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Disciplinary sessions

GD – Geodynamics

Programme Group Chair: Jeroen van Hunen

MAL19-GD
Augustus Love Medal Lecture by Taras Gerya and GD Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture by Anne Glerum
Convener: Jeroen van Hunen
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room K1
Tue, 19:00
DM7
Division meeting for Geodynamics (GD)
Convener: Jeroen van Hunen
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room G2
Tue, 12:45

GD1 – Mantle Dynamics and Plate Tectonics

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Laetitia Le Pourhiet

GD1.1 EDI

The Earth's lithospheric movements and geomorphology serve as a crucial lens for understanding the dynamic behavior of the planet's interior. Surface observations offer key insights into mantle convection patterns across space and time, while seismic data provides a contemporary snapshot, and they constitute important constraints for theoretical models. Geological records contribute invaluable spatial-temporal information on the historical vertical motion of the lithosphere. Geomorphology of volcanoes and volcanic features contains inherent information on the wide range of geologic and geomorphic processes that construct and degrade them. These collective observations facilitate addressing still-standing debates, for instance on mechanisms (i.e. active margin-related versus mantle plume-related),, amalgamation/collision timings, and the evolution of biosphere pathways leading to the formation of Gondwana.

This session offers a comprehensive examination of Earth's dynamic processes since Gondwana formation, encompassing geophysical, geochemical, geomorphological, seismological, stratigraphic, and volcanic aspects, along with investigations in submarine and subglacial environments, and numerical modeling. It presents a platform for diverse presenters and attendees, spanning various disciplines, demographics, and career stages, to actively participate in addressing exciting and emerging challenges in Earth science.

Co-organized by GM8/GMPV10
Convener: Ingo L. Stotz | Co-conveners: Daniel O'Hara, Matthieu Kervyn, Paula Castillo, Megan Holdt, Victoria Milanez Fernandes, Sergei Lebedev
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00
GD1.2 EDI

The introduction of the plate tectonics theory in the 1960s has been able to satisfactory explain ~90% of the Earth’s volcanism, attributing it to either convergent or divergent plate boundaries. However, the origin of a significant amount of volcanism occurring on the interior of both continental and oceanic tectonic plates – widely known as intraplate volcanism – is considered to be unrelated to common plate boundary processes. A variety of models have been developed to explain the origins of this enigmatic type of magmatism. With time, technological breakthroughs have enabled improvement of instrumentation, resolution, and numerical modelling, as well as the development of new techniques that allow us to better understand mantle dynamics in the Earth’s interior. This technological improvement has helped re-evaluate and refine existing models and develop new models on the origins of intraplate magmatism. These models in turn, provide better insights on processes at depth, and also shed light on the complex interactions between the mantle and the surface. Understanding what triggers magmatism away from plate boundaries is critical to understand and reconstruct the evolution of Earth’s mantle through time, especially in eras where the tectonic plates weren’t yet developed or when the surface of the Earth was dominated by supercontinents. Investigating the relationship between the kinematics and mechanics of the tectonic plates on the one hand and the mantle dynamics on the other can give insights on the impact of the magmatism on the plates themselves. Moreover, deciphering the origins of intraplate magmatism on Earth can give us invaluable knowledge towards understanding magmatism on other planetary bodies in the solar system and beyond.
We welcome contributions dealing with the origins and evolution of intraplate magmatism, both in continental and oceanic settings, using a variety of approaches and techniques to tackle outstanding questions, such as but not limited to: petrological, geochemical, geochgronological and isotopic data, geophysical and geodynamical analysis, and seismological data. The aim of the session is to bring together scientists looking to understand intraplate magmatism using different approaches and to enhance discussion and collaboration between the various disciplines.

Co-organized by GMPV10
Convener: Martha Papadopoulou | Co-conveners: Jordan J. J. Phethean, Magdalena Matusiak-Małek, Matthew J. Comeau, Lara Kalnins, Ingo Grevemeyer
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Fri, 10:45
TS8.1 EDI

In this session we want to celebrate the scientific achievements of W. Jason Morgan, the discoverer of Plate Tectonics and Mantle Plumes, while looking into the future developments of the scientific revolution that he helped to ignite. Fifty years after their discovery, we still have basic questions in our understanding of how Plate Tectonics and Mantle Plumes are linked to the flow structure of the mantle, heat loss from Earth's core, and Earth's evolution from its accretion to the present day. Inspired by these concepts, the modern subdisciplines of Tectonics, Geodynamics, Seismology, Geochemistry, and Earth Magnetism/Rock Physics continue to grapple with gaining a deeper understanding of our planet. Here we welcome contributions that highlight recent progress and problems in this endeavor.

Co-organized by EMRP1/GD1/GMPV10/SM6
Convener: Jason Morgan | Co-conveners: Karin Sigloch, Hans-Peter Bunge, João C. Duarte, Ya-Nan Shi
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 14:00

GD2 –  Melts, Volatiles and Chemistry of the Mantle

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Boris Kaus

GD2.1 | PICO

The origin and evolution of the continental lithosphere is closely linked to changes in mantle dynamics through time, from its formation through melt depletion to multistage reworking and reorganisation related to interaction with melts formed both beneath and within it. Understanding this history is critical to constraining terrestrial dynamics, element cycles and metallogeny. We welcome contributions dealing with: (1) Reconstructions of the structure and composition of the lithospheric mantle, and the influence of plumes and subduction zones on root construction; (2) Interactions of plume- and subduction-derived melts and fluids with the continental lithosphere, and the nature and development of metasomatic agents; (3) Source rocks, formation conditions (P-T-fO2) and evolution of mantle melts originating below or in the mantle lithosphere; (4) Deep source regions, melting processes and phase transformation in mantle plumes and their fluids; (5) Modes of melt migration and ascent, as constrained from numerical modelling and microstructures of natural mantle samples; (6) Role of mantle melts and fluids in the generation of hybrid and acid magmas.These topics can be illuminated using the geochemistry and fabric of mantle xenoliths and orogenic peridotites, mantle-derived melts and experimental simulations.

Co-organized by GMPV10
Convener: Igor Ashchepkov | Co-conveners: Sonja Aulbach, NV Chalapathi Rao, Evgenii Sharkov, Natalia Lebedeva
PICO
| Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 1
Mon, 16:15

GD3 – Dynamics and Evolution of Earth and Terrestrial Planets

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Maelis Arnould

GD3.1 EDI

The first half of Earth’s history (Hadean to Paleoproterozoic) laid the foundations for the planet we know today. But how and why it differed and how and why it evolved remain enduring questions.
In this session, we encourage the presentation of new approaches that improve our understanding on the formation, structure, and evolution of the early Earth ranging from the mantle and lithosphere to the atmosphere, oceans and biosphere, and interactions between these reservoirs.
This session aims to bring together scientists from a large range of disciplines to provide an interdisciplinary and comprehensive overview of the field. This includes, but is not limited to, fields such as early mantle dynamics, the formation, evolution and destruction of the early crust and lithosphere, early surface environments and the evolution of the early biosphere, mineral deposits, and how possible tectonic regimes impacted across the early Earth system.

Co-organized by BG7/CL1.1/GMPV10/TS8
Convener: Ria Fischer | Co-conveners: Peter Cawood, Jeroen van Hunen, Bing Xia, Desiree Roerdink
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Thu, 16:15
GD3.2 | PICO

Dynamical processes shape the Earth and other rocky planets throughout their history; their present state is a result of this long-term evolution. Early on, processes and lifetimes of magma oceans establish the initial conditions for their long-term development; subsequently their long-term evolution is shaped by the dynamics of the mantle-lithosphere system, compositional differentiation or mixing, possible core-mantle reactions, etc.. These processes can be interrogated through observations of the rock record, geochemistry, seismology, gravity, magnetism and planetary remote sensing all linked through geodynamical modelling constrained by physical properties of relevant phases.

This session aims to provide a holistic view of the dynamics, structure, composition and evolution of Earth and rocky planets (including exoplanets) on temporal scales ranging from the present day to billions of years, and on spatial scales ranging from microscopic to global, by bringing together constraints from geodynamics, mineral physics, geochemistry, petrology, planetary science and astronomy.

Co-organized by PS1
Convener: Paul Tackley | Co-conveners: Gregor Golabek, Lena Noack, Paolo Sossi
PICO
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 1
Mon, 08:30
PS1.3

In June 2021, NASA and ESA selected a fleet of three international missions to Venus. Moreover, the ISRO orbiter mission Shukrayyan-1 and VOICE (Chinese Academy of Sciences) are currently proposed for launch in the mid 2020s. With the ‘Decade of Venus’ upon us, many fundamental questions remain regarding Venus. Did Venus ever have an ocean? How and when did intense greenhouse conditions develop? How does its internal structure compare to Earth's? How can we better understand Venus’ geologic history as preserved on its surface as well as the present-day state of activity and couplings between the surface and atmosphere? Although Venus is one of the most uninhabitable planets in the Solar System, understanding our nearest planetary neighbor may unveil important lessons on atmospheric and surface processes, interior dynamics and habitability. It may further help us draw important conclusions on the history of our own planet. Beyond the solar system, Venus’ analogues are likely a common type of exoplanets, and we likely have already discovered many of Venus’ sisters orbiting other stars. This session welcomes contributions that address the past, present, and future of Venus science and exploration, and what Venus can teach us about (ancient) Earth as well as exo-Venus analogues. Moreover, Venus mission concepts, new Venus observations, Earth-Venus comparisons, exoplanet observations, new results from previous observations, and the latest lab and modelling approaches are all welcome to our discussion of solving Venus’ mysteries.

Co-organized by GD3
Convener: Moa Persson | Co-conveners: Cédric Gillmann, Anna Gülcher, Maxence Lefevre, Gregor Golabek
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room L1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X3
Orals |
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 14:00
BG5.3 EDI

This session aims to bring together a diverse group of scientists who are interested in how life and planetary processes have co-evolved over geological time. This includes studies of how paleoenvironments have contributed to biological evolution and vice-versa, linking fossil records to paleo-Earth processes and the influence of tectonic and magmatic processes on the evolution of life. As an inherently multi-disciplinary subject, we aspire to better understand the complex coupling of biogeochemical cycles and life, the links between mass extinctions and their causal geological events and how fossil records shed light on ecosystem drivers over deep time. We aim to understand our planet and its biosphere through both observation- and modelling-based studies.

Co-organized by CL1.1/GD3/SSP4
Convener: Khushboo Gurung | Co-conveners: Julian Rogger, Emily Mitchell, Attila Balázs, Svetlana Botsyun, William Matthaeus, Katarzyna Marcisz
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room 2.95
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 14:00

GD4 – Subduction and Orogeny

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Antoniette Greta Grima

GD4.1 EDI

Subduction drives plate tectonics, generating the major proportion of subaerial volcanism, releasing >90% seismic moment magnitude, forming continents, and recycling lithosphere. Numerical and laboratory modelling studies have successfully built our understanding of many aspects of the geodynamics of subduction zones. Detailed geochemical studies, investigating compositional variation within and between volcanic arcs, provide further insights into systematic chemical processes at the slab surface and within the mantle wedge, providing constraints on thermal structures and material transport within subduction zones. However, with different technical and methodological approaches, model set-ups, inputs, and material properties, and in some cases conflicting conclusions between chemical and physical models, a consistent picture of the controlling parameters of subduction-zone processes has so far not emerged.

This session aims to follow subducting lithosphere on its journey from the surface down into the Earth's mantle and to understand the driving processes for deformation and magmatism in the over-riding plate. We aim to address topics such as: subduction initiation and dynamics; changes in mineral breakdown processes at the slab surface; the formation and migration of fluids and melts at the slab surface; primary melt generation in the wedge; subduction-related magmatism; controls on the position and width of the volcanic arc; subduction-induced seismicity; mantle wedge processes; the fate of subducted crust, sediments and volatiles; the importance of subducting seamounts, LIPs, and ridges; links between near-surface processes and slab dynamics and with regional tectonic evolution; slab delamination and break-off; the effect of subduction on mantle flow; and imaging subduction zone processes.

With this session, we aim to form an integrated picture of the subduction process and invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines, such as geodynamics, modelling, geochemistry, petrology, volcanology, and seismology, to discuss subduction zone dynamics at all scales from the surface to the lower mantle, or in applications to natural laboratories.

Co-organized by GMPV4/SM4/TS2
Convener: Ágnes Király | Co-conveners: Jeroen van Hunen, César R. Ranero, Oğuz H Göğüş, Taras Gerya
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00

GD5 – Rifting and Mid Ocean Ridges

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Jeroen van Hunen

GD5.1 EDI

Relative motions at plate boundaries allow the Earth’s crust to compensate forces driven by global plate tectonics. Mid-oceanic ridges (MORs) provide the unique opportunity to study two of the three plate boundaries: divergent at the ridge axis and strike-slip at transform faults (off-setting the ridge axis). Knowledge of the active and past processes building and altering the oceanic lithosphere has increased over the past 20 years due to advances in deep sea research technologies and numerical modelling techniques. Yet, several questions remain open, such as the relative role of magmatic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes in the formation of the oceanic lithosphere at the ridge axis, especially at slow and ultra-slow spreading ridges and at their intersection with transform faults. Transform faults and their extension into fracture zones, for example, remain largely under-studied features. For a long time, they were considered as cold and inactive; however, evidence for magmatism emerged recently inside both features. Given the complex network of faults associated with these structures, they represent ideal pathways for hydrothermal percolation into the Earth’s lithosphere and may therefore play a significant role in the chemical and the thermal budget of the planet, as well as in the chemical exchange with the ocean (e.g., nutrients). This session aims at fostering the scientific exchange across all disciplines studying mid-oceanic ridge axes, transform faults and fracture zones. Studies building on the use of cutting-edge deep-sea research technology are particularly welcome. The session also welcomes recent developments in thermo-mechanical models, which integrate geophysical and geological data with numerical modelling tools, bridging the gap between observations and numerical models.

Co-organized by TS2
Convener: Philipp Brandl | Co-conveners: Marcia Maia, Eleonora Ficini, Antoine Demont, Florent Szitkar
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Tue, 10:45
GD5.2

It is becoming increasingly apparent that Wilson Cycle processes (i.e. processes controlling rifting, drifting and inversion) involve complexities not easily explained by standard models, especially in oblique and transform settings. In rifted margins, oceans and orogens, abundant data showcases the significance of inherited geological structures, lithospheric rheology, time-dependence, surface processes, magmatism, obliquity, and geometry in processes of rifting, drifting and inversion, yet our understanding of the role and interaction of these factors remains far from complete. Unexpected discoveries, such as continental material far offshore (e.g. at the Rio Grande Rise) and wide-magmatic rifted margins (e.g. the Laxmi Basin), challenge conventional models and exemplify the need for further work on Wilson Cycle processes. This session aims to bring together new observations, models, and ideas to help us understand the complex factors influencing rifting, drifting, and inversion, at orthogonal, oblique and/or transform settings. Works investigating time-dependence, inheritance, plate kinematics, strain localisation, magmatism, obliquity, interior plate deformation, driving forces, sedimentation, surface processes, and the interaction/feedback between processes controlling the Wilson Cycle are therefore welcomed to this session. Contributions from any geoscience discipline, including geophysics, marine geophysics, seismology, ocean drilling, geochemistry, petrology, plate kinematics, tectonics, sedimentology, field and structural geology, numerical and analogue modelling, or thermo and geochronology etc., are sought. We particularly encourage cross-disciplinarity, innovative studies, the spanning of spatio-temporal scales, and thought-provoking ideas that challenge conventions from any and all researchers.

Solicited speakers for this session are Pauline Chenin and Gianreto Manatschal.

Co-organized by TS2
Convener: Jordan J. J. Phethean | Co-conveners: Zoltán Erdős, Patricia Cadenas Martínez, Haakon Fossen, Scott Jess, Alexander L. Peace, Frank Zwaan
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 10:45
TS2.1 EDI

Continental rifting is a complex process spanning from the inception of extension to continental rupture or the formation of a failed rift. This session aims at combining new data, concepts and techniques elucidating the structure and dynamics of rifts and rifted margins. We invite submissions highlighting the time-dependent evolution of processes such as: initiation and growth of faults and ductile shear zones, tectonic and sedimentary history, magma migration, storage and volcanism, lithospheric necking and rift strength loss, influence of the pre-rift lithospheric structure, rift kinematics and plate motion, mantle flow and dynamic topography, as well as break-up and the transition to sea-floor spreading. We encourage contributions using multi-disciplinary and innovative methods from field geology, geochronology, geochemistry, petrology, seismology, geodesy, marine geophysics, plate reconstruction, or numerical or analogue modelling. Special emphasis will be given to presentations that provide an integrated picture by combining results from active rifts, passive margins, failed rift arms or by bridging the temporal and spatial scales associated with rifting.

Co-organized by GD5/SM4/SSP1
Convener: Frank Zwaan | Co-conveners: Sylvie Leroy, Giacomo Corti, Carolina Pagli, Ameha Muluneh
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 16:15

GD6 – Crust, Lithosphere and Asthenosphere

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Frederic Deschamps

GD6.1

The session topic is interpretation and modelling of the geodynamic processes in the lithosphere-asthenosphere system and the interaction between crust and lithospheric mantle, as well as the importance of these processes for the formation of the discontinuities that we today observe in the crust and mantle. We aim at establishing links between seismological observations and process-oriented modelling studies to better understand the relation between present-day fabrics of the lithosphere and contemporary deformation and ongoing dynamics within the asthenospheric mantle. Methodologically, the contributions will include studies based on application of geochemical, petrological, tectonic and geophysical (seismic, thermal, gravity, electro-magnetic) methods with emphasis on integrated interpretations.

We invite, in particular multidisciplinary, contributions which focus on the structure, deformation and evolution of the continental crust and upper mantle and on the nature of mantle discontinuities. The latter include, but are not limited to, the mid-lithosphere discontinuity (MLD), the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), and the mantle transition zone, as imaged by various seismological techniques and interpreted with interdisciplinary approaches. Papers with focus on the structure of the crust and the nature of the Moho are also welcome.

Co-organized by SM6
Convener: Alexey Shulgin | Co-conveners: Hans Thybo, Xiaoqing Zhang
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Wed, 10:45
G4.3 EDI

The session is dedicated to the processing and modelling of gravity and magnetic field data related to spatial and temporal variations at all scales. This includes studies on modern processing and interpretation methods (e.g. including machine learning) as well as forward and inverse modelling case studies. Of special interest are studies dedicated to the crustal or lithospheric structure by integrating gravity and magnetic methods with other geophysical data (e.g. petrophysics, seismic) or combining data from terrestrial, airborne and satellite missions.

Co-organized by EMRP2/GD6
Convener: Jörg Ebbing | Co-conveners: Carla Braitenberg, Alexandra Guy, Bart Root, Mikhail Kaban
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Wed, 16:15
TS4.3

The intricate links between crustal deformation, mantle dynamics, and climate-driven surface processes have long been acknowledged as primary drivers shaping the evolution of orogens and sedimentary basins. Tectonics, climate, and surface processes all leave fingerprints on modern topography, making it difficult for researchers to univocally characterize their contribution to shaping landscapes. Unraveling the distinct roles of crustal, deep mantle, and climatic forcings poses a formidable challenge due to the vast range of spatial and temporal scales involved in these processes. The comprehensive study of such dynamic systems necessitates a multidisciplinary approach, integrating observational data from field studies, geophysical and subsurface data analysis, quantification methods of rock or surface uplift rates and erosion rates, as well as both analogue and numerical modeling techniques.

We invite contributions that delve into the exploration of orogenesis and sedimentary basin evolution, emphasizing their intricate connections to surface processes, and the underlying dynamics of crustal and mantle forcings. Furthermore, we encourage studies utilizing a diverse array of methodologies, including analogue and numerical models, along with quantitative techniques like cosmogenic nuclides and thermochronometers, as well as field studies. This collective effort aims to quantify and elucidate the intricate coupling between tectonics and surface processes in these dynamic geological systems and the links to mantle forcings.

Co-organized by GD6/GMPV10
Convener: Yanyan Wang | Co-conveners: Romano Clementucci, Attila Balázs, Sebastien Carretier, Zoltán Erdős, Duna Roda-Boluda, Sebastian G. Wolf
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 16:15

GD7 – Rheology and Multiscale Mineralogy in Geodynamics

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Laetitia Le Pourhiet

GD7.1 EDI

Many regions of the Earth, from crust to core, exhibit anisotropic fabrics which can reveal much about geodynamic processes in the subsurface. These fabrics can exist at a variety of scales, from crystallographic orientations to regional structure alignments. In the past few decades, a tremendous body of multidisciplinary research has been dedicated to characterizing anisotropy in the solid Earth and understanding its geodynamical implications. This has included work in fields such as: (1) geophysics, to make in situ observations and construct models of anisotropic properties at a range of depths; (2) mineral physics, to explain the cause of some of these observations; and (3) numerical modelling, to relate the inferred fabrics to regional stress and flow regimes and, thus, geodynamic processes in the Earth. The study of anisotropy in the Solid Earth encompasses topics so diverse that it often appears fragmented according to regions of interest, e.g., the upper or lower crust, oceanic lithosphere, continental lithosphere, cratons, subduction zones, D'', or the inner core. The aim of this session is to bring together scientists working on different aspects of anisotropy to provide a comprehensive overview of the field. We encourage contributions from all disciplines of the earth sciences (including mineral physics, seismology, magnetotellurics, geodynamic modelling) focused on anisotropy at all scales and depths within the Earth.

Co-organized by EMRP1/SM6
Convener: Manuele Faccenda | Co-conveners: Tuna Eken, Judith Confal
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Thu, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
GD7.2

The goal of this session is to reconcile short-time/small-scale and long-time/large-scale observations, including geodynamic processes such as subduction, collision, rifting, or mantle lithosphere interactions. Despite the remarkable advances in experimental rock mechanics, the implications of rock-mechanics data for large temporal and spatial scale tectonic processes are still not straightforward, since the latter are strongly controlled by local lithological stratification of the lithosphere, its thermal structure, fluid content, tectonic heritage, metamorphic reactions, and deformation rates.

Mineral reactions have mechanical effects that may result in the development of pressure variations and thus are critical for interpreting microstructural and mineral composition observations. Such effects may fundamentally influence element transport properties and rheological behavior.
Here, we encourage presentations focused on the interplay between metamorphic processes and deformation on all scales, on the rheological behavior of crustal and mantle rocks, and time scales of metamorphic reactions in order to discuss
(1) how and when up to GPa-level differential stress and pressure variations can be built and maintained at geological timescales and modeling of such systems,
(2) deviations from lithostatic pressure during metamorphism: fact or fiction?
(3) the impact of deviations from lithostatic pressure on geodynamic reconstructions.
(4) the effect of porous fluid and partial melting on the long-term strength.
We, therefore, invite the researchers from different domains (rock mechanics, petrographic observations, geodynamic and thermo-mechanical modeling) to share their views on the way forward for improving our knowledge of the long-term rheology and chemo-thermo-mechanical behavior of the lithosphere and mantle.

Co-organized by GMPV4
Convener: Yury Podladchikov | Co-conveners: Lucie Tajcmanova, Shun-ichiro Karato, Evangelos Moulas, Leni Scheck-Wenderoth
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 14:00
ITS5.14/GD7.3 EDI

Geological materials such as ice and olivine are often modelled as viscous fluids at the large scale. However, they have complex, evolving microstructures which are not present in normal fluids, and these can have a significant impact on large-scale flow behaviour. These different materials have many commonalities in how the evolving microstructure influences the large scale flow, yet research is often siloed into individual disciplines.

With this session, we aim to bring together researchers from a range of disciplines, studying a variety of anisotropic materials, and working on different aspects of complex viscous flow such as: viscous anisotropy related to CPO or extrinsic microstructures; crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) or fabric evolution; other controls on rheology such as grain size, dynamic recrystallisation and deformation mechanisms; and impact of rheology on complex flow, e.g. in the transition through a shear margin.

We encourage submissions investigating this topic through numerical modelling, laboratory experiments and observational studies. We are aiming to convene an inclusive and collaborative session, and invite contributions from all disciplines. We particularly encourage early career researchers to participate.

Co-organized by CR6
Convener: Daniel Richards | Co-conveners: Felicity McCormack, Lisa Craw, Ágnes Király
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 1.34
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 10:45
G3.4 EDI

The dynamic response of the solid Earth to the waxing and waning of ice sheets and corresponding spatial and temporal sea-level changes is termed Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). This process, like solid Earth tides, oceanic load tide, other short-period surface loading (e.g., continental water), and normal-mode oscillations, causes surface deformation and changes in the gravity field, rotation, and stress state of the Earth. Different types of observational data, now standardized, help constrain highly sophisticated models of the Earth. They also serve as a tool to constrain the rheological properties of the Earth.

We aim to bring together researchers working on GIA, body tides, short-period loading problems, and normal modes with the broad goal of using these various processes to better understand the interior of the Earth and other planets across these wide temporal and spatial scales. This session is co-sponsored by the SCAR sub-committee INSTANT-EIS, Earth - Ice - Sea level, in view of instabilities and thresholds in Antarctica (https://www.scar.org/science/instant/home/).

Co-organized by CR5/GD7, co-sponsored by SCAR
Convener: Holger Steffen | Co-conveners: Hilary Martens, Hugo Boulze, Federico Daniel Munch, Anastasia Consorzi, Jun'ichi Okuno, Matthias O. Willen
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Wed, 10:45
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00

GD8 – Core Dynamics

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Phil Livermore

GD8.1 EDI | PICO

Understanding the structures and dynamics of the core of a planet is essential to constructing a global geochemical and geodynamical model, and has implication on the planet's thermal, compositional and orbital evolution.

Remote sensing of planetary interiors from space and ground based observations is entering a new era with perspectives in constraining their core structures and dynamics. Meanwhile, increasingly accurate seismic data provide unprecedented images of the Earth's deep interior. Unraveling planetary cores' structures and dynamics requires a synergy between many fields of expertise, such as mineral physics, geochemistry, seismology, fluid mechanics or geomagnetism.

This session welcomes contributions from all the aforementioned disciplines following theoretical, numerical, observational or experimental approaches.

Co-organized by EMRP2/PS5
Convener: Jerome Noir | Co-conveners: Sébastien Merkel, Daria Holdenried-Chernoff, Jessica Irving
PICO
| Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 1
Tue, 10:45

GD9 – Geodynamics of Specific Regions

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Antoniette Greta Grima

GD9.1

The western South American subduction zone is among the largest subduction systems on the planet and stands out as the archetype of ocean-continent convergent margins. Compared to other subduction zones, the region is notable because it is associated with the largest accretionary orogen of the world (The Andes cordillera), it shows several regions of flat slab subduction, and it hosted some of the largest instrumentally recorded earthquakes. Over the last years and decades, significant progress has been achieved in characterizing and imaging the constituent parts of the South American subduction zone (downgoing oceanic plates, South American upper plate, plate interface between them, mantle wedge beneath the upper plate) as well in the understanding of geodynamic and seismotectonic processes shaping the convergent margin.

In this session, we aim to bring together scientists and contributions from a wide variety of disciplines that try to constrain and understand past and ongoing processes in this subduction zone. These can include, but are not limited to: seismo-geodetic studies of slow and fast deformation along the plate interface; geophysical studies of subduction zone structure, geometry and fluid processes; analog and numerical modeling studies of this subduction zone; studies on faulting or fluid processes in the upper plate; offshore studies on bathymetry and structure of the downgoing plate or the outer forearc; studies of Andean magmatism, volcanic processes and their link to tectonics.

Co-organized by SM4/TS2
Convener: Christian Sippl | Co-conveners: Andres Tassara, Anne Socquet, Sergio Ruiz, Marcos Moreno
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Thu, 16:15
GD9.2 EDI

The Tethyan Belt is the most prominent collisional zone on Earth, covering the vast area between far eastern Asia and Europe. The geological-tectonic evolution of the belt shows along-strike heterogeneity between its various regions, including the Indo-Burman Range, the Tibetan-Himalayan region, the Iranian Plateau, Anatolia and the Alps. The Tethyan Belt is the result of the subduction of the Tethyan Oceans, including significant terrane amalgamation, and collisional tectonics along the whole belt. The belt is today strongly affected by the ongoing convergence and collision between the Eurasian, African, Arabian and Indian plates. The long formation history and the variability of tectonic characteristics and deep structures of the belt make it a natural laboratory for understanding the accretion processes that have shaped the Earth through its history and have led to the formation of vast resources in the crust.

We invite contributions based on geological, tectonic, geophysical and geodynamic studies of the Tethyan Belt. We particularly invite interdisciplinary studies, which integrate observational data and interpretations based on a variety of methods. This session will include contributions on the whole suite of studies of the Tethyan Belt with the aim of providing a comprehensive overview of its formation and evolution.

Co-organized by SM4, co-sponsored by ILP
Convener: Hans Thybo | Co-conveners: Nalan Lom, Ling Chen, Bo Wan
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Wed, 10:45
TS2.6

The Alps, a representative orogenic system, offers an exceptional natural laboratory to study the evolution of mountain-building processes from short- to long-term scales, including the evolution of a plate margin, from rifting to subduction, inheritance from previous orogenic cycles), ophiolite emplacement, collision and exhumation, upper-plate and foreland basin evolution.

Advances in a variety of geophysical and geological fields provide a rich and growing set of constraints on the crust-lithosphere and mantle structure, tectonics and geodynamics of the entire mountain belt.

We invite contributions from different and multi-disciplinary perspectives ranging from the Earth’s surface to the mantle, and based on geology (tectonics, petrology, stratigraphy, geo- and thermochronology, geochemistry, paleomagnetism and geomorphology), geophysics (seismotectonics, seismic tomography and anisotropy) and geodesy and modelling (numerical and analogue). The aim is for contributions to provide new insight and observation on the record of subduction/collision, pre-Alpine orogenic stages; the influence of structural and palaeogeographic configuration; plate/mantle dynamics relationships; coupling between deep and surface processes.

Co-organized by GD9/GMPV11
Convener: Alexis Plunder | Co-conveners: Mark R. Handy, Marco Giovanni Malusa', Ralf Schuster, Philippe Agard
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–17:45 (CEST)
 
Room K1
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 14:00

GD10 – Modelling, Data collection and Inversion

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Frederic Deschamps

GD10.1

Geological and geophysical data sets convey observations of physical processes governing the Earth’s evolution. Such data sets are widely varied and range from the internal structure of the Earth, plate kinematics, composition of geomaterials, estimation of physical conditions, dating of key geological events, thermal state of the Earth to more shallow processes such as natural and “engineered” reservoir dynamics in the subsurface.

The complexity in the physics of geological processes arises from their multi-physics nature, as they combine hydrological, thermal, chemical and mechanical processes. Multi-physics couplings are prone to nonlinear interactions ultimately leading to spontaneous localisation of flow and deformation. Understanding the couplings among those processes therefore requires the development of appropriate numerical tools.

Integrating high-quality data into physics-based predictive numerical simulations may lead to a constructive workflow and allow to further constrain unknown key parameters within the models. Innovative inversion strategies, linking forward dynamic models with observables, and combining PDE solvers with machine-learning via differentiable programming is therefore an important research topic that will improve our knowledge of the governing physical parameters.

We invite contributions from the following two complementary themes:

#1 Computational advances associated with
- alternative spatial and/or temporal discretisation for existing forward/inverse models
- scalable HPC implementations of new and existing methodologies (GPUs / multi-core)
- solver and preconditioner developments
- Combining PDEs with AI / Machine learning-based approaches (physics-informed ML)
- Automatic differentiation (AD) and differentiable programming
- code and methodology comparisons (“benchmarks”)

#2 Physics advances associated with
- development of partial differential equations to describe geological processes
- inversion strategies and adjoint-based modelling
- numerical model validation through comparison with observables (data)
- scientific discovery enabled by 2D and 3D modelling
- utilisation of coupled models to explore nonlinear interactions

We plan on a special topical issue for the research output presented in this session in the EGU journal of Geoscientific Model Development (GMD) https://www.geoscientific-model-development.net.

Convener: Ludovic Räss | Co-conveners: Boris Kaus, Ivan Utkin, Thibault Duretz, Dave May
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 10:45
GD10.2

Mantle circulation simulations are now capable of a high level of precision and complexity that allows the creation of numerous "Earth-like" models. Likewise, advances in observation resources and methods have improved the quantity and quality of data on the Earth's interior. Combining these developments presents a unique opportunity to enhance our understanding of mantle dynamics and evolution over geological time scales. However, the exact physics leading to Earth-like simulations remains debated (e.g. the existence of a primordial layer, the core-mantle-boundary temperature, etc...). Furthermore, constraining geodynamical simulations or assessing their predictions with observational data can be challenging, for example, due to data noise, issues related to inverse methods, or uncertainty propagation.

This session aims to explore how observational data can be used to constrain or assess geodynamical simulations and advance our knowledge of the physical processes that govern the Earth's mantle. We invite submissions from various fields, including seismology, geochemistry, mineral physics or geomagnetism where observations have the potential to constrain geodynamical simulations or assess their predictions. The nature of these studies can be purely observational, exploring the inversion of data to possible Earth models or proposing metrics to assess how Earth-like a model is.

This session also aims to compare these observations and address their potential to constrain or assess geodynamical simulations, with the ultimate goal of better understanding which parameters may cause models to be more or less Earth-like.

Co-organized by EMRP2/SM6
Convener: Franck Latallerie | Co-conveners: Thomas Duvernay, James Ward, Emma Chambers, James Panton, Menno Fraters, Sarah Jane Fowler
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X2
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00
TS5.2 EDI | PICO

Geologic processes are generally too slow, too rare, or too deep to be observed in-situ and to be monitored with a resolution high enough to understand their dynamics. Analogue experiments and numerical simulation have thus become an integral part of the Earth explorer's toolbox to select, formulate, and test hypotheses on the origin and evolution of geological phenomena.

To foster synergy between the rather independently evolving experimentalists and modellers we provide a multi-disciplinary platform to discuss research on tectonics, structural geology, rock mechanics, geodynamics, volcanology, geomorphology, and sedimentology.

We therefore invite contributions demonstrating the state-of-the-art in analogue and numerical / analytical modelling on a variety of spatial and temporal scales, varying from earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions to sedimentary processes, plate tectonics and landscape evolution. We especially welcome those presentations that discuss model strengths and weaknesses, challenge the existing limits, or compare/combine the different modelling techniques to realistically simulate and better understand the Earth's behaviour.

Co-organized by GD10/SM4/SSP1
Convener: Thorben Schöfisch | Co-conveners: Betti Hegyi, Frank Zwaan, Ágnes Király, Riccardo Reitano
PICO
| Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 1
Tue, 08:30

GD11 – Geodynamics and society: Short Courses, EDI, and General Interest

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Jeroen van Hunen

SC5.5

The main goal of this short course is to provide an introduction into the basic concepts of numerical modelling of solid Earth processes in the Earth’s crust and mantle in a non-technical manner. We discuss the building blocks of a numerical code and how to set up a model to study geodynamic problems. Emphasis is put on best practices and their implementations including code verification, model validation, internal consistency checks, and software and data management.

The short course introduces the following topics:
(1) The physical model, including the conservation and constitutive equations
(2) The numerical model, including numerical methods, discretisation, and kinematical descriptions
(3) Code verification, including benchmarking
(4) Model design, including modelling philosophies
(5) Model validation and subsequent analysis
(6) Communication of modelling results and effective software, data, and resource management

Armed with the knowledge of a typical numerical modelling workflow, participants will be better able to critically assess geodynamic numerical modelling papers and know how to start with numerical modelling.

This short course is aimed at everyone who is interested in, but not necessarily experienced with, geodynamic numerical models; in particular early career scientists (BSc, MSc, PhD students and postdocs) and people who are new to the field of geodynamic modelling.

Co-organized by G7/GD11/TS9
Convener: Fabio Crameri | Co-conveners: Luuk van Agtmaal, Andres Rodríguez Corcho, Xin Zhou, Nickolas Moccetti Bardi, Björn Heyn, Marcel Thielmann
Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.85/86
Tue, 16:15
SC5.1 EDI

This short course aims to introduce non-geologists to the structural geological and petrological principles that are used by geologists to study system earth.

The data available to geologists is often minimal, incomplete, and representative only for part of the geological history. Besides learning the field techniques that are needed to take measurements and acquire data, geologists also need to develop a logical way of thinking to overcome these challenges and to solve this complex puzzle.

In this course we briefly introduce the following subjects:
1) Geology rocks: Introduction to the principles of geology.
2) Moving rocks: The basics of plate tectonics.
3) Breaking rocks: From lab experiments to natural examples.
4) Dating rocks: Absolute and relative dating of rocks.
5) Shaping rocks: Using the morphology of landscapes as tectonic constraints.
6) Q&A!

Our aim is not to make you the next specialist in geology, but we will try and make you aware of the challenges a geologist faces when they go out into the field. We will also address currently used methodologies for the collection of geological data, to give other earth scientists a feel for the capabilities and limitations of geological research.

This course is given by Early Career Scientists and forms a quintet with the short courses on ‘Geodynamics 101’, ‘Seismology 101’, ‘Tectonics 101’, and ‘Geodesy 101’. For this reason, we will also explain what kind of information we expect from the fields of geodynamics, seismology and geodesy, and we hope to receive input on the kind of information you could use from our side.