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GI – Geosciences Instrumentation & Data Systems

Programme Group Chair: Pietro Tizzani

MAL20-GI

The Christiaan Huygens Medal was established by the Geosciences Instrumentation and Data Systems Division to recognise significant contributions in fields within the scope of the division. The medal is awarded for an innovation, development or discovery that has had major impact in its field, or for a series of contributions, during an extended period, that has led to significant progress in the tecnologies develop and advanced method system analysis Earth Science context. The Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Awards (formerly Division Outstanding Young Scientists Awards) recognise scientific achievement made by an Early Career Scientist in the field(s) covered by the GI division.

Convener: Pietro Tizzani | Co-convener: Raffaele Castaldo
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Tue, 19:00
DM10
Division meeting for Geosciences Instrumentation & Data Systems (GI)
Convener: Pietro Tizzani
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Tue, 12:45

GI1 – General sessions on geoscience instrumentation

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Vira Pronenko, Raffaele Castaldo

GI1.1

The Open Session on Geosciences Instrumentation is the European forum with an open call for professional conference papers in the field of Geosciences Instrumentation, Methods, Software and Data Systems. The session aims to inform the scientific and engineering geosciences communities about new and/or improved instrumentation and methods, and their related new or existing applications. The session also deals with new ways of utilizing observational data by novel approaches and the required data infrastructure design and organization.

The session is open to all branches of geoscience measurement techniques, including, but not limited to, optical, electromagnetic, seismic, acoustic and gravity. The session is intended as an open forum and discussion between representatives of different fields within geosciences is strongly encouraged. Past experience has shown that such mutual exchange and cross-fertilization between areas have been very successful and can open up for a breakthrough in frontier problems of modern geosciences.

The session is also open for applications related to environmental monitoring and security providing, like archeological surveys, rubbish deposit studies, unexploded ordnance and/or mines detection, water dam inspection, seismic hazards monitoring, etc.

Convener: Vira Pronenko | Co-conveners: Pietro Tizzani, Francesco Soldovieri, Raffaele Castaldo, Nina Zaronikola, Thomas Wallmach
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 0.96/97
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 10:45
ITS1.15/GI1.3

Space-based measurements of the Earth System, including its atmosphere, oceans, land surface, cryosphere, biosphere, and interior components, require extensive prelaunch and post-launch calibration and validation activities to evaluate scientific accuracy, characterise uncertainties and ensure the fitness for purpose of the geophysical information provided throughout lifetime of satellite missions. This stems from the need to demonstrate unambiguously that space-based measurements, which are typically based on engineering measurements by the detectors (e.g. photons), are sensitive to and can be used to reliably retrieve the geophysical and/or biogeochemical parameters of interest across the Earth.

Most geophysical parameters vary in time and space, and the retrieval algorithms used must be accurate and tested under the representative range of conditions encountered. Satellite missions also benefit from the availability of precursor data made available from other satellite missions, field campaigns, and/or surface-based measurement networks that are used in the definition of geophysical products and for the development and testing of the retrieval algorithms prior to launch during the satellite and ground segment development. Post-launch calibration and validation over the lifetime of missions assure that any long-term variation in observation can be unambiguously tied to the evolution of the Earth system. Such activities are also critical in ensuring that measurements from different satellites can be inter-compared and used seamlessly to create long-term multi-instrument/multi-platform data sets, which serve as the basis for large-scale international science investigations into topics with high societal or environmental importance.

This session seeks presentations on the use of surface-based, airborne, and/or space-based observations to develop precursor data sets and support both pre- and post- launch calibration/validation and retrieval algorithm development for space-based satellite missions measuring our Earth system. A particular but not exclusive focus will be on collaborative activities carried out jointly by NASA and ESA as part of their Joint Program Planning Group Subgroup on provision of precursor data sets for future ESA, NASA, and related partner missions, and the full range of pre- and post-launch calibration and validation and field activities for these satellite projects.

Convener: Malcolm W. J. Davidson | Co-conveners: Jack Kaye, Mark Drinkwater
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.24
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 10:45
NH9.11 EDI

Natural radioactivity fully affects our environment as a result of cosmic radiation from space and terrestrial sources from soil and minerals in rocks containing primordial radionuclides as Uranium, Thorium and Potassium. Among the terrestrial sources, Radon (222Rn) gas is considered the major source of ionising radiation exposure to the population and an indoor air pollutant due to its harmful effects on human health (cancerogenic, W.H.O.). Also, artificial radionuclides from nuclear and radiation accidents and incidents provide an additional contribution to the environmental radioactivity.
This session embraces all the aspects and challenges of environmental radioactivity including geological surveys, mineral and space resources exploration, atmosphere tracing including greenhouse gases and pollutant, groundwater contamination, with a specific focus on radon hazard and risk assessment.
Studies about the use of fallout radionuclides as environmental tracers and the relevance of the radioactivity for public health, including the contamination from Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), are welcome.
Contributions on novel methods and instrumentation for environmental radioactivity monitoring including portable detectors, airborne and drones’ surveys and geostatistical methods for radioactivity mapping are also encouraged.

Co-organized by GI1
Convener: Eleonora Benà | Co-conveners: Virginia Strati, Alessandra Sciarra, Anita Erőss, Eric Petermann
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 0.15
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00
G2.7 EDI | PICO

This session combines two key aspects of geoscience research. Firstly, the potential of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) will be explored, with a focus on small and mass market devices. They are used in various geosciences such as geodesy, hydrology, meteorology and similar topics. Contributions deal with instrumentation, innovative applications, algorithms and sensor calibration.

Secondly, the session will address recent advances and future challenges in thermospheric and ionospheric research, with a focus on space weather modelling and prediction. We investigate the interconnected systems that influence total electron content (TEC), plasma density and thermospheric neutral density. To address these interrelations, impacts, and applications, the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) Focus Area on Geodetic Space Weather Research was implemented into the structure of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG). All relevant research and contributions on solar-Earth interactions and the effects of space weather on TEC and electron density are encouraged.

This joint session clusters diverse contributions that highlight the challenges and opportunities in these dynamic areas and helps to understand the geophysical phenomena that shape our world.

Co-organized by GI1
Convener: Balaji Devaraju | Co-conveners: Tobias Kersten, Franziska Koch, Jens-Andre Paffenholz, Ehsan Forootan, Claudia Borries, Maike Schumacher
PICO
| Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 1
Fri, 08:30
GM3.1 EDI

Recent advances in image collection, e.g. using unoccupied aerial vehicles (UAVs), and topographic measurements, e.g. using terrestrial or airborne LiDAR, are providing an unprecedented insight into landscape and process characterization in geosciences. In parallel, historical data including terrestrial, aerial, and satellite photos as well as historical digital elevation models (DEMs), can extend high-resolution time series and offer exciting potential to distinguish anthropogenic from natural causes of environmental change and to reconstruct the long-term evolution of the surface from local to regional scale.
For both historic and contemporary scenarios, the rise of techniques with ‘structure from motion’ (SfM) processing has democratized data processing and offers a new measurement paradigm to geoscientists. Photogrammetric and remote sensing data are now available on spatial scales from millimetres to kilometres and over durations of single events to lasting time series (e.g. from sub-second to decadal-duration time-lapse), allowing the evaluation of event magnitude and frequency interrelationships.
The session welcomes contributions from a broad range of geoscience disciplines such as geomorphology, cryosphere, volcanology, hydrology, bio-geosciences, and geology, addressing methodological and applied studies. Our goal is to create a diversified and interdisciplinary session to explore the potential, limitations, and challenges of topographic and orthoimage datasets for the reconstruction and interpretation of past and present 2D and 3D changes in different environments and processes. We further encourage contributions describing workflows that optimize data acquisition and processing to guarantee acceptable accuracies and to automate data application (e.g. geomorphic feature detection and tracking), and field-based experimental studies using novel multi-instrument and multi-scale methodologies. This session invites contributions on the state of the art and the latest developments in i) modern photogrammetric and topographic measurements, ii) remote sensing techniques as well as applications, iii) time-series processing and analysis, and iv) modelling and data processing tools, for instance, using machine learning approaches.

Co-organized by BG2/CR5/GI1/SSS10
Convener: Amaury Dehecq | Co-conveners: Katharina Anders, Anette Eltner, Livia Piermattei, Benoît Smets
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Tue, 10:45
ESSI2.9 EDI

Cloud computing has emerged as the dominant paradigm, supporting practically all industrial applications and a significant number of academic and research projects. Since its inception and subsequent widespread adoption, migrating to cloud computing has presented a substantial challenge for numerous organisations and enterprises. Leveraging cloud technologies to process big data in proximity to their physical location represents an ideal use case. These cloud resources provide the requisite infrastructure and tools, especially when accompanied by high-performance computing (HPC) capabilities.

Pangeo (pangeo.io) is a global community of researchers and developers that tackle big geoscience data challenges in a collaborative manner using HPC and Cloud infrastructure. This session's aim is threefold:
(1) Focuses on Cloud/Fog/Edge computing use cases and aims to identify the status and the steps towards a wider cloud computing adoption in Earth Observation and Earth System Modelling.
(2) to motivate researchers who are using or developing in the Pangeo ecosystem to share their endeavours with a broader community that can benefit from these new tools.
(3) to contribute to the Pangeo community in terms of potential new applications for the Pangeo ecosystem, containing the following core packages: Xarray, Iris, Dask, Jupyter, Zarr, Kerchunk and Intake.

We warmly welcome contributions that detail various Cloud computing initiatives within the domains of Earth Observation and Earth System Modelling, including but not limited to:
- Cloud federations, scalability and interoperability initiatives across different domains, multi-provenance data, security, privacy and green and sustainable computing.
- Cloud applications, infrastructure and platforms (IaaS, PaaS SaaS and XaaS).
- Cloud-native AI/ML frameworks and tools for processing data.
- Operational systems on the cloud.
- Cloud computing and HPC convergence and workload unification for EO data processing.

Also, presentations using at least one of Pangeo’s core packages in any of the following domains:
- Atmosphere, Ocean and Land Models
- Satellite Observations
- Machine Learning
- And other related applications

We welcome any contributions in the above themes presented as science-based in other EGU sessions, but more focused on research, data management, software and/or infrastructure aspects. For instance, you can showcase your implementation through live executable notebooks.

Co-organized by AS5/CL5/GI1/OS4
Convener: Tina Odaka | Co-conveners: Vasileios Baousis, Stathes Hadjiefthymiades, Anne Fouilloux, Alejandro Coca-Castro, Pier Lorenzo Marasco, Guillaume Eynard-Bontemps
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 0.51
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
ESSI3.3 | PICO

In recent decades, the use of geoinformation technology has become increasingly important in understanding the Earth's environment. This session focuses on modern open-source software tools, including those built on top of commercial GIS solutions, developed to facilitate the analysis of mainly geospatial data in various branches of geosciences. Earth science research has become more collaborative with shared code and platforms, and this work is supported by Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and shared virtual research infrastructures utilising cloud and high-performance computing. Contributions will showcase practical solutions and applications based on FOSS, cloud-based architecture, and high-performance computing to support information sharing, scientific collaboration, and large-scale data analytics. Additionally, the session will address the challenges of comprehensive evaluations of Earth Systems Science Prediction (ESSP) systems, such as numerical weather prediction, hydrologic prediction, and climate prediction and projection, which require large storage volumes and meaningful integration of observational data. Innovative methods in open frameworks and platforms will be discussed to enable meaningful and informative model evaluations and comparisons for many large Earth science applications from weather to climate to geo in the scope of Open Science 2.0.

Co-organized by GI1, co-sponsored by SSI and AGU
Convener: Kaylin Bugbee | Co-conveners: Christopher Kadow, Ionut Cosmin Sandric, Paul Kucera, George P. Petropoulos
PICO
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 4
Fri, 10:45

GI2 – Data networks and analysis

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Masatoshi Yamauchi, Andrea Vitale

GI2.3 EDI

The session gathers multi-disciplinary transport processes triggered by human-made disturbances in the natural system. Understanding the transport processes, tracers, drivers, and possible consequences are the main concerns in understanding dynamics For example, radioactive materials from nuclear power plant accidents (e.g., Fukushima and Chernobyl) are known as polluting hazardous materials, but are also ideal markers in understanding the transport processes (dynamics and physical/chemical/biological reaction chains) from the atmosphere to the soil-water system and then to the ocean and biosystem.

With water as the key carrier after the fallout, the marker aspect particularly promoted studies in the soil-water system, e.g., effects of artificial change in the entire soil-water interface (watersheds) from the drivers to the possible consequences. Such studies help risk/quality management of human-made forcing to the nature, such as possible nuclear power plants accident (risk is increasing in Ukraine and Yellow Sea).


The following specific topics will particularly discussed:
(a) Atmospheric Input (transport and deposition of radionuclides);
(b) Responses in Soil and Forestry System (interaction and transfer to organic system);
(c) Hydrologic drivers for transport (soil-water interactions);
(d) Oceanology (long-range transport);
(e) Natural Hazards (risk assessment in possible accidents);
(f) Measurement Techniques (advanced instrumentation).

Co-organized by HS13
Convener: Daisuke Tsumune | Co-conveners: Fi-John Chang, Jr-Chuan Huang, Roman Bezhenar, Junko Takahashi, Hikaru Miura, Masatoshi Yamauchi
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 0.51
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 16:15
GI2.4 EDI

In recent years, technologies based on Artificial Intelligence (AI), such as image processing, smart sensors, and intelligent inversion, have garnered significant attention from researchers in the geosciences community. These technologies offer the promise of transitioning geosciences from qualitative to quantitative analysis, unlocking new insights and capabilities previously thought unattainable.
One of the key reasons for the growing popularity of AI in geosciences is its unparalleled ability to efficiently analyze vast datasets within remarkably short timeframes. This capability empowers scientists and researchers to tackle some of the most intricate and challenging issues in fields like Geophysics, Geochemistry, Seismology, Hydrology, Planetary Science, Remote Sensing, and Disaster Risk Reduction.
As we stand on the cusp of a new era in geosciences, the integration of artificial intelligence promises to deliver more accurate estimations, efficient predictions, and innovative solutions. By leveraging algorithms and machine learning, AI empowers geoscientists to uncover intricate patterns and relationships within complex data sources, ultimately advancing our understanding of the Earth's dynamic systems. In essence, artificial intelligence has become an indispensable tool in the pursuit of quantitative precision and deeper insights in the fascinating world of geosciences.
For this reason, aim of this session is to explore new advances and approaches of AI in Geosciences.

Convener: Andrea Vitale | Co-conveners: Jie Xu, Luigi Bianco, Giacomo Roncoroni, Ivana Ventola, J ZhangZhou, Guillaume Siron
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.94/95
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00
GM2.2 EDI | PICO

Sediment transport is a fundamental component of all geomorphic systems (including fluvial, aeolian, coastal, hillslopes and glacial), yet it is something that we still find surprisingly difficult both to monitor and to model. Robust data on where and how sediment transport occurs are needed to address outstanding research questions, including the spatial and temporal controls on critical shear stress, the influence of varying grain size distributions, and the impact of large magnitude events. Recent developments have provided a) new opportunities for measuring sediment transport in the field; and b) new ways to represent sediment transport in both physical laboratory models and in numerical models. These developments include (but are not limited to) the application of techniques such as seismic and acoustic monitoring, 3D imaging (e.g. CT and MRI scanning), deployment of sensors such as accelerometers, replication of field topography using 3D printing, use of luminescence as a sediment tracer, remote sensing of turbidity, discrete numerical modelling, and new statistical approaches.

In this session we welcome contributions from all areas of geomorphology that develop new methods for monitoring and modelling all types of sediment transport, or that showcase an application of such methods. Contributions from ECRs and underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged.

Co-organized by GI2
Convener: Rebecca Hodge | Co-conveners: Catherine Sanders, Anshul Yadav, James Christie
PICO
| Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 3
Mon, 10:45
NH9.2

Increasing effects of climate change, urbanization, and increased interconnectedness between ecological, physical, human, and technological systems pose major challenges to disaster risk management in a globalised world. Economic losses from natural hazards and climate change are still increasing, and the recent series of catastrophic events across the world have manifested the need to shift from single-hazard and sectoral approaches to new and innovative ways of assessing and managing risks across sectors, borders and scales based on a multi-hazard and systemic risk lens.

Addressing the above challenges, this session aims to gather the latest research, empirical studies, and observation data that are useful for understanding and assessing the complex interplay between multiple natural hazards and social vulnerabilities to: (i) identify persistent gaps, (ii) propose potential ways forward, and (iii) inform resilience building strategies in the context of global change.

Co-organized by GI2/HS13
Convener: Johanna Mård | Co-conveners: Korbinian Breinl, Michael Hagenlocher, Giuliano Di Baldassarre
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.15
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
BG3.26

Treeline ecotones are transition zones between closed forest and climatically tree-less areas. Due to their climate sensitivity they are considered sentinels of global-change effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Vegetation patterns in treeline ecotones are constrained by multiple factors acting at different spatial and temporal scales. Climatic treeline positions are strongly influenced by global- and regional-scale climatic patterns, but other factors such as soil, meso-topography, and natural and anthropogenic disturbances dominate patterns at the landscape scale. Moreover, species competition/facilitation and micro-topographic heterogeneity are key factors for vegetation dynamics at finer scales. A current trend in vegetation dynamics both at latitudinal and altitudinal treelines is the accelerated encroachment of trees and shrubs, caused by interactions between climate and land-use changes. This encroachment can have far-reaching consequences for the biodiversity and functioning of mountain and subarctic ecosystems. Spatial vegetation patterns likely hold important information about the factors and processes (e.g. seed dispersal, safe-site characteristics, biotic interactions) that control this encroachment, yet few of treeline research deals with the spatial component of patterns and processes. For this reason, it is crucial to improve our understanding of spatial processes and the spatial signals of global change impacts in treeline ecotones and there is a need for a multiscale and multidisciplinary approach, to plan better adaptation strategies and monitor biodiversity trends in such sensitive ecosystems and to better link treeline metrics to ecological questions. Specifically, remote sensing can be combined with field data and modeling to capture the heterogeneity and variability of ecological conditions in treeline ecotones and couple observed spatial patterns to ecological processes. In this session, we invite contributions from all fields of research related to either the detection and description of treeline spatial and temporal patterns or the processes that may be relevant for these patterns.

Public information:

SPECIAL ISSUE ON BIOGEOSCIENCES JOURNAL: A special issue based on the session topic is scheduled and will be focused on observational and modeling studies along latitudinal and elevational treelines of the globe.

Co-organized by ESSI4/GI2
Convener: Matteo Garbarino | Co-conveners: Maaike Bader, Alessandro Vitali, Johanna Toivonen, Nicolò Anselmetto
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.23
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Mon, 16:15
ESSI3.5 EDI

In the Environmental and Solid Earth research fields, addressing complex scientific and societal challenges with holistic solutions within the dynamic landscape of data-driven science underscores the critical need for data standardisation, integration and interoperability. Just as humans communicate effectively to share insights, machines must seamlessly exchange data. The high-capacity computing services allow for the discovery and processing of large amounts of information, boosting the integration of data from different scientific domains and allowing environmental and solid Earth research to thrive on interdisciplinary collaboration and on the potential of big data.
As earth and environmental researchers, our expertise is essential in addressing natural and ecological problems, which extends to our engagement with operational infrastructures (the Environmental Research Infrastructures-ENVRIs, the European Open Science Cloud-EOSC, the EGI Federation, among others). Data repositories, e-service providers and other research or e-infrastructures support scientific development with interoperability frameworks and technical solutions, to effectively bridge the traditional boundaries between the disciplines, and enhance machine-to-machine (M2M) interactions, enabling data and service interoperation. 
Join this session to explore real-world examples from earth and environmental scientists (from atmosphere, marine, ecosystems or solid earth), data product developers, data scientists and engineers. Whether you've navigated infrastructures, addressed data analytics, visualisation and access challenges, or embraced the transformative potential of digital twins. Whether you've gained expertise in data collection, quality control and processing, employed infrastructures to expedite your research, or participated in Virtual Access and/or Transnational Access programs to expand your horizons. We invite researchers with diverse expertise in data-driven research to showcase impactful scientific use cases and discuss interdisciplinary methodologies or propose best practices with successful interoperability frameworks. Join us as we explore ways to enhance the FAIRness of earth and environmental data, fostering open science within and beyond our fields. 

Co-organized by GI2
Convener: Angeliki Adamaki | Co-conveners: Fabio Feriozzi, Federica Tanlongo, Jacco Konijn, Anca Hienola, Marta Gutierrez, Magdalena Brus
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.16
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 14:00
NP4.1 EDI

Time series are a very common type of data sets generated by observational and modeling efforts across all fields of Earth, environmental and space sciences. The characteristics of such time series may however vastly differ from one another between different applications – short vs. long, linear vs. nonlinear, univariate vs. multivariate, single- vs. multi-scale, etc., equally calling for specifically tailored methodologies as well as generalist approaches. Similarly, also the specific task of time series analysis may span a vast body of problems, including
- dimensionality/complexity reduction and identification of statistically and/or dynamically meaningful modes of (co-)variability,
- statistical and/or dynamical modeling of time series using stochastic or deterministic time series models or empirical components derived from the data,
- characterization of variability patterns in time and/or frequency domain,
- quantification various aspects of time series complexity and predictability,
- identification and quantification of different flavors of statistical interdependencies within and between time series, and
- discrimination between mere correlation and true causality among two or more time series.
According to this broad range of potential analysis goals, there exists a continuously expanding plethora of time series analysis concepts, many of which are only known to domain experts and have hardly found applications beyond narrow fields despite being potentially relevant for others, too.

Given the broad relevance and rather heterogeneous application of time series analysis methods across disciplines, this session shall serve as a knowledge incubator fostering cross-disciplinary knowledge transfer and corresponding cross-fertilization among the different disciplines gathering at the EGU General Assembly. We equally solicit contributions on methodological developments and theoretical studies of different methodologies as well as applications and case studies highlighting the potentials as well as limitations of different techniques across all fields of Earth, environmental and space sciences and beyond.

Co-organized by BG2/CL5/EMRP2/ESSI1/G1/GI2/HS13/SM3/ST2
Convener: Reik Donner | Co-conveners: Tommaso Alberti, Giorgia Di Capua, Simone Benella, Nina Kukowski
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room K2
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Wed, 10:45

GI3 –  Planetary Atmosphere and Ocean instrumentation system

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Bernard Foing

GI3.3 EDI

This session focuses on technological advances and applications of planetary, atmospheric and active acoustic water column instrumentation and data, as well as their novel or established applications.
The session is open to
1. All branches of planetary and space measurement tools and techniques, including but not limited to optical, electromagnetic, seismic, acoustic, particle and gravitational methods.
2. Improvements in instrument hardware or in methods of data acquisition, processing, or visualization of acoustic water column data. Abstract focusing on using these data for biological, geological and oceanographic (including lacustrine) purposes are also welcomed. Some non-exhaustive examples include system calibration; optimizing acquisition protocols; (open-source) code for data processing and visualization; and research case studies on the detection of kelp, gas seepage or suspended sediment in the water column.

Co-sponsored by IAF and COSPAR
Convener: Thomas Vandorpe | Co-conveners: Bernard Foing, Caroline Haslebacher, Thomas Hermans, Alexandre Schimel, Marc Roche
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 0.94/95
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 14:00
CR5.1 EDI | PICO

Earth’s cryosphere demonstrates itself in many shapes and forms, but we use similar geophysical and in-situ methods to study its wide spectrum: from ice-sheets and glaciers, to firn and snow, sea ice, permafrost, and en-glacial and subglacial environments.

In this session, we welcome contributions related to all methods in cryospheric measurements, including: advances in radioglaciology, active and passive seismology, geoelectrics, acoustic sounding, fibre-optic sensing, GNSS reflectometry, signal attenuation, and time delay techniques, cosmic ray neutron sensing, ROV and drone applications, and electromagnetic methods. Contributions can include field applications, new approaches in geophysical or in-situ survey techniques, or theoretical advances in data analysis processing or inversion. Case studies from all parts of the cryosphere, including snow and firn, alpine glaciers, ice sheets, glacial and periglacial environments, alpine and arctic permafrost as well as rock glaciers, or sea ice, are highly welcome.

This session will give you an opportunity to step out of your research focus of a single cryosphere type and to share experiences in the application, processing, analysis, and interpretation of different geophysical and in-situ techniques in these highly complex environments. This session has been running for over a decade and always produces lively and informative discussion. We have a successful history of PICO and other short-style presentations - submit here if you want a guaranteed short oral!

Co-organized by EMRP2/GI3/SM6
Convener: Jonas K. Limbrock | Co-conveners: Franziska Koch, Saskia Eppinger, Polona Itkin, Winnie Chu
PICO
| Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 4
Thu, 08:30
ESSI1.3 EDI | PICO

Modern challenges of climate change, disaster management, public health and safety, resources management, and logistics can only be addressed through big data analytics. A variety of modern technologies are generating massive volumes of conventional and non-conventional geospatial data at local and global scales. Most of this data includes geospatial data components and is analysed using spatial algorithms. Ignoring the geospatial component of big data can lead to an inappropriate interpretation of extracted information. This gap has been recognised and led to the development of new spatiotemporally aware strategies and methods.

This session discusses advances in spatiotemporal machine learning methods and the software and infrastructures to support them.

Co-organized by GI3
Convener: Christopher Kadow | Co-conveners: Hanna Meyer, Jens Klump, Ge Peng
PICO
| Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 4
Mon, 16:15

GI4 – Earth Observation systems & instrumentation

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officers: Susi Pepe, Giuseppe Solaro

GI4.1 EDI

This session invites contributions on the latest developments and results in lidar remote sensing of the atmosphere, covering • new lidar techniques as well as applications of lidar data for model verification and assimilation, • ground-based, airborne, and space-borne lidar systems, • unique research systems as well as networks of instruments, • lidar observations of aerosols and clouds, thermodynamic parameters and wind, and trace-gases. Atmospheric lidar technologies have shown significant progress in recent years. While, some years ago, there were only a few research systems, mostly quite complex and difficult to operate on a longer-term basis because a team of experts was continuously required for their operation, advancements in laser transmitter and receiver technologies have resulted in much more rugged systems nowadays, many of which are already operated routinely in networks and several even being fully automated and commercially available. Consequently, also more and more data sets with very high resolution in range and time are becoming available for atmospheric science, which makes it attractive to consider lidar data not only for case studies but also for extended model comparison statistics and data assimilation. Here, ceilometers provide not only information on the cloud bottom height but also profiles of aerosol and cloud backscatter signals. Scanning Doppler lidars extend the data to horizontal and vertical wind profiles. Raman lidars and high-spectral resolution lidars provide more details than ceilometers and measure particle extinction and backscatter coefficients at multiple wavelengths. Other Raman lidars measure water vapor mixing ratio and temperature profiles. Differential absorption lidars give profiles of absolute humidity or other trace gases (like ozone, NOx, SO2, CO2, methane etc.). Depolarization lidars provide information on the shapes of aerosol and cloud particles. In addition to instruments on the ground, lidars are operated from airborne platforms in different altitudes. Even the first space-borne missions are now in orbit while more are currently in preparation. All these aspects of lidar remote sensing in the atmosphere will be part of this session.

Convener: Andreas Behrendt | Co-conveners: Paolo Di Girolamo, Silke Gross, Joelle Buxmann, Diego Lange Vega
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Mon, 16:15
GI4.3

The proposed session is inspired by the themes that have characterized the 20-year research activity of the colleague Mariarosaria Manzo, to whose memory is dedicated the session.
Particularly, the scientific contributions provided by Mariarosaria Manzo have been mainly focused on the exploitation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for Earth surface deformation retrieval and investigation through the application of the original Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) technique and the development of advanced DInSAR methods focused on generation of deformation time series, as for the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach.
Several application scenarios and test sites have been investigated in the works of Mariarosaria Manzo, focused on Earth deformations induced by: Earthquakes, Volcanic activities, landslides and anthropic activities, such as excavations, just to quote some examples. Moreover, her activities have been also devoted to the assessment of the performance of advanced DInSAR techniques and on the development of new algorithmic solutions.
The session is thus intended to focus on the latest analyses achieved through the development and/or the exploitation of DInSAR methods for Earth observation; potential application scenarios include, but are not limited to, those mentioned above.

Convener: Riccardo Lanari | Co-convener: Stefano Perna
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.16
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 16:15
GI4.4 EDI

In the face of escalating natural disasters and the evolving consequences of climate change, novel technologies are urgently needed to comprehend their full impact. Uncrewed Aerial Systems (UAS), equipped with a diverse array of sensors, are emerging as powerful tools in this endeavor. By gathering high-resolution data, UAS enable researchers to study environmental changes, whether driven by climate or other factors. This session fosters collaboration and knowledge exchange by focusing on (i) UAS configuration and specifications for the study of the topsoil and sub soil (not only the physical properties of soil, vegetation and rocks, but also the anthropically induced effects); (ii) the changes/impacts with the use of UAS, for those doing remote measurement with the ability to control every segment of the remote sensing chain; (iii) development of a procedure for the management and processing of the data flow obtained from the new sensors integrated with the UAS; (iv) deliver a white paper on international community-sourced best practices for UAS operations in volcanic regions; (v) and finally, the session is also intended to give space for presentation and discussion on the overview of sensors that are being used and will be used, with hinting at the development of new sensors, which can help geoscientists develop new ideas and electromagnetic landscapes.
Shifting focus to the landscape of smart cities, the session also highlights the growing interest in non-invasive methods for studying urban environments. These methods play a vital role in developing sustainable and resilient cities capable of withstanding the challenges posed by climate change and natural hazards. The session delves into advancements in: (i) innovative sensors designed for dense urban geophysical networks; (ii) great attention will be devoted to innovative sensors (e.g. fiber optics, MEMS) for dense and distributed geophysical network array, to the exploitation of opportunistic data, to the use of AI-based algorithms and machine learning technologies for data analysis, to the monitoring based on augmented-vision strategies and to new methods for 3D and 4D tomographic inversion and visualization. (iii) monitoring strategies incorporating augmented-vision and 3D/4D visualization; (iv) the crucial role of applied geophysics in constructing smart and resilient cities; (v) supporting and promoting the activities of Early Career Scientists (ECS).

Convener: Vincenzo De Novellis | Co-conveners: Misha Krassovski, Jean Dumoulin, Ilaria Catapano, Vincenzo Lapenna, Francesco Zucca, Filippo Accomando
Orals
| Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 0.94/95
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 10:45
GM2.6 EDI

Transport of sediments in geophysical flows occurs in mountainous, fluvial, estuarine, coastal, aeolian and other natural or man-made environments on Earth, while also shapes the surface of planets such as Mars, Titan, and Venus. Understanding the motion of sediments is still one of the most fundamental problems in hydrological and geophysical sciences. Such processes can vary across a wide range of scales - from the particle to the landscape - which can directly impact both the form (geomorphology) and, on Earth, the function (ecology and biology) of natural systems and the built infrastructure surrounding them. In particular, feedback between fluid and sediment transport as well as interparticle interactions including size sorting are a key processes in surface dynamics, finding a range of important applications, from hydraulic engineering and natural hazard mitigation to landscape evolution and river ecology.

Specific topics of interest include (but are not restricted to):

A) particle-scale interactions and transport processes:
- mechanics of entrainment and disentrainment (for fluvial and aeolian flows)
- dry granular flows
- momentum (turbulent impulses) and energy transfer between turbulent flows and particles
- upscaling and averaging techniques for stochastic transport processes
- interaction among grain sizes in poorly sorted mixtures, including particle segregation

B) reach-scale sediment transport and geomorphic processes
- links between flow, particle transport, bedforms and stratigraphy
- discrete element modelling of transport processes and upscaling into continuum frameworks
- derivation and solution of equations for multiphase flows (including fluvial and aeolian flows)
- shallow water hydro-sediment-morphodynamic processes
- scouring around structures

C) large-scale, highly unsteady and complex water-sediment flows:
- flash floods, debris flows and landslides due to extreme rainfall
- natural and build dam failures and compound disasters (due to landslides, debris flow intrusion and downstream flooding)
- reservoir operation schemes and corresponding fluvial processes
- design of hydraulic structures such as fish passages, dam spillways, also considering the impact of sediment
- dredging, maintenance and regulation for large rivers and navigational waterways

This session is promoted by the IAHR committee on Experimental Methods and Instrumentation.

Co-organized by GI4/SSP3
Convener: Gordon Gilja | Co-conveners: Rui Miguel Ferreira, Thomas Pähtz, Zhixian Cao, Xiuqi Wang, Sjoukje de Lange
Orals
| Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–17:45 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X1
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X1
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 14:00
GM3.2 EDI

Geomorphometry, a science of quantitative land surface analysis, gathers various mathematical, statistical and image processing techniques to quantify morphological, hydrological, ecological and other aspects of a land surface. Geomorphometry and geomorphological mapping are essential tools for understanding landscape processes and dynamics on Earth and other planetary bodies. The rapid growth of available geospatial data available for morphometric analysis and opens up considerable possibilities for morphometric analysis from mapping new landforms to understand the underlying processes. It also presents unique challenges in data processing and analysis.
The typical input to geomorphometric analysis is a square-grid representation of the land surface - a digital elevation model (DEM). Global DEMs and the increasing availability of much finer resolution LiDAR and SFM high-resolution DEMs call for new analytical methods and advanced geo-computation techniques necessary to cope with diverse application contexts. Point clouds have increasing accuracy over complex scenes, characterized by high topographic variation in three (and four) dimensions, generating a shift in geomorphologists’ work.
This session welcomes studies of advanced geo-computation methods, including high-performance and parallel computing implementations. We welcome general, technical and applied studies of geomorphometry applications and landform mapping from any discipline (geomorphology, planetary science, natural hazards, computer science, and Earth observation). Examples are:
- Use of Digital Elevation, Terrain and Surface Models and point clouds
- High-resolution LiDAR, photogrammetry and satellite data
- Automated surface analysis, machine learning, new algorithms
- Earth's and planetary morphometry, surface changes
- Collecting or derivation of geospatial data products
- Tools for extraction and analysis of geomorphometric variables
- Mapping and morphometric analysis of landforms and landscapes
- Modeling natural hazards on the Earth's surface
- Marine Geomorphometry and bathymetry
- Geomorphometry for urban areas and cultural heritage
- Professional and industrial applications of Geomorphometry
Contributions on inter-disciplinary approaches are particularly encouraged. We also welcome professional, commercial and industrial applications of terrain/surface data and geomorphometric techniques, including software packages, to bridge the gap between academic researchers and industry.

Co-organized by GI4/NP4, co-sponsored by ISG
Convener: Massimiliano Alvioli | Co-conveners: Giulia Sofia, John K. Hillier, Stuart Grieve, Mihai Niculita
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X1
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 16:15
NH10.5 EDI

Natural hazards in the Earth system, such as earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, volcanic eruptions, cyclones, and extreme weather, primarily brew and occur in the lithosphere and troposphere, which often happen unexpectedly and impact human daily life. Tracing the atmospheric and ionospheric disturbances due to the hazards benefits nowcasting their occurrences. On the other hand, solar activities can induce geomagnetic storms that accompany the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and atmospheric disturbances, which impact satellite operation, global high-precision positioning and navigation, and damage the electric supply system near the Earth’s surface. Impacts of the hazards are not limited to a specific geosphere but often impact multiple geospheres, subsequently affecting daily life. Therefore, there is an urgent need for instrumental arrays to monitor useful signals, novel methodologies to retrieve associated data, and numerical simulations to understand the interaction between the lithosphere (hydrosphere), atmosphere, and space (LAS).

In this session, we invite scientists interested in studying the interaction between the lithosphere (hydrosphere), atmosphere, and space but it is not limited to natural hazards alone. The interaction between the multiple geospheres can be excited by numerous potential sources, ranging from lithospheric activities in the Earth’s interior to solar activities in the space beyond the Earth system. Observations of parameters in one geosphere interacting with others, methodologies for detecting signals related to changes in the other geospheres, and the construction of numerical models spanning multiple geospheres are all welcome. The session aims to integrate scientists studying distinct fields to improve and enhance our understanding of the LAS interactions. Ultimately, this research aims to mitigate the loss of human life and property coming with a higher risk of being affected by natural hazards from the Earth and space.

Co-organized by AS4/ESSI4/GI4
Convener: Chieh-Hung Chen | Co-conveners: Yen-Jung Wu, Yasuhide Hobara, Gilbert Pi, Min-Yang Chou
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room 1.14
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X4
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 14:00

GI5 – Earth surface and subsurface methods of investigation

Sub-Programme Group Scientific Officer: Jean Dumoulin

CR5.4 EDI

Radar is a prominent tool to study ice on Earth and is quickly becoming widespread in the study of other planetary bodies. In this session, we hope to bring together all those interested in radar to showcase their work, take inspiration from each other and develop new interdisciplinary collaborations. We aim for this session to encompass many targets, instruments and applications, including:

Targets: snow, firn, land ice, sea ice, lake ice, river ice and permafrost on Earth as well as the surfaces and interiors of Mars, Europa, The Moon, Titan, Venus, Small bodies, etc.
Instruments: airborne and spaceborne sounders, altimeters, SAR and passive microwave radiometers as well as drones, GPR, ApRES and other stationary radars, etc.
Acquisition and processing: hardware, passive measurements, datasets, algorithm development, etc.
Analysis and Interpretation techniques: reflectometry, interferometry, thermometry, specularity, EM simulations, etc.
Applications: surface-, englacial and basal structure, roughness, hydrology, geothermal heat flux, material properties, modeling, Earth and extraterrestrial synergies, etc.

We especially encourage the participation of Early Career Researchers and those from underrepresented groups.

Co-organized by GI5/PS7
Convener: Kirk M. Scanlan | Co-conveners: Anja Rutishauser, Christopher Gerekos, Marie G. P. Cavitte
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 1.34
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 16:15
HS8.2.10 EDI

Groundwater's strategic importance for water, energy, and food security is growing in the face of ongoing environmental changes. It is crucial to observe and correctly interpret ongoing subsurface groundwater storage and energy transfers in the currently rapidly changing environment, in order to sustainably manage groundwater resources. For example, time-series of groundwater temperature on decadal timescales observed in piezometers provide a record of subsurface changes that have led to an improved understanding of hydrogeological processes. While such observations can be incidental and provide important insights, dedicated observatories (e.g., LTER sites; https://lternet.edu) of subsurface change (water and energy) do provide more robust, long-term, spatially detailed information on groundwater resources, to enable in-depth studies to be carried out, land-use changes to be taken into account. While observations in ad-hoc settings and at observatories can be used to understand subsurface change on the local to regional scale and over decadal to centennial timescales, a phenomenon like offshore freshened groundwater, increasingly looked as a source for potable fresh water in arid coastal zones, can only be properly understood in the context of continental scale processes over millennial time-scales.
This session aims to illustrate this diversity in subsurface observations of water and energy transport processes in aquifer systems, especially in the context of changing climate and environmental conditions. This includes extreme short-lived events such as heatwaves, floods, and droughts, but also impacts of climate change and glaciation. These events can have a significant impact on aquifer functioning and deserve special attention to understand the resilience of the aquifer. We seek contributions on advances in the characterization of subsurface flow processes based on field observations and on-site experiments possibly combined with modelling approaches. The analysis of groundwater issues related to the consequences of anthropogenic activities is of particular interest. Studies that explore innovative and multidisciplinary approaches to quantify water and energy transfers, are also welcomed. This session is partly organized through a community effort support by the COST action OFFSOURCE (https://off-source.eu/).

Co-organized by ERE2/GI5
Convener: Victor Bense | Co-conveners: Agnès Rivière, Wei-Li Hong, Barret Kurylyk, Anne Jost, Susanne A. Benz, Ariel Thomas
Orals
| Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 3.16/17
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 19 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall A
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 14:00
NH4.1 EDI

From the real-time integration of multi-parametric observations is expected the major contribution to the development of operational t-DASH systems suitable for supporting decision makers with continuously updated seismic hazard scenarios. A very preliminary step in this direction is the identification of those parameters (seismological, chemical, physical, biological, etc.) whose space-time dynamics and/or anomalous variability can be, to some extent, associated with the complex process of preparation of major earthquakes.
This session wants then to encourage studies devoted to demonstrate the added value of the introduction of specific, observations and/or data analysis methods within the t-DASH and StEF perspectives. Therefore, studies based on long-term data analyses, including different conditions of seismic activity, are particularly encouraged. Similarly welcome will be the presentation of infrastructures devoted to maintain and further develop our present observational capabilities of earthquake related phenomena also contributing in this way to build a global multi-parametric Earthquakes Observing System (EQuOS) to complement the existing GEOSS initiative.
To this aim this session is not addressed just to seismology and natural hazards scientists but also to geologist, atmospheric sciences and electromagnetism researchers, whose collaboration is particular important for fully understand mechanisms of earthquake preparation and their possible relation with other measurable quantities. For this reason, all contributions devoted to the description of genetic models of earthquake’s precursory phenomena are equally welcome.

Co-organized by EMRP1/ESSI4/GI5, co-sponsored by JpGU and EMSEV
Convener: Valerio Tramutoli | Co-conveners: Pier Francesco Biagi, Carolina Filizzola