical and laboratory studies to promote a better understanding of modern and paleo fluid-driven systems in the upper crust. In particular, we call for contributions from 1) investigations of tectonic discontinuities pre-existing geological structures; 2) the geochemical reactions occurring at depth and the surface, including micro- and biological studies; 3) geophysical imaging and monitoring of fluid flow systems associated with vertical fluid expulsion at the upper crust; 4) experimental and numerical studies about fluid flow evolution; 5) studies of piercement dynamics related to climatic and environmental implications.

Convener: Adriano Mazzini | Co-conveners: Matteo Lupi, Giuliana Panieri
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 16:15
GMPV8.2 EDI

Hydrothermal systems exert crucial influence on volcanic hazards. For example, hydrothermal alteration can reduce the strength of edifice- and dome-forming rocks, increasing the likelihood of volcano spreading and flank collapse, and high pore pressures that develop within hydrothermal systems can promote phreatic/phreatomagmatic explosions and further increase volcano instability. On the other hand, hydrothermal systems also offer the opportunity to exploit minerals of economic interest, and their heat can be harnessed to produce energy. A detailed understanding of hydrothermal systems, fluid-rock interactions in hydrothermal systems, and the resulting effects of alteration, using multidisciplinary studies, is required to better anticipate the hazards posed, to exploit the economic opportunities they provide, and to execute engineering design. We invite diverse contributions dedicated to the characterisation, imaging, monitoring, and hazard/economic assessment of volcanic hydrothermal systems and associated fluid-rock interactions. Contributions can be based on fieldwork, laboratory work, modelling, or a combination of these approaches. Because understanding hydrothermal systems requires multidisciplinary, collaborative teamwork, we welcome contributions based on any subdiscipline (e.g., geology, geophysics, geochemistry, engineering) and using any technique or method (e.g., geological mapping, magnetic, gravity, and spectroscopic methods, laboratory experiments, gas monitoring, numerical modelling). It goes without saying that we hope to have a diverse session in terms of both speakers and audience.

Convener: Alexandra Kushnir | Co-conveners: Claire HarnettECSECS, Marlene Villeneuve, Thomas R. Walter
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 14:00
GMPV8.6 EDI

The session deals with the documentation and modelling of the tectonic, deformation and geodetic features of any type of volcanic area, on Earth and in the Solar System. The focus is on advancing our understanding on any type of deformation of active and non-active volcanoes, on the associated behaviours, and the implications for hazards. We welcome contributions based on results from fieldwork, remote-sensing studies, geodetic and geophysical measurements, analytical, analogue and numerical simulations, and laboratory studies of volcanic rocks.
Studies may be focused at the regional scale, investigating the tectonic setting responsible for and controlling volcanic activity, both along divergent and convergent plate boundaries, as well in intraplate settings. At a more local scale, all types of surface deformation in volcanic areas are of interest, such as elastic inflation and deflation, or anelastic processes, including caldera and flank collapses. Deeper, sub-volcanic deformation studies, concerning the emplacement of intrusions, as sills, dikes and laccoliths, are most welcome.
We also particularly welcome geophysical data aimed at understanding magmatic processes during volcano unrest. These include geodetic studies obtained mainly through GPS and InSAR, as well as at their modelling to imagine sources.

The session includes, but is not restricted to, the following topics:
• volcanism and regional tectonics;
• formation of magma chambers, laccoliths, and other intrusions;
• dyke and sill propagation, emplacement, and arrest;
• earthquakes and eruptions;
• caldera collapse, resurgence, and unrest;
• flank collapse;
• volcano deformation monitoring;
• volcano deformation and hazard mitigation;
• volcano unrest;
• mechanical properties of rocks in volcanic areas.

Convener: Michael Heap | Co-conveners: Valerio Acocella, Virginie Pinel, Sigurjon Jonsson, Thorbjorg AgustsdottirECSECS, Kyriaki DrymoniECSECS, Tim DavisECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
GMPV8.7 EDI

Magma composition, eruptive frequency, and tectonic context are highly variable features of volcanoes. Within such contexts, volcanic volatiles play a key role in magma transport, and impact on the style and timing of volcanic eruptions. Gas chemical and isotopic compositions may change over time, reflecting variations in the magmatic feeding systems of volcanoes. As the magma rises from depth, the decreasing pressure allows volatile species to partition into the gas phase. Bubbles form, grow, and coalesce, and gases start to flow through the vesciculated magma. Eventually, fluid and gases reach the surface and are released into the atmosphere through soil degassing, fumarolic vents, or bubbling through a water surface, forming large plumes or explosive eruption columns.

Volcanic emissions can also have significant impacts on the terrestrial environment, atmospheric composition, climate, and human health at various temporal and spatial scales. For instance, sulfur dioxide emissions can cause acid rain and influence aerosol formation, and if an eruption column reaches the stratosphere, it causes global dimming and a lowering of the Earth’s surface temperatures that may last for years. Similarly, halogens can dramatically affect proximal ecosystems, influence the oxidation capacity of the troposphere, and alter the stratospheric ozone layer.

Understanding the physicochemical processes underlying volcanic eruptions has improved tremendously through major advances in computational and analytical capabilities, instrumentation and monitoring networks, thereby improving the ability to reduce volcanic hazards. This session focuses on all aspects of volcanic volatile degassing in the Earth’s system through case studies and theoretical and multidisciplinary approaches. We invite contributions discussing how novel measurement techniques, field measurements, direct and remote ground and space-based observations, and modeling studies of volcanic degassing can provide new insights into volcanic and atmospheric processes at local and global scales.
Finally, but significantly, we strongly encourage critical contributions that offer alternative explanations and viewpoints, willingness to consider new ideas supported by evidence, and with the potential to improve the ability to forecast eruptions.

Convener: Marco Liuzzo | Co-conveners: Nicole Bobrowski, Jonas Kuhn
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Mon, 10:45
GMPV8.8 EDI

Volcanoes release gaseous and particulate into the atmosphere during both eruptive and quiescent activity. Volcanic degassing exerts a dominant role in forcing the nature of volcanic unrest and the timing and style of eruptions. Emissions range from silent exhalation through soils to astonishing eruptive clouds injecting gas and particles into the atmosphere. Strong explosive eruptions are a major natural driver of climate variability potentially impacting on the Earth’s radiation budget over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Persistent quiescent passive degassing and smaller-magnitude eruptions, on the other hand, may impact on regional climate system. Through direct exposure and indirect effects, volcanic emissions may influence local-to-regional air quality and seriously affect the biosphere and environment and, in turn, livelihoods causing socio-economic challenges. Gas emissions are observed and monitored via a range of in situ direct and remote sensing techniques to gain insights into both the subterranean-surface processes and quantify the extent of their impacts. Inverted data are then used to tune models of subsurface and atmospheric/climatic processes as well as laboratory experiments and, finally, to validate and interpret satellite observations. This session focuses on the state-of-the-art and interdisciplinary science concerning all aspects of volcanic degassing and impacts of relevance to the Volcanology, Environmental, Atmospheric and Climate Sciences - including regional climate - and Hazard assessment. We invite contributions on all aspects of volcanic plumes science, their observation, modelling and impacts. We welcome contributions that address hazard assessment and impacts from volcanic degassing both in crises and at persistently degassing volcanoes.

Convener: Pasquale Sellitto | Co-conveners: Giuseppe G. Salerno, Corinna KlossECSECS, Tamsin Mather, Stefano Corradini
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 10:45

GMPV9 – Active volcanism: hazards, monitoring, human response, mitigation and risk

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Chiara Maria Petrone, Anita Di Chiara

GMPV9.1

Monitoring active and quiescent volcanoes is the pillar for successful hazard assessment and risk mitigation. Traditional surficial and aerial monitoring is increasingly associated with petrology and novel techniques such as muography, new generation of remote sensing, unoccupied aircraft systems, continuous gas monitoring, satellite observations, and the tremendous advances in computing power, leading to an increased use of data-driven approaches, including artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. Machine learning, is gaining importance in volcanology, not only for automatic processing of large datasets (i.e., monitoring purposes) but also for later hazards analysis (e.g., modelling tools). Equally important is to establish the volcano eruptive history and probabilistic eruption forecasting modelling. However, many volcano observatories lack economic resources to deploy many of the current techniques and thus acquire additional monitoring data for a more effective volcano surveillance. Development of low-cost monitoring equipment and higher-throughput methods are under way which promise to address this economic barrier to science and hazard mitigation.
In this session, we welcome contributions of any aspect of the broad field of volcano monitoring from traditional to novel techniques and the new frontiers in the field blending machine-learning, data-driven approaches, and physics-based simulations. Inter- and multidisciplinary approach and best practices in hazard assessment and risk mitigation are particularly welcome.

Co-sponsored by AGU
Convener: Chiara Maria Petrone | Co-conveners: Claudia CorradinoECSECS, Daniele Andronico, Matthew Pankhurst, Ciro Del Negro, Michael Ramsey, Vito ZagoECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Thu, 16:15
GMPV9.5 EDI

Volcanoes cause high-risk phenomena, such as pyroclastic and lava flows, lahars and glacial outburst floods from sub-glacial environments, as well as far reaching ash dispersal. A broad range of both ground- and satellite-based instrumentation capture geophysical responses, geological features and geochemical emissions, permitting an unprecedented, multi-parameter vision of the surface manifestations of magmatic processes beneath volcanoes.
Developing physical-mathematical models able to interpret the observed signals and describe the evolution of eruptive phenomena is a key point in volcanology. Predicting their spatial and temporal evolution and determining the potentially affected areas is fundamental in supporting every action directed at mitigating the risk as well as for environmental planning.
Within this context, this session aims to bring together a multidisciplinary audience to discuss the most recent innovations in volcano imaging and monitoring, and to present observations, methods and models that increase our understanding of volcanic processes.

Convener: Gaetana Ganci | Co-conveners: Jurgen Neuberg, Eva EiblECSECS, Miriam Christina Reiss, Dario Pedrazzi, Iestyn Barr, Annalisa CappelloECSECS
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:40 (CEST), 16:15–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Mon, 10:45

GMPV10 – Mantle-core fingerprints at Earth's surface - the connections

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Urs Schaltegger, Richard Palin

GMPV10.1 EDI

The nature of Earth’s lithospheric mantle is largely constrained from the petrological and geochemical studies of xenoliths. They are complemented by studies of orogenic peridotites and ophiolites, which show the space relationships among various mantle rocks, missing in xenoliths. Mantle xenoliths from cratonic regions are distinctly different from those occurring in younger non-cratonic areas. Percolation of melts and fluids through the lithospheric mantle significantly modifies its petrological and geochemical features, which is recorded in mantle xenoliths brought to the surface by oceanic and continental volcanism. Basalts and other mantle-derived magmas provide us another opportunity to study the chemical and physical properties the mantle. These various kinds of information, when assembled together and coupled with experiments and geophysical data, enable the understanding of upper mantle dynamics.
This session’s research focus lies on mineralogical, petrological and geochemical studies of mantle xenoliths, orogenic and ophiolitic peridotites and other mantle derived rocks. We strongly encourage the contributions on petrology and geochemistry of mantle xenoliths and other mantle rocks, experimental studies, the examples and models of mantle processes and its evolution in space and time.

Convener: Jacek Puziewicz | Co-conveners: Federico CasettaECSECS, Costanza Bonadiman, Magdalena Matusiak-Małek
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 14:00
GMPV10.2 EDI | PICO

The knowledge of the oxidation state of heterovalent elements (e.g., Fe, V, Co, Cr, C, S, etc.) in minerals, melts and fluids is fundamental to track redox processes occurring in the terrestrial planets through space and time. Some of these processes include, but are not limited to, formation of the cores and atmospheres of these planets, evolution of Earth’s mantle redox state through time, the partial melting of mantle rocks (e.g., promoted by the circulation of oxidized volatile species such as CO2 and H2O), diamond formation, abiotic dehydrogenation and methanogenesis in metamorphic environments. These processes likely influenced - and are influenced by - the physical properties of rocks and minerals and hence dynamic behavior including plate tectonics. Volatile release through volcanic gases and their subsequent exchange with the solid Earth and the exosphere has implications for the composition of the atmosphere of the Earth, as well as habitability of rocky planets more generally.
Analytical techniques such as Mössbauer, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy combined to transmission electron microscopy, electron microprobe flank method and XANES allow the oxidation state of heterovalent elements to be investigated among a wide spectrum of geological materials, both from laboratory experiments (including crystalline and amorphous solids/liquids/gases) or natural samples (e.g., mantle mineral assemblages, inclusions in diamonds, high-pressure metamorphic rocks, meteorites, lavas, volcanic gases etc.).
We invite contributions on mineralogical, petrological and geochemical studies with diverse analytical techniques of any element or compound used to constrain redox-driven processes both at the surfaces and at depth of terrestrial planets.

Convener: Vincenzo Stagno | Co-conveners: Giulia MarrasECSECS, Yanhao Lin, Paolo Sossi, Sonja Aulbach
PICO
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 1
Thu, 08:30
TS8.1 EDI

In this session we want to celebrate the scientific achievements of W. Jason Morgan, the discoverer of Plate Tectonics and Mantle Plumes, while looking into the future developments of the scientific revolution that he helped to ignite. Fifty years after their discovery, we still have basic questions in our understanding of how Plate Tectonics and Mantle Plumes are linked to the flow structure of the mantle, heat loss from Earth's core, and Earth's evolution from its accretion to the present day. Inspired by these concepts, the modern subdisciplines of Tectonics, Geodynamics, Seismology, Geochemistry, and Earth Magnetism/Rock Physics continue to grapple with gaining a deeper understanding of our planet. Here we welcome contributions that highlight recent progress and problems in this endeavor.

Co-organized by EMRP1/GD1/GMPV10/SM6
Convener: Jason Morgan | Co-conveners: Karin Sigloch, Hans-Peter Bunge, João C. Duarte, Ya-Nan ShiECSECS
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 14:00
GD1.1 EDI

The Earth's lithospheric movements and geomorphology serve as a crucial lens for understanding the dynamic behavior of the planet's interior. Surface observations offer key insights into mantle convection patterns across space and time, while seismic data provides a contemporary snapshot, and they constitute important constraints for theoretical models. Geological records contribute invaluable spatial-temporal information on the historical vertical motion of the lithosphere. Geomorphology of volcanoes and volcanic features contains inherent information on the wide range of geologic and geomorphic processes that construct and degrade them. These collective observations facilitate addressing still-standing debates, for instance on mechanisms (i.e. active margin-related versus mantle plume-related),, amalgamation/collision timings, and the evolution of biosphere pathways leading to the formation of Gondwana.

This session offers a comprehensive examination of Earth's dynamic processes since Gondwana formation, encompassing geophysical, geochemical, geomorphological, seismological, stratigraphic, and volcanic aspects, along with investigations in submarine and subglacial environments, and numerical modeling. It presents a platform for diverse presenters and attendees, spanning various disciplines, demographics, and career stages, to actively participate in addressing exciting and emerging challenges in Earth science.

Co-organized by GM8/GMPV10
Convener: Ingo L. Stotz | Co-conveners: Daniel O'HaraECSECS, Matthieu Kervyn, Paula CastilloECSECS, Megan HoldtECSECS, Victoria Milanez Fernandes, Sergei Lebedev
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00
GD2.1 | PICO

The origin and evolution of the continental lithosphere is closely linked to changes in mantle dynamics through time, from its formation through melt depletion to multistage reworking and reorganisation related to interaction with melts formed both beneath and within it. Understanding this history is critical to constraining terrestrial dynamics, element cycles and metallogeny. We welcome contributions dealing with: (1) Reconstructions of the structure and composition of the lithospheric mantle, and the influence of plumes and subduction zones on root construction; (2) Interactions of plume- and subduction-derived melts and fluids with the continental lithosphere, and the nature and development of metasomatic agents; (3) Source rocks, formation conditions (P-T-fO2) and evolution of mantle melts originating below or in the mantle lithosphere; (4) Deep source regions, melting processes and phase transformation in mantle plumes and their fluids; (5) Modes of melt migration and ascent, as constrained from numerical modelling and microstructures of natural mantle samples; (6) Role of mantle melts and fluids in the generation of hybrid and acid magmas.These topics can be illuminated using the geochemistry and fabric of mantle xenoliths and orogenic peridotites, mantle-derived melts and experimental simulations.

Co-organized by GMPV10
Convener: Igor Ashchepkov | Co-conveners: Sonja Aulbach, NV Chalapathi Rao, Evgenii Sharkov, Natalia LebedevaECSECS
PICO
| Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 1
Mon, 16:15
GD1.2 EDI

The introduction of the plate tectonics theory in the 1960s has been able to satisfactory explain ~90% of the Earth’s volcanism, attributing it to either convergent or divergent plate boundaries. However, the origin of a significant amount of volcanism occurring on the interior of both continental and oceanic tectonic plates – widely known as intraplate volcanism – is considered to be unrelated to common plate boundary processes. A variety of models have been developed to explain the origins of this enigmatic type of magmatism. With time, technological breakthroughs have enabled improvement of instrumentation, resolution, and numerical modelling, as well as the development of new techniques that allow us to better understand mantle dynamics in the Earth’s interior. This technological improvement has helped re-evaluate and refine existing models and develop new models on the origins of intraplate magmatism. These models in turn, provide better insights on processes at depth, and also shed light on the complex interactions between the mantle and the surface. Understanding what triggers magmatism away from plate boundaries is critical to understand and reconstruct the evolution of Earth’s mantle through time, especially in eras where the tectonic plates weren’t yet developed or when the surface of the Earth was dominated by supercontinents. Investigating the relationship between the kinematics and mechanics of the tectonic plates on the one hand and the mantle dynamics on the other can give insights on the impact of the magmatism on the plates themselves. Moreover, deciphering the origins of intraplate magmatism on Earth can give us invaluable knowledge towards understanding magmatism on other planetary bodies in the solar system and beyond.
We welcome contributions dealing with the origins and evolution of intraplate magmatism, both in continental and oceanic settings, using a variety of approaches and techniques to tackle outstanding questions, such as but not limited to: petrological, geochemical, geochgronological and isotopic data, geophysical and geodynamical analysis, and seismological data. The aim of the session is to bring together scientists looking to understand intraplate magmatism using different approaches and to enhance discussion and collaboration between the various disciplines.

Co-organized by GMPV10
Convener: Martha PapadopoulouECSECS | Co-conveners: Jordan J. J. PhetheanECSECS, Magdalena Matusiak-Małek, Matthew J. Comeau, Lara Kalnins, Ingo Grevemeyer
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Fri, 10:45
GD3.1 EDI

The first half of Earth’s history (Hadean to Paleoproterozoic) laid the foundations for the planet we know today. But how and why it differed and how and why it evolved remain enduring questions.
In this session, we encourage the presentation of new approaches that improve our understanding on the formation, structure, and evolution of the early Earth ranging from the mantle and lithosphere to the atmosphere, oceans and biosphere, and interactions between these reservoirs.
This session aims to bring together scientists from a large range of disciplines to provide an interdisciplinary and comprehensive overview of the field. This includes, but is not limited to, fields such as early mantle dynamics, the formation, evolution and destruction of the early crust and lithosphere, early surface environments and the evolution of the early biosphere, mineral deposits, and how possible tectonic regimes impacted across the early Earth system.

Co-organized by BG7/CL1.1/GMPV10/TS8
Convener: Ria Fischer | Co-conveners: Peter Cawood, Jeroen van Hunen, Bing XiaECSECS, Desiree Roerdink
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Thu, 16:15
TS4.3

The intricate links between crustal deformation, mantle dynamics, and climate-driven surface processes have long been acknowledged as primary drivers shaping the evolution of orogens and sedimentary basins. Tectonics, climate, and surface processes all leave fingerprints on modern topography, making it difficult for researchers to univocally characterize their contribution to shaping landscapes. Unraveling the distinct roles of crustal, deep mantle, and climatic forcings poses a formidable challenge due to the vast range of spatial and temporal scales involved in these processes. The comprehensive study of such dynamic systems necessitates a multidisciplinary approach, integrating observational data from field studies, geophysical and subsurface data analysis, quantification methods of rock or surface uplift rates and erosion rates, as well as both analogue and numerical modeling techniques.

We invite contributions that delve into the exploration of orogenesis and sedimentary basin evolution, emphasizing their intricate connections to surface processes, and the underlying dynamics of crustal and mantle forcings. Furthermore, we encourage studies utilizing a diverse array of methodologies, including analogue and numerical models, along with quantitative techniques like cosmogenic nuclides and thermochronometers, as well as field studies. This collective effort aims to quantify and elucidate the intricate coupling between tectonics and surface processes in these dynamic geological systems and the links to mantle forcings.

Co-organized by GD6/GMPV10
Convener: Yanyan WangECSECS | Co-conveners: Romano ClementucciECSECS, Attila BalázsECSECS, Sebastien Carretier, Zoltán Erdős, Duna Roda-BoludaECSECS, Sebastian G. WolfECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 16:15

GMPV11 – Interdisciplinary studies with a regional focus

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Brendan McCormick Kilbride, Jörg Hermann

GMPV11.1 EDI | PICO

The Anatolian block, which is located on the Afro-Arabian-Eurasian plates active collision zone, have a complex tectonic framework and is one of the most geologically active regions in south-eastern Europe. The last catastrophic earthquakes in February 2023 are a clear example of this activity, and the reason that Anatolia deformation and seismicity is continuously monitored by the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake research institute (KOERI, Istanbul) and the Ministry of Interior, Disaster and Emergency Presidency (AFAD). However, the Anatolian volcanism have not received the same attention from governmental institutions. Although there are several historical volcanic activities (last eruption on 2nd July of 1840 by Agri Dagi volcano – Mount Ararat), and some national and international universities/institutions have recently undergone volcano-related investigations, the 13 potentially active Anatolian volcanoes still need to be better studied.
This session aims to bring together scientific contributions from different disciplines to delve deeper into the understanding of volcanism in Anatolia and better assess its potential impacts on the region and beyond. It is also a good opportunity to identify knowledge gaps in the current state-of-the-art and establish future scientific collaborations to fill these through new volcano-related studies. We seek participants to present their research addressing key aspects on the Anatolia volcanism, including: 1) Volcanic Geology, Volcano-Tectonism and Volcano Geophysics: investigations focusing on the formation, evolution, and structural characteristics of volcanoes; 2) Geochemistry, Geochronology and Petrology: studies to unravel the eruptive history and evolution of volcanic systems, as well as the composition and genesis of the associated magmas; 3) Volcanic Stratigraphy and Tephrochronology: identification, characterisation and correlation of eruptions through the study of associated volcanic deposits (including distal ashes to synchronise records); 4) Geoarchaeology and Geoheritage: studies examining the interaction between volcanic activity and human presence in Anatolia over time, revealing potential cultural and societal impacts; 5) Volcanic Hazard and Risk Assessment: investigations focused to mitigate volcanic impacts on society; 6) Environmental and Climatic Impact: Studies investigating how volcanic eruptions in Anatolia have influenced the regional environment and climate throughout geological history.

Convener: Ivan Sunye PucholECSECS | Co-conveners: Gökhan AticiECSECS, Bjarne FriedrichsECSECS, Rebecca KearneyECSECS
PICO
| Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 1
Thu, 10:45
TS2.6

The Alps, a representative orogenic system, offers an exceptional natural laboratory to study the evolution of mountain-building processes from short- to long-term scales, including the evolution of a plate margin, from rifting to subduction, inheritance from previous orogenic cycles), ophiolite emplacement, collision and exhumation, upper-plate and foreland basin evolution.

Advances in a variety of geophysical and geological fields provide a rich and growing set of constraints on the crust-lithosphere and mantle structure, tectonics and geodynamics of the entire mountain belt.

We invite contributions from different and multi-disciplinary perspectives ranging from the Earth’s surface to the mantle, and based on geology (tectonics, petrology, stratigraphy, geo- and thermochronology, geochemistry, paleomagnetism and geomorphology), geophysics (seismotectonics, seismic tomography and anisotropy) and geodesy and modelling (numerical and analogue). The aim is for contributions to provide new insight and observation on the record of subduction/collision, pre-Alpine orogenic stages; the influence of structural and palaeogeographic configuration; plate/mantle dynamics relationships; coupling between deep and surface processes.

Co-organized by GD9/GMPV11
Convener: Alexis Plunder | Co-conveners: M. R. Handy, Marco Giovanni Malusa', Ralf Schuster, Philippe Agard