EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2019
Centre International de Conférences de Genève (CICG) | Geneva | Switzerland
15–20 September 2019
EPSC-DPS2019
Geneva | Switzerland
15–20 September 2019

Session programme

EXO

EXO – Exoplanets and Origins

EXO1

The field of extrasolar planets is one of the most rapidly changing areas of astrophysics and planetary science. Ground-based surveys and dedicated space missions have already discovered nearly 4000 planets with many more detections expected in the near future. A key challenge is now the characterisation of their atmospheres in order to answer to the questions: what are these worlds actually like and what processes govern their formation and evolution?

To answer these questions, a broad range of skills and expertise are required, stretching from Solar System science to statistical astrophysics, from ground-based observations to spacecraft measurements, and atmospheric/interior/orbital modelling. The numerous studies conducted in the past twenty years have unveiled a large diversity of atmospheres. The next generation of space and ground based facilities (e.g. E-ELT, JWST, and ARIEL) will characterise this multifarious population in stunning detail and challenge our current understanding. Both theoretical works and experimental measurements are required to prepare for such a change of scale.

This session will focus on the atmospheric characterisation of warm planets (from ultra-hot to warm, including Super-Earths) and the conveners welcome any abstract related to this subject.

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Convener: Olivia Venot | Co-conveners: Vivien Parmentier, Giovanna Tinetti, Martin Turbet, Ingo Waldmann
Orals
| Mon, 16 Sep, 13:30–18:25
 
Uranus (Room 4)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Level 2
EXO2

The goal of this session is to bring together observers, modellers and experimentalists to discuss pathways to characterise the atmosphere, surface and interior of temperate, Earth-sized exoplanets and to prepare for future space missions, including ESA’s PLATO and NASA/ESA's JWST, and for extremely large ground-based telescopes such as the E-ELT, GMT and TMT.

More specifically, the following questions will be addressed:

- What are the most promising observational techniques to characterise temperate, Earth-sized planets with existing and future telescopes?
- What are the best targets available now and in a near-future?
- What are the most probable types of atmospheres around these planets? And what are the easiest types of atmospheres to detect and characterise?
- What lessons can be learned from the modelling and observation of Solar System objects and of warmer and/or more massive exoplanets?
- What experimental work do we need to improve our understanding of these worlds?

This session welcomes any abstract related to the characterisation of temperate, Earth-sized planets, at all stages of their evolution. Efforts to connect this characterisation with ongoing and forthcoming observations will be appreciated.

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Convener: Martin Turbet | Co-conveners: Emeline Bolmont, Vincent Bourrier, Ramon Brasser, David Ehrenreich, Christophe Lovis, Stephen J. Mojzsis, Olivia Venot, Stephanie C. Werner
Orals
| Tue, 17 Sep, 08:30–12:00
 
Venus (Room 6), Wed, 18 Sep, 08:30–12:00
 
Uranus (Room 4)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Level 2
EXO4

This session aims at understanding deep interiors and atmospheres of solar system bodies and massive extra-solar planets, their associated internal processes and corresponding material behaviour at extreme pressures and temperatures. These will have important implications for structural models (e.g. location of layer boundaries), evolution scenarios (e.g. demixing phenomena, diffusion), and magnetic field generation (e.g. nonmetal-metal transitions). This session also bridges the geophysical knowledge of bodies in the Solar System to rocky exoplanets by considering the potentially observable signatures associated with geologically-active worlds. Potentially fruitful targets are molten or volcanically-active planets, where the atmosphere and interior are tightly coupled through the exchange of heat and mass.

The session will include solicited and contributed papers addressing observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies of matter under planetary interior conditions.

Included subtopics are:
(1) Ab initio simulations and laboratory studies for matter under extreme conditions
(2) Interior structure, composition, and evolution
(3) Equation of state, melting, and phase transformation at extreme states
(4) Volcanism and magma ocean modeling
(5) Novel observational signatures of active worlds

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Co-organized as TP10/OPS14
Convener: Frank Sohl | Co-conveners: Karen Appel, Dan J. Bower, Caroline Dorn, Martin French, Helene Massol, Nadine Nettelmann, Lena Noack, Apurva V. Oza, Gerd Steinle-Neumann
Orals
| Thu, 19 Sep, 13:30–17:00
 
Earth (Room 5), Fri, 20 Sep, 08:30–10:00
 
Earth (Room 5)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 19 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Wed, 18 Sep, 14:00–Fri, 20 Sep, 17:30|Level 2
EXO5

Atmospheric aerosols and cloud particles are found in every atmosphere of the solar system, as well as, in exoplanets. Depending on their size, shape, chemical composition, latent heat, and distribution, their effect on the radiation budget varies drastically and is difficult to predict. When organic, aerosols also carry a strong prebiotic interest reinforced by the presence of heavy atoms such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur.

The aim of the session is to gather presentations on these complex objects for both terrestrial and giant planet atmospheres, including the special cases of Titan’s and Pluto's hazy atmospheres. All research aspects from their production and evolution processes, their observation/detection, to their fate and atmospheric impact are welcomed, including laboratory investigations and modeling.

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Co-organized as TP19/OPS6
Convener: Panayotis Lavvas | Co-conveners: Nathalie Carrasco, Anni Määttänen
Orals
| Tue, 17 Sep, 10:30–12:00, 13:30–17:00
 
Mercury (Room 7+8)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Level 2
EXO6

Accurate measurements of Solar-System objects can reveal information on our origin. In addition, the characterisation of exoplanets and exoplanetary systems provides a broader view of planets and planetary systems. These can be used to better understand planet formation and evolution. Despite the great progress in theory and observations the following key questions remain unsolved:
- How do planets form?
- What determines the architecture of planetary systems?
- How do planetary systems evolve?
- Is our Solar System unique?
In this session we invite abstracts related to the formation and evolution of planets and planetary systems. This includes the Solar-System as well as exoplanetary systems, and both theoretical and observational studies.

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Convener: Ravit Helled | Co-conveners: Yann Alibert, Adrien Leleu
Orals
| Wed, 18 Sep, 13:30–18:15
 
Earth (Room 5)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Level 2
EXO7

Space missions, ground-based observations and theory allow for detailed characterization of planetary upper atmospheres in the solar system that provides novel insights into the physical mechanisms at play. At the same time, the detection of short-period extrasolar planets has inspired numerous studies of chemistry, dynamics, and escape of the upper atmospheres of these planets, at more extreme conditions than those found in the solar system. More than ever, it is critical to foster the communication between the communities working on the theoretical and observational aspects of both solar system and exoplanet upper atmospheres. This communication will secure a solid progress in the interpretation of new atmospheric observables and in the implications for e.g. planet demographics.

This session brings together researchers from the solar system and exoplanet communities in an attempt to exchange knowledge and ideas. We welcome papers on all aspects of planetary aeronomy i.e., the science of the upper atmosphere, either in the solar system or exoplanet systems. Suitable papers include results on photochemistry and ionization, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, energy balance and circulation, atmospheric escape and evolution as well as new observations and novel observational techniques.

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Co-organized as TP18/OPS7
Convener: Antonio García Muñoz | Co-conveners: Tommi Koskinen, Panayotis Lavvas
Orals
| Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–10:00
 
Uranus (Room 4)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Level 2
EXO8

Exoplanets are being discovered in large numbers thanks to recent and ongoing surveys using state-of-the-art instrumentation from the ground and from space. In the next years, new astronomical instruments will further scout our Galaxy to overcome the current observational biases in the search of alien worlds, to gain a deeper understanding of the chemical and physical properties of exoplanets, and to unveil the processes of formation and evolution of planets and their atmospheres.


The goal of this session is to bring together the instrumentation and observational communities that are underpinning the future of this field. Contributions are invited to review ongoing programmes of exoplanet discovery and characterisation, to update on the progress of planned instrumentation programmes, and to present innovative ideas for future instrumentation.

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Convener: Enzo Pascale | Co-conveners: Camilla Danielski, Paul Eccleston, Subhajit Sarkar
Orals
| Thu, 19 Sep, 08:30–12:00
 
Earth (Room 5), Fri, 20 Sep, 08:30–10:00
 
Uranus (Room 4)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 19 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Wed, 18 Sep, 14:00–Fri, 20 Sep, 17:30|Level 2
EXO9

Giant planets are recognised to greatly influence their host environment by shaping their natal disk, the architecture of planetary systems and the distribution of small bodies. In the Solar System, giant planets are also the hosts of systems of rings and moons, some of the latter being a target for upcoming space missions.

Despite several decades of theoretical investigations and rapid recent progress, some major questions remain regarding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planets and their moons.
- How much solid material is accreted by a giant planet?
- How fast is the gaseous envelope accreted?
- What is the response of the protoplanetary disc to the formation of a giant planet in terms of migration, gap formation and the distribution of dust/planetesimals.
- What can regular and irregular moons tells us about the history of their hosts?

This session welcomes all abstracts with a focus on the formation and dynamical evolution of systems of giant planets and their moons, from theoretical or observational perspective.

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Co-organized as OPS9
Convener: Michiel Lambrechts | Co-conveners: Yuri Fujii, Anders Johansen, Daohai Li, Farzana Meru, Thomas Ronnet
Orals
| Fri, 20 Sep, 10:30–12:00, 13:30–16:40
 
Uranus (Room 4)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 19 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Wed, 18 Sep, 14:00–Fri, 20 Sep, 17:30|Level 2
EXO10

The past few years have witnessed great advances in the computational simulations of impacts in planetary systems. These advances have played fundamental roles in reshaping models of planet formation, especially the formation of terrestrial planets and their compositions. For instance, more accurate simulations of giant impacts have enabled terrestrial planet formation models to branch away from the traditional perfect-merging scenario and have placed them on the path to becoming quantitative (and, therefore, predictive). Also, recent ideas on the early instabilities in our solar system have opened a new pathway to adopting more realistic initial conditions for the formation of our terrestrial planets and the origin of their chemical compositions. Collectively all these advances have also paved the way for extending new models of terrestrial planet formation to other planetary systems. The goal of this session is to address the above-mentioned topics through a combination of invited and contributed talks (as well as poster presentations). We will be happy to receive and welcome abstracts for oral and poster contributions in all areas related to theoretical, observational and experimental studies of terrestrial planet formation in our solar system and extrasolar planets.

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Co-organized as TP11
Convener: Nader Haghighipour | Co-convener: Thomas Maindl
Orals
| Fri, 20 Sep, 13:30–15:00
 
Earth (Room 5)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 19 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Wed, 18 Sep, 14:00–Fri, 20 Sep, 17:30|Level 2
EXO11

Astrobiology is the study of whether present or past life exists elsewhere in the universe. To understand how life can begin in space, it is essential to know what organic compounds were likely available, and how they interacted with the planetary environment. This session seeks papers that offer existing/novel theoretical models or computational works that address the chemical and environmental conditions relevant to astrobiology on terrestrial planets/moons or ocean worlds, along with other theoretical, experimental, and observational works related to the emergence and development of Life in the Universe. This includes work related to prebiotic chemistry, the chemistry of early life, the biogeochemistry of life’s interaction with its environment, chemistry associated with biosignatures and their false positives, and chemistry pertinent to conditions that could possibly harbor life (e.g. Titan, Enceladus, Europa, TRAPPIST-1, habitable exoplanets, etc.). Understanding how the planetary environment has influenced the evolution of life and how biological processes have changed the environment is an essential part of any study of the origin and search for signs of life. Major Space Agencies identified planetary habitability and the search for evidence of life as a key component of their scientific missions in the next two decades. The development of instrumentation and technology to support the search for complex organic molecules and the endurance of life in space environments is critical to define unambiguous approaches to life detection over a broad range of planetary environments.

This session welcomes abstracts from several scientific domains such as prebiotic and interstellar chemistry, micropaleontology, limits of life, habitability, and biosignature detection.

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Co-organized as TP22/OPS5
Convener: Shiblee Ratan Barua | Co-conveners: Rosanna del Gaudio, Felipe Gómez, James O'Donoghue, Conor Nixon
Orals
| Fri, 20 Sep, 10:30–12:00
 
Earth (Room 5)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 19 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Wed, 18 Sep, 14:00–Fri, 20 Sep, 17:30|Level 2
EXO12

In this session, we aim to bring together observers and theorists to discuss recent developments regarding planetary atmospheric escape as well as the radiation, plasma, and magnetic environments of planetary systems. Many questions remain to be addressed regarding the state of close-in exoplanet atmospheres and of their interactions with the host star. Observations and studies of atmospheric escape can bring crucial information about both planets and their star. They further suggest that this mechanism can significantly impact the evolution and potential habitability of close-in planets. This session will thus put a special focus on escaping exoplanet atmospheres and their observational signatures, welcoming contributions on topics related to planetary system evolution, stellar and planetary wind interactions, stellar plasmas and radiative impacts on planetary environments. We will discuss which observing and modeling tools are available, or should be developed, to study these phenomena.

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Convener: Vincent Bourrier | Co-conveners: Navin Dwivedi, Luca Fossati, Maxim Khodachenko, Ildar F. Shaikhislamov, Aline Vidotto
Orals
| Tue, 17 Sep, 13:30–17:00
 
Venus (Room 6), Wed, 18 Sep, 13:30–15:00
 
Moon (Room 15)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Level 2
ODA4

Science communicators have an increasingly broad range of tools for reaching diverse audiences, including social media, podcasting, vlogging or mixed/interactive media, as well as more traditional approaches such as public talks, experiments, science festivals, articles or books for both younger and adult audiences. However, widening participation and engaging with under-represented communities can remain a challenge. What lessons can be learned from experiences within different communities? How can we tailor outreach efforts to connect with traditionally under-represented or under-resourced groups? How can limited resources be put to the most effective use? How can we measure the short-term outcomes and long-term impacts of outreach activities? This session is aimed at exploring how planetary science can utilise both novel and rising traditional modes of science communication to engage with a broad range of communities and how the impact of these activities can be evaluated.

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Co-organized as EXO13
Convener: Anita Heward | Co-conveners: Eleni Chatzichristou, Livia Giacomini, Brian Jackson, Anastasia Kokori, Julie Nekola Novakova, Kala Perkins, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher
Orals
| Fri, 20 Sep, 13:30–15:10
 
Mercury (Room 7+8)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 19 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Wed, 18 Sep, 14:00–Fri, 20 Sep, 17:30|Level 1
TP23

Earth analogues are natural field sites with conditions that resemble one or more conditions found in planetary bodies. The importance of those extreme sites are crucial for study limits of life, habitability and for the space missions tools and techniques test before flying. Those extreme sites can be interpreted as natural laboratories. This session also welcomes abstracts on scientific investigations in planetary analogues fieldwork that are being carried out with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) a.k.a. drones.

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Co-organized as MIT11/EXO14
Convener: Felipe Gómez | Co-conveners: Barbara Cavalazzi, Janice Bishop, Jessica Flahaut, Fulvio Franchi, Karen Olsson-Francis, Monica Pondrelli, Angelo Pio Rossi
Orals
| Fri, 20 Sep, 13:30–15:00
 
Mars (Room 18)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 19 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Wed, 18 Sep, 14:00–Fri, 20 Sep, 17:30|Basement
TP14

Planetary accretion, giant collisions, core formation, magma-ocean crystallization and other important processes during the early days of the solar system set the stage for the long-term evolution of terrestrial planets. These early processes can happen simultaneously or in recurring stages, and are ultimately followed by progressive crustal growth, long-term mantle mixing/differentiation, core-mantle interaction, as well as inner-core crystallization. Indeed, the coupled early and long-term evolution shapes the present-day structure and thermal state of planetary interiors. We seek to gain a better understanding of the formation and evolution of terrestrial bodies by bringing together studies from geophysics, geodynamics, mineral physics, geochemistry, and petrology.
This session welcomes contributions focused on data analysis, modeling and experimental work that address the formation and evolution of terrestrial planets and moons in the Solar System, and around other stars.

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Co-organized as OPS13/EXO15
Convener: Maxim Ballmer | Co-conveners: James Badro, Renaud Deguen, Alison Hunt, Ana-Catalina Plesa, Sebastiano Padovan, Gregor Golabek, Lena Noack
Orals
| Wed, 18 Sep, 10:30–12:00, 13:30–15:00
 
Venus (Room 6)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Basement
OPS3

The set of known and suspected ocean worlds continues to expand, leading to intense interest in their viability as potential habitats that may be or may have been inhabited. Previous missions such as Cassini-Huygens, Galileo and New Horizons provide a major incentive for future exploration of the icy Galilean satellites with Europa Clipper and JUICE. Understanding ocean worlds and preparing for their exploration requires input from a variety of scientific disciplines: planetary geology and geophysics (including active processes, e.g. plumes), atmospheric physics, life sciences, magnetospheric environment, space weathering, as well as supporting laboratory studies, preparatory studies for future missions and technology developments in instrumentation and engineering. We welcome abstracts that span the full breadth of disciplines that apply to the icy moons in the outer Solar System with potential liquid oceans underneath, and their exploration.

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Co-organized as EXO16
Convener: Carly Howett | Co-conveners: Shahab Fatemi, Chris German, Candy Hansen, Jason Hofgartner, Mika Holmberg, Terry Hurford, Hans Huybrighs, Alison Murray, Alyssa Rhoden, Darci Snowden, Anezina Solomonidou, Joseph Spitale, Federico Tosi
Orals
| Wed, 18 Sep, 08:30–12:00, 13:30–18:30
 
Jupiter (Room 1), Thu, 19 Sep, 08:30–12:00, 13:30–17:00
 
Jupiter (Room 1)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 19 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Wed, 18 Sep, 14:00–Fri, 20 Sep, 17:30|Level 2
EXO18

New modelling efforts supported by observations of space probes like Mars Express or Cassini have improved our understanding of physical and chemical processes of moon formation in the Solar System. Modeling of formation has been extensively developed but several aspects are still uncertain. For instance, models of the origin of the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos are still debated. The evolution of the icy moons of giant planets is still puzzling. It motivates new mission like the NASA’s Europa Clipper and ESA’S JUICE missions to the Jovian system, as well as the JAXA’s MMX mission to the Martian system. The MMX mission will collect samples from Phobos (first sample return mission from the Martian system) and engage in a close-range exploration of Deimos too. Amongst their objectives the JUICE and Europa missions will focus on the interior of Galilean satellites and on the Jovian environment and its link with the moon system.
These missions will provide further data to answer the fundamental question how moons in our solar system formed.
The session invites contributions related to current knowledge and understanding of formation processes of solar system satellites as well as related to current missions in development, like MMX, Eurpa-Clipper or JUICE, and their approach to further our understanding of formation and evolution of natural satellites.

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Co-organized as TP7/OPS10/SB12
Convener: Konrad Willner | Co-conveners: Maurizio Pajola, Pascal Rosenblatt
Orals
| Mon, 16 Sep, 15:30–17:00
 
Mars (Room 18)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Level 2
LP5

Late posters Exoplanets and Origins (EXO)

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Posters
| Attendance Tue, 17 Sep, 17:15–18:45 | Display Mon, 16 Sep, 08:30–Wed, 18 Sep, 11:00|Level 2