Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

NH4

NH – Natural Hazards

Programme group chair: Ira Didenkulova

NH4 – Earthquake Hazards

Programme group scientific officer: Antonella Peresan

NH4.1

The study of active faults and deformation of the Earth's surface has made, and continues to make, significant contributions to our understanding of earthquakes and the assessment of seismic related hazard. Active faulting may form and deform the Earth's surface so that records are documented in young sediments and in the landscape. Field studies of recent earthquake ruptures help to constrain earthquake source parameters and to identify previously unknown active structures. The insights gleaned from recent earthquakes can be applied to study past earthquakes. Paleoseismology and related disciplines such as paleogeodesy and paleotsunami investigations still are the primary tools to establish earthquake records that are long enough to determine recurrence intervals and long-term deformation rates for active faults. Multidisciplinary data sets accumulated over the years have brought unprecedented constraints on the size and timing of past earthquakes and allow deciphering shorter-term variations in fault slip rates or seismic activity rates, as well as the interaction of single faults within fault systems. This wide range of methods leads to a wide range of uncertainties in the definition of what is an active fault, which parameters are entered in fault databases, which consequently conditions the strategy used to transfer earthquake-fault data into fault models suitable for probabilistic SHA. Which uncertainty can be quantified by geologists and how can it be made easily accessible for proper usage in hazard computation is a fundamental question that the FAULT2SHA ESC working group (www.fault2sha.net) is attempting to tackle.
This FAULT2SHA session aims to spark a discussion between field earthquake geologists, crustal deformation modellers and fault modellers/seismic hazard practitioners around fault-related uncertainty issues and their inclusion in fault-based PSHA. We welcome contributions describing and critically discussing approaches used to study active faults as well as presentations discussing existing efforts on how fault-related information is translated into dedicated databases of primary surface information and then into 3D fault models. We particularly encourage contributions related to local studies of fault systems where specific issues could be debated on either fault data collection aspects, databases questions and/or fault hazard modelling

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Co-organized by SM3/TS5
Convener: Oona Scotti | Co-conveners: Esther Hintersberger, Bruno Pace
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
NH4.2

The scientific base of the process of seismic risk mitigation involves various seismic hazard models, developed at different time scales and by different methods, as well as the use of information as complete and reliable as possible about past seismicity. Some recent large earthquakes caused extensive damage in areas where some models indicated low seismic hazard, leading to an increased demand for criteria to objectively assess how well seismic hazard models are performing. This session aims to tackle theoretical and implementation issues, as well as aspects of science policy and diplomacy, which are all essential elements towards effective disasters mitigation, and include:
⇒ earthquake hazard and risk estimation at different time and space scales, including extreme seismic events;
⇒ methods for assessing performances of seismic hazard and risk models;
⇒ discussions of the pros and cons of deterministic, neo-deterministic, probabilistic, and intensity-based seismic hazard assessments
⇒ long-term evidences about past great earthquakes, as well as evidences of lack of them, including unconventional seismological observations (e.g. impact on caves, ancient constructions and other deformations evidences);
⇒ earthquake hazard assessment in terms of macro-seismic intensity;
⇒ seismic hazard and risk assessment and their temporal variability, including the contribution of aftershocks and earthquake-induced cascading effects (e.g. landslides, tsunamis, etc).
We invite contributions related to: hazard and risk assessment methods and their performance in applications; verification methods that are suitable to quantify seismic hazard estimates and that can be applied to limited and/or heterogeneous observations (ranging from recent records of ground shaking parameters to past intensity data); seismic hazard/risk monitoring and modeling; and risk communication and mitigation.
The session will provide an opportunity to share best practices and experience gained with different methods, highlighting existing gaps and future research directions. Also, the session would like to discuss issues related to disaster science policy and diplomacy, providing opportunities to advance our understanding of disaster risk in "all its dimensions of vulnerability, capacity, exposure of persons and assets, hazard characteristics and the environment", while simultaneously building bridges between nations, where relationships could otherwise be strained.

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Co-organized by SM3, co-sponsored by IUGG
Convener: Antonella Peresan | Co-conveners: Katalin Gribovszki, Yekaterina KontarECSECS, Katerina Orfanogiannaki, Elisa Varini
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
NH4.3

This session results from a merge of:
NH3.3 - Earthquake-induced landslides: mechanisms, modelling and related hazards
NH4.3 - Seismic microzonation: site effects and ground failures in urban areas.

Field evidence collected after past earthquakes worldwide demonstrated that damage and death toll depend on both the transient and the permanent deformations. They, in turn, are related to earthquake source and path, local geological and geotechnical conditions, structural design and construction features. Seismic microzonation (SM) focuses on the assessment of the first two factors and therefore represents the basis of a sustainable policy for earthquake risk mitigation. It deals with the assessment of ground shaking amplification, but also with the ground failures as landslides, soil liquefaction and ground subsidence. The multiple hazards resulting from these processes commonly are treated separately even though an integrated approach to the problem clearly is desirable. The purpose of this session is to provide a forum for discussion among researchers and other professionals who study amplification of the ground motion and the related ground failures caused by both seismic and volcanic activity and to encourage multidisciplinary research in these fields. Topics of interest include the following:
- Subsoil investigation and characterization for SM mapping;
- Multi-level SM mapping
- Evaluation of seismic site response (1D-2D-3D)
- Case histories of earthquake-triggered landslides, analysed at either local or regional
- Analysis of factors associated with seismically/volcanically-induced landslide occurrence;
- Slope stability and runout modelling of seismically/volcanically-induced landslide;
- Assessments of landslide and other ground-failure hazards in relation to deterministic earthquake and volcanic event scenarios or to regional probabilistic evaluations;
- Application of GIS techniques to evaluate and portray seismic and volcanic ground-failure hazards and risks;
-User requirements regarding risk assessment and persisting challenges.
- Studies on Soil liquefaction

A focused special issue in an EGU-journal will be edited based on the contributions of this session.

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Convener: Giovanni ForteECSECS | Co-conveners: Paolo Frattini, Hans-Balder Havenith, Giovanni Crosta, Filippo Santucci de Magistris, Janusz Wasowski, Patrick Meunier, Chyi-Tyi Lee
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
NH4.4

Over the last years, significant progress has been made towards understanding spatio-temporal correlations of earthquake occurrence, scaling laws, earthquake clustering, and the emergence of seismicity patterns. Background and clustered seismicity occur with great spatio-temporal variability. New models being developed in statistical seismology and pattern recognition have direct implications for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment, probabilistic earthquake forecasting and for analyzing the evolution of seismicity clusters. In many regions where complex fault systems exist, clusters are characterized by multiple mainshock sequences, with large aftershocks, which increase the overall hazard.
In this session, we invite researchers to present their latest results and insights on the physical and statistical models (either theoretical or based on laboratory and numerical experiments on rock fracture and friction) for the occurrence of earthquakes, foreshocks and aftershocks. Particular emphasis will be placed on:

- physical and statistical models of earthquake occurrence;
- analysis of earthquake clustering;
- spatio-temporal properties of earthquake statistics;
- quantitative testing of earthquake occurrence models;
- implications for time-dependent hazard assessment;
- methods for earthquake forecasting;
- data analyses and requirements for model testing;
- pattern recognition in seismology;
- machine learning applied to seismic data.

Confirmed solicited speaker: Ilya Zaliapin (University of Nevada, Reno, USA)

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Co-organized by SM1
Convener: Stefania Gentili | Co-conveners: Rita Di Giovambattista, Álvaro GonzálezECSECS, Filippos Vallianatos
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
NH4.5

From the real-time integration of multi-parametric observations is expected the major contribution to the development of operational t-DASH systems suitable for supporting decision makers with continuously updated seismic hazard scenarios. A very preliminary step in this direction is the identification of those parameters (seismological, chemical, physical, biological, etc.) whose space-time dynamics and/or anomalous variability can be, to some extent, associated with the complex process of preparation of major earthquakes.
This session wants then to encourage studies devoted to demonstrate the added value of the introduction of specific, observations and/or data analysis methods within the t-DASH and StEF perspectives. Therefore studies based on long-term data analyses, including different conditions of seismic activity, are particularly encouraged. Similarly welcome will be the presentation of infrastructures devoted to maintain and further develop our present observational capabilities of earthquake related phenomena also contributing in this way to build a global multi-parametric Earthquakes Observing System (EQuOS) to complement the existing GEOSS initiative.
To this aim this session is not addressed just to seismology and natural hazards scientists but also to geologist, atmospheric sciences and electromagnetism researchers, whose collaboration is particular important for fully understand mechanisms of earthquake preparation and their possible relation with other measurable quantities. For this reason all contributions devoted to the description of genetic models of earthquake’s precursory phenomena are equally welcome. Selected papers will be proposed for publication in a dedicated Special Issue of Frontiers in Earth Science (i.e. Achievements and New Frontiers in Research Oriented to Earthquake Forecasting https://www.frontiersin.org/research-topics/11302)

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Co-sponsored by JpGU and EMSEV
Convener: Valerio Tramutoli | Co-conveners: Pier Francesco Biagi, Nicola GenzanoECSECS, Dimitar Ouzounov, Xuhui Shen
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
SM3.2

The analysis of the spatiotemporal evolution of seismicity and the development of physical
and statistical models of seismicity have substantially improved our understanding of
earthquake occurrence. Such endeavor has considerably benefited from the availability of
new techniques and high-resolution, high-quality datasets. However, our forecasting skill of
large earthquake is still bounded to the "low-probability" environment. Additional
challenges are posed by issues such as missing data, catalog quality, biases affecting the
estimation of model parameters.
This session focuses on the most recent developments of models and techniques for
seismicity analysis, together with the main issues we need to be aware of. Specifically, it
will address the following topics:
• Advances in earthquake forecasting at different time scales;
• Advances in the analysis of spatiotemporal properties of seismicity;
• Earthquake statistics;
• Challenges affecting the analysis and modeling of spatiotemporal earthquake
occurrence;
• Future perspectives in seismicity modeling;
• Is there life beyond ETAS?

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Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Angela StalloneECSECS | Co-conveners: Ilaria SpassianiECSECS, Sebastian Hainzl, Jiancang Zhuang
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS4.2

Faults are complex three-dimensional geological objects that grow and change their properties over time (i.e., fourth dimension). Therefore, their thorough understanding intrinsically requires a three- and four- rather than two-dimensional analysis. In this session, we invite contributions that address the geometrical, kinematical, and the underlying mechanical characteristics of faults, by considering their inherent three- and four-dimensional nature. Considerations in this new light will bring us closer to fully address some of the fundamental questions in fault analysis: how do faults initiate? How do they evolve in space and time? How do they accommodate displacement and at what slip rates? Ideally, contributions should arise from analysis of a broad spectrum of data such as, among others, geophysical imaging, earthquake seismicity, outcrop (including novel virtual outcrop geology), and analogue and numerical modelling data. The integration of these different data types will provide insights on characteristics of faults at different scales and resolutions, and on their evolution at different time frames. We encourage contributions that explore the repercussions that a three- and four- rather than two-dimensional approach to the study of faults can have on a broad range of practical problems such as, among others, earthquake hazard assessment and fluid flow.

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Co-organized by NH4/SM2
Convener: Giovanni CamanniECSECS | Co-conveners: Efstratios DelogkosECSECS, Michael KettermannECSECS, Vincent Roche, David Tanner
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
SM7.3

Numerical modeling of earthquakes provides new approaches to apprehend the physics of earthquake rupture and the seismic cycle, seismic wave propagation, fault zone evolution and seismic hazard assessment.
Recent advances in numerical algorithms and increasing computational power enable unforeseen precision and multi-physics components in physics-based earthquake simulation but also pose challenges in terms of fully exploiting modern supercomputing infrastructure, realistic parameterization of simulation ingredients and the analysis of large synthetic datasets while advances in laboratory experiments link earthquake source processes to rock mechanics.
This session aims to bring together modelers and data analysts interested in the physics and computational aspects of earthquake phenomena and earthquake engineering. We welcome studies focusing on all aspects of seismic hazard assessment and the physics of earthquakes - from slow slip events, fault mechanics and rupture dynamics, to wave propagation and ground motion analysis, to the seismic cycle and inter seismic deformation - and studies which further the state-of-the art in the related computational and numerical aspects.

Public information:
Welcome to session SM7.3 "Physics-based earthquake modeling and engineering”.
Our session aims to bring together modelers and data analysts interested in the physics and computational aspects of earthquake phenomena and earthquake engineering.
We are looking forward to discussing uploaded displays in display number order as appearing to your right. Presenters please prepare a short introduction, then we will discuss questions. We will end with an open discussion at the end of the session.

We stick with the simple EGU text chat during all the session increasing accessibility. Please take advantage by asking lots of questions, and, importantly, post comments beneath displays!

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Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS | Co-conveners: Jean Paul Ampuero, Hideo Aochi
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
SM5.1

Recent advances in deformation sensing have led to new applications in various geophysical disciplines such as earthquake physics, broadband seismology, volcanology, seismic exploration, strong ground motion, earthquake engineering and geodesy.
New developments in translation, rotation and strain sensing enable the complete observation of seismic ground motion and deformation. Applications are manifold, ranging from the reduction of nonuniqueness in seismic inverse problems to the characterization, separation and reconstruction of the seismic wavefield.
Among others, fibre optic technologies is bound to become a standard tool for crustal exploration and seismic monitoring thanks to: (i) easier installation (low cost, simpler installation and maintenance, robustness in harsh environment); (ii) high spatial and temporal resolution over long distance; (iii) broader frequency band. There have been significant breakthroughs, applying fibre optic technologies to interrogate cables at very high precision over very large distances both on land and at sea, in boreholes and at the surface.
These developments overlap with considerable improvements in optical and atom interferometry for inertial rotation and gravity sensing which has led to a variety of improved sensor concepts over the last two decades.
We welcome contributions on theoretical advances and applications of novel sensing methodologies in seismology, geodesy, geophysics, natural hazards, oceanography, urban environment, geothermal investigations, etc. including laboratory studies, large-scale field tests and modelling.

We are happy to announce Nathaniel J. Lindsey as invited speaker.

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Co-organized by ERE6/NH4
Convener: Gilda Currenti | Co-conveners: David SollbergerECSECS, Philippe Jousset, Felix Bernauer, Shane Murphy, André Gebauer, Zack SpicaECSECS, Sneha SinghECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
TS5.2

The largest earthquakes globally occur along plate boundaries, producing intense shaking and associated secondary hazards over broad regions. In the past few years, there have been significant improvements in the quantity and quality of geodetic, seismological, and geological observations of the slow accumulation and rapid release of strain at these plate boundaries. At the same time, improvements in modeling techniques are providing new insights into the geodynamic processes controlling the occurrence of major earthquakes. With these advances, it is now becoming possible to address outstanding issues about both seismic and aseismic deformation at plate boundaries, such as time-variable locking and unlocking of the plate interface, the extent and role of slow slip events, the links between earthquake cycles and permanent deformation, and the behavior of complete cycles revealed by paleo-seismic and paleo-geodetic observations.

We invite contributions that investigate the spectrum of deformation occurring throughout the earthquake cycle at plate boundaries, from aseismic to seismic and across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Submissions that utilize improved remote and field observational capabilities, developments in data analysis, or innovations in analog and numerical modeling to advance the understanding of the underlying physical processes are encouraged.

Public information:
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We will begin our session by allowing 5-10 minutes for participants to look through the displays and prepare some discussion points. After this, we will go through all of the presenting author, and have each author briefly introduce their research. Audience participants will then have a few minutes to ask questions and make comments. Depending on the number of displays, we will be more or less strict on timing, but we are aiming for 5-10 minutes per author. Finally, after all authors have presented, we will turn the comments to open discussion. Talk to you soon!

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Co-organized by GD9/NH4/SM4
Convener: Matthew Herman | Co-conveners: Ylona van DintherECSECS, Marcos Moreno, Luca Dal ZilioECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SM3.1

We focus on the aspect of combining frontier science with high-density ground and building measurements and large open data pools to better predict ground-shaking and building behavior but also to better quantify and visualize the potential impact of earthquakes.
The aim of this session is to give an up-to-date view of new ideas and methods using dense seismological networks, the latest generation of ground-motion databases, data-mining analyses, crowd-sourcing data, and smart-city technologies to evaluate ground-shaking and assess earthquake hazard and risk.
We invite papers related to:
(1) Site-specific and ultra-high-density earthquake ground-motion prediction (e.g. non-ergodic ground-motion models, use of machine learning in engineering seismology, high-resolution site conditions)
(2) Scenario-based or probabilistic earthquake hazard and risk assessment
(3) Exposure models from open data (e.g. use of OpenStreetMap data)
(4) Structural health monitoring of buildings for dynamic vulnerability modeling during earthquake sequences or dynamic exposure modeling
(5) Transparent and innovative hazard/risk visualization methods

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Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Fabrice Cotton | Co-conveners: Kuo-Fong Ma, Danijel Schorlemmer
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SM2.1

This session covers the broad field of earthquake source processes, and
includes the topics of imaging the rupture kinematics and simulating
earthquake dynamics using numerical methods, to develop a deeper
understanding of earthquake source physics. We also invite presentation
that link novel laboratory experiments to earthquake dynamics, and
studies on earthquake scaling properties.

Earthquake sources are imaged using seismic data and surface deformation
measurements (e.g.GPS and InSAR) to estimate rupture properties on
faults and fault systems. Each data set and each method has its strength
and limitations in the context of the source-inversion problem, but the
uncertainties are often not well quantified and the robustness of the
source models not well known.
The session invites contributions that address the source-inversion
problem and provide new methods, innovative applications, and
thought-provoking new ideas. Contributions are welcome that make use of modern
computing paradigms and infrastructure to tackle large-scale forward
simulation of earthquake process, but also inverse modeling to retrieve
the rupture process with proper uncertainty quantification.

Earthquake source imaging, numerical modeling of rupture dynamics, and
source-scaling relations help to understand earthquake source processes.
Furthermore, new numerical modeling approaches for multi-scale
earthquake physics, including earthquake-cycle simulations, may include
fault-zone evolution and even target seismic hazard assessment. The
question that these lines of research are targeting are profound and of
first-order socio-economic relevance:

Which first-order physical processes control, at a given space-time
scale, the macroscopic evolution of dynamic rupture and its seismic
radiation? Is the physics of fault rupture the same for large and small
earthquakes? How can modern earthquake hazard assessment profit from a
deeper understanding of rupture dynamics? Which source processes need to
be considered to better understand, and then model, tsunami generation,
triggering phenomena, induced seismicity and earthquake cycles?

Within this framework our session also provides a forum to discuss case
studies of kinematic or dynamic source modeling of recent significant
earthquakes.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/NH4
Convener: P. Martin Mai | Co-conveners: Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS, Henriette Sudhaus, Martin Vallée
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS5.5

The broad scale tectonics of the Eastern Mediterranean are dominated by the interaction of the Nubian and Arabian plates with the Eurasian plate. This complex tectonic frame exhibit almost all type of plate boundary conditions such as continental convergence and extension, oceanic subduction, and continental transform. The evolution and present deformation are constrained by diverse geological, geophysical, and geodetic observations and have been explained by different hypotheses, such as (a) tectonic escape system caused by the post-collisional convergence of Eurasian and Arabian plates creating forces at its boundaries with gravitational potential differences of the Anatolian high plateau (b) asthenospheric flow dragging the circular flow of lithosphere from the Levant to Anatolia in the east and the Aegean in the west, (c) slab pull of the Hellenic subduction, (d) mantle upwelling underneath Afar and with the large-scale flow associated with a whole mantle, Tethyan convection cell, (e) or combinations of these mechanisms for the Eastern Mediterranean. Naturally, this tectonic setting generates frequent earthquakes with large magnitudes (M > 7), forming a natural laboratory on understanding the crustal deformation, and crust-mantle interactions for various disciplines of active tectonics.
Multi-disciplinary studies, especially within the last three decades, have made significant contributions to our understanding of the processes on the crustal deformation, and interaction of the mantle with the crustal processes of this region. With this session, we aim to bring together the recent findings of these studies, thus we welcome/invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines including, but not limited to, neotectonics, seismology, tectonic geodesy (e.g. GNSS, InSAR), paleoseismology, tectonic geomorphology, remote sensing, structural geology and geodynamic modelling, which geographically cover the Eastern Mediterranean region, including Anatolia-Aegean Block, Caucasus, Iran, Middle East and Greece.

Invited talks:
- Jonathan Weiss - Measuring Anatolian plate velocity and strain with InSAR: Implications for fault-locking, seismic hazard, and crustal dynamics.
- Pierre Henry - Contrasting seismogenic behaviors on the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara

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Co-organized by GD7/NH4/SM2
Convener: Cengiz Zabcı | Co-conveners: Michael Floyd, A. Ozgun Konca, Onno Oncken, Philippe Vernant
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
SM2.2

Typical practice for seismic hazard assessment (SHA) in stable continental regions (SCRs) uses a global-analogues approach to amalgamate seismicity data from SCRs globally. This approach is premised on all SCR crust sharing the same seismogenic potential. Is this approach valid? How can we better define seismogenic analogues in low strain regions? Are earthquake recurrence and long-term slip rates meaningful concepts in these settings for the purpose of seismic hazard analysis?
This session seeks to integrate paleoseismic, geomorphic, geodetic, geophysical and seismological datasets to provide insight into the earthquake cycle in low-strain regions. It will draw upon recent advances in high-resolution topography, geochronology, satellite geodesy techniques, subsurface imaging techniques, longer seismological records, high-density geophysical networks and unprecedented computational power to explore the driving mechanisms for earthquakes in low-strain settings. A comparison of the range of seismic behavior as a function of the different geodynamic attributes of these settings (e.g., crustal age, structure, stress, geology, antecedent
tectonics (inheritance); evolving boundary conditions; Quaternary processes (glaciation), etc), may provide a means to better refine and constrain the types of features or active processes that warrant treatment as analogues for seismic hazard assessment. We welcome contributions that (1) present new observations that place constraints on earthquake occurrence in low-strain regions, (2) explore patterns of stable or temporally varying earthquake recurrence, and (3) provide insight into the mechanisms that control earthquakes in regions of slow deformation via observation and/or
modeling.

Public information:
The session will be hosted both on Zoom and on the EGU text-based chat.

Schedule :
- 10:45-11:15 : Zoom session (see link below) - Presentations only (no questions and answers, this will take place in the chat), presenters are invited to share their screen
- 11:15-12:30 : EGU chat session - questions and answers for all presenters

------------------------------------- Zoom session link ------------------------------------
Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://videoconf-colibri.zoom.us/j/98788480483
Or iPhone one-tap: 308810988,98788480483# or 211202618,98788480483#
Or Telephone:
Dial: +351 308 810 988 (Portugal Toll) or +351 211 202 618 (Portugal Toll)
Meeting ID: 987 8848 0483
International numbers available: https://videoconf-colibri.zoom.us/u/adNZCcmlD1
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Zoom session will start with a 10 minute presentation by Eulalia Gracia for a solicited talk. It will be followed by 6 3-minute long presentations.
Then, we will switch to the text-based chat for questions and answers ; 5 minutes for each presentation. Each presentation will be introduced by the conveners.

The schedule is given below.

ZOOM (10:45-11:15) -
10:45-10:55 E. Gracia Earthquake crisis unveils the growth of an incipient continental fault system
10:55-10:58 J. Ritz The Mw4.9 Le Teil surface-rupturing earthquake in southern France: New insight on seismic hazard assessment in stable continental regions
10:58-11:01 A. Vallage Full characterization of the ML 5.4 2019/11/11 Le Teil earthquake in France based on a multi-technology approach
11:01-11:04 T. King The 2016 Mw 6.1 Petermann Ranges earthquake rupture, Australia: another “one-off” stable continental region earthquake
11:04-11:07 C.-H. Tsai Palaeo-earthquake magnitudes on the Dzhungarian fault, N. Tien shan, and implications for the rupture processes of intraplate strike-slip faults
11:07-11:10 C. Daxer Quantitative paleoseismology in Carinthia, Eastern Alps: Calibrating the lacustrine sedimentary record with historical earthquake data
11:10-11:13 M. Moorkamp Integrated geophysical analysis of the April 2017 Moiyabana intra-plate earthquake, Botswana

TEXT-BASED EGU CHAT (11:15-12:30)
11:15-11:20 E. Gracia Earthquake crisis unveils the growth of an incipient continental fault system
11:20-11:25 O. Olesen Large magnitude earthquakes of late Holocene age in the Precambrian of Finnmark, Northern Norway
11:25-11:30 J. Ritz The Mw4.9 Le Teil surface-rupturing earthquake in southern France: New insight on seismic hazard assessment in stable continental regions
11:30-11:35 A. Vallage Full characterization of the ML 5.4 2019/11/11 Le Teil earthquake in France based on a multi-technology approach
11:35-11:40 T. King The 2016 Mw 6.1 Petermann Ranges earthquake rupture, Australia: another “one-off” stable continental region earthquake
11:40-11:45 C.-H. Tsai Palaeo-earthquake magnitudes on the Dzhungarian fault, N. Tien shan, and implications for the rupture processes of intraplate strike-slip faults
11:45-11:50 H. Choi What if a larger earthquake would occur at the causative fault of the Gyeongju earthquake with ML 5.8 on September 11, 2016 in South Korea?
11:50-11:55 J. Kley Seismotectonic regions for Germany - Concept and results
11:55-12:00 D. Clark Neotectonic constraint on models of strain localisation within Australian Stable Continental Region (SCR) crust
12:05-12:10 C. Daxer Quantitative paleoseismology in Carinthia, Eastern Alps: Calibrating the lacustrine sedimentary record with historical earthquake data
12:10:12:15 R. Minetto High-resolution catalog of the the Maurienne Swarm (French Alps) based on template matching and double-different relocation
12:15-12:20 M. Moorkamp Integrated geophysical analysis of the April 2017 Moiyabana intra-plate earthquake, Botswana
12:20-12:25 C. Reyes-Carmona Evidence of recent activity in the Camorro Fault (Central Betics, Southern Spain)

12:25-12:30 - Additional questions and time for discussion

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Co-organized by NH4/TS5
Convener: Pierre Arroucau | Co-conveners: Beau WhitneyECSECS, Susana Custódio, Stéphane Baize, Ryan Gold, Dan Clark, Gordana Vlahovic, Sierd Cloetingh
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
SM1.3

Ambient seismic noise-based monitoring and imaging techniques have matured into a core part of the seismological toolkit. The advantages are based on the commonly obtained robust reconstruction of empirical Green’s function estimates that allows seismic imaging and continuous monitoring of a wide range of subsurface structures.

In this session, we focus on open questions and methodological advances in seismic interferometry and ambient noise based seismology. We invite (A) contributions on new methodological approaches in seismic interferometry and noise processing, (B) studies of time variations of elastic material properties, and (C) investigations of the sources of the ambient seismic noise.

This could, for example, include contributions that...
... further extend the resolution capabilities and sensitivities of methods using the continuously recorded wavefield and its applications;
... propose ideas that aim to push the imaging resolution of multiple scattered wavefields;
... report on case studies of established techniques that are applied to data collected by unconventional solid earth and acoustic acquisition systems such as distributed acoustic sensing cables, rotation sensors, or infrasound installations;
... investigate causes of temporal variations of medium properties, including suggestions for the upscaling of laboratory configurations to local and regional scales;
... show monitoring applications that connect the obtained velocity change signals with complementary observables such as seismicity rates, geodetic signals, or meltwater drainage to better constrain underlying physical processes and model parameters;
... study the excitation of the ambient field over the entire frequency range and implications for the stability of the reconstructed signals;

Solicited presentation by Dr. Eileen Martin (Virginia Tech, USA) on ambient noise interferometry with fiber optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS).

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Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Céline Hadziioannou | Co-conveners: Laura ErmertECSECS, Gregor Hillers, Anne Obermann, Christoph Sens-Schönfelder
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
GM2.6

Characterizing and monitoring Earth surface processes often requires the development of challenging scientific approaches leading to the rise of innovative techniques. From the highest mountains to the deepest oceans, passive to active monitoring techniques are in constant progress and push further terra incognita boundaries. In particular, seismic techniques are becoming widely used to detect and quantitatively characterise a wide variety of natural processes occurring at the Earth’s surface. These processes include mass movements such as landslides, rock falls, debris flows and lahars; glacial phenomena such as icequakes, glacier calving/serac falls, glacier melt and supra- to sub-glacial hydrology; snow avalanches; water storage and water dynamics phenomena such as water table changes, river flow turbulence and fluvial sediment transport. Where other methods often provide limited spatial and temporal coverage, seismic observations allow recovering sequences of events with high temporal resolution and over large areas. In addition to seismic techniques, recent advances in other in-situ geophysical instrumentation (e.g. Doppler radar, sub bottom profilers, etc.) or remote sensing techniques (e.g. inSAR, unmanned aerial systems, unmanned maritime systems, etc.) have made remote monitoring and data acquisition a reality. These novel techniques represent more affordable, practical solutions for the collection of spatial and temporal data sets in challenging environments.
These observational capabilities allow establishing connections with meteorological drivers, and give unprecedented insights on the underlying physics of the various Earth’s surface processes as well as on their interactions (chains of events). These capabilities are also of first interest for real time hazards monitoring and early warning purposes.
This session aims to bring together research on seismic methods as well as holistic, novel and/or in-development monitoring solutions to study Earth surface dynamics, particularly in challenging and hostile areas. We welcome contributions from a broad range of disciplines (including geomorphology, cryospheric sciences, seismology, natural hazards, volcanology, soil system sciences and hydrology) and applications (from landslides, snow avalanches, glaciers, cave systems, marine/lake and submarine systems, to volcano and permafrost monitoring).

Solicited presenter: Zack Spica - University of Michigan (USA)

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Co-organized by GI5/NH4/SM1
Convener: Anne SchöpaECSECS | Co-conveners: Wei-An ChaoECSECS, Velio CovielloECSECS, Andrea Manconi, Arnaud WatletECSECS, Zakaria GhazouiECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)