Union-wide
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions AS–GM
Disciplinary sessions GMPV–TS

Session programme

NH9

NH – Natural Hazards

NH9 – Natural Hazards & Society

NH9.1

The purpose of this session is to: (1) showcase the current state-of-the-art in global and continental scale natural hazard risk science, assessment, and application; (2) foster broader exchange of knowledge, datasets, methods, models, and good practice between scientists and practitioners working on different natural hazards and across disciplines globally; and (3) collaboratively identify future research avenues.
Reducing natural hazard risk is high on the global political agenda. For example, it is at the heart of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage Associated with Climate Change Impacts. In response, the last 5 years has seen an explosion in the number of scientific datasets, methods, and models for assessing risk at the global and continental scale. More and more, these datasets, methods and models are being applied together with stakeholders in the decision decision-making process.
We invite contributions related to all aspects of natural hazard risk assessment at the continental to global scale, including contributions focusing on single hazards, multiple hazards, or a combination or cascade of hazards. We also encourage contributions examining the use of scientific methods in practice, and the appropriate use of continental to global risk assessment data in efforts to reduce risks. Furthermore, we encourage contributions focusing on globally applicable methods, such as novel methods for using globally available datasets and models to force more local models or inform more local risk assessment.
At various scales from global to local, many efforts on the collection and use of loss data related to natural hazards (e.g. cyclone, earthquake, flood, wildfire) as well as open datasets have been made in recent years. The integration of these socioeconomic loss databases and open datasets for loss and risk assessment allow for effective use for both science and policy, and to create a community linking academia, government and insurance.
We also encourage you to submit a manuscript to the NHESS special issue on Global- and continental-scale risk assessment for natural hazards (https://www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/special_issue966.html). Deadline for submissions to the special issues is 31 December 2019.

Public information:
Public information:
The discussion of the displays in this session will be carried out in five blocks of 20 minutes. The authors who have indicated that they will present their Displays have been assigned to one of the blocks, and the time-schedule is as follows:
14:00-14:05: welcome and structure of the session
14:05-14:25: Finn Løvholt, Adrien Pothon, Krescencja Glapiak, Svetlana Stripajova
14:25-14:45: Jana Sillmann, Gaby Gründemann, Dominik Paprotny, Edwin Sutanudjaja
14:45-15:05: Oliver Wing (sollicited), Jerom Aerts, Dirk Eilander, Viet Dung Nguyen
15:05-15:25: Robert McCall, Samuel Eberenz, John Hillier, Maria Chertova
15:25-15:45: Claudia Wolff, Jacopo Margutti, Paola Salvati, Sara Lindersson
15:45: Closing remarks

Share:
Co-organized by AS4/HS2.5
Convener: Philip Ward | Co-conveners: Hannah Cloke, James DaniellECSECS, Hessel Winsemius, Jeroen Aerts, John K. HillierECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
NH9.3

This session aims at a better understanding of the vulnerability of the built environment (building envelop, building content and infrastructure) to different types of natural hazards. The main focus herein is to present different models and approaches to bridge the gap between ex-post loss and damage assessment and ex-ante predictive models. Studies on loss, damage and vulnerability often address different scales and spatial patterns obstructing the comparison and transfer of results and methods. Moreover, although existing models (matrices, indices and functions) demonstrate high variance, analysis of the associated uncertainties remains fragmentary. We invite contributions addressing vulnerability, loss and damage assessment and we provide a platform for scientific exchange and implementation for successful disaster risk reduction strategies focusing on building back better, mitigation and adaptation.

Share:
Co-organized by GM12
Convener: Maria Papathoma-Koehle | Co-conveners: Sven Fuchs, Margreth Keiler
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
NH9.4

Critical infrastructures and other technological systems such as transportation systems, telecommunications networks, pipelines, and reservoirs are at risk of natural hazards (e.g., landslides, earthquakes, floods) in many urban and rural areas worldwide. A key to safe and affordable operations of these types of infrastructure is an in-depth knowledge of their exposure and vulnerability to natural hazards and the impact of damage experienced either locally or across the network. Fundamental understanding of hazard and risk involves (i) systematic identification and mapping of potential infrastructure exposure, (ii) integrated assessment of impact as result of damage, repair and/or mitigation, (iii) indirect losses from infrastructure disruption, (iv) consideration of interactions between hazards and/or cascades of hazards. This session welcomes contributions with a focus on natural hazards risk assessment for critical infrastructures and technological systems, and compilation of databases to record impact and elements at risk. We also encourage abstracts addressing the development and application of tools for cost modeling. The session is dedicated to contributions with national, regional, and local perspective and intends to bring together experts from science and practice as well as young scientists. We encourage poster submissions, and foresee a lively poster session couple with oral talks, and will, if appropriate, have an associated splinter discussion session.

Public information:
We will first discuss the displays in the order of appearance in the programme.
In the last half hour we will discuss overarching questions we as defined from the displays in the uploaded session materials.
Overall we will have 10 minutes to discuss each display with uploaded additional material and 5 minutes to discuss each display without any uploaded additional material so that every display has an amount of time for discussion adequate to the material available. Supporting material can be uploaded until before the session. Please introduce first yourself as presenting author, in 1-2 sentences, and then your display in a similar way. If there are more authors present, they can highlight their contribution.
We welcome a lively discussion at the end of the #shareEGU week!
You are encouraged to participate in the discussion of the displays on the website, until the 31st of May, and put any questions for which the time of the chat is tight.

Share:
Convener: Elena Petrova | Co-convener: Maria Bostenaru Dan
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
NH9.5

The adverse effects of droughts are felt all over the globe. Droughts often lead to direct and indirect impacts on different sectors from local to global scales. The likelihood of such impacts, understood as drought risk, is caused by the combination of drought hazard and underlying socio-economic, environmental, and governance-related vulnerability factors. To support the identification and planning of drought risk reduction and adaptation options, information on the drivers, patterns, and dynamics of current and future drought risk is needed in all dimensions of drought hazard, exposure, and vulnerability. Nevertheless, the majority of recent drought research merely focuses on the hazard component.
Even though the effects of drought are widespread and well known, research focused on the different drought risk dimensions is lagging behind other natural hazard research. Common standards for risk analysis and its components, as well as for impact assessment are missing. Furthermore, common criteria to assess past and potential future drought impacts are not existent. Whether this is due to the difficulty to grasp the hazard, the lack of standards for vulnerability and risk assessment, the myriad of different sectors involved, or the complex web of impacts remains unknown.
This session addresses drought research beyond the hazard. This includes techniques to collect drought impact information, methods to assess vulnerability and drought risk for different sectors (e.g. agriculture, energy production, commercial shipping and tourism), at different spatial (local to global) and temporal (past trends, current patterns, future scenarios) scales. The session aims at pooling examples from around the globe, discussing best practices, existing challenges and potential ways forward. We welcome the full variety of thematic foci (hazard, exposure, vulnerability, risk, and impact assessment) based on qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods approaches. The session aims to bring together scientists and practitioners to evaluate the current state-of-the-art, foster drought risk research, establish a community of researchers and practitioners, and shape the future of drought vulnerability and risk research.

Share:
Convener: Veit BlauhutECSECS | Co-conveners: Michael HagenlocherECSECS, Isabel Meza, Gustavo Naumann
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
NH9.6

Increasing impacts from natural hazard events have been observed over the last decades in many regions. For the future, a further rise of losses and damages is expected as a consequence of anthropogenic climate change, increasing exposure and insufficient attention put to reducing vulnerabilities. Hence, the further reduction of disaster mortality, number of people affected, economic and intangible losses remain high priority targets for disaster risk management and adaptation as stipulated in the Paris Agreement and Sendai Framework with a view also towards learning from observed events. In this regard, the provisions of effective emergency response capabilities, as well as informed adaptation planning, are relevant issues on the research agenda.
Event-centered multi-disciplinary forensic investigations offer unique opportunities to gain insights and to better understand risk systems, dynamics including cascading effects as well as interactions between hazard, exposure and vulnerability as the key drivers of risk. Monitoring and documenting natural hazard events, its impacts and causes is an important element and a valuable basis for learning from disasters, revising current risk management strategies, as well as improving risk analyses and risk modelling. In addition, rapid impact and cost assessment of natural hazard events may provide decision-makers with richer information to make more informed and timely decisions on emergency measures and recovery. Another key aspect that needs to be better studied and communicated in line with forensics and rapid assessments is climate attribution of observed extreme events, such as heatwaves, storms or floods. This line of study has emerged as a particular field of event assessment concerned with understanding and quantifying to what extent anthropogenic climate forcing has changed the probability of occurrence or magnitude of events with high impact.
All of these mentioned pose important and interesting challenges to the research community across disciplines. For this aim this session invites contributions on a) event monitoring and disaster forensics, b) rapid impact and cost assessment of hazard events including new methods and technologies, and c) climate attribution for all types of natural hazards. Abstracts that highlight analyses of recent events, methodological advances or practical implementations with an inter-disciplinary perspective are particularly encouraged.

Share:
Convener: Kai Schröter | Co-conveners: Heidi Kreibich, Michael Kunz, Reinhard Mechler, Michael Szoenyi, Rui FigueiredoECSECS, Mario Lloyd Virgilio Martina
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
NH9.11

This session addresses knowledge exchange between researchers, the public, policy makers, and practitioners about natural hazards. Although we welcome all contributions in this topic, we are particularly interested in: (i) The communication (by scientists, engineers, the press, civil protection, government agencies, and a multitude other agencies) of natural hazards risk and uncertainty to the general public and other government officials; (ii) Approaches that address barriers and bridges in the science-policy-practice interface that hinder and support application of hazard-related knowledge; (iii) The teaching of natural hazards to university and lower-level students, using innovative techniques to promote understanding. We also are specifically interested in distance education courses on themes related to hazard and risk assessment, and disaster risk management, and in programmes for training in developing countries. We therefore solicit abstracts, particularly dynamic posters, on all aspects of how we communicate and educate the better understanding of natural hazards. We plan on having a PICO session to ensure a lively combination of discussion and poster presentation.

Share:
Co-organized by EOS7/GM12/HS13/SM3
Convener: Joel GillECSECS | Co-conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Alison SneddonECSECS, Adam D. Switzer, Faith TaylorECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
NH9.12

In recent years an increasing number of research projects focused on natural hazards (NH) and climate change impacts, providing a variety of information to end user or to scientists working on related topics.

The session aims at promoting new and innovative studies, experiences and models to improve risk management and communication about natural hazards to different end users.

End users such as decision and policy makers or the general public, need information to be easy and quickly interpretable, properly contextualized, and therefore specifically tailored to their needs. On the other hand, scientists coming from different disciplines related to natural hazards and climate change (e.g., economists, sociologists), need more complete dataset to be integrated in their analysis. By facilitating data access and evaluation, as well as promoting open access to create a level playing field for non-funded scientists, data can be more readily used for scientific discovery and societal benefits. However, the new scientific advancements are not only represented by big/comprehensive dataset, geo-information and earth-observation architectures and services or new IT communication technologies (location-based tools, games, virtual and augmented reality technologies, and so on), but also by methods in order to communicate risk uncertainty as well as associated spatio-temporal dynamic and involve stakeholders in risk management processes.

However, data and approaches are often fragmented across literature and among geospatial/natural hazard communities, with an evident lack of coherence. Furthermore, there is not a unique approach of communicating information to the different audiences. Rather, several interdisciplinary techniques and efforts can be applied in order to simplify access, evaluation, and exploration to data.

This session encourages critical reflection on natural risk mitigation and communication practices and provides an opportunity for geoscience communicators to share best methods and tools in this field. Contributions – especially from Early Career Scientists – are solicited that address these issues, and which have a clear objective and research methodology. Case studies, and other experiences are also welcome as long as they are rigorously presented and evaluated.

In cooperation with NhET (Natural hazard Early career scientists Team

Share:
Co-organized by GM2
Convener: Raffaele AlbanoECSECS | Co-conveners: Valeria CigalaECSECS, Emanuela Toto, Veronica Casartelli, Jonathan RizziECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
NH9.13

There is no point modelling hazards and risks if that information is of no use to decision makers (at both an individual and policy level including the scientific community, the public, governmental institutions, engineers, policy makers, emergency and resilience managers). We therefore have to ensure that we are providing the information that different stakeholders need, in a format and time frame that is of use to them, in a form that minimizes the possibility of misunderstanding or misperception, and that focuses on the needs of the respective stakeholder. In this session we aim at addressing the problems surrounding communicating hazard and risk of natural catastrophes. Important questions include: who are the key stakeholders for each kind of information that we can provide? What information does each require? How do we balance the trade-off between restricting the information provided to improve comprehension versus the ethics of withholding information? How to approach the boundary between providing information and providing advice? How do we communicate the different uncertainties (both epistemic and aleatory)? What can be learned about the communication of geospatially- and temporally-dynamic data from other fields (such as meteorology, military defence etc) and how should we communicate in ongoing crises, in particular during unexpected changes in the development of catastrophic events? How do we ensure our communications are trustworthy? What are the metrics of success in such communications? We will be considering all time frames and stages of hazard assessment from long-term maps and planning to emergency warning and rapid loss assessment when an event occurs. This includes all possible communication channels (e.g. scientific publications, public or press announcements, social networks, TV, radio, newsletters) and/or content types (e.g. text, video, graphics). We solicit contributions from all fields with the aim of bringing together a variety of researchers to share their experiences from their respective fields.

Public information:
Please join us for the online chat on Monday at 10:45 CEST. You are encouraged to stay for the whole duration of the session, but there is a schedule available showing the timings when each presentation will be discussed (15 minutes per presentation).

Thank you!

Share:
Convener: Danijel Schorlemmer | Co-conveners: Rémy Bossu, Sarah Dryhurst, Alexandra Freeman
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
HS4.2

Drought and water scarcity are important issues in many regions of the Earth. While an increase in the severity and frequency of droughts can lead to water scarcity situations, particularly in regions that are already water-stressed, overexploitation of available water resources can exacerbate the consequences of droughts. In the worst case, this can lead to long-term environmental and socio-economic impacts. It is, therefore, necessary to improve both monitoring and sub-seasonal to seasonal forecasting for droughts and water availability and to develop innovative indicators and methodologies that translate the information provided into effective drought early warning and risk management. This session addresses statistical, remote sensing and physically-based techniques, aimed at monitoring, modelling and forecasting hydro-meteorological variables relevant to drought and/or water scarcity. These include, but are not limited to, precipitation, snow cover, soil moisture, streamflow, groundwater levels, and extreme temperatures. The development and implementation of drought indicators meaningful to decision-making processes, and ways of presenting and explaining them to water managers, policymakers and other stakeholders, are further issues that are addressed. The session aims to bring together scientists, practitioners and stakeholders in the fields of hydrology and meteorology, as well as in the field of water resources and/or risk management; interested in monitoring, modelling and forecasting drought and water scarcity, and in analyzing their interrelationships, hydrological impacts, and the feedbacks with society. Particularly welcome are applications and real-world case studies in regions subject to significant water stress, where the importance of drought warning, supported through state-of-the-art monitoring and forecasting of water resources availability is likely to become more important in the future. Contributors to the session are invited to submit papers to the Special Issue (SI) entitled "Recent advances in drought and water scarcity monitoring, modelling, and forecasting", to be published in the open-access journal Natural Hazard and Earth System Sciences (https://www.natural-hazards-and-earth-system-sciences.net/special_issues/schedule.html). Submission is open until 30 July 2020, for manuscripts that are not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

Public information:
A tutorial video on "how to see and reply to comments on your display" is available for all participants at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTCPKDmgSVw

Share:
Co-organized by NH9
Convener: Brunella Bonaccorso | Co-conveners: Carmelo Cammalleri, Athanasios Loukas, Micha Werner
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
HS4.5

This interactive session aims to bridge the gap between science and practice in operational forecasting for different water-related natural hazards. Operational (early) warning systems are the result of progress and innovations in the science of forecasting. New opportunities have risen in physically based modelling, coupling meteorological and hydrological forecasts, ensemble forecasting and real time control. Often, the sharing of knowledge and experience about developments are limited to the particular field (e.g. flood forecasting or landslide warnings) for which the operational system is used.

The focus of this session will be on bringing the expertise from different fields together as well as exploring differences, similarities, problems and solutions between forecasting systems for varying natural hazards. Real-world case studies of system implementations - configured at local, regional and national scales - will be presented, including trans-boundary issues. An operational warning system can include, for example, monitoring of data, analysing data, making forecasts, giving warning signals and suggesting response measures.

Contributions are welcome from both scientists and practitioners who are involved in developing operational forecasting and/or management systems for water-related natural or man-made hazards, such as flood, drought, tsunami, landslide, hurricane, hydropower, pollution etc.

Share:
Co-organized by NH9
Convener: Michael Cranston | Co-conveners: Céline Cattoën-Gilbert, Femke Davids, Ilias Pechlivanidis
Displays
| Attendance Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
HS7.5

Extreme hydro-meteorological events drive a number of hydrologic and geomorphic hazards, (such as floods, landslides and debris flows) which pose a significant threat to modern societies on a global scale. The continuous increase of population and urban settlements in hazard-prone areas in combination with evidence of changes in extreme weather events lead to a continuous increase of the risk associated with weather-induced hazards. To improve resilience and to design more effective mitigation strategies, we need to better understand the aspects of vulnerability, risk, and triggers that are associated with these hazards.

This session aims to gather contributions dealing with various hydro-meteorological hazards that address the aspects of vulnerability analysis, risk estimation, impact assessment, mitigation policies and communication strategies. Specifically, we aim to collect contributions from the academia, the industry (e.g. insurance) and government agencies (e.g. civil protection) that will help identify the latest developments and ways forward for increasing the resilience of communities at local, regional and national scales, and proposals for improving the interaction between different entities and sciences.

Contributions focusing on, but not limited to, novel developments and findings on the following topics are particularly encouraged:

- Physical and social vulnerability analysis and impact assessment of precipitation-related hazards.
- Advances in the estimation of socioeconomic risk from precipitation-induced hazards.
- Characteristics of hydro-meteorological patterns leading to high-impact events.
- Evidence on the relationship between hydro-meteorological patterns and socio-economic impacts.
- Hazard mitigation procedures.
- Communication strategies for increasing public awareness, preparedness, and self-protective response.
- Impact-based forecast and warning systems.

Keywords: vulnerability analysis, risk estimation, impact assessment, mitigation strategies, precipitation induced hazards, pluvial floods.

Share:
Co-organized by NH9
Convener: Efthymios Nikolopoulos | Co-conveners: Francesco Marra, Nadav PelegECSECS, Federica Remondi, Isabelle Ruin
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
ITS1.4/HS4.8

The Sendai Framework for disaster risk reduction (SFDRR) and its seventh global target recognizes that increased efforts are required to develop risk-informed and impact-based multi-hazard early warning systems. Despite significant advances in disaster forecasting and warning technology, it remains challenging to produce useful forecasts and warnings that are understood and used to trigger early actions. Overcoming these challenges requires understanding of the reliability of forecast tools and implementation barriers in combination with the development of new risk-informed processes. It also requires a commitment to create and share risk and impact data and to co-produce impact-based forecasting models and services. To deal with the problem of coming into action in response to imperfect forecasts, novel science-based concepts have recently emerged. As an example, Forecast-based Financing and Impact-based Multi-Hazard Early Warning Systems are currently being implemented operationally by both governmental and non-governmental organisations in several countries as a result of increasing international effort by several organizations such as the WMO, World Bank, IFRC and UNDRR to reduce disaster losses and ensuring reaching the objectives of SFDRR. This session aims to showcase lessons learnt and best practices on impact-based multi-hazards early warning system from the perspective of both the knowledge producers and users. It presents novel methods to translate forecast of various climate-related and geohazards into an impact-based forecast. The session addresses the role of humanitarian agencies, scientists and communities at risk in creating standard operating procedures for economically feasible actions and reflects on the influence of forecast uncertainty across different time scales in decision-making. Moreover, it provides an overview of state-of-the-art methods, such as using Artificial Intelligence, big data and space applications, and presents innovative ways of addressing the difficulties in implementing forecast-based actions. We invite submissions on the development and use of operational impact-based forecast systems for early action; developing cost-efficient portfolios of early actions for climate/geo-related impact preparedness such as cash-transfer for droughts, weather-based insurance for floods; assessments on the types and costs of possible forecast-based disaster risk management actions; practical applications of impact forecasts.

Share:
Co-organized by AS4/NH9/SM3
Convener: Marc van den Homberg | Co-conveners: Bapon Fakhruddin, Andrea FicchìECSECS, Gabriela Guimarães NobreECSECS, Annegien Tijssen, David MacLeodECSECS, Maurine Ambani, Alison SneddonECSECS
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GI2.8

The session gathers geoscientific aspects such as dynamics, reactions, and environmental/health consequences of radioactive materials that are massively released accidentally (e.g., Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents, wide fires, etc.) and by other human activities (e.g., nuclear tests).

The radioactive materials are known as polluting materials that are hazardous for human society, but are also ideal markers in understanding dynamics and physical/chemical/biological reactions chains in the environment. Thus, the radioactive contamination problem is multi-disciplinary. In fact, this topic involves regional and global transport and local reactions of radioactive materials through atmosphere, soil and water system, ocean, and organic and ecosystem, and its relation with human and non-human biota. The topic also involves hazard prediction and nowcast technology.

By combining 34 years (> halftime of Cesium 137) monitoring data after the Chernobyl Accident in 1986, 9 years dense measurement data by the most advanced instrumentation after the Fukushima Accident in 2011, and other events, we can improve our knowledgebase on the environmental behavior of radioactive materials and its environmental/biological impact. This should lead to improved monitoring systems in the future including emergency response systems, acute sampling/measurement methodology, and remediation schemes for any future nuclear accidents.

The following specific topics have traditionally been discussed:
(a) Atmospheric Science (emissions, transport, deposition, pollution);
(b) Hydrology (transport in surface and ground water system, soil-water interactions);
(c) Oceanology (transport, bio-system interaction);
(d) Soil System (transport, chemical interaction, transfer to organic system);
(e) Forestry;
(f) Natural Hazards (warning systems, health risk assessments, geophysical variability, countermeasure);
(g) Measurement Techniques (instrumentation, multipoint data measurements);
(h) Ecosystems (migration/decay of radionuclides).

The session consists of updated observations, new theoretical developments including simulations, and improved methods or tools which could improve observation and prediction capabilities during eventual future nuclear emergencies. New evaluations of existing tools, past nuclear contamination events and other data sets also welcome.

Public information:
Here is instruction of a live chat,
(1) Convener’s summary at the beginning of Chat 10:45-11:00
(2) We then go each presentation for 5 minutes including discussion.
(3) Each presenter posts their own "a few sentence summary within 80 words" in total, and the discussion. Omit any greeting to save time.
(4) To save time, we even offer to post your summary when we introduce your talk if you send me before hand
Live chat schedule
10:45 Convener summary
— we present one highlight slide from each presentation and give audience to search for presentation to deeply look into.
11:00 10066 Mykola Talerko et al
11:05 15257 Joffrey Dumont Le Brazidec et al
11:10 233 Sheng Fang et al
11:15 5844 Elena Korobova et al
11:20 2252 Misa Yasumiishi et al
11:25 13220 Yuichi Onda et al (solicited/Highlights)
11:30 13965 Fumiaki Makino et al
11:35 12301 Michio Aoyama et al
11:40 22136 Yasuhito Igarashi et al
11:45 12465 Hikaru Iida et al
11:50 19250 Mark Zheleznyak et al
11:55 12477 Yoshifumi Wakiyama et al
12:00 3175 Michio Aoyama et al (solicited)
12:05 11813 Yayoi Inomata and Michio Aoyama
12:10 12627 Daisuke Tsumune et al
12:15 21319 Susumu Yamada (Masahiko Machida) et al
12:20 6987 Hikaru Miura et al
12:25 Closing remark

The session gathers geoscientific aspects such as dynamics, reactions, and environmental/health consequences of radioactive materials that are massively released accidentally (e.g., Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents, wide fires, etc.) and by other human activities (e.g., nuclear tests).

In addition to hazardous aspect for human society, the radioactive materials are used as ideal markers in understanding dynamics and physical/chemical/biological reactions chains in the environment. This multi-disciplinary session gathers all these aspect.

Share:
Co-organized by AS4/BG1/ERE4/GM12/NH9
Convener: Daisuke Tsumune | Co-conveners: Nikolaos Evangeliou, Yasunori IgarashiECSECS, Liudmila KolmykovaECSECS, Masatoshi Yamauchi
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
ITS1.5/NH9.21

Disasters caused by natural hazards often lead to significant and long-lasting disruptions of economic, social and ecological systems. To improve both ex-ante disaster risk reduction and ex-post recovery, increasing attention is placed on strengthening the “disaster resilience” of communities, cities, regions and countries. However, a lack of empirical data and evidence, a high diversity in assessment and measurement approaches as well as various definitions of disaster resilience make it difficult to establish a solid understanding of what contributes to disaster resilience and how it can be measured. This hinders targeted resilience strengthening investments and actions across all levels, that are increasingly demanded in the context of climate change adaptation and sustainable development.

This session aims to discuss concepts and frameworks that improve the understanding of economic, social and ecological resilience to various natural hazards (e.g. floods, droughts, wildfires) as well as to review current frameworks and tools that aim to measure disaster resilience. We invite submissions addressing process- and outcome-based approaches to assess or measure disaster resilience, as well as studies using remote sensing or other innovative approaches such as predictive models aiming to quantify disaster resilience. We particularly encourage presentations on operationalized and applied resilience assessment frameworks, case studies using new data sets to measure resilience as well new tools and approaches to engage with decision makers, practitioners and the general public. We also welcome submissions from governments at all levels, the development and humanitarian sector as well as practitioners that effectively work for the hazard affected communities both from the developed and developing world.

Public information:
During the live chat we will go through all displays that have been uploaded in order of appearance. To decrease confusion during the chat session, we will discuss the displays one by one and have an overall discussion at the end. Authors will provide a short summary of their work, followed by 5 minutes during which all participants can read/listen to the presentation materials and another 5 minutes (max.) for questions to the authors. We will close the session with a joint discussion on the challenges and opportunities related to resilience to natural hazard studies.

Share:
Co-organized by HS12
Convener: Viktor RözerECSECS | Co-conveners: Emilie Etienne, Adriana Keating, Finn LaurienECSECS, Colin McQuistan
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
ITS5.6/NH9.22

Globally, there is increased concern for the potential impacts of extreme climate events in terms of losses and damage to people, assets & infrastructure, property and society as a whole. Plenty of evidence provided by, e.g., the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the scientific literature, but also by the insurance sector, supports these concerns, indicating clearly that both, overall and insured losses and damages are on the rise, and that a major part of these developments can be attributed to climate change.
New multi-hazard and multi-risk models, catastrophe (CAT) models, tools, and services aimed at providing reliable and probabilistic climate information to a broad range of public and economic sectors are currently being developed in close collaboration with users. Innovations in this regard can provide the means to, e.g., better understand costs and benefits of adaptation and more accurately underwrite risk by insurance and re-insurance companies, who serve as key implementers in increasing societies’ resilience and recovery from extreme events. Such services are crucial in order to facilitate effective and evidence-based adaptation planning by for example cities, regional authorities and other sectors.
This session invites contributions that: (1) highlight the current state-of-the-art in climate change hazard and risk assessment related to extremes and high impact events such as floods, storms, droughts and heat waves, including compound events; (2) demonstrate the applicability and added-value of such analyses (or tools based thereupon) for stakeholders and practitioners with a particular focus on insurance and adaptation in different sectors; and (3) foster discussions on new scientific methodologies, good practices and emerging standards between scientists and practitioners across disciplines and application areas. Papers related to all aspects of climate hazard and/or (economic) risk assessment and attribution covering all geographical areas are welcomed, regardless of whether they are focused on single hazards (risks), multiple hazards (risks), or a combination or cascade of hazards (risks). Contributions related to projects funded under EU H2020, Copernicus Climate Change Services (C3S), ERA4CS, JPI Climate and other larger scale climate service programmes are especially encouraged.
This session is endorsed by the European Climate Research Alliance (ECRA)’s Collaborative Programme on High Impact Events and Climate Change.

Share:
Co-organized by CL5/HS12
Convener: Fred Fokko Hattermann | Co-conveners: Elin AndréeECSECS, Hilppa Gregow, Claire Souch, Max SteinhausenECSECS, Aleksandra BorodinaECSECS, Symeon Koumoutsaris, Jessica Turner
Displays
| Attendance Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
ITS1.10/NH9.27

In this session, we invite contributions to explore diverse experiences with inter- and transdisciplinary research and practice, that is specifically applied in the mountain context. Taking mountains as complex social-ecological systems, they provide a concrete and spatially-defined contexts in which to explore how global change phenomena manifests and how it poses challenges and opportunities for communities and society in general.

Addressing societal concerns, and finding suitable solutions with regards to associated impacts of global change in mountains, requires and inter- and transdisciplinary (IT-TD) approach to research and practice. We invite contributions based on empirical research and/or practical experience with IT-TD, to critically reflect on these practices in the mountains context and learn from experiences that explicitly address societal grand challenges such as (but not limited to) climate change impacts and adaptation, transformations to sustainability, disaster risk reduction, or transitions to low carbon economies. We welcome contributions depicting research experiences in European mountain regions, other mountain regions around the world, as well as contributions from Early Career Researchers.

The session is led and coordinated by the Mountain Research Initiative (MRI) with expectations to be able to draw from this session as inputs for the formulation of future research agendas and coordination of research collaborations in mountain regions, worldwide.

www.mountainresearchinitiative.org

Public information:
In this session, we invite contributions to explore diverse experiences with inter- and transdisciplinary research and practice, that is specifically applied in the mountain context. Taking mountains as complex social-ecological systems, they provide a concrete and spatially-defined contexts in which to explore how global change phenomena manifests and how it poses challenges and opportunities for communities and society in general.

Addressing societal concerns, and finding suitable solutions with regards to associated impacts of global change in mountains, requires and inter- and transdisciplinary (IT-TD) approach to research and practice. We invite contributions based on empirical research and/or practical experience with IT-TD, to critically reflect on these practices in the mountains context and learn from experiences that explicitly address societal grand challenges such as (but not limited to) climate change impacts and adaptation, transformations to sustainability, disaster risk reduction, or transitions to low carbon economies. We welcome contributions depicting research experiences in European mountain regions, other mountain regions around the world, as well as contributions from Early Career Researchers.

The session is led and coordinated by the Mountain Research Initiative (MRI) with expectations to be able to draw from this session as inputs for the formulation of future research agendas and coordination of research collaborations in mountain regions, worldwide.

www.mountainresearchinitiative.org

Share:
Co-organized by EOS4/CL4/CR7/GM7
Convener: Carolina Adler | Co-convener: Aino Kulonen
Displays
| Attendance Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
ITS2.17/SSS12.2

Human interaction with the environment has gone through several stages of evolution. Being a product of the natural evolution of living organisms in the biosphere, Homo sapiens as a species has evolved in the geochemical conditions of the virgin biosphere. The rapid development of intellectual abilities of this genus allowed, first, to survive in adverse environmental conditions around the whole world, then, to cultivate the land, transform the entire system of biocenoses, and now to create a new habitat for man exclusively. The result was a significant geochemical transformation of the virgin biosphere, but a kind of punishment for the achieved progress was the emergence of a number of endemic diseases of a geochemical nature. Nowadays a variety of anthropogenic sources of pollution and their location in various natural geochemical conditions require not only constant monitoring of the chemical state of soil, water, air and food products, but also the development of spatially differentiated approaches to assessing the risk of provoked diseases. To solve this problem it is necessary concertedly interpreting a geochemical and medical information in order to assess the risks to human health associated with modern natural and anthropogenic geochemical features in urban and rural habitats. During session we propose to discuss:
1) global trends of health transformation in new geochemical environment of modern noosphere;
2) criteria for determining pollution level depending on environmental and geochemical constrains;
3) new approaches to assess the risk of diseases of geochemical nature in different countries;
4) the problem of mapping the risk zones, related to negative medical effects due to deficiency or excess of certain chemical elements or compounds.
Session co-sponsored by the European Association of Geochemistry.

Public information:
Human interaction with the environment has gone through several stages of evolution. Man as a species first survived in adverse environmental conditions around the world, then he began to cultivate the land, exploit other species and develop industry, changing the structure and composition of natural ecosystems, and now creates a new habitat exclusively in accordance with his own requirements. This activity leads to significant chemical pollution of the environment at the local, and in some cases at the regional level, which leads to disruption of natural food chains. This process is followed by the negative biological reactions of living organisms, including the man himself. These reactions and, in particular, endemic diseases of a geochemical nature can be regarded as a kind of punishment for the progress made. Emerging environmental problems require not only constant monitoring of the chemical state of soil, water, air and food products and identification of anthropogenic induced negative reactions, but also the development of spatially differentiated approaches to assessing the risk of triggered negative reactions and diseases. During our session, we will discuss:
1) global trends in health status in the new geochemical environment of the modern noosphere (the anthropogenic stage of biosphere evolution);
2) methods and criteria for determining the level of environmental pollution by metals, pesticides, radionuclides and pharmaceutical substances;
3) new approaches to assessing the risk of pollution and diseases of a geochemical nature in different countries;
4) the problems of identifying and mapping risk zones.
We kindly invite all interested parties to our session.

Share:
Co-organized by EOS4/AS4/BG2/GM12/GMPV10/HS13/NH9, co-sponsored by EAG
Convener: Elena Korobova | Co-conveners: Maria Manuela Abreu, Jaume Bech, Glenda Garcia-Santos, Liudmila KolmykovaECSECS, Virginia Aparicio, Manfred Sager
Displays
| Attendance Tue, 05 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
ITS5.9/EOS4.14

World-wide an increasing number of research projects focus on the challenges associated with changes in the Arctic regions. Whereas these often have a natural and physical science focus, this session focuses on trans-disciplinary approaches to study the multiple phenomena associated with global warming, especially but not exclusively in Arctic regions. Another focus is to understand better how to tackle these in large, trans-disciplinary research projects, initiatives and programs (e.g. HORIZON2020 Nunataryuk, INTAROS and the T-MOSAIC program of the International Arctic Research Council, NSF Navigating the New Arctic), as well as communicating results effectively to the public in terms of outreach and education. Contributions are invited, but are not limited, to the following themes:
• science communication, education and outreach tools, and co-production of knowledge
• integration of social and natural science approaches
• indigenous and collaborative approaches to adaptation and mitigation, equitable mitigation, and risk perception
• socio-economic modelling in relation to Arctic environmental change,
• examining the impacts of permafrost thaw and other phenomena on health and pollution as well as infrastructure (and consequences of the built environment).

One of the aims of this session is to bring together researchers from both social and natural sciences who are involved or interested in reaching out to stakeholders and the general public, and share successful experiences. Examples from past, ongoing and future initiatives that include traditional indigenous knowledge and scientific tools and techniques are welcome.

This session merged from

ITS5.9/EOS4.14
Trans-disciplinary aspects of researching permafrost thaw: science communication, integration, monitoring, modelling and risk perception
Co-organized by CL4/CR4/GM7/HS12/NH9
Convener: Peter Schweitzer | Co-conveners: Annett Bartsch, Susanna Gartler

EOS4.1
Where human and natural systems meet: promoting innovative tools for Arctic outreach and education
Convener: Terenzio zenone | Co-conveners: Frederic Bouchard, Stein Sandven, Ylva Sjöberg, Donatella zona

CR4.5
Towards collaborative frameworks for permafrost research that incorporate northern principles: challenges and opportunities
Convener: Peter Morse | Co-conveners: Ryley Beddoe, Hugh O'Neill, Ashley Rudy, Greg Sieme

Share:
Co-organized by CL4/CR4/GM7/HS12/NH9
Convener: Peter Schweitzer | Co-conveners: Susanna GartlerECSECS, Annett Bartsch, Terenzio zenone, Frederic Bouchard, Stein Sandven, Donatella Zona, Ylva Sjöberg
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
ITS1.2/CL5.9

Weather and climate services involve the production, translation, transfer, and use of scientific information for decision-making. They include long term climate projections, monthly to seasonal forecasts and daily weather forecasts. They are particularly useful (i) for several climate sensitive sectors such as agriculture, water resources, health, energy, disaster risk reduction and (ii) in developing countries where vulnerability to climate change and weather shocks is high. This interdisciplinary session aims at showing tools, results, methodologies that could lead in fine to an operational improvement of WCS in developing countries. It focuses not only on models improvement but also on how to interact with end-users, assess WCS added value, broadcast information, avoid inequalities access, involve the private sector etc. The session will focus particularly on feedbacks and results from different case studies located in the global South.

Share:
Co-organized by EOS4/AS4/HS12/NH9
Convener: Philippe Roudier | Co-conveners: Pauline Dibi Kangah, Seyni Salack, Ibrahima Sy, Catherine Vaughan
Displays
| Attendance Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)