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Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions

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ITS

ITS – Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions

ITS1 – History and Philosophy of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences

ITS1.2/GD1.5/EOS3.4/GI1.7/GM1.8/GMPV1.9/SSP1.10/TS12.3 Media|ECS

Geoscience witnessed a flurry of major breakthroughs in the 19th and 20th century, leading to major shifts in our understanding of the Earth system. Such breakthroughs included new concepts, such as plate tectonics and sequence stratigraphy, and new techniques, like radiometric dating and remote sensing. However, the pace of these discoveries has declined, raising the question of whether we have now made all of the key geoscience breakthroughs. Put another way, have we reached “Peak Geoscience” and are we now in a time of synthesis, incremental development and consolidation? Or are there new breakthroughs on the horizon? If so what will these developments be?

One key remaining challenge is the management of the inherent uncertainties in geoscience. Despite the importance of understanding uncertainty, it is often neglected by interpreters, geomodellers and experimentalists. With ever-more powerful computers and the advent of big data analytics and machine learning, our ability to quantify uncertainty in geological interpretation, models and experiments will be crucial.

This session aims to bring together those with an interest in the future of geoscience. We welcome contributions from any field of geoscience which either demonstrate a new, disruptive geoscience breakthrough or provide insights into where the next breakthrough will come. We encourage contributions associated with uncertainty in geoscience models and data, machine learning or big data analytics.

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Co-organized as GD1.5/EOS3.4/GI1.7/GM1.8/GMPV1.9/SSP1.10/TS12.3
Convener: Andrew Davies | Co-conveners: Juan Alcalde, Helen Cromie, Lucia Perez-Diaz
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X2

ITS2 – Resources and the energy transition

ITS2.2/ERE4.4

Most of the world-class ore discoveries have been made close to the surface. Many of these large-tonnage deposits are mined out or are largely decreasing in production. Mineral exploration at depth is becoming one of the fundamental challenges for the exploration industry in this century. The sharp increase in demand for commodities driven by a growing population and technology-based society is coupled with the decrease in world-class ore deposit discoveries in the last three decades. This is setting the stage for an unprecedented scenario, that is, ensuring that the market supply for critical metals (Ni, Co, Au, PGE, etc.) is satisfied. This situation is becoming the driving force for a restructuring of mineral exploration paradigms. New technologies and methodologies are being developed; and, as a consequence, regions that were considered to be unfavourable for ore deposit exploration are now being reconsidered.

In this session, we invite research contributions show case or assist elucidating a better understanding of novel and innovative approaches to the search of mineral deposits for the future in new environments (e.g., at depth, bottom of the oceans, frontier regions, regolith-dominated terrains…), spanning from economic, environmental and technical challenges to greenfields or browndfields technologies and methodologies.

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Co-organized as ERE4.4
Convener: Ignacio Gonzalez-Alvarez | Co-conveners: Mário Gonçalves, Ana P. Jesus, Janina Wiszniewska
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room L7
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X1
ITS2.5/HS5.5.2/ERE8.3/GM8.6

Synergistic approaches to respond to water, food and energy increasing needs, incorporating the need to hinder impacts on the environmental (land) and socio-economic realities, are essential to attain the UN Sustainable Development Goals 2, 6, 7 and 15. Such nexus approach is highly challenging given the substantial and highly contextual interdependencies between sectors. It becomes more daunting if we consider the need to adapt to climate change.

In response to this global development challenge, this session brings together the community of engineers, scholars, scientists and decision makers, with a common interest on novel frameworks and methodologies for an integrated water resources management taking into account its connections to energy production, land use and impacts and societal implications in a context of climate change adaptation. We discuss improved approaches for water related nexus, which not only considers the effects in the geophysical system (water, sediment, landscape) but also further implications related to socio-economic and ecological spheres. The works presented contain conceptual and applied models with references to energy production, engineering response, management, nature protection, agriculture and society. New approaches to analyse and manage superficial water storage, essential to sustain and stabilize water supply, food and energy production, reduce hydro-climatological hazards, and adapt to climate change, are discussed as well.

More generally, the session presents integrated models for assessment and optimization which identify co-benefits and trade-offs between different Sustainable Development Goals at several spatial and temporal scales: global, regional and basin; and short, middle and long- term perspectives, respectively. Contributions integrate the impacts of climate change into long-term planning, dynamic adaptation or simulation models.

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Co-organized as HS5.5.2/ERE8.3/GM8.6
Convener: Mário J Franca | Co-conveners: Edward A. Byers, Andrey V. Mitusov, Gretchen Gettel, Germán Santos, Francesco Gardumi, Michelle van Vliet
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room L7
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall A
ITS2.7/HS11.71/BG1.37/ERE6.8/GMPV3.6

Geofluids (i.e. fluids located in the subsurface) are increasingly becoming of interest due to their significant role as natural resources. These fluids span a vast range of geological environments including groundwater drinking resources, shale gas and oil, deep/shallow geothermal resources and hydrothermal mineral resources. Despite being valuable resources, geofluids are both vulnerable to contamination or may themselves represent a potential source of contamination through externally-driven mechanisms, as in the case of shale gas extraction, CO2 leaking or land use for agriculture purposes. Ont he other hand geofluids themselves can be a source of natural contamination as in the geogenic contamination of groundwater resources containing elevated levels of trace elements including arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), and uranium (U), amongst others. Strategic management of geofluids and protection of geological resources related to them is indispensable for the future sustainable development of these societal and economically important resources. The characterization of geofluids and their behaviour in natural or artificial (human-driven) circumstances requires a deep understanding of complex physical, geochemical and microbiological processes. They are influenced directly by geological setting, structural evolution, and fluid flow systems.

The aim of this session is to foster scientific discussion between those with interest in a range of geofluid systems to better understand the role which these fluids have as socio-environmental and economic resources. The session emphasises the importance of lithological & mineralogical characterizationof various systems including in aquifers for a range of geogenic contaminants in groundwater, specifically addressing the source pathways and mobilisation mechanisms. The session also welcomes work including fluid flow, hydrology, geochemistry, environmental tracers, microbial investigations and both numerical and statistical modelling in support of fluid and resource management.

The session is supported by the RGFC-IAH (‘Regional Groundwater Flow Commission’ of International Association of Hydrogeologists) and the EU H2020 ENeRAG (‘Excellency Network Building for Comprehensive Research and Assessment of Geofluids’) project.

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Co-organized as HS11.71/BG1.37/ERE6.8/GMPV3.6, co-sponsored by RGFC-IAH
Convener: Daniele Pedretti | Co-conveners: Alex Russell, Ádám Tóth, Frank McDermott, Marie-Amélie Petre
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room L7
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall A

ITS3 – Contributions of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences to changes in society

ITS3.1/SSS1.4/EOS3.2/BG1.21/ESSI3.8/HS11.32/NH9.22 Media

Citizen science (the involvement of the public in scientific processes) is gaining momentum in one discipline after another, thereby more and more data on biodiversity, earthquakes, weather, climate, health issues among others are being collected at different scales that can extend the frontiers of knowledge. Successful citizen observatories can potentially be scaled up in order to contribute to larger environmental and policy strategies and actions (such as the European Earth Observation monitoring systems) and to be integrated in GEOSS and Copernicus. Making credible contributions to science can empower citizens to actively participate in environmental decision making, can raise awareness about environmental issues and can help bridge the science-society gap. Often, citizen science is seen in the context of Open Science, which is a broad movement embracing Open Data, Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Open Source, Open Methodology, and Open Peer Review to transparently publish and share scientific research - thus leveraging Citizen Science and Reproducible Research.

Both, open science in general and citizen science in particular, pose great challenges for researchers, and to support the goals of the various openness initiatives, this session looks at what is possible nowadays and what is ready for application in geosciences. Success stories, failures, best practices and solutions will be presented, in addition to various related networks. We aim to show how researchers, citizens, funding agencies, governments and other stakeholders can benefit from citizen science and open science, acknowledging the drawbacks and highlighting the opportunities available for geoscientists.

In this session, we are looking for successful approaches of working with citizen science and open science to bridge the gap between a multitude of stakeholders in research, policy, economy, practice and society at large by finding emerging environmental issues and empowering citizens. This session shall be an open space to exchange experiences and to present either successful examples or failed efforts. Learning from others and understanding what to adopt and what to change help the participants in their own undertakings and new initiatives, so that they become future success stories.

We want to ask and find answers to the following questions:
Which approaches can be used in Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences?
What are the biggest challenges and how to overcome them?
What kind of citizen scientist involvement and open science strategies exist?
How to ensure transparency in project results and analyses?
How to evaluate successful bridging of the science-society-gap?

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Co-organized as SSS1.4/EOS3.2/BG1.21/ESSI3.8/HS11.32/NH9.22
Convener: Taru Sandén | Co-conveners: Daniel Dörler, Steffen Fritz, Florian Heigl, Amanda Whitehurst, Martin Hammitzsch
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X1
ITS3.3/NH9.18/EOS4.4/HS11.20 | PICO Media

Natural hazards and the associated risk are in some cases a major hindrance to economic and social growth in economically developing countries. This is particularly evident for urban areas, since rapid and uncontrolled urbanization in hazard-prone regions may result in a significant increase in risk due to insufficient spatial planning, which sometimes does not correctly consider (if at all) the impact of natural hazards, and to inadequate building practices. This session will profile the challenges faced in the developing world when doing assessments of natural hazard and risk and designing mitigation strategies. Examples of these challenges include (i) a frequent lack of data, along with difficulties in collecting it, (ii) rapid and often unplanned urban development, with building practices often neglecting the potential hazards, (iii) less regulated nature-human interactions, (iv) limited resources and capacity to undertake the most appropriate prevention and mitigation actions and to actually respond to disastrous and extreme events, (v) climate change, and (vi) difficulties in communication between science, policy and decision makers, and the general public.
Submissions to this PICO session covering all relevant topics are welcome, including but not limited to: database and archive construction; modeling, monitoring and tools for natural hazard and risk assessment; conceptual understanding of multi-hazards and nature-technology interactions; response and mitigation strategies; and communications, policy and decision-making. We particularly welcome abstracts focusing on urban areas, as well as the participation of stakeholders to share their innovative theoretical and practical ideas and success stories of how risk can be understood and addressed across economically developing countries.

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Co-organized as NH9.18/EOS4.4/HS11.20
Convener: Faith Taylor | Co-conveners: Olivier Dewitte, Joel Gill, Andreas Günther, Bruce D. Malamud
PICOs
| Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
PICO spot 4
ITS3.5/PS1.6/BG1.47/CL3.11/ERE1.3/HS11.25 | PICO

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) (or Global Goals for Sustainable Development) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations Development Programme.The formal name for the SDGs is: "Transforming our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development." That has been shortened to "2030 Agenda." The goals are broad and interdependent, yet each has a separate list of targets to achieve. Achieving all 169 targets would signal accomplishing all 17 goals. The SDGs cover social and economic development issues including poverty, hunger, health, education, global warming, gender equality, water, sanitation, energy, urbanization, environment and social justice.
For this interdisciplinary session, we invite contributions discussing How Earth, Planetary and Space Scientists can address UN Sustainable Development Goals . We shall discuss the relevance of fields of research disciplines covered by EGU, and how they can inform and support society government bodies, and stakeholders for the SDGs.
The session will include invited and contributed oral papers, as well as interactive posters, and panel discussions.

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Co-organized as PS1.6/BG1.47/CL3.11/ERE1.3/HS11.25
Convener: Bernard Foing | Co-convener: Germaine Van der Sanden
PICOs
| Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
PICO spot 4
ITS3.6/NH9.17 Media

Over the past decades, many initiatives have been produced to archive the losses and datasets associated with natural perils events (EM-DAT, MunichRe NATCATservice, SwissRe Sigma, CATDAT, Dartmouth Flood Observatory etc.). On a European scale, much research has also been undertaken on a Europe-wide, country and subcountry level either using Desinventar or through other academic and insurer data archiving. However, these loss databases provide varying levels of parameters, data completeness, quality checks, spatial integration, and spatiotemporal limits. In addition, the types of data collection and definitions of loss often differ greatly between databases.

With over 3000 Open Data Initiatives around Europe (www.europeandataportal.eu/) and the World, the amount of data freely available is increasing, but censoring and data checks are required in order to ensure that the quality is reasonable. This similarly goes for online media archives and loss reporting. Even though some initial attempts have been made to connect different databases and stimulate consistency and open access (e.g. IRDR-DATA), this is a topic that needs to be explored further.

This session aims to advance efforts on loss data collection and provide a future inventory of socioeconomic loss databases for loss and risk analysis as well as to create a community linking academia, government and insurance.

Abstracts are welcomed in the following fields:-
- Socioeconomic loss databases for natural perils
- Infrastructure and sectoral loss archiving
- Online media initiatives for collecting loss data (e.g. twitter)
- Post-disaster loss analysis
- Online analysis of loss data or loss reporting
- Parametric risk transfer products
- GIS integration of past natural hazards event data
- Open data efforts for loss modelling
- Insurance loss data and loss archives
- Government post-disaster loss analysis and loss databases
- Other relevant loss-related research

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Co-organized as NH9.17
Convener: James Daniell | Co-conveners: Jeroen Aerts, John K. Hillier, Gero Michel, Harriette Stone
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X3
ITS3.7/CL5.10/EOS7.2

Climate services challenge the traditional interface between users and providers of climate information as it requires the establishment of a dialogue between subjects, who often have limited knowledge of each-other’s activities and practices. Increasing the understanding and usability of climate information for societal use has become a major challenge where economic growth, and social development crucially depends on adaptation to climate variability and change.

To this regard, climate services do not only create user-relevant climate information, but also stimulate the need to quantify vulnerabilities and come up with appropriate adaptation solutions that can be applied in practice.

The operational generation, management and delivery of climate services poses a number of new challenges to the traditional way of accessing and distributing climate data. With a growing private sector playing the role of service provider is important to understand what are the roles and the responsibilities of the publicly funded provision of climate data and information and services.

This session aims to gather best practices and lessons learnt, for how climate services can successfully facilitate adaptation to climate variability and change by providing climate information that is tailored to the real user need.
Contributions are strongly encouraged from international efforts (GFCS, CSP, ClimatEurope…); European Initiatives (H2020, ERA4CS, C3S, JPI-Climate…) as well as national, regional and local experiences.

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Co-organized as CL5.10/EOS7.2
Convener: Alessandro Dell'Aquila | Co-conveners: Marta Bruno Soares, Daniela Domeisen, Nube Gonzalez-Reviriego, Mathew Stiller-Reeve
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X5
ITS3.8/BG3.23/AS4.32/OS1.33

In spring and summer 2018, Central and Northern Europe faced a severe drought with rainfall deficits beginning as early as April and lasting until late August in some regions (partly combined with a heat wave in July and August). Due to higher spring temperatures and high radiation the Baltic Sea showed a very unusal low pCO2 signal since late April and a spectacular summer bloom this year. The impact on terrestrial ecosystems became obvious through crop failure and forest fires. This transdiciplinary session calls for scientific results from Earth Observation showing the impact of the drought and for presentations from the interface between science a climate action e.g. adaptation strategies, questions on measuring, reporting and verification of inventories or general communication of climate change to societies.

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Co-organized as BG3.23/AS4.32/OS1.33, co-sponsored by ICOS
Convener: Werner Leo Kutsch | Co-convener: Philippe Ciais
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall A
ITS3.9/GM6.1/ERE7.4/GMPV7.15/SSS13.29

Geodiversity is an interest for all geosciences, where the natural environment for our science is recorded and assessed. Geoheritage is the appreciation, valuation, and sustainable exploitation of part of this geodiversity for the good of the environment, for society and for science. Geodiversity and geoheritage provide essential links to other disciplines in the natural and social sciences, and they give geosciences a voice to the greater public and to local to global governance.
The EGU geodiversity and geoheritage session has been a large and vibrant meeting spot for a large diverse assemblage of geoscientists and stakeholders for over 5 years, growing with the increasing appreciation of the central role these topics have.
This EGU 2019 session aims to highlight the hottest issues and challenges pending or emerging, as well as inviting a broad range of topics, to engage in a far reaching discussion. As in previous years, we will hold a Splinter Meeting to further discuss hot topics, and will animate the poster session with a special picnic session.

Five main themes to tackle have been identified for 2019:

1) Society, climate change and geodiversity: the problems related to economic and environmental dynamics affecting geodiversity under changing climate and global development conditions. This topic has implications for and links to the IUGS RFG (Resourcing Future Generations) initiative and is a central theme for UNESCO Global Geoparks and World Heritage, and concerns also the management of all types of natural risk.

2) Geo- to ecosystem services and geoheritage: this follows from the first theme in exploring the possibility of developing a holistic and integrated approach to geodiversity, by considering geosystem services, in a perspective of sustainable management of geoheritage to the benefit of the whole environment.

3) Geodiversity, geosites and geoheritage assessments at multiple spatial scales: integrating data from global to local: the present lack of integration between global, regional and local geological and geomorphological data can limit the validity of geodiversity assessment and prevent its applicability for enhancement and protection of geoheritage. This subject relates to practical issues on different spatial scales for geodiversity immediately applicable to the protection of geodiversity, geoheritage and has links with the problems raised in the first two themes.

4) Virtual and Augmented Reality and Geoheritage: the strong innovation potential for this research field due to enhanced application of geoinformation technologies (GIS and Semantic Web). This use of global platforms, such as Google Earth, to outcrops scale augmented reality is a powerful research and educational tool that is developing fast. This theme will draw together demonstrations of the ongoing development of such techniques and their practical implementation into geodiversity and geoheritage sites.

5) Towards a fruitful integration/collaboration of international designations; this is a topic that we invite discussion about, and which is being hotly discussed between the major geoscience unions, associations, programmes and global instances like the UNESCO’s International Geoscience and Geoparks Programme and Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage, the IUGS International Geoheritage Commission and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, especially through the Geoheritage Specialist Group/WCPA. It will form a subject of the Splinter Meeting, where these major unions will be open to discuss the theme.

Geodiversity and Geoheritage attract a broad range of people from all sides of geosciences and therefore we invite all this diversity to participate in the session.

The session is co-sponsored by the Working Group on Geomorphosites and the Working Group on Landform Assessment for Geodiversity of the International Association of Geomorphologists; ProGEO, the European Association for the Conservation of the Geological Heritage; the IUGS International Commission on Geoheritage; the Geoheritage Specialist Group of the World Commission on Protected Areas of the International Union of Conservation of Nature, the International Lithosphere Program, and the IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic Geoheritage and Protected Volcanic Landscape.
The session is closely linked to the those of Geoheritage Stones, and to Volcano Resources.

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Co-organized as GM6.1/ERE7.4/GMPV7.15/SSS13.29
Convener: Marco Giardino | Co-conveners: Paola Coratza, Alicja Najwer, Karoly Nemeth, Benjamin van Wyk de Vries
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X2

ITS4 – Scientific challenges posed by global warming

ITS4.2/CL4.21/HS11.21/OS2.11 Media

Climate change in the Mediterranean region poses critical environmental issues and can affect many sectors of human activities. Contrasting climate trends, levels of exposure and vulnerability are present across this region with associated potential conflicts. Climate research is expected to contribute an increasingly precise information on the future climate and impacts of climate change in this region. A large set of instrumental records and climate proxies allows in many areas of the Mediterranean region to bridge present trends and past climate over a wide range of timescales. This session encourages contributions adopting a multidisciplinary approach and it aims to promote a dialogue between climatologists and researchers interested on the impacts of climate on human and natural systems. It aims at including contributions describing new scientific findings on the climate of the Mediterranean region, its dynamics, variability, change, and studies of climate related impacts on societies and ecosystems. The session considers different time scales (from paleoclimate to future model projections), different components (atmosphere, ocean, land and its hydrology) and factors (chemical, biological, anthropic) as well as highlights of sub-regional hotspots and climate processes.

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Co-organized as CL4.21/HS11.21/OS2.11
Convener: Piero Lionello | Co-conveners: Andrea Toreti, Heidi Webber
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room L7
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X5
ITS4.5/AS4.33/ERE8.1

International failure in curbing the global greenhouse gas emissions has sparked studies on diverse and largely hypothetical methods, known collectively as geoengineering, to intentionally mitigate climate change. At the same time, operational activities to modify weather, especially in terms of snow and rain enhancement, are taking place in more than 50 countries. Although these two topics are typically discussed separately, they are in many ways interlinked. Importantly, successful long-term weather modification and geoengineering would alter climatic conditions and the water cycle on local to regional scales.
In this session, the nexus between regional geoengineering and weather modification is discussed and analyzed. The importance of regional-scale modeling and experimental studies is specifically highlighted. All contributions are welcome, which investigate the various geoengineering and weather modification options from the local to the regional scale. Particularly encouraged are studies, which consider potential interlinkages between geoengineering and rain enhancement.

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Co-organized as AS4.33/ERE8.1
Convener: Hannele Korhonen | Co-conveners: Volker Wulfmeyer, Lulin Xue
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room L7
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X5
ITS4.6/CL3.09/ERE1.7/NH1.39 Media

Estimating the impact of climate change on both the natural and socio-economic environment plays an important role in informing a range of national and international policies, including energy, agriculture and health. Understanding these impacts, and those avoided, has never been more pertinent since the adoption of the 2015 Paris Agreement, which sought to hold “the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C, recognizing that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change".

Policies may aim to mitigate (i.e. reduce emissions), counteract (i.e. negative emissions) and/or adapt to anthropogenic climate change and it is equally important to quantify the impact of implementing these options. While rapid, deep mitigation is clearly a pre-requisite to success, delays to such measures imply a greater reliance upon large scale negative emissions technologies. Those based on land are likely to face competing pressure from wide ranging economic activity, and knowledge of these interactions and synergies is limited. Similarly while adaptation options are wide ranging, the uses of nature-based solutions, which often provide mitigation co-benefits and are often highly cost effective, are under-researched and rarely integrated into overall natural hazard or climate change risk management strategies.

Furthermore, the methods used to evaluate impact in the climate context are many and varied, including empirical, econometric and process-based. These methods continue to evolve implying that the assessment of impact may depend upon the analytical approach chosen.

This inter- and transdisciplinary session aims to draw together scientists, developing climate-impact evaluation methods, evaluating the impact (or avoided impact) of anthropogenic climate change upon natural and socio-economic environments, investigating the potential for mitigation and counteraction options to reduce long term risk, and studying the value of multiple adaptation options to stakeholders when planning how to manage vulnerability.

Invited speaker: Sonia Seneviratne

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Co-organized as CL3.09/ERE1.7/NH1.39
Convener: Luke Jackson | Co-conveners: Paul Hudson, Dann Mitchell, Fabian Stenzel
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room L7
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X5
ITS4.7/NH1.26/AS4.48/CL2.08/HS4.3.3/NP9.9 Media

The occurrence of extremes such as droughts, flash floods, hailstorms, storm surges and tropical storms can have significant and sometimes catastrophic consequences to society. However, not all low probability weather/climate events will lead to “high impacts” on human or natural systems or infrastructure. Rather, the severity of such events depend also intrinsically on the exposure, vulnerability and/or resilience to such hazards of affected systems, including emergency management procedures. Similarly, high impact events may be compounded by the interaction of several, e.g., in their own right less severe hydro-meteorological incidents, sometimes separated in time and space. Or they may similarly result from the joint failures of multiple human or natural systems. Consequently, it is a deep transdisciplinary challenge to learn from past high impact events, understand the mechanisms behind them and ultimately to project how they may potentially change in a future climate.

The ECRA (European Climate Research Alliance) Collaborative Programme on “High Impact Events and Climate Change” aims to promote research on the mechanisms behind high impact events and climate extremes, simulation of high impact events under present and future climatic conditions, and on how relevant information for climate risk analysis, vulnerability and adaptation may be co-created with users, e.g., in terms of tailored climate services. For this aim, this Interdisciplinary and Transdisciplinary Session invites contributions that will serve to (i) better understand the mechanisms behind high impact events from a transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary perspective, e.g. case studies and the assessment of past high impact events, including detection and attribution; (ii) project changes to high impact events through, e.g. high resolution climate and impacts modelling (including economic modelling); (iii) produce climate information at the relevant scales (downscaling); and co-create climate services with users to help deal with the risk and/or impacts of high-impact events, e.g. risk analysis and climate adaptation. Abstracts that highlight recent advances from a transdisciplinary perspective for example through the innovation of climate services will be particularly encouraged. Authors and contributors to this session will be offered to present their work in a Special Issue of the journal “Sustainability”.

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Co-organized as NH1.26/AS4.48/CL2.08/HS4.3.3/NP9.9
Convener: Martin Drews | Co-conveners: Peter Braesicke, Hilppa Gregow, Kristine S. Madsen
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room L7
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X3
ITS4.8/AS4.46/BG1.41/CL3.13/CR1.12/GM5.6 Media

The Tibetan Plateau and surrounding mountain regions, known as the Third Pole, cover an area of > 5 million km2 and are considered to be the water tower of Asia. The Pan Third Pole expands on both the north-south and the east-west directions, going across the Tibetan Plateau, Pamir, Hindu Kush, Iran Plateau, Caucasian and Carpathian, and covering an area of about 20 million km2. Like the Arctic and Antarctica, the Pan Third Pole’s environment is extremely sensitive to global climate change. In recent years, scientists from around the globe have increased observational, remote sensing and numerical modeling research related to the Pan Third Pole in an effort to quantify and predict past, current and future scenarios. Co-sponsored by TPE (www.tpe.ac.cn), this session is dedicated to studies of Pan Third Pole atmosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere and their interactions with global change. Related contributions are welcomed.

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Co-organized as AS4.46/BG1.41/CL3.13/CR1.12/GM5.6
Convener: Yaoming Ma | Co-conveners: Fahu Chen, Franco Salerno, Bob Su, Fan Zhang
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15, 10:45–12:30
 
Room L7
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X5

ITS5 – The Anthropocene

ITS5.1/SSP2.1/CL3.01/GM6.7/SSS13.32 Media

The Anthropocene is a topic of broad and current interest that is being discussed across various disciplines, within Earth Sciences, but also in the humanities and in the media. Its significance and usefulness as the youngest epoch of the Geological Time Scale is examined by the Working Group of the Anthropocene of the Subcommission on Quaternary Stratigraphy, part of the International Commission on Stratigraphy. A multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary approach for investigating and discussing the Anthropocene is feasible, including not only various Earth Sciences disciplines such as stratigraphy, sedimentology, geochemistry and palaeontology, but also archaeology, geography, geomorphology and various disciplines of the humanities and the arts. This session invites transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary contributions on the significance, usefulness and application of the term, as well as case studies including proposals on possible GSSPs (Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point) for a definition of the Anthropocene as part of the Geological Time Scale. The session will foster transdisciplinary dialogue and interdisciplinary cooperation and understanding on the scale and reach of anthropogenic changes within the Earth System.

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Co-organized as SSP2.1/CL3.01/GM6.7/SSS13.32
Convener: Michael Wagreich | Co-conveners: Katrin Hornek, Kira Lappé, Colin N. Waters, Jan Zalasiewicz
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X1
ITS5.2/OS4.13/EOS10.2/BG3.18/GM6.6/HS11.63 Media

Plastic contamination has been reported in all realms of the environment from the tropics to the polar oceans. The consequences of this contamination may be severe for ecosystems and could adversely affect ecosystem services such as fisheries and even human health. Our poor knowledge of plastics sources, their composition, sizes, pathways, hot spots of accumulation and ultimate fate prevents an assessment of environmental risks and the development of appropriate mitigation strategies. In order to understand current distributions of plastics and the way they evolve in space and time, much better observations and common consistent measuring methods are required but simultaneously, observations must be combined with computational models from their sources on land to rivers, estuaries, oceans and sea ice. This requires improved standardized accurate observations and the development of advanced modelling capabilities to quantify and predict contamination levels.

The session aims to set up a forum for multi-disciplinary discussions to create a global picture of plastic contamination in the environment and to suggest approaches for future research, monitoring and mitigation of plastic pollutions impacts. The session will provide a framework to advise legislators and industry on the best ways to reduce the risks of serious damage from this contaminant.

This session will draw together data on plastic contamination across all sizes of plastics, from nano- and micro-plastics to large plastic fragments, and across all environments and locations. It will combine observations with state-of-the-art computational modelling to promote the fast advance of research and improve our understanding of how plastic pollution affects environments worldwide. We invite contributions on new methods and field observations, laboratory experiments, novel modelling approaches, related scientific initiatives and projects. New ideas for citizen-science involvement and for mitigation strategies to reduce plastic contamination of the environment are especially welcome.

Invited speaker: Prof. Dr. Erik van Sebille

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Co-organized as OS4.13/EOS10.2/BG3.18/GM6.6/HS11.63
Convener: Jörg-Olaf Wolff | Co-conveners: Richard Lampitt, Simon Dixon, Jessica Hickie, Alice Horton, Ilka Peeken, Anna Rubio, Stefanie Rynders
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
ITS5.4/GI2.7/AS4.43/BG1.39/ERE5.6/GMPV6.4/HS11.65/NH8.7/OS4.33/SSS8.7

The session gathers geoscientific aspects such as dynamics, reactions, and environmental/health consequences of radioactive materials that are massively released accidentally (e.g., Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear power plant accidents, wide fires, etc.) and by other human activities (e.g., nuclear tests).

The radioactive materials are known as polluting materials that are hazardous for human society, but are also ideal markers in understanding dynamics and chemical/biological/electrical reactions chains in the environment. Thus, the radioactive contamination problem is multi-disciplinary. In fact this topic involves regional and global transport and local reactions of radioactive materials through atmosphere, soil and water system, ocean, and organic and ecosystem, and its relation with human and non-human biota. The topic also involves hazard prediction and nowcast technology.

By combining >30 year (halftime of Cesium 137) monitoring data after the Chernobyl Accident in 1986, >5 year dense measurement data by the most advanced instrumentation after the Fukushima Accident in 2011, and other events, we can improve our knowledgebase on the environmental behavior of radioactive materials and its environmental/biological impact. This should lead to improved monitoring systems in the future including emergency response systems, acute sampling/measurement methodology, and remediation schemes for any future nuclear accidents.

The following specific topics have traditionally been discussed:
(a) Atmospheric Science (emissions, transport, deposition, pollution);
(b) Hydrology (transport in surface and ground water system, soil-water interactions);
(c) Oceanology (transport, bio-system interaction);
(d) Soil System (transport, chemical interaction, transfer to organic system);
(e) Forestry;
(f) Natural Hazards (warning systems, health risk assessments, geophysical variability);
(g) Measurement Techniques (instrumentation, multipoint data measurements);
(h) Ecosystems (migration/decay of radionuclides).

The session consists of updated observations, new theoretical developments including simulations, and improved methods or tools which could improve observation and prediction capabilities during eventual future nuclear emergencies. New evaluations of existing tools, past nuclear contamination events and other data sets also welcome.

Public information:
The release of radioactive materials by human activity (such as nuclear accidents) are both severe hazard problem as well as ideal markers in understanding geoscience at all level of the Earth because it cycles through atmosphere, soil, plant, water system, ocean, and lives. Therefore, we must gather knowledge from all geoscience field for comprehensive understanding.

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Co-organized as GI2.7/AS4.43/BG1.39/ERE5.6/GMPV6.4/HS11.65/NH8.7/OS4.33/SSS8.7
Convener: Masatoshi Yamauchi | Co-conveners: Nikolaos Evangeliou, Yasunori Igarashi, Liudmila Kolmykova, Daisuke Tsumune
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X1
ITS5.5/HS10.11/BG6.6/GM5.5

In recent years there has been a growing emergence of interdisciplinary research areas concerned with investigating the dynamic and multifaceted interactions between biotic and abiotic components of aquatic ecosystems. Such is the acknowledged importance of these interactions, that quantifying and understanding the two-way feedbacks of interacting abiotic and biotic components is recognised as a key contemporary research challenge. However, the different terminology used by various disciplines highlights the separation rather than the overlap between disciplines. Further, in many instances the creation of new sub-disciplines (or research areas) is not developing the study field, but arguably is leading to the ‘reinvention of the wheel’ in parallel disciplines. Changing the traditional perspectives by bridging the gaps between disciplines is therefore key to bring considerable advances in aquatic research.
This session focuses on bringing together scientists from different backgrounds dealing with the effects of environmental (both biotic and abiotic) stressors on the aquatic biosphere, from individual organisms through to whole ecosystems with the aim of simulating truly interdisciplinary research. Several temporal scales ranging from a single event (e.g. response to hydropeaking, predatory attacks) to long term evolution (e.g. adaptation to climate change, ecosystem modification) may be considered. We expect strong contributions from researchers transcending a variety of disciplines such as geomorphology, engineering, ecology and environmental sciences. Emphasis is given to studies dealing with stressors driven by climate change or anthropogenic activities. In this context we particularly welcome contributions on consolidated or novel measurement techniques and modelling tools to assess the effects of environmental stressors (e.g. flow modifications, habitat alterations) on biota, such as vegetation, macroinvertebrates and fish, that cross disciplinary boundaries.

The session will include an invited keynote by Prof. Markus Holzner from ETH Zürich.

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Co-organized as HS10.11/BG6.6/GM5.5
Convener: Davide Vettori | Co-conveners: Kate Mathers, Riccardo Fornaroli
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall A
ITS5.6/GM6.2/BG1.46/CL2.28/ERE8.8/GI1.9/NH9.28/SSS13.27

The originality of the session is to emphasize on the central position of human activities in environmental research (both terrestrial and atmospheric), as a driving factor and/or a response, by combining different spatio-temporal scales.
Continental environments (under various climatic conditions) experience profound societal and physical changes, which prompt scientists to investigate the complex interactions between environmental functioning and human activities.
The complexity originates from the multiplicity of factors involved and resulting spatial and temporal variabilities, of their multiple origins in time (historical integration) and/or legacy.
As a consequence, causal links in this societal-environmental relationship are difficult to establish but, it is fundamental to understand these causal links to adapt, conserve, protect, preserve and restore the functioning of the environment as well as human activities. From this point of view, the geographical approach highlights the relationships (or their absence) through the expression of the spatial and temporal trajectories of the processes studied by clarifying the observation of signals.
The ensuing issues on the relevance of indicators used in different supports of nowadays research (imagery, archives, models ...) are raised as a methodological open up.
In this context, oral and poster presentations dealing with any studies related to the following issue(s) are welcome:
- human forcing on the environments and environmental resilience
- response of socio-systems to environmental changes
- scenarios, prospective and retrospective models of the evolution of environments and human activities
- management modes (adaptive management) of anthropised continental environments, reciprocity, mutual benefits (ecosystem services), positive feedback

The session may include the following methodological aspects:
- in situ metrology,
- statistical and numerical modeling,
- spatio-temporal analysis,
- remote Sensing,
- surveys,
- landscape analysis,
- paleoenvironmental approach,
at various scales:
- spatial scales, from the station and site through watershed,
- time scales from the event to the Holocene.

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Co-organized as GM6.2/BG1.46/CL2.28/ERE8.8/GI1.9/NH9.28/SSS13.27
Convener: Armelle Decaulne | Co-conveners: Anne-Julia Rollet, Olivier Planchon, Thorsteinn Saemundsson, Etienne Cossart
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2

ITS6 – Urban Geoscience

ITS6.1/NP8.5/AS4.50/CL2.26/HS11.31/NH9.23

As discussed by EGU2017 DB2 and EGU 2018 TM16, there had been an impressive series of international agreements and development of large networks of cites that call for qualitative improvements of urban systems and their interactions with their environment. The main goal of this ITS is to mobilise geoscientists, highlight their present contributions and encourage holistic approaches beyond the traditional silos of urban meteorology/hydrology/climatology/ecology/resilience, as well as some other terms.

Public information:
See also Town Hall TM 19 "Cities and Interdisciplinary Geosciences"
to be held on Thursday 11 April in room 1.85 from 19:00 to 20:00.
https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2019/session/33913

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Co-organized as NP8.5/AS4.50/CL2.26/HS11.31/NH9.23
Convener: Daniel Schertzer | Co-conveners: Klaus Fraedrich, Stefano Tinti
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X4
ITS6.2/NH9.20/HS11.13

2007 was a crucial year when the threshold of 50% of the population living in urban areas has been achieved and Ten years later, many hazards and often combination of hazards heat the urban environment everywhere in the world. This increase rate corresponds to a new city of 1 million people every week during the next 40 years. This exponential curve is enough to imagine that cities become more vulnerable: issues we will have to face dealing with risk management become more complex. Moreover, this quick urbanization comes with climate change uncertainties. Climate change, coupled with people and asset concentration in cities, is the worst combination to set up a sustainable natural hazard management plan. As an example, floods are considered the major natural hazard in the EU in terms of risk to people and assets. Currently, more than 40 bn € per year are spent on flood mitigation and recovery in the EU. More than 75 % of the damage caused by floods is occurring in urban areas. Climate change and concentration of population and assets in urban areas are main trends likely to affect these numbers in the near future. Global warming is expected to lead to more severe storm and rainfall events as well as to increasing river discharges and sea level rise. This means that flood risk is likely to increase significantly. At least, urban systems contain assets of high value and complex and interdependent infrastructure networks (i.e. power supplies, communications, water, transport etc.). The infrastructure networks are critical for the continuity of economic activities as well as for the people’s basic living needs. Their availability is also required for fast and effective recovery after disasters (floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, landslides...). The severity of damage therefore largely depends on the degree that both high value assets and critical urban infrastructure are affected, either directly or indirectly.
In this context, we obtain an urban society:
• more and more menaced by a lot of hazards
• more and more vulnerable due to increasing issues and complex urban system relations;
• less and less resilient.

This session aims at discussing how researchers, practitioners and professionals are integrating the resilient concept to set up new risk management approaches and to design more resilient and flexible cities to face all types of natural hazards. Indeed, a lot of projects in the EU are now trying to use the concept of resilience to mitigate different types of risks in urban areas. This session represents a great opportunity to exchange on resilient cities and to build up a resilience framework. We are attending presentations combining different disciplines, bringing conceptual elements on resilience but also tangible applications. All methods, frameworks, tools (GIS) designed to reduce risks in cities and integrating the resilience concept are welcome in this session.

From the Urban Resilience Studies part, we are expecting communications questioning the traditional risk management approaches, based on case studies and leading to new approaches based on the concept of resilience.
From the Risk Mapping, communications have to demonstrate how risks are characterized, assessed and mapped at several scales allowing to develop operational spatial decision support systems.

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Co-organized as NH9.20/HS11.13
Convener: Bruno Barroca | Co-conveners: Damien Serre, Charlotte Heinzlef, Mattia Leone, Xun Sun, Elisabeth Krueger, Vincent Becue
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X3
ITS6.4/BG1.29/EOS7.3/AS4.52/CL2.27/HS10.13/SSS13.30 Media

Cities all over the world are facing rising population densities. This leads to increasing fractions of built-up and sealed areas, consequencing in a more and more altered and partly disrupted water balance - both in terms of water quantities and qualities. On top, climate change is altering precipitation regimes.

This session focuses on according urban ecohydrological problems and approaches to solve them spanning from technical to nature-based solutions in different time and spatial scales from the building to the whole city.

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Co-organized as BG1.29/EOS7.3/AS4.52/CL2.27/HS10.13/SSS13.30
Convener: Thomas Nehls | Co-conveners: Simone Fatichi, Günter Langergraber, Gabriele Manoli, Athanasios Paschalis
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15, 10:45–12:30
 
Room N1
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall A