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SM – Seismology

DM18

The Division meeting aims at presenting the status of the activities within the Seismology Division and its place within EGU. I will present the statistics of the seismology abstracts within the division and EGU, remind the importance of the outstanding researcher medal Beno Gutenberg

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Convener: Philippe Jousset
Wed, 06 May, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)

SM1 – General seismology sessions

SM1.1

The session General Contributions on Earthquakes, Earth Structure, Seismology features a wide range of presentations on recent earthquakes and earthquake sequences of local, regional, and global significance, as well as recent advances in characterization of Earth structure using a variety of methods.

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Convener: Philippe Jousset | Co-convener: P. Martin Mai
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
SM1.2

In the last two decades the number of high quality seismic instruments being installed around the world has grown exponentially and probably will continue to grow in the coming decades. This led to a dramatic increase in the volume of available seismic data and pointed out the limits of the current standard routine seismic analysis, often performed manually by seismologists. Exploiting this massive amount of data is a challenge that can be overcome by using new generation, fully automated and noise-robust seismic processing techniques. In the last years waveform-based detection and location methods have grown in popularity and their application have dramatically improved seismic monitoring capability. Moreover, machine learning techniques, which are dedicated methods for data-intensive applications, are showing promising results in seismicity characterization applications opening new horizons for the development of innovative, fully automated and noise-robust seismic analysis methods. Such techniques are particularly useful when working with data sets characterized by large numbers of weak events with low signal-to-noise ratio, such as those collected in induced seismicity, seismic swarms and volcanic monitoring operations. This session aims to bring to light new methods that can be applied to large data sets, either retro-actively or in (near) real-time, to characterize seismicity (i.e., perform detection, location, magnitude and source mechanisms estimation) at different scales and in different environments. We thus encourage contributions that demonstrate how the proposed methods help improve our understanding of earthquake and/or volcanic processes.

- Invited presentation by Dr. Sebastian Heimann (GFZ Potsdam, Germany) on probabilistic characterization of earthquake sources from a combination of seismic and geodetic observations

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Convener: Nima NooshiriECSECS | Co-conveners: Natalia Poiata, Francesco GrigoliECSECS, Simone Cesca, Federica LanzaECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SM1.3

Ambient seismic noise-based monitoring and imaging techniques have matured into a core part of the seismological toolkit. The advantages are based on the commonly obtained robust reconstruction of empirical Green’s function estimates that allows seismic imaging and continuous monitoring of a wide range of subsurface structures.

In this session, we focus on open questions and methodological advances in seismic interferometry and ambient noise based seismology. We invite (A) contributions on new methodological approaches in seismic interferometry and noise processing, (B) studies of time variations of elastic material properties, and (C) investigations of the sources of the ambient seismic noise.

This could, for example, include contributions that...
... further extend the resolution capabilities and sensitivities of methods using the continuously recorded wavefield and its applications;
... propose ideas that aim to push the imaging resolution of multiple scattered wavefields;
... report on case studies of established techniques that are applied to data collected by unconventional solid earth and acoustic acquisition systems such as distributed acoustic sensing cables, rotation sensors, or infrasound installations;
... investigate causes of temporal variations of medium properties, including suggestions for the upscaling of laboratory configurations to local and regional scales;
... show monitoring applications that connect the obtained velocity change signals with complementary observables such as seismicity rates, geodetic signals, or meltwater drainage to better constrain underlying physical processes and model parameters;
... study the excitation of the ambient field over the entire frequency range and implications for the stability of the reconstructed signals;

Solicited presentation by Dr. Eileen Martin (Virginia Tech, USA) on ambient noise interferometry with fiber optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS).

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Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Céline Hadziioannou | Co-conveners: Laura ErmertECSECS, Gregor Hillers, Anne Obermann, Christoph Sens-Schönfelder
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
ITS4.6/NH6.7

Smart monitoring and observation systems for natural hazards, including satellites, seismometers, global networks, unmanned vehicles (e.g., UAV), and other linked devices, have become increasingly abundant. With these data, we observe the restless nature of our Earth and work towards improving our understanding of natural hazard processes such as landslides, debris flows, earthquakes, floods, storms, and tsunamis. The abundance of diverse measurements that we have now accumulated presents an opportunity for earth scientists to employ statistically driven approaches that speed up data processing, improve model forecasts, and give insights into the underlying physical processes. Such big-data approaches are supported by the wider scientific, computational, and statistical research communities who are constantly developing data science and machine learning techniques and software. Hence, data science and machine learning methods are rapidly impacting the fields of natural hazards and seismology. In this session, we will see research from natural hazards and seismology for processes over a broad range of time and spatial scales.

Dr. Pui Anantrasirichai of the University of Bristol, UK will give the invited presentation:
Application of Deep Learning to Detect Ground Deformation in InSAR Data

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Co-organized by ESSI2/GI2/GM2/HS12/NP4/SM1
Convener: Hui TangECSECS | Co-conveners: Kejie ChenECSECS, Stephanie OlenECSECS, Fabio CorbiECSECS, Jannes Münchmeyer
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
ITS4.1/NP4.2

This session aims to bring together researchers working with big data sets generated from monitoring networks, extensive observational campaigns and detailed modeling efforts across various fields of geosciences. Topics of this session will include the identification and handling of specific problems arising from the need to analyze such large-scale data sets, together with methodological approaches towards semi or fully automated inference of relevant patterns in time and space aided by computer science-inspired techniques. Among others, this session shall address approaches from the following fields:
• Dimensionality and complexity of big data sets
• Data mining in Earth sciences
• Machine learning, deep learning and Artificial Intelligence applications in geosciences
• Visualization and visual analytics of big and high-dimensional data
• Informatics and data science
• Emerging big data paradigms, such as datacubes

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Co-organized by AS5/CL5/ESSI2/G6/GD10/HS3/SM1
Convener: Mikhail Kanevski | Co-conveners: Peter Baumann, Sandro Fiore, Kwo-Sen Kuo, Nicolas Younan
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
PS4.1

InSight landed on Mars on November 26th, 2018, bringing the first geophysical observatory to the surface of Mars. It attempts to constrain the interior structure of the planet and identify key physical processes that have shaped its evolution. At the time of the meeting, the instruments have been operating at full capacity for 14 months, or about half a Martian year. This session invites contributions from numerical modeling, experimental studies and data processing from various disciplines such as but not limited to geophysics, geology and geochemistry that aim to evaluate, interpret and complement the seismic and heat flow measurements, as well as rotational state, magnetic and atmospheric data of the InSight mission.
This interdisciplinary session will gather together results welcoming all research, whether part of the mission team or not.

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Co-organized by EMRP2/G6/GD11/SM1
Convener: Simon C. StählerECSECS | Co-conveners: Brigitte Knapmeyer-Endrun, Ana-Catalina PlesaECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
ERE5.4

Mineral resources are used in larger quantities than ever before in history, and are the basis of our modern society. The safe and sustainable supply of mineral resources is fostering a demand for innovative actions to cover the foreseeable future industry and human demands. Exploration is the first step in the mineral resources cycle. On one hand, most of the giant deposits at shallow depths have been already explored and mined out and the industry is moving towards deeper and more complex mineral systems, which brings significant exploration challenges. On the other hand, the exploration sector needs time-saving, cost-effective, and, particularly in Europe, environmentally friendly and socially acceptable techniques to ensure sustainable access to mineral resources.
This session aims to bring together geoscientists from various (e.g. remote sensing, geochemistry, geology, geophysics, modelling, mineralogy, structural geology) involved in mineral exploration for the 21st Century. Abstract submissions for this session can include, but are not limited to, the following topics: new methods of exploration; imaging; conceptual modelling and quantification of deposits and mineral systems; cost reduction in exploration; non-invasive exploration; integration of multidisciplinary methodologies and datasets; scale-up and replicability; industry-academia synergies and FAIR data repositories.

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Co-organized by SM1
Convener: Juan AlcaldeECSECS | Co-conveners: Louis AndreaniECSECS, Ramon CarbonellECSECS, Alba Gil de la IglesiaECSECS, Fernando Tornos
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS5.1

Seismic activity and crustal deformation are indicative of underlying plate tectonic and/or volcanic processes. Their connectedness is often non-linear and non-sequential. Seismic activity can result in crustal deformation in a tectonically or volcanically active region, while deformation arising from these forces can harness seismic potency. In isolation, seismic and geodetic (GNSS, InSAR) analysis potentially run the risk of delivering partial inferences, especially in compound geodynamic settings. Evidently, independently obtained results from seismic and geodetic observations are heavily reliant on the data type, methodology, model assumptions, and error estimations. In recent times, there have been several measures to jointly employ seismic and geodetic data to understand complex processes in aforementioned settings. Such studies have made significant contributions to modern and reliable data analysis practices. Therefore, this session aims to explore ongoing research that works towards arriving at comprehensive results from both ends of the spectrum; seismicity, a form of fast deformation, and its relationship with the slower geodetically measured deformation.

The current session invites presentation of research that simultaneously incorporates seismic and geodetic (GNSS, InSAR) techniques to investigate any given tectonic and/or volcanic setting. The study may include analyses of selected earthquakes and related deformation, comparison studies between seismic and geodetic data analysis, volcanic deformation and associated seismicity, and seismic cycle monitoring based on both seismology and geodesy. We also encourage studies using models (analytical or numerical) linking geodetic and seismic research, such as stress-strain models in volcanic and tectonic areas.

Invited Abstract:
Using Seismic and Geodetic Observations in a Simultaneous Kinematic Model of the 2019 Ridgecrest, California Earthquakes
Dara Goldberg1, Diego Melgar1, Valerie Sahakian1, Amanda Thomas1, Xiaohua Xu2, Brendan Crowell3, and Jianghui Geng4
1Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, United States of America
2Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America
3Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America
4Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

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Co-organized by G3/SM1
Convener: Revathy M. ParameswaranECSECS | Co-conveners: Cécile DucrocqECSECS, Siqi LiECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
GI1.2

The nature of science has changed: it has become more interconnected, collaborative, multidisciplinary, and data intensive. The main aim of this session, now in its third edition, is to create a common space for interdisciplinary scientific discussion where EGU-GA delegates involved in recent and ongoing COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology)* Actions can share ideas and present the research activities carried out in their networks. The session represents an invaluable opportunity for different Actions and their members to identify possible synergies and establish new collaborations, find novel links between disciplines, and design innovative research approaches. So far, this session has hosted contributions stemming from 26 Actions, covering different areas of the geosciences (sky, earth and subsurface monitoring, terrestrial life and ecosystems, earth's changing climate and natural hazards, sustainable management of resources and urban development, environmental contaminants, and big data); we are looking forward to receiving new contributions this year.

Same as in past editions, part of this session will be dedicated to presenting and discussing activities carried out in further national and international scientific networks, associations, and collaborative projects.

Moreover, this session is of course open to everyone and abstracts authored by individual scientists or small research teams are most welcome, too. Actually, in 2018 and 2019 we received a very good number of such abstracts, submitted by researchers who wanted to disseminate the results of their studies in front of the multidisciplinary audience that characterizes this session, as an alternative to making a presentation in a thematic session. In fact, contributing to this session can be a productive way to broaden the perspective and find new partners for future interdisciplinary research ventures.

-- Notes --

* COST (www.cost.eu) is funded by the EU and enables researchers to set up their interdisciplinary and international scientific networks (the “Actions”). Academia, industry, public- and private-sector laboratories work together in the Actions, sharing knowledge, leveraging diversity, and pulling resources. Every Action has a main objective, defined goals and deliverables. This session is a follow-up initiative of COST Action TU1208 “Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar” (www.gpradar.eu).

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Co-organized by EOS9/AS4/CL5/GD1/NH5/NP8/SM1/SSP1/SSS12
Convener: Lara Pajewski | Co-conveners: Aleksandar Ristic, Patricia María Rodríguez GonzálezECSECS
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GM2.6

Characterizing and monitoring Earth surface processes often requires the development of challenging scientific approaches leading to the rise of innovative techniques. From the highest mountains to the deepest oceans, passive to active monitoring techniques are in constant progress and push further terra incognita boundaries. In particular, seismic techniques are becoming widely used to detect and quantitatively characterise a wide variety of natural processes occurring at the Earth’s surface. These processes include mass movements such as landslides, rock falls, debris flows and lahars; glacial phenomena such as icequakes, glacier calving/serac falls, glacier melt and supra- to sub-glacial hydrology; snow avalanches; water storage and water dynamics phenomena such as water table changes, river flow turbulence and fluvial sediment transport. Where other methods often provide limited spatial and temporal coverage, seismic observations allow recovering sequences of events with high temporal resolution and over large areas. In addition to seismic techniques, recent advances in other in-situ geophysical instrumentation (e.g. Doppler radar, sub bottom profilers, etc.) or remote sensing techniques (e.g. inSAR, unmanned aerial systems, unmanned maritime systems, etc.) have made remote monitoring and data acquisition a reality. These novel techniques represent more affordable, practical solutions for the collection of spatial and temporal data sets in challenging environments.
These observational capabilities allow establishing connections with meteorological drivers, and give unprecedented insights on the underlying physics of the various Earth’s surface processes as well as on their interactions (chains of events). These capabilities are also of first interest for real time hazards monitoring and early warning purposes.
This session aims to bring together research on seismic methods as well as holistic, novel and/or in-development monitoring solutions to study Earth surface dynamics, particularly in challenging and hostile areas. We welcome contributions from a broad range of disciplines (including geomorphology, cryospheric sciences, seismology, natural hazards, volcanology, soil system sciences and hydrology) and applications (from landslides, snow avalanches, glaciers, cave systems, marine/lake and submarine systems, to volcano and permafrost monitoring).

Solicited presenter: Zack Spica - University of Michigan (USA)

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Co-organized by GI5/NH4/SM1
Convener: Anne SchöpaECSECS | Co-conveners: Wei-An ChaoECSECS, Velio CovielloECSECS, Andrea Manconi, Arnaud WatletECSECS, Zakaria GhazouiECSECS
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
NH4.4

Over the last years, significant progress has been made towards understanding spatio-temporal correlations of earthquake occurrence, scaling laws, earthquake clustering, and the emergence of seismicity patterns. Background and clustered seismicity occur with great spatio-temporal variability. New models being developed in statistical seismology and pattern recognition have direct implications for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment, probabilistic earthquake forecasting and for analyzing the evolution of seismicity clusters. In many regions where complex fault systems exist, clusters are characterized by multiple mainshock sequences, with large aftershocks, which increase the overall hazard.
In this session, we invite researchers to present their latest results and insights on the physical and statistical models (either theoretical or based on laboratory and numerical experiments on rock fracture and friction) for the occurrence of earthquakes, foreshocks and aftershocks. Particular emphasis will be placed on:

- physical and statistical models of earthquake occurrence;
- analysis of earthquake clustering;
- spatio-temporal properties of earthquake statistics;
- quantitative testing of earthquake occurrence models;
- implications for time-dependent hazard assessment;
- methods for earthquake forecasting;
- data analyses and requirements for model testing;
- pattern recognition in seismology;
- machine learning applied to seismic data.

Confirmed solicited speaker: Ilya Zaliapin (University of Nevada, Reno, USA)

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Co-organized by SM1
Convener: Stefania Gentili | Co-conveners: Rita Di Giovambattista, Álvaro GonzálezECSECS, Filippos Vallianatos
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

SM2 – Deformation, Faulting, and Earthquake Processes (incl. seismotectonics, geodynamics, earthquake source physics)

SM2.1

This session covers the broad field of earthquake source processes, and
includes the topics of imaging the rupture kinematics and simulating
earthquake dynamics using numerical methods, to develop a deeper
understanding of earthquake source physics. We also invite presentation
that link novel laboratory experiments to earthquake dynamics, and
studies on earthquake scaling properties.

Earthquake sources are imaged using seismic data and surface deformation
measurements (e.g.GPS and InSAR) to estimate rupture properties on
faults and fault systems. Each data set and each method has its strength
and limitations in the context of the source-inversion problem, but the
uncertainties are often not well quantified and the robustness of the
source models not well known.
The session invites contributions that address the source-inversion
problem and provide new methods, innovative applications, and
thought-provoking new ideas. Contributions are welcome that make use of modern
computing paradigms and infrastructure to tackle large-scale forward
simulation of earthquake process, but also inverse modeling to retrieve
the rupture process with proper uncertainty quantification.

Earthquake source imaging, numerical modeling of rupture dynamics, and
source-scaling relations help to understand earthquake source processes.
Furthermore, new numerical modeling approaches for multi-scale
earthquake physics, including earthquake-cycle simulations, may include
fault-zone evolution and even target seismic hazard assessment. The
question that these lines of research are targeting are profound and of
first-order socio-economic relevance:

Which first-order physical processes control, at a given space-time
scale, the macroscopic evolution of dynamic rupture and its seismic
radiation? Is the physics of fault rupture the same for large and small
earthquakes? How can modern earthquake hazard assessment profit from a
deeper understanding of rupture dynamics? Which source processes need to
be considered to better understand, and then model, tsunami generation,
triggering phenomena, induced seismicity and earthquake cycles?

Within this framework our session also provides a forum to discuss case
studies of kinematic or dynamic source modeling of recent significant
earthquakes.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/NH4
Convener: P. Martin Mai | Co-conveners: Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS, Henriette Sudhaus, Martin Vallée
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SM2.2

Typical practice for seismic hazard assessment (SHA) in stable continental regions (SCRs) uses a global-analogues approach to amalgamate seismicity data from SCRs globally. This approach is premised on all SCR crust sharing the same seismogenic potential. Is this approach valid? How can we better define seismogenic analogues in low strain regions? Are earthquake recurrence and long-term slip rates meaningful concepts in these settings for the purpose of seismic hazard analysis?
This session seeks to integrate paleoseismic, geomorphic, geodetic, geophysical and seismological datasets to provide insight into the earthquake cycle in low-strain regions. It will draw upon recent advances in high-resolution topography, geochronology, satellite geodesy techniques, subsurface imaging techniques, longer seismological records, high-density geophysical networks and unprecedented computational power to explore the driving mechanisms for earthquakes in low-strain settings. A comparison of the range of seismic behavior as a function of the different geodynamic attributes of these settings (e.g., crustal age, structure, stress, geology, antecedent
tectonics (inheritance); evolving boundary conditions; Quaternary processes (glaciation), etc), may provide a means to better refine and constrain the types of features or active processes that warrant treatment as analogues for seismic hazard assessment. We welcome contributions that (1) present new observations that place constraints on earthquake occurrence in low-strain regions, (2) explore patterns of stable or temporally varying earthquake recurrence, and (3) provide insight into the mechanisms that control earthquakes in regions of slow deformation via observation and/or
modeling.

Public information:
The session will be hosted both on Zoom and on the EGU text-based chat.

Schedule :
- 10:45-11:15 : Zoom session (see link below) - Presentations only (no questions and answers, this will take place in the chat), presenters are invited to share their screen
- 11:15-12:30 : EGU chat session - questions and answers for all presenters

------------------------------------- Zoom session link ------------------------------------
Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://videoconf-colibri.zoom.us/j/98788480483
Or iPhone one-tap: 308810988,98788480483# or 211202618,98788480483#
Or Telephone:
Dial: +351 308 810 988 (Portugal Toll) or +351 211 202 618 (Portugal Toll)
Meeting ID: 987 8848 0483
International numbers available: https://videoconf-colibri.zoom.us/u/adNZCcmlD1
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Zoom session will start with a 10 minute presentation by Eulalia Gracia for a solicited talk. It will be followed by 6 3-minute long presentations.
Then, we will switch to the text-based chat for questions and answers ; 5 minutes for each presentation. Each presentation will be introduced by the conveners.

The schedule is given below.

ZOOM (10:45-11:15) -
10:45-10:55 E. Gracia Earthquake crisis unveils the growth of an incipient continental fault system
10:55-10:58 J. Ritz The Mw4.9 Le Teil surface-rupturing earthquake in southern France: New insight on seismic hazard assessment in stable continental regions
10:58-11:01 A. Vallage Full characterization of the ML 5.4 2019/11/11 Le Teil earthquake in France based on a multi-technology approach
11:01-11:04 T. King The 2016 Mw 6.1 Petermann Ranges earthquake rupture, Australia: another “one-off” stable continental region earthquake
11:04-11:07 C.-H. Tsai Palaeo-earthquake magnitudes on the Dzhungarian fault, N. Tien shan, and implications for the rupture processes of intraplate strike-slip faults
11:07-11:10 C. Daxer Quantitative paleoseismology in Carinthia, Eastern Alps: Calibrating the lacustrine sedimentary record with historical earthquake data
11:10-11:13 M. Moorkamp Integrated geophysical analysis of the April 2017 Moiyabana intra-plate earthquake, Botswana

TEXT-BASED EGU CHAT (11:15-12:30)
11:15-11:20 E. Gracia Earthquake crisis unveils the growth of an incipient continental fault system
11:20-11:25 O. Olesen Large magnitude earthquakes of late Holocene age in the Precambrian of Finnmark, Northern Norway
11:25-11:30 J. Ritz The Mw4.9 Le Teil surface-rupturing earthquake in southern France: New insight on seismic hazard assessment in stable continental regions
11:30-11:35 A. Vallage Full characterization of the ML 5.4 2019/11/11 Le Teil earthquake in France based on a multi-technology approach
11:35-11:40 T. King The 2016 Mw 6.1 Petermann Ranges earthquake rupture, Australia: another “one-off” stable continental region earthquake
11:40-11:45 C.-H. Tsai Palaeo-earthquake magnitudes on the Dzhungarian fault, N. Tien shan, and implications for the rupture processes of intraplate strike-slip faults
11:45-11:50 H. Choi What if a larger earthquake would occur at the causative fault of the Gyeongju earthquake with ML 5.8 on September 11, 2016 in South Korea?
11:50-11:55 J. Kley Seismotectonic regions for Germany - Concept and results
11:55-12:00 D. Clark Neotectonic constraint on models of strain localisation within Australian Stable Continental Region (SCR) crust
12:05-12:10 C. Daxer Quantitative paleoseismology in Carinthia, Eastern Alps: Calibrating the lacustrine sedimentary record with historical earthquake data
12:10:12:15 R. Minetto High-resolution catalog of the the Maurienne Swarm (French Alps) based on template matching and double-different relocation
12:15-12:20 M. Moorkamp Integrated geophysical analysis of the April 2017 Moiyabana intra-plate earthquake, Botswana
12:20-12:25 C. Reyes-Carmona Evidence of recent activity in the Camorro Fault (Central Betics, Southern Spain)

12:25-12:30 - Additional questions and time for discussion

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Co-organized by NH4/TS5
Convener: Pierre Arroucau | Co-conveners: Beau WhitneyECSECS, Susana Custódio, Stéphane Baize, Ryan Gold, Dan Clark, Gordana Vlahovic, Sierd Cloetingh
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS4.2

Faults are complex three-dimensional geological objects that grow and change their properties over time (i.e., fourth dimension). Therefore, their thorough understanding intrinsically requires a three- and four- rather than two-dimensional analysis. In this session, we invite contributions that address the geometrical, kinematical, and the underlying mechanical characteristics of faults, by considering their inherent three- and four-dimensional nature. Considerations in this new light will bring us closer to fully address some of the fundamental questions in fault analysis: how do faults initiate? How do they evolve in space and time? How do they accommodate displacement and at what slip rates? Ideally, contributions should arise from analysis of a broad spectrum of data such as, among others, geophysical imaging, earthquake seismicity, outcrop (including novel virtual outcrop geology), and analogue and numerical modelling data. The integration of these different data types will provide insights on characteristics of faults at different scales and resolutions, and on their evolution at different time frames. We encourage contributions that explore the repercussions that a three- and four- rather than two-dimensional approach to the study of faults can have on a broad range of practical problems such as, among others, earthquake hazard assessment and fluid flow.

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Co-organized by NH4/SM2
Convener: Giovanni CamanniECSECS | Co-conveners: Efstratios DelogkosECSECS, Michael KettermannECSECS, Vincent Roche, David Tanner
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
SM2.5

Since 2004, there have been a number of large subduction earthquakes whose unexpected rupture features contributed to the generation of devastating tsunamis. The impact that these events have had on human society highlights the need to improve our knowledge of the key mechanisms behind their origin. Advances in these areas have led to progress in our understanding of the most important parameters affecting tsunamigenesis.

With increasing geophysical data, new descriptions of faulting and rupture complexity are being hypothesized (e.g., spatial and temporal seismic rupture heterogeneity, fault roughness, geometry and sediment type, interseismic coupling, etc.). Rock physicists have proposed new constitutive laws and parameters based on a new generation of laboratory experiments, which simulate close to natural seismic deformation conditions on natural fault samples. In addition, advances in numerical modelling now allow scientists to test how new geophysical observations, e.g. ocean drilling projects and laboratory analyses, influence subduction zone processes over a range of temporal and spatial scales (i.e., geodynamic, seismic cycling, earthquake rupture, wave propagation modelling).

In light of these advances, this session has a twofold mission: i) to integrate recent results from different fields to foster a comprehensive understanding of the key parameters controlling the physics of large subduction earthquakes over a range of spatial and temporal scales; ii) to identify how tsunami hazard analysis can benefit from using a multi-disciplinary approach.

We invite abstracts that enhance interdisciplinary collaboration and integrate observations, rock physics experiments, analog- and numerical modeling, and tsunami hazard.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/NH5/TS5
Convener: Elena SpagnuoloECSECS | Co-conveners: Yoshi Ito, Shane Murphy, Fabrizio Romano
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS7.4

The Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt is one of the largest and most prominent suture zones on Earth. The belt ranges from the Mediterranean in the west to Indonesia in the east. It results from the subduction and closing of different branches of the Tethyan Oceanic Realm and the subsequent collision of the African, Arabian and Indian continental plates with Eurasia. Its long-lasting geological record of complex interactions among major and smaller plates, featuring the presence of subduction zones at different evolutionary stages, has progressively grown as a comprehensive test site to investigate fundamental plate tectonics and geodynamic processes with multi-disciplinary studies. Advances in a variety of geophysical and geological fields provide a rich and growing set of constraints on the crust-lithosphere and mantle structure, as well as tectonics and geodynamic evolution of the entire mountain belt

We welcome contributions presenting new insights and observations derived from different perspectives like geology (stratigraphy, petrology, geochronology, geochemistry, tectonics and geomorphology), geophysics (seismicity, seismic imaging, seismic anisotropy, gravity), geodesy (GPS, InSAR), modelling (numerical and analogue), risk assessment (earthquake, volcanism), as well as from multi-disciplinary studies.

Keynote presentation by Boris Kaus (University of Mainz)

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Co-organized by GD7/GMPV11/SM2
Convener: Ágnes KirályECSECS | Co-conveners: Derya GürerECSECS, Marc Hässig, Claudia Piromallo
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
GD5.1

Subduction drives plate tectonics, generating the major proportion of subaerial volcanism, releasing >90% seismic moment magnitude, forming continents, and recycling lithosphere. Therefore, it is the most important geodynamical phenomenon on Earth and the major driver of global geochemical cycles. Seismological data show a fascinating range in shapes of subducting slabs. Arc volcanism illustrates the complexity of geochemical and petrological phenomena associated with subduction.

Numerical and laboratory modelling studies have successfully built our understanding of many aspects of the geodynamics of subduction zones. Detailed geochemical studies, investigating compositional variation within and between volcanic arcs, provide further insights into systematic chemical processes at the slab surface and within the mantle wedge, providing constraints on thermal structures and material transport within subduction zones. However, with different technical and methodological approaches, model set-ups, inputs and material properties, and in some cases conflicting conclusions between chemical and physical models, a consistent picture of the controlling parameters of subduction-zone processes has so far not emerged.

This session aims to follow subducting lithosphere on its journey from the surface down into the Earth's mantle, and to understand the driving processes for deformation and magmatism in the over-riding plate. We aim to address topics such as: subduction initiation and dynamics; changes in mineral breakdown processes at the slab surface; the formation and migration of fluids and melts at the slab surface; primary melt generation in the wedge; subduction-related magmatism; controls on the position and width of the volcanic arc; subduction-induced seismicity; mantle wedge processes; the fate of subducted crust, sediments and volatiles; the importance of subducting seamounts, LIPs, and ridges; links between near-surface processes and slab dynamics and with regional tectonic evolution; slab delamination and break-off; the effect of subduction on mantle flow; and imaging subduction zone processes.

With this session, we aim to form an integrated picture of the subduction process, and invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines, such as geodynamics, modelling, geochemistry, petrology, volcanology and seismology, to discuss subduction zone dynamics at all scales from the surface to the lower mantle, or in applications to natural laboratories.

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Co-organized by GMPV2/SM2/TS7
Convener: Oğuz H Göğüş | Co-conveners: Taras Gerya, Ágnes KirályECSECS, Wim Spakman
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS5.3

Earthquake mechanics is controlled by a spectrum of processes covering a wide range of length scales, from tens of kilometres down to few nanometres. While the geometry of the fault/fracture network and its physical properties control the global stress distribution and the propagation/arrest of the seismic rupture, earthquake nucleation and fault weakening is governed by frictional processes occurring within extremely localized sub-planar slipping zones. The co-seismic rheology of the slipping zones themselves depends on deformation mechanisms and dissipative processes active at the scale of the grain or asperity. The study of such complex multiscale systems requires an interdisciplinary approach spanning from structural geology to seismology, geophysics, petrology, rupture modelling and experimental rock deformation. In this session we aim to convene contributions dealing with different aspects of earthquake mechanics at various depths and scales such as:

· the thermo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with co-seismic fault weakening based on rock deformation experiments, numerical simulations and microstructural studies of fault rocks;
· the study of natural and experimental fault rocks to investigate the nucleation mechanisms of intermediate and deep earthquakes in comparison to their shallow counterparts;
· the elastic, frictional and transport properties of fault rocks from the field (geophysical and hydrogeological data) to the laboratory scale (petrophysical and rock deformation studies);
· the internal architecture of seismogenic fault zones from field structural survey and geophysical investigations;
· the modeling of earthquake ruptures, off-fault dynamic stress fields and long-term mechanical evolution of realistic fault networks;
· the earthquake source energy budget and partitioning between fracture, friction and elastic wave radiation from seismological, theoretical and field observations.
· the interplay between fault geometry and earthquake rupture characteristics from seismological, geodetic, remote sensed or field observations;

We particularly welcome novel observations or innovative approaches to the study of earthquake faulting. Contributions from early career scientists are solicited.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM2
Convener: Matteo DemurtasECSECS | Co-conveners: Stefano AretusiniECSECS, Michele FondriestECSECS, Francois PasselegueECSECS, Marco Maria ScuderiECSECS
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
TS5.4

Tectonic faults accommodate plate motion through various styles of seismic and aseismic slip spanning a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. Understanding the mechanics and interplay between seismic rupture and aseismic slip is central to seismotectonics as it determines the seismic potential of faults. In particular, unraveling the underlying physics controlling these styles of deformation bears a great deal in earthquakes hazards mitigation especially in highly urbanized regions.
In partnership with the AGU Tectonophysics section, we invite contributions from observational, experimental, geological and theoretical studies that explore the diversity and interplay among seismic and aseismic slip phenomena in various tectonic settings, including the following questions: (1) How does the nature of creeping faults change with the style of faulting, loading rate, and other factors? (2) Are different slip behaviors well separated in space, or can the same fault areas experience different failure modes? (3) Is there a systematic spatial or temporal relation between different types of slip?

Invited speakers:
- Chris Marone, Penn State. "Fault healing plays a key role in creating the spectrum of tectonic faulting styles from seismic to aseismic slip "

- Adriano Gualandi, Caltech. "Towards Slow Earthquakes Forecasting"

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Co-organized by GD9/SM2, co-sponsored by AGU
Convener: Jorge JaraECSECS | Co-conveners: Blandine GardonioECSECS, Luca Dal ZilioECSECS, Allie HutchisonECSECS, Valere LambertECSECS, Sylvain MichelECSECS, Harsha S. Bhat
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS14.2

Tectonic models represent hypothesised approximations of past geological events that best fit and explain a pre-defined collection of data points. Incorporation of geological observations with an understanding and consideration of geodynamic concepts, geological processes, and physical properties of geological materials ensures that empirical models are consistent with physics and mechanics, and that numerical models are consistent with field observations and petrological constraints. Integrating these constraints and concepts within a plate kinematic framework that considers the size, distribution and past and present motions of tectonic plates ensures that models are consistent with global plate tectonics. Incorporating this information with interpretations of the distribution of subducted slabs and plumes in the upper and lower mantle allows for construction of tectonic models that consider the global tectonic-mantle system. We welcome state-of-the-art, multi-disciplinary, and multi-scale studies that combine geological and geophysical constraints from the bedrock record with interpretations of deep mantle structure and/or plate kinematic datasets to investigate geodynamic events of past and present. These may include, but are not limited to studies of rifting and ocean spreading, subduction, orogeny and terrane accretion, and dynamic topography. We expect this session to include a diverse range of multi-disciplinary studies united by a common goal of understanding the geological evolution of our planet’s tectonic-mantle system.

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Co-organized by GD1/SM2/SSP2
Convener: Andrew ParsonsECSECS | Co-conveners: Dennis Brown, Mat DomeierECSECS, Stephen Johnston, Lucia Perez-DiazECSECS
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
SM2.11

The Mediterranean region spanning from the Betic Cordillera and the Alboran Sea to the Levantine and Dead Seas is the most tectonically active region of Europe. Over the last decades several moderate to large magnitude earthquakes affected the Mediterranean regions often causing substantial economical and sometimes human losses. The scientific community is developing a better understanding of the crustal processes that may drive seismic sequences thanks to denser and higher quality geophysical networks, multidisciplinary experiments and rapid field deployments in the aftermath of a mainshock. This allowed increasingly larger and more accurate datasets that can be exploited to improve the knowledge of crustal seismogenic processes. Over the years, this effort lead to the identification of seismic gaps, the production of seismic hazard maps and, not least, the characterization of seismogenic structures. Yet, each seismic sequence seems to be strongly affected by the local tectonics and by the interplay of crustal processes.

In this session we welcome contributions aimed at a better understanding of recent seismic sequences that may help improving our still fragmentary knowledge of earthquake nucleation processes. We are interested in new results from earthquakes that occurred both in front-arc and back-arc regions along the convergence zones between Africa and Europe, in the Apennines and other Mediterranean regions and their comparison with major historical earthquakes. This includes geophysical experiments, analyses of recent seismic sequences, and multidisciplinary studies focusing on the identification, characterisation and monitoring of seismic gaps. We also encourage analyses of fluid-driven seismic sequences and offshore campaigns characterizing key regional faults.

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Co-organized by GD7/TS5
Convener: Matteo Lupi | Co-conveners: Athanassios Ganas, Eulàlia Gràcia, Marc-Andre Gutscher, Fabio Villani
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS5.5

The broad scale tectonics of the Eastern Mediterranean are dominated by the interaction of the Nubian and Arabian plates with the Eurasian plate. This complex tectonic frame exhibit almost all type of plate boundary conditions such as continental convergence and extension, oceanic subduction, and continental transform. The evolution and present deformation are constrained by diverse geological, geophysical, and geodetic observations and have been explained by different hypotheses, such as (a) tectonic escape system caused by the post-collisional convergence of Eurasian and Arabian plates creating forces at its boundaries with gravitational potential differences of the Anatolian high plateau (b) asthenospheric flow dragging the circular flow of lithosphere from the Levant to Anatolia in the east and the Aegean in the west, (c) slab pull of the Hellenic subduction, (d) mantle upwelling underneath Afar and with the large-scale flow associated with a whole mantle, Tethyan convection cell, (e) or combinations of these mechanisms for the Eastern Mediterranean. Naturally, this tectonic setting generates frequent earthquakes with large magnitudes (M > 7), forming a natural laboratory on understanding the crustal deformation, and crust-mantle interactions for various disciplines of active tectonics.
Multi-disciplinary studies, especially within the last three decades, have made significant contributions to our understanding of the processes on the crustal deformation, and interaction of the mantle with the crustal processes of this region. With this session, we aim to bring together the recent findings of these studies, thus we welcome/invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines including, but not limited to, neotectonics, seismology, tectonic geodesy (e.g. GNSS, InSAR), paleoseismology, tectonic geomorphology, remote sensing, structural geology and geodynamic modelling, which geographically cover the Eastern Mediterranean region, including Anatolia-Aegean Block, Caucasus, Iran, Middle East and Greece.

Invited talks:
- Jonathan Weiss - Measuring Anatolian plate velocity and strain with InSAR: Implications for fault-locking, seismic hazard, and crustal dynamics.
- Pierre Henry - Contrasting seismogenic behaviors on the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara

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Co-organized by GD7/NH4/SM2
Convener: Cengiz Zabcı | Co-conveners: Michael Floyd, A. Ozgun Konca, Onno Oncken, Philippe Vernant
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
G3.6

The WEGENER initiative was started in 1981 with the aim of creating an interdisciplinary forum supporting geodynamic studies by means of space and terrestrial geodetic techniques. Therefore, WEGENER promotes the establishment of a consistent framework leading from data acquisition, to data analysis, modeling and interpretation of the results. These activities provide key information to a broad range of phenomena that have critical implications for society, particularly in the field of natural hazards and climate change using techniques such as GNSS, InSAR, LiDAR, space/air/terrestrial gravimetry and ground-based geodetic observations.
In this session, we seek contributions that improve our understanding of geodynamical processes and crustal deformations at the local-to-global scale by means of geodetic techniques and innovative modeling approaches. Contributions showing the benefit of integrating geodetic and complementary geophysical, hydrological, geological, oceanographical and climatological information are also welcome. Relevant submissions may focus on the earthquake cycle, volcanic processes, sea-level changes, fluid redistributions and near surface motions such as landslides and subsidence. We also encourage contributions discussing the realization and outcomes of Supersites in the frame of the GEO initiative, as well as reports of the establishment of new geodetic networks in tectonically active areas.
Among other activities, the WEGENER will contribute to the joint IAG-IASPEI sub-commission on Seismo-Geodesy.

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Co-organized by GD10/SM2
Convener: Sara BruniECSECS | Co-conveners: Takuya Nishimura, Jean-Mathieu Nocquet, Haluk Ozener, Susanna Zerbini
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
NH5.1

Tsunamis can produce catastrophic damage on vulnerable coastlines, essentially following major earthquakes, landslides or atmospheric disturbances. After the disastrous tsunamis in 2004 and 2011, tsunami science has grown significantly, opening new fields of research for various domains, and also in regions where the tsunami hazard was previously underestimated.
Numerical modeling, complemented with laboratory experiments, are essential to quantify the tsunami hazard. To this end, it is essential to rely on complete databases of past tsunami observations, including both historical events and results of paleotsunami investigations. Furthermore, a robust hazard analysis has to take into account uncertainties and probabilities with the more advanced approaches such as PTHA.
Because the vulnerability of populations, of infrastructures and of the built environment in coastal zones increases, integrated plans for tsunami risk prevention and mitigation should be encouraged in any exposed coastline, consistent with the procedures now in place in a growing number of Tsunami Warning System.

The tsunami session welcomes multidisciplinary contributions covering any of the aspects mentioned here, encompassing field data, regional hazard studies, observation databases, numerical modeling, risk studies, real time networks, operational tools and procedures towards a most efficient warning.

A focus on recent tsunami events all over the globe is encouraged, as well as on the achievements of recent research and operational projects.

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Co-organized by OS2/SM2
Convener: Helene Hebert | Co-conveners: Alberto Armigliato, Miquel Canals, Ira Didenkulova
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)

SM3 – Seismic Hazard Assessment (earthquake forecasting, ground-motion modelling, seismic and/or multihazard probabilistic assessment)

SM3.1

We focus on the aspect of combining frontier science with high-density ground and building measurements and large open data pools to better predict ground-shaking and building behavior but also to better quantify and visualize the potential impact of earthquakes.
The aim of this session is to give an up-to-date view of new ideas and methods using dense seismological networks, the latest generation of ground-motion databases, data-mining analyses, crowd-sourcing data, and smart-city technologies to evaluate ground-shaking and assess earthquake hazard and risk.
We invite papers related to:
(1) Site-specific and ultra-high-density earthquake ground-motion prediction (e.g. non-ergodic ground-motion models, use of machine learning in engineering seismology, high-resolution site conditions)
(2) Scenario-based or probabilistic earthquake hazard and risk assessment
(3) Exposure models from open data (e.g. use of OpenStreetMap data)
(4) Structural health monitoring of buildings for dynamic vulnerability modeling during earthquake sequences or dynamic exposure modeling
(5) Transparent and innovative hazard/risk visualization methods

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Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Fabrice Cotton | Co-conveners: Kuo-Fong Ma, Danijel Schorlemmer
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
SM3.2

The analysis of the spatiotemporal evolution of seismicity and the development of physical
and statistical models of seismicity have substantially improved our understanding of
earthquake occurrence. Such endeavor has considerably benefited from the availability of
new techniques and high-resolution, high-quality datasets. However, our forecasting skill of
large earthquake is still bounded to the "low-probability" environment. Additional
challenges are posed by issues such as missing data, catalog quality, biases affecting the
estimation of model parameters.
This session focuses on the most recent developments of models and techniques for
seismicity analysis, together with the main issues we need to be aware of. Specifically, it
will address the following topics:
• Advances in earthquake forecasting at different time scales;
• Advances in the analysis of spatiotemporal properties of seismicity;
• Earthquake statistics;
• Challenges affecting the analysis and modeling of spatiotemporal earthquake
occurrence;
• Future perspectives in seismicity modeling;
• Is there life beyond ETAS?

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Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Angela StalloneECSECS | Co-conveners: Ilaria SpassianiECSECS, Sebastian Hainzl, Jiancang Zhuang
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
ITS1.8/SSS1.1

Citizen science (the involvement of the public in scientific processes) is gaining momentum across multiple disciplines, increasing multi-scale data production on biodiversity, earthquakes, weather, climate, health issues and food production, amongst others, that is extending the frontiers of knowledge. Successful participatory science enterprises and citizen observatories can potentially be scaled-up in order to contribute to larger policy strategies and actions (e.g. the European Earth Observation monitoring systems), for example to be integrated in GEOSS and Copernicus. Making credible contributions to science can empower citizens to actively participate as citizen stewards in decision making, helping to bridge scientific disciplines and promote vibrant, liveable and sustainable environments for inhabitants across rural and urban localities.
Often, citizen science is seen in the context of Open Science, which is a broad movement embracing Open Data, Open Technology, Open Access, Open Educational Resources, Open Source, Open Methodology, and Open Peer Review to transparently publish and share scientific research - thus leveraging Citizen Science and Reproducible Research. Both open science and citizen science pose great challenges for researchers to facilitate effective participatory science. To support the goals of the various Open Science initiatives, this session looks at what is possible and what is applied in geosciences. The session will showcase how various stakeholders can benefit from co-developed participatory research using citizen science and open science, acknowledging the drawbacks and highlighting the opportunities available, particularly through applications within mapping, technology, policy, economy, practice and society at large. Learning from bottom-up initiatives, other disciplines, and understanding what to adopt and what to change can help synergize scientific disciplines and empower participants in their own undertakings and new initiatives.

We want to ask and find answers to the following questions:
Which approaches can be used in Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences?
What are the biggest challenges in bridging between scientific disciplines and how to overcome them?
What kind of participatory citizen scientist involvement and open science strategies exist?
How to ensure transparency in project results and analyses?
What kind of critical perspectives on the limitations, challenges, and ethical considerations exist?

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Co-organized by EOS2/CL5/HS12/SM3
Convener: Taru SandénECSECS | Co-conveners: Lorenzo Bigagli, Daniel DörlerECSECS, Martin Hammitzsch, Florian HeiglECSECS, Eloise Biggs, Julia FöllmerECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
ITS1.7/SM3.5

The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) senses the solid Earth, the oceans and the atmosphere with a global network of seismic, infrasound, and hydroacoustic sensors as well as detectors for atmospheric radioactivity. The primary purpose of the IMS data is for nuclear explosion monitoring regarding all aspects of detecting, locating and characterizing nuclear explosions and their radioactivity releases. On-site verification technologies apply similar methods on smaller scales as well as geophysical methods such as ground penetrating radar and geomagnetic surveying with the goal of identifying evidence for a nuclear explosion close to ground zero. Papers in this session address advances in the sensor technologies, new and historic data, data collection, data processing and analysis methods and algorithms, uncertainty analysis, machine learning and data mining, experiments and simulations including atmospheric transport modelling. This session also welcomes papers on applications of the IMS and OSI instrumentation data. This covers the use of IMS data for disaster risk reduction such as tsunami early warning, earthquake hazard assessment, volcano ash plume warning, radiological emergencies and climate change related monitoring. The scientific applications of IMS data establish another large range of topics, including acoustic wave propagation in the Earth crust, stratospheric wind fields and gravity waves, global atmospheric circulation patterns, deep ocean temperature profiles and whale migration. The use of IMS data for such purposes returns a benefit with regard to calibration, data analysis methods and performance of the primary mission of monitoring for nuclear explosions.

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Co-organized by AS4/NH10/OS4
Convener: Martin Kalinowski | Co-conveners: Lars Ceranna, Yan Jia, Peter Nielsen, Ole Ross
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
ITS1.4/HS4.8

The Sendai Framework for disaster risk reduction (SFDRR) and its seventh global target recognizes that increased efforts are required to develop risk-informed and impact-based multi-hazard early warning systems. Despite significant advances in disaster forecasting and warning technology, it remains challenging to produce useful forecasts and warnings that are understood and used to trigger early actions. Overcoming these challenges requires understanding of the reliability of forecast tools and implementation barriers in combination with the development of new risk-informed processes. It also requires a commitment to create and share risk and impact data and to co-produce impact-based forecasting models and services. To deal with the problem of coming into action in response to imperfect forecasts, novel science-based concepts have recently emerged. As an example, Forecast-based Financing and Impact-based Multi-Hazard Early Warning Systems are currently being implemented operationally by both governmental and non-governmental organisations in several countries as a result of increasing international effort by several organizations such as the WMO, World Bank, IFRC and UNDRR to reduce disaster losses and ensuring reaching the objectives of SFDRR. This session aims to showcase lessons learnt and best practices on impact-based multi-hazards early warning system from the perspective of both the knowledge producers and users. It presents novel methods to translate forecast of various climate-related and geohazards into an impact-based forecast. The session addresses the role of humanitarian agencies, scientists and communities at risk in creating standard operating procedures for economically feasible actions and reflects on the influence of forecast uncertainty across different time scales in decision-making. Moreover, it provides an overview of state-of-the-art methods, such as using Artificial Intelligence, big data and space applications, and presents innovative ways of addressing the difficulties in implementing forecast-based actions. We invite submissions on the development and use of operational impact-based forecast systems for early action; developing cost-efficient portfolios of early actions for climate/geo-related impact preparedness such as cash-transfer for droughts, weather-based insurance for floods; assessments on the types and costs of possible forecast-based disaster risk management actions; practical applications of impact forecasts.

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Co-organized by AS4/NH9/SM3
Convener: Marc van den Homberg | Co-conveners: Bapon Fakhruddin, Andrea FicchiECSECS, Gabriela Guimarães NobreECSECS, Annegien Tijssen, Dave MacLeodECSECS, Maurine Kasuvu Ambani, Alison SneddonECSECS
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
NH4.2

The scientific base of the process of seismic risk mitigation involves various seismic hazard models, developed at different time scales and by different methods, as well as the use of information as complete and reliable as possible about past seismicity. Some recent large earthquakes caused extensive damage in areas where some models indicated low seismic hazard, leading to an increased demand for criteria to objectively assess how well seismic hazard models are performing. This session aims to tackle theoretical and implementation issues, as well as aspects of science policy and diplomacy, which are all essential elements towards effective disasters mitigation, and include:
⇒ earthquake hazard and risk estimation at different time and space scales, including extreme seismic events;
⇒ methods for assessing performances of seismic hazard and risk models;
⇒ discussions of the pros and cons of deterministic, neo-deterministic, probabilistic, and intensity-based seismic hazard assessments
⇒ long-term evidences about past great earthquakes, as well as evidences of lack of them, including unconventional seismological observations (e.g. impact on caves, ancient constructions and other deformations evidences);
⇒ earthquake hazard assessment in terms of macro-seismic intensity;
⇒ seismic hazard and risk assessment and their temporal variability, including the contribution of aftershocks and earthquake-induced cascading effects (e.g. landslides, tsunamis, etc).
We invite contributions related to: hazard and risk assessment methods and their performance in applications; verification methods that are suitable to quantify seismic hazard estimates and that can be applied to limited and/or heterogeneous observations (ranging from recent records of ground shaking parameters to past intensity data); seismic hazard/risk monitoring and modeling; and risk communication and mitigation.
The session will provide an opportunity to share best practices and experience gained with different methods, highlighting existing gaps and future research directions. Also, the session would like to discuss issues related to disaster science policy and diplomacy, providing opportunities to advance our understanding of disaster risk in "all its dimensions of vulnerability, capacity, exposure of persons and assets, hazard characteristics and the environment", while simultaneously building bridges between nations, where relationships could otherwise be strained.

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Co-organized by SM3, co-sponsored by IUGG
Convener: Antonella Peresan | Co-conveners: Katalin Gribovszki, Yekaterina KontarECSECS, Katerina Orfanogiannaki, Elisa Varini
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
NH4.1

The study of active faults and deformation of the Earth's surface has made, and continues to make, significant contributions to our understanding of earthquakes and the assessment of seismic related hazard. Active faulting may form and deform the Earth's surface so that records are documented in young sediments and in the landscape. Field studies of recent earthquake ruptures help to constrain earthquake source parameters and to identify previously unknown active structures. The insights gleaned from recent earthquakes can be applied to study past earthquakes. Paleoseismology and related disciplines such as paleogeodesy and paleotsunami investigations still are the primary tools to establish earthquake records that are long enough to determine recurrence intervals and long-term deformation rates for active faults. Multidisciplinary data sets accumulated over the years have brought unprecedented constraints on the size and timing of past earthquakes and allow deciphering shorter-term variations in fault slip rates or seismic activity rates, as well as the interaction of single faults within fault systems. This wide range of methods leads to a wide range of uncertainties in the definition of what is an active fault, which parameters are entered in fault databases, which consequently conditions the strategy used to transfer earthquake-fault data into fault models suitable for probabilistic SHA. Which uncertainty can be quantified by geologists and how can it be made easily accessible for proper usage in hazard computation is a fundamental question that the FAULT2SHA ESC working group (www.fault2sha.net) is attempting to tackle.
This FAULT2SHA session aims to spark a discussion between field earthquake geologists, crustal deformation modellers and fault modellers/seismic hazard practitioners around fault-related uncertainty issues and their inclusion in fault-based PSHA. We welcome contributions describing and critically discussing approaches used to study active faults as well as presentations discussing existing efforts on how fault-related information is translated into dedicated databases of primary surface information and then into 3D fault models. We particularly encourage contributions related to local studies of fault systems where specific issues could be debated on either fault data collection aspects, databases questions and/or fault hazard modelling

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Co-organized by SM3/TS5
Convener: Oona Scotti | Co-conveners: Esther Hintersberger, Bruno Pace
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
NH9.11

This session addresses knowledge exchange between researchers, the public, policy makers, and practitioners about natural hazards. Although we welcome all contributions in this topic, we are particularly interested in: (i) The communication (by scientists, engineers, the press, civil protection, government agencies, and a multitude other agencies) of natural hazards risk and uncertainty to the general public and other government officials; (ii) Approaches that address barriers and bridges in the science-policy-practice interface that hinder and support application of hazard-related knowledge; (iii) The teaching of natural hazards to university and lower-level students, using innovative techniques to promote understanding. We also are specifically interested in distance education courses on themes related to hazard and risk assessment, and disaster risk management, and in programmes for training in developing countries. We therefore solicit abstracts, particularly dynamic posters, on all aspects of how we communicate and educate the better understanding of natural hazards. We plan on having a PICO session to ensure a lively combination of discussion and poster presentation.

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Co-organized by EOS7/GM12/HS13/SM3
Convener: Joel GillECSECS | Co-conveners: Bruce D. Malamud, Alison SneddonECSECS, Adam D. Switzer, Faith TaylorECSECS
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)

SM4 – Seismic Imaging Across Scales (from near-surface to global scale, incl. methodological developments)

SM4.2

Geophysical imaging techniques such as seismic, (complex) electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar methods are widely used to characterize structures and processes in the shallow subsurface. Advances in experimental design, instrumentation, data acquisition, data processing, numerical modeling, and inversion constantly push the limits of spatial and temporal resolution. Despite these advances, the interpretation of geophysical images often remains ambiguous. Persistent challenges addressed in this session include optimal data acquisition strategies, (automated) data processing and error quantification, appropriate spatial and temporal regularization of model parameters, integration of non-geophysical measurements and geological realism into the imaging process, joint inversion, as well as the quantitative interpretation of tomograms through suitable petrophysical relations.

In light of these topics, we invite submissions concerning a broad spectrum of near-surface geophysical imaging methods and applications at different spatial and temporal scales. Novel developments in the combination of complementary measurement methods, machine learning, and process-monitoring applications are particularly welcome.

Invited speaker: Andreas Fichtner (ETH Zurich)

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Convener: Florian WagnerECSECS | Co-conveners: Adam Booth, Andreas Kemna, Anja KlotzscheECSECS, Frédéric Nguyen
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
SM4.3

This session will cover applied and theoretical aspects of geophysical imaging, modelling and inversion using active- and passive-source seismic measurements as well as other geophysical techniques (e.g., gravity, magnetic and electromagnetic) to investigate properties of the Earth’s crust and uppermost mantle, and explore the processes involved. We invite contributions focused on methodological developments, theoretical aspects, and applications. Studies across the scales and disciplines are particularly welcome.

Among others, the session may cover the following topics:
- Active- and passive-source imaging using body- and surface-waves;
- Full waveform inversion developments and applications;
- Advancements and case studies in 2D and 3D imaging;
- Interferometry and Marchenko imaging;
- Seismic attenuation and anisotropy;
- Developments and applications of multi-scale and multi-parameter inversion;
- Joint inversion of seismic and complementary geophysical data;
- Applications of new acquisition systems.

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Convener: Michal Malinowski | Co-conveners: Matthew AgiusECSECS, Giovanni DiaferiaECSECS, Milena MarjanovicECSECS, Cedric Schmelzbach
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
TS11.3

Seismic data analysis and interpretation is the key tool enabling the unravelling of the geometry and evolution of subsurface geology.
In the last decades, significant improvements in the acquisition and processing techniques have been combined with a growing coverage of high-resolution and broadband frequency seismic data, including the public release of large volumes of 2D-3D hydrocarbon industry-sourced data. This led to shedding genuine new light on the subsurface geology of large portions of the Earth’s continental margins, and enabled improved quantitative rock property parametrization.
In addition, seismic reflection data have recently appealed to an ever-growing scientific audience, including exploration geoscientists, marine geologists, seismic geomorphologists, stratigraphers and structural geologists. This growing community has been collectively working towards the integrated application of seismic interpretation techniques, including seismic attribute analysis, for industrial purposes as well as for environmental and academic research studies.
In this fast-developing context, it is fundamental to share the knowledge between different research and application approaches. Therefore, the aim of this session is to provide the state-of-the-art and new prospective in seismic data analysis and quantitative subsurface characterization for structural geology and tectonics, but also for exploration seismology, marine geology, seismic geomorphology, stratigraphy, etc.
We thus invite submissions that aim to present new insights in the seismic interpretation of: i) shallow high-resolution seismic data; ii) deep industrial subsurface data (e.g., for hydrocarbon exploration); and iii) ultra-deep lithospheric seismic data. Studies integrating different approaches and disciplines are particularly welcomed.

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Co-organized by GD4/SM4/SSP2
Convener: Vittorio Scisciani | Co-convener: Stefano PatrunoECSECS
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD4.2

International Lithosphere Program (ILP) has since 1980 been initiating major international, multidisciplinary research programmes to elucidate the nature, dynamics, origin and evolution of the lithosphere. ILP has taken initiative to more than 70 programmes within its four research themes: (1) Geoscience of Global Change, (2) Contemporary Dynamics and Deep Processes, (3) Continental Lithosphere and (4) Oceanic Lithosphere. Example programmes initiated by ILP include World Stress Map, Global Strain Rate Map, Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Map, Seismic Hazards and Megacities, Global Impact project, International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), and a series of Global Geoscience Transects and programmes. Present programmes focus on integrated mapping of lithosphere physical parameters, lithosphere dynamics including the fate of subducted lithosphere and deformation of continental lithosphere, response of the lithosphere to surface processes including changes in climate and erosion/deposition dynamics, mineral resources, and seismic risk. ILP promotes high class science in combination with community services through the Evgueni Burov medal for mid-career scientists and the Flinn-Hart Award for outstanding early-career scientists, which are awarded during the UGU annual meeting. The activities of ILP seeks to achieve a balance between: "addressing societal needs" in regard to e.g. natural catastrophes, resource exploration and environmental protection; and "satisfying scientific curiosity" in regard to global and regional processes affecting the lithosphere. This symposium presents some of the ILP activities.
In particular, we invite, in particular multidisciplinary, contributions which focus on the structure and evolution of the continental crust and upper mantle and on the nature of mantle discontinuities. The latter include, but are not limited to, the mid-lithosphere discontinuity (MLD), the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), and the mantle transition zone, as imaged by various seismological techniques and interpreted within interdisciplinary approaches. Papers with focus on the structure of the crust and the nature of the Moho are also welcome. Methodologically, the contributions will include studies based on seismic, thermal, gravity, petrological, and/or electro-magnetic data interpretations.

Confirmed invited speakers: Sierd Cloetingh, Harsh Gupta, Sergei Lebedev and Taras Gerya.

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Co-organized by SM4/TS11
Convener: Alexey Shulgin | Co-conveners: Hans Thybo, Magdalena Scheck-Wenderoth, Alexander Rudloff, Lev Vinnik
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
GD4.1

Structure and dynamics of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system is one of the key questions for understanding geological processes. Constraining the styles, mechanisms and fabrics evolution in the crust and the upper mantle come from both direct and indirect observations with the use of variety of methods. Seismological studies focusing on anisotropy have successfully improved our knowledge of deformation patterns, acting both at present as well as in the past. When combined with tomographic models, velocity anisotropy can shed light on the geometry, structure, and dynamics of deformation in the lithosphere and the asthenosphere. Sophisticated geodynamic modelling and laboratory experiments enhance our understanding of flow patterns in the upper mantle and their effects on vertical motions of the crust and the lithosphere. Combining with inferences from seismic anisotropy, these methods have the potential to reveal mechanisms that create deformation-induced features such as shape preferred orientation (SPO) and lattice-preferred orientation (LPO), which created in the past or during the last deforming processes. Structural and kinematic characterization of deformation events by geometric and kinematic analyses infer the direction and magnitude of the tectonic forces involved in driving deformation within crust and upper mantle. Additionally, both physical analogue and numerical modelling foster our understanding of complex 3D-plate interaction on various timescales, controlled through the degree of plate coupling and the rheology of the lithosphere.
However, additional work is required to better integrate various experimental and modelling techniques, and to link them with multi-scale observations. The session aims at bringing together inferences from different disciplines that focus on structure and deformation of the lithosphere and the sub-lithospheric upper mantle as well as on the dynamics and nature of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. The main goal is to demonstrate the potential of different methods, and to share ideas of how we can collaboratively study lithosphere structure, and how the present-day fabrics of the lithosphere relates to the contemporary deformation processes and ongoing dynamics within the asthenospheric mantle. Contributions from studies employing seismic anisotropy observation, geodynamical modelling (analogue and numerical), structural geology, and mineral and rock physics are welcome.

Invited Speakers:
Eric Debayle (Laboratoire de Geologie de Lyon-Terre, Planètes, Environnement, CNRS, France)
Christof Völksen (Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Germany)

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Co-organized by SM4/TS14
Convener: Ehsan QorbaniECSECS | Co-conveners: Irene Bianchi, Boris Kaus, Jaroslava Plomerova, Ernst Willingshofer
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD8.2

Many regions of the Earth, from crust to core, exhibit anisotropic fabrics which can reveal much about geodynamic processes in the subsurface. These fabrics can exist at a variety of scales, from crystallographic orientations to regional structure alignments. In the past few decades, a tremendous body of multidisciplinary research has been dedicated to characterizing anisotropy in the solid Earth and understanding its geodynamical implications. This has included work in fields such as: (1) geophysics, to make in situ observations and construct models of anisotropic properties at a range of depths; (2) mineral physics, to explain the cause of some of these observations; and (3) numerical modelling, to relate the inferred fabrics to regional stress and flow regimes and, thus, geodynamic processes in the Earth. The study of anisotropy in the Solid Earth encompasses topics so diverse that it often appears fragmented according to regions of interest, e.g., the upper or lower crust, oceanic lithosphere, continental lithosphere, cratons, subduction zones, D'', or the inner core. The aim of this session is to bring together scientists working on different aspects of anisotropy to provide a comprehensive overview of the field. We encourage contributions from all disciplines of the earth sciences (including mineral physics, seismology, magnetotellurics, geodynamic modelling) focused on anisotropy at all scales and depths within the Earth.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM4
Convener: Manuele Faccenda | Co-conveners: Sébastien Chevrot, Tuna Eken, Miriam Christina Reiss
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD2.1

Dynamic processes shape the Earth and other planets throughout their history. Geochemical observations place major constraints on dynamical processes that operated throughout Earth’s history while seismic imaging gives a snapshot of today’s mantle. Knowledge of physical properties and rheology from mineral physics is key to quantify processes in the mantle, and is undergoing constant advances (e.g. related to the iron spin transition or the thermal conductivity of the core). Magma ocean crystallisation established the initial conditions for subsequent long-term Earth evolution but is not well understood and typically not considered in models of long-term evolution. Modern-day plate tectonics may not have operated in the past; there is active debate about what tectonic mode(s) may have preceded it and their geological and geochemical signatures.

This session aims to provide a multidisciplinary view of the dynamics and evolution of the Earth, including its mantle, lithosphere, core and atmosphere. We welcome contributions that address aspects of this problem including geochemical observations and their interpretation, new mineral physics findings, geodynamical modelling, and seismological observations, on temporal scales ranging from the present day to billions of years, and on spatial scales ranging from microscopic mineralogical samples to global models. Contributions that take a multidisciplinary approach are particularly welcome.

Invited speaker: Matthew Jackson, Saskia Goes, Lorenzo Colli, Paula Koelemeijer

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Co-organized by EMRP1/GMPV4/SM4, co-sponsored by EAG
Convener: Simone PiliaECSECS | Co-conveners: Laura Cobden, Andrea Giuliani, Hauke Marquardt, Maria TsekhmistrenkoECSECS, stephanie durandECSECS, Bernhard Schuberth, Martina UlvrovaECSECS
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
TS7.6

The Alps have been intensively studied by geologists for more than a century, providing a unique natural laboratory to deepen our understanding of orogenic processes and their relationship to mantle dynamics. Although most concepts that underlie current studies of mountain belts and convergence dynamics were born in the Alps, the belt is now being examined with renewed vigour in the AlpArray project. This project involves a large number of European institutions, with efforts focused on the AlpArray Seismic Network to provide homogeneous seismological coverage of the greater Alpine area at unprecedented aperture and station density, both on land and sea. New data is being recorded in a multidisciplinary research effort, and other projects are being planned in the immediate and mid-term future.
Within this context, we invite contributions from the Earth Science community that highlight new results in AlpArray and that identify and solve key open questions of the present and past structure and dynamics of the Alps and neighbouring orogens. Both disciplinary and multi-disciplinary contributions are welcome from geophysical imaging, (seismo)tectonics, structural geology, gravimetry, geodesy, geodynamics, petrology, geochronology and other allied fields, combined with various modelling approaches. Scales of interest range from crustal to upper mantle, in the Alps and neighbouring mountain belts such as the Apennines, the Carpathians and the Dinarides.

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Co-organized by GD7/SM4
Convener: Anne Paul | Co-conveners: M. R. Handy, György Hetényi, Marco Giovanni Malusa', Irene Molinari
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), Thu, 07 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS5.2

The largest earthquakes globally occur along plate boundaries, producing intense shaking and associated secondary hazards over broad regions. In the past few years, there have been significant improvements in the quantity and quality of geodetic, seismological, and geological observations of the slow accumulation and rapid release of strain at these plate boundaries. At the same time, improvements in modeling techniques are providing new insights into the geodynamic processes controlling the occurrence of major earthquakes. With these advances, it is now becoming possible to address outstanding issues about both seismic and aseismic deformation at plate boundaries, such as time-variable locking and unlocking of the plate interface, the extent and role of slow slip events, the links between earthquake cycles and permanent deformation, and the behavior of complete cycles revealed by paleo-seismic and paleo-geodetic observations.

We invite contributions that investigate the spectrum of deformation occurring throughout the earthquake cycle at plate boundaries, from aseismic to seismic and across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Submissions that utilize improved remote and field observational capabilities, developments in data analysis, or innovations in analog and numerical modeling to advance the understanding of the underlying physical processes are encouraged.

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Co-organized by GD9/NH4/SM4
Convener: Matthew Herman | Co-conveners: Ylona van DintherECSECS, Marcos Moreno, Luca Dal ZilioECSECS
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
TS6.1

The separation of the African and Arabian plates is responsible for the opening of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden that meet the East African Rift at the Afar triple junction. Moreover, the strike-slip movement between the African and the Arabian plates is accommodated in the northernmost part of the rift system by the Dead Sea fault and its marine extension in the Gulf of Aqaba. High volcanic and seismic activity in and around the three arms of the divergence highlights some of the key aspects of this opening system.

This complex geodynamic system is currently investigated by multiple geoscientific approaches including e.g., tectonics, volcanology, stratigraphy, geodynamics, geodesy as well as active and passive geophysical methods.

In this session, we welcome contributions that are based on (but not limited to) such methods and investigate the basins of the Gulf of Suez, Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Afar depression and their surrounding regions, from the mantle to the crust.

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Co-organized by GD7/GMPV11/SM4
Convener: Laura ParisiECSECS | Co-conveners: Nico Augustin, Joël Ruch, Daniele TrippaneraECSECS
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
CR2.1

Geophysical measurements offer important baseline datasets as well as validation for modelling and remote sensing products for cryospheric sciences. Applications include the dynamics of ice-sheets, alpine glaciers and sea ice, changes in snow cover properties of seasonal and permanent snow, snow/ice-atmosphere-ocean interactions, permafrost degradation, geomorphic processes and changes in subsurface materials.

In this session we welcome contributions related to a wide spectrum of geophysical- and in-situ methods, including advances in diverse techniques such as radioglaciology, active and passive seismology, acoustic sounding, GPS/GNSS reflectometry or time delay techniques, cosmic ray neutron sensing, drone applications, geoelectrics and NMR. Contributions may concern field applications as well as new approaches in geophysical/in-situ survey techniques or theoretical advances in the field of data analysis, processing or inversion. Case studies from all parts of the cryosphere such as snow, alpine glaciers, ice sheets, glacial and periglacial environments and sea ice are highly welcome. The focus of the session is to compare experiences in the application, processing, analysis and interpretation of different geophysical and in-situ techniques in these highly complex environments.

This session is offered as a PICO: an engaging presentation format that has been successfully tested for this session during the last three years at EGU. All selected contributions will present their research orally, and then further present their research using interactive screens. This results in rich scientific feedback and is an effective tool for communicating science with high visibility.

This is a joined session - we merged with the former session SM5.5 'Active and passive seismic methods for imaging and monitoring the cryosphere'.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Invited Speaker ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dustin Schroeder: Observing Evolving Subglacial Conditions with Muti-Temporal Radar Sounding

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Co-organized by HS1.1/SM4
Convener: Franziska KochECSECS | Co-conveners: Nanna Bjørnholt Karlsson, Kristina Keating, Mariusz Majdanski, Emma C. SmithECSECS, Schlindwein Vera, Andreas Köhler
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
GD7.1

The Arctic realm hosts vast extended continental shelves bordering old land masses, one of the largest submarine Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) -the Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge - of Mesozoic age, and the slowest mid-ocean spreading ridge (the Gakkel Ridge) on the globe. Extreme variations in the evolution of landscapes and geology reflect the tug-of-war between the formation of new oceans, like the North Atlantic, and the destruction of older oceans: the South Anyui, Angayucham and North Pacific, which were accompanied by rifting, collision, uplift and subsidence. The causal relationships between the deep-mantle and surface processes in the Circum-Arcic region remain unclear. Geoscientific information on the relationship between the onshore geology and offshore ridges and basins in combination with variations in the mantle is the key for any deeper understanding of the entire Arctic Ocean.
This session provides a forum for discussions of a variety of problems linked to the Circum-Arctic geodynamics and aims to bring together a diversity of sub-disciplines including plate tectonics, mantle tomography, seismology, geodynamic modelling, igneous and structural geology, geophysical imaging, sedimentology, and geochemistry. Particularly encouraged are papers that address lithospheric-mantle interactions in the North Atlantic, the Arctic and North Pacific regions, mantle dynamics and vertical and horizontal motion of crustal blocks and consequences for paleogeography. As geologic and tectonic models are inherently tied with changes in the oceanographic and climatic development of the Arctic, we also invite studies that focus on the interplay between these processes and across timescales. Lastly, we would like to invite contributions from studies concerning the implications of how the Arctic’s geography and geology are portrayed by modern data and issues related to jurisdiction and sovereign rights with particular focus on the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea.

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Co-organized by CL4/GMPV11/SM4/TS14
Convener: Grace E. ShephardECSECS | Co-conveners: Frances DeeganECSECS, Karolina Kośmińska, Rebekka Steffen
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)

SM5 – Seismic Instrumentation & Infrastructure

SM5.1

Recent advances in deformation sensing have led to new applications in various geophysical disciplines such as earthquake physics, broadband seismology, volcanology, seismic exploration, strong ground motion, earthquake engineering and geodesy.
New developments in translation, rotation and strain sensing enable the complete observation of seismic ground motion and deformation. Applications are manifold, ranging from the reduction of nonuniqueness in seismic inverse problems to the characterization, separation and reconstruction of the seismic wavefield.
Among others, fibre optic technologies is bound to become a standard tool for crustal exploration and seismic monitoring thanks to: (i) easier installation (low cost, simpler installation and maintenance, robustness in harsh environment); (ii) high spatial and temporal resolution over long distance; (iii) broader frequency band. There have been significant breakthroughs, applying fibre optic technologies to interrogate cables at very high precision over very large distances both on land and at sea, in boreholes and at the surface.
These developments overlap with considerable improvements in optical and atom interferometry for inertial rotation and gravity sensing which has led to a variety of improved sensor concepts over the last two decades.
We welcome contributions on theoretical advances and applications of novel sensing methodologies in seismology, geodesy, geophysics, natural hazards, oceanography, urban environment, geothermal investigations, etc. including laboratory studies, large-scale field tests and modelling.

We are happy to announce Nathaniel J. Lindsey as invited speaker.

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Co-organized by ERE6/NH4
Convener: Gilda Currenti | Co-conveners: David SollbergerECSECS, Philippe Jousset, Felix Bernauer, Shane Murphy, André Gebauer, Zack SpicaECSECS, Sneha SinghECSECS
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
SM5.6

Observational seismology has witnessed tremendous advances in the last two decades in Europe and worldwide. Current state-of-the-art permanent seismic monitoring means dense deployments of modern broadband velocity and acceleration sensors, often co-located, writing on 24- or 26-bit digitisers, with continuous real-time streaming to data centres. Technological improvements have been accompanied by community developments of standards, protocols, strategies and software to ease and homogenise data acquisition, archival, dissemination and processing. The establishment of EIDA (http://orfeus-eu.org/data/eida/) marked a change of paradigm in seismic data dissemination in Europe. The EIDA federated infrastructure is accessible via standard web services, including those promoted by FDSN. The deployment of dense modern accelerometer networks has progressively blurred the boundary between broadband and strong-motion seismology. Geophysical site characterisation has become standard practice, and open databases have been created to host basic and advanced station metadata. In this dynamic landscape, ORFEUS (http://orfeus-eu.org/) carries out since more than 30 years its mandate to promote and coordinate waveform seismology in Europe through the collection, archival and distribution of seismic waveform data, metadata and closely-related derived products. ORFEUS services (http://orfeus-eu.org/data/) currently provide access to the waveforms acquired by ~ 10,000 stations in Pan-Europe, including dense temporary experiments, with strong emphasis on open data and high data quality. Contributing data to ORFEUS archives means long-term archival, state-of-the-art quality control, enhanced data access and usage. At the onset of a new era for observational seismology, characterised by the challenges posed by big data and the establishment of a coordinated governance of all European seismological services in EPOS Seismology, this session discusses the latest advances in seismological observation in Pan-Europe and the challenges ahead. This includes integration of different datasets like GPS, OBS and portable arrays. Focus is on, but not limited to the participants to ORFEUS, their hardware and software infrastructure, technical and scientific products. Contributions from other global / international / national agencies focused on observational seismology are welcome. This session facilitates seismological data discovery and promotes open data sharing and integration.

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Convener: Carlo Cauzzi | Co-conveners: Lucia Luzi, Lars Ottemöller, Helle Pedersen, Damiano Pesaresi
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
ITS4.5/GI1.4

Environmental systems often span spatial and temporal scales covering different orders of magnitude. The session is oriented in collecting studies relevant to understand multiscale aspects of these systems and in proposing adequate multi-platform and inter-disciplinary surveillance networks monitoring tools systems. It is especially aimed to emphasize the interaction between environmental processes occurring at different scales. In particular, a special attention is devoted to the studies focused on the development of new techniques and integrated instrumentation for multiscale monitoring high natural risk areas, such as: volcanic, seismic, energy exploitation, slope instability, floods, coastal instability, climate changes and other environmental context.
We expect contributions derived from several disciplines, such as applied geophysics, geology, seismology, geodesy, geochemistry, remote and proximal sensing, volcanology, geotechnical, soil science, marine geology, oceanography, climatology and meteorology. In this context, the contributions in analytical and numerical modeling of geological and environmental processes are also expected.
Finally, we stress that the inter-disciplinary studies that highlight the multiscale properties of natural processes analyzed and monitored by using several methodologies are welcome.

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Co-organized by AS4/CL2/GM2/GMPV9/NH8/NP3/OS4/SM5/SSS10
Convener: Pietro Tizzani | Co-conveners: Antonello Bonfante, Francesca Bianco, Raffaele Castaldo, Nemesio M. Pérez, Annalisa Cappello
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
NH6.2

Space-based geodetic techniques including Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and SAR-based change detection have become essential tools for high-quality mapping and analysis of the damage, change and deformation induced by natural and anthropogenic processes. Processing of these data have led to many new insights into understanding of geophysical and geological processes related to earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, sinkholes, floods, glaciers, and groundwater exploitation. They are also extremely useful for civil protection authorities for post-disaster response, detecting precursors of failure, and planning warning systems for areas prone to risk.
All scientists exploiting SAR/InSAR data to address challenges in the areas of the geosphere, cryosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere are cordially invited to contribute to this session. We welcome contributions from innovative processing algorithms, interpretation and modelling methods that are used for generating high-level products from SAR data for applications in earth and environmental sciences. Submissions are encouraged to cover a broad range of topics, which may include, but are not limited to, the following activities: SAR/InSAR algorithm development including cloud-based computing, deep learning and big data analysis, crustal deformation and earthquake cycle, landslides, volcanic processes, land subsidence, sinkholes, mining activities, infrastructure monitoring, flood monitoring, forest biomass and agriculture, glacier and ice dynamics, and permafrost

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Co-organized by G6/SM5
Convener: Mahdi Motagh | Co-conveners: Ziyadin Cakir, Oriol Monserrat
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)

SM6 – Crustal Fluids & Seismic Activity (incl. induced & triggered seismicity, volcano seismology)

SM6.1

In tectonic and volcanic regions earthquake swarms and seismic sequences are frequently characterized by complex temporal evolution, and a delayed occurrence of the largest magnitude earthquakes. The complex evolution of such seismic sequences is generally considered to derive from transient forcing where fluids play a major role causing slow-slip and creeping events, and – at volcanoes – stresses due to magma migration (i.e. dike intrusion and pressurization of the magma plumbing system). Yet, the mechanisms of fluid-rock interaction, leading to changes of the rheological properties of faults, and of the fracture mechanics, are still far beyond a full understanding. Therefore, it is fundamental to develop and implement innovative methodologies and technologies or to apply multi-disciplinary approaches for a multi-parametric crustal imaging aimed at tracking fluid movements and/or pore fluid-pressure diffusion within the seismogenic crust, and to integrate the results with the analysis of spatio-temporal and size characteristics of earthquake occurrence. The two approaches complement each other improving, on one hand, our understanding of crustal properties and, on the other hand, help constraining the degree of involvement of fluids by the analysis of the earthquake statistics.
This session aims at putting together studies of swarms and complex seismic sequences modulated by aseismic transient forcing as well as field studies, numerical modeling, theoretical and experimental investigation on the detection and tracking of crustal fluids in tectonic, volcanic and industrial contexts. Contributions from multi-disciplinary studies of fluid geochemistry, surface ground deformation and space-time variations of electrical and seismic crustal properties are also welcome, as well as laboratory and numerical modeling simulating the mechanical condition yielding to fluid-driven swarm-like and complex seismic sequences.

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Co-organized by GMPV9/TS5
Convener: Luigi Passarelli | Co-conveners: Grazia De LandroECSECS, Nicola D'Agostino, Francesco Maccaferri, Maria MesimeriECSECS, Mathilde Radiguet, Agata Siniscalchi, Tony Alfredo Stabile
Displays
| Fri, 08 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), Fri, 08 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
SM6.3

Crustal faults are complex natural systems whose physical and chemical properties change with time over several scales. Tracking the evolution of a fault system toward the generation of a large earthquake requires thus a multi-disciplinary approach, that involves the analysis and modelling of seismological, geodetic, geochemical and other geophysical observations. To understand the fault behaviour, near-fault observatories have been deployed in Europe and worldwide, as dense, innovative infrastructures that monitor the underlying Earth crust providing state-of-the-art, high-resolution multidisciplinary time series.

This session promotes contributions aimed at characterizing physical and chemical processes related to the fault evolution through cross-disciplinary analysis and modelling of near fault observations. We encourage the submission of works that investigate faulting processes such as earthquake preparation, nucleation and triggering processes, aseismic transients and forcing mechanisms such as creeping that may influence further rupture development, diffusive processes associated to fluid migration and fluid-rock interaction, accurate location and characterization of the micro-seismicity to constrain space-time-magnitude patterns and other tectonic transients that may affect fault tectonics.

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Co-organized by TS5
Convener: Gaetano Festa | Co-conveners: Lauro Chiaraluce, Tomáš Fischer, Alexandru Marmureanu
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
ERE6.2

Numerous cases of induced/triggered seismicity have been reported in the last decades, directly or indirectly related to anthropogenic activity for the geo-resources exploration. Induced earthquakes felt by local population can often negatively affect public perception of geo-energies and may lead to the cancellation of important projects. Furthermore, large earthquakes may jeopardize wellbore stability and damage surface infrastructure. Thus, monitoring and modeling processes leading to fault reactivation, (seismic or aseismic) are critical to develop effective and reliable forecasting methodologies during deep underground exploitation. The complex interaction between injected fluids, subsurface geology, stress interactions, and resulting induced seismicity requires an interdisciplinary approach that accounts for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical processes to understand the triggering mechanisms.
In this session, we invite contributions from research aimed at investigating the interaction of the above processes during exploitation of underground resources, including hydrocarbon extraction, wastewater disposal, geothermal-energy exploitation, hydraulic fracturing, gas storage and production, mining, and reservoir impoundment for hydro-energy. We particularly encourage novel contributions based on laboratory and underground near-fault experiments, numerical modeling, the spatio-temporal relationship between seismic properties, injection/extraction parameters, and/or geology, and fieldwork. Contributions covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of induced and triggered seismicity at multiple spatial and temporal scales are welcome.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM6
Convener: Antonio Pio Rinaldi | Co-conveners: Léna CauchieECSECS, Rebecca Harrington, Marco Maria ScuderiECSECS, Victor Vilarrasa
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
SM6.5

Seismology is fundamental for monitoring and investigating volcanic systems.
Volcanoes are complex systems comprising both time-varying processes and structural heterogeneity. This combination of wide-ranging complex processes, extreme geomechanical heterogeneity, frequently rapid changes in time, leads to challenges in interpreting seismic observations in terms of physical processes at depth. In addition, the link between the variety of physical processes beneath volcanoes and their seismic response (or lack of) is often poorly understood, making it difficult to develop a detailed understanding of the physical processes at work in volcanic systems.
To address these challenges, this session aims to bring together seismologists, volcano and geothermal seismologists, and wave propagation and source modellers working on different aspects of volcano seismology including but not limited to: (i) seismicity catalogues (statistics & spatio-temporal evolution of seismicity), (ii) innovative methods for source locations (iii) source inversions (iv) seismic wave propagation & scattering, (v) small scale deformation studies, (vi) new developments in volcano imagery, (vii) time-lapse studies – including the use of noise, multiplets and high-rate GPS. Studies on geothermal systems in volcanic environments are also welcome.
By considering interrelationships between these complementary seismological areas, we aim to develop a coherent picture of the latest advances, successful applications and outstanding challenges in volcano seismology.

Public information:
SCHEDULE

16:15 Start of the session
Introduction

16:20 Guardo et al.: “Space-weighted seismic attenuation multi-frequency tomography at Deception Island volcano (Antartica)” (EGU2020-9986)

16:25 Eibl et al.: “Rotational sensor on a volcano: New insights from Etna, Italy” (EGU2020-18862)

16:30 Gabrielli et al.: “Geomorphological controls on seismic recordings in volcanic areas” (EGU2020-511)

16:35 Metaxian et al.: “Towards real-time monitoring with a seismic antenna at Merapi volcano” (EGU2020-19068)

16:40 Falcin et al.: “Automatic classification of seismo-volcanic signals at La Soufrière of Guadeloupe” (EGU2020-10234)

16:45 Lamb et al.: “Identifying icequakes at ice-covered volcanoes in Southern Chile” (EGU2020-851)

16:50 Battaglia et al.: “Discriminating icequakes from volcanic seismicity at Cotopaxi volcano (Ecuador) “ (EGU2020-11749)

16:55 Garza-Giron et al.: “Hidden earthquakes unveil the dynamic evolution of a large-scale explosive eruption “ (EGU2020-14124)

17:00 Shapiro et al.: "Degassing of volatile-reach basaltic magmas: source of deep long period volcanic earthquakes" (EGU2020-8251)

17:05 Cesca et al.: “The seismic sound of deep volcanic processes”, (EGU2020-6813)

17:10 Sadeghi and Suzuki: “The 11 November 2018 Mayotte event was observed at the Iranian Broadband seismic stations” (EGU2020-9767)

17:15 Ikegaya and Yamamoto: “Spatio-temporal characteristics and focal mechanisms of deep low-frequency earthquakes beneath Zao volcano, Japan”, (EGU2020-12533)

17:20 Möllhoff et al.: “Recent microseismicity observed at Hekla volcano and first velocity inversion results” (EGU2020-18954)

17:25 Bjarnasson et al. (presenting Revathy Parameswaran): “Interseismic stress field variations in Hjalli-Ölfus, SW Iceland” (EGU2020-8521)

17:30 Eibl et al.: “Seismic Eruption Catalog of Strokkur Geyser, Iceland“ (EGU2020-16535)

17:35 Thorbjarnardóttir et al.: “The Great Geysir and tectonic interactions in South Iceland”, (EGU2020-16388)

17:40 Nooshiri et al.: “Source mechanisms of seismic events during the 2018 eruption of Sierra Negra Volcano (Galapagos) determined by using polarization properties of complete (near-field and far-field) body waves”, (EGU2020-11297)

17:45 Longobardi,et al.: “Multiplet Based Time Lapse Velocity Changes Prior to the 2018 Eruption of Sierra Negra Volcano, Galapagos Island Observed with Coda Wave Interferometry” (EGU2020-18213)

17:50 Ka Lok Li et al.: “Different mechanisms of the pre- and co-eruptive tremor during the 2018 eruption at Sierra Negra volcano, Galapagos” (EGU2020-18975)

17:55 Dehghanniri and Jellinek: “An Experimental Study of Volcanic Tremor Driven by Magma Wagging” (EGU2020-11365)



FORMAT OF THE SESSION: Each author will present her/his work by highlighting the main points (ideally copy/paste). Please do it in a short summary. This will be followed by questions and discussion. The length of the individual slot (including questions) is 5 minutes.

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Co-organized by GMPV9/NH2
Convener: Ivan Lokmer | Co-conveners: Chris Bean, Vala Hjörleifsdóttir, Kristín Jónsdóttir, Diana Roman
Displays
| Thu, 07 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
GMPV9.7

Over the past few years, major technological advances allowed to significantly increase both the spatial coverage and frequency bandwidth of multi-disciplinary observations at active volcanoes. Networks of instruments for the quantitative measurement of many parameters now permit an unprecedented, multi-parameter vision of the surface manifestations of mass transport beneath volcanoes. Furthermore, new models and processing techniques have led to innovative paradigms for inverting observational data to image the structures and interpret the dynamics of volcanoes. Within this context, this session aims at bringing together a multidisciplinary audience to discuss the most recent innovations in volcano imaging and monitoring, and to present observations, methods and models that increase our understanding of volcanic processes.
We welcome contributions (1) related to methodological and instrumental advances in geophysical, geological and geochemical imaging of volcanoes, and (2) to explore new knowledge provided by these studies on the internal structure and physical processes of volcanic systems.
We invite contributors from all geophysical, geological and geochemical disciplines such as seismology, electromagnetics, geoelectrics, gravimetry, magnetics, muon tomography, volatile measurements and analysis; from in-situ monitoring networks to high resolution remote sensing and innovative processing methods, applied to volcanic systems ranging from near-surface hydrothermal activity to magmatic processes at depth.

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Co-organized by NH2/SM6
Convener: Jurgen Neuberg | Co-conveners: Benoît SmetsECSECS, Luca De Siena, Thomas R. Walter, Rachel Whitty, Hugues Brenot, Nicolas d'Oreye, Gaetana Ganci
Displays
| Tue, 05 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
GD5.2

Subduction zones are arguably the most important geological features of our planet, where plates plunge into the deep, metamorphic reactions take place, large earthquakes happen and melting induces volcanism and creation of continental crust. None of these processes would be possible without the cycling of volatiles, and this session aims to explore their role in convergent margins. Questions to address include the following. Do Atlantic and Pacific subduction zones cycle volatiles in different ways? What dynamic or chemical roles are played by subducted fracture zones and plate bending faults? How do fluids and melts interact with the mantle wedge and overlying lithosphere? Why do some of the Earth’s largest mineral resources form in subduction settings? We aim to bring together geodynamicists, geochemists, petrologists, seismologists, mineral and rock physicists, and structural geologists to understand how plate hydration/slab dynamics/dehydration, and subsequent mantle wedge melting/fluid percolation, and ultimately melt segregation/accumulation lead to the diverse range of phenomena observed at convergence zones around the globe.

Includes Augustus Love Medal by Harro Schmeling
Invited Speaker: Nestor Cerpa (University of Montpellier, France)

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Co-organized by GMPV2/SM6/TS7
Convener: Jeroen van Hunen | Co-conveners: Jenny Collier, Colin Macpherson, Andreas Rietbrock, Jamie Wilkinson
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
TS3.4

Geophysical data demonstrate elevated seismic activity in subduction zones. Here dehydration and fluid pressure cycling as a function of increasing compaction and metamorphic grade are closely linked to deformation over a multitude of spatial and time scales. The highly anisotropic and initially fluid saturated marine sediments and altered oceanic crust dehydrate, while being incorporated into the accretionary wedge and subducted under the upper plate. Under high tectonic stresses, fluid overpressure eventually results in mechanical instabilities, promoting either hydrofracturing or ductile failure giving way for fluids to circulate. Collection of these fluids at the micron-scale and propagation along pathways up to the deca-kilometre scale are probably in charge for phenomena such as episodic tremor and slow slip. Increasing evidence from geophysical and seismic studies suggest that accumulation of slow slip events and fluids may even trigger devastating high-energy megathrust earthquakes. Quantitative understanding about (i) the release of fluids from their host rocks, (ii) the effect of localisation of both fluid flow and deformation and (iii) their effect on seismic activity are therefore crucial to understand the complex feedback processes. This system can only be fully understood by a close collaboration between experts from structural geology, metamorphic petrology and geophysics. In this interdisciplinary session, we therefore invite contributions from natural, experimental- and numerical modelling-based studies focussing on both exhumed (paleo) and active subduction zones.

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Co-organized by GMPV2/SM6
Convener: Ismay Vénice AkkerECSECS | Co-conveners: Francesco GiuntoliECSECS, Marco Herwegh, Christoph Schrank, Emily Warren-Smith
Displays
| Wed, 06 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
ERE2.6

With an increasing demand for low-carbon energy solutions, the need of geothermal resources utilization is accelerating. Geothermal energy can be extracted from various, often complex geological settings, e.g. fractured crystalline rock, magmatic systems or sedimentary basins. Current advancements also target unconventional systems (e.g., Enhanced Geothermal Systems, super-hot, pressurized and co-produced, super-critical systems) besides conventional hydrothermal systems. Optimizing investments leads to the development of associated resources such as lithium, rare earths and hydrogen. This requires a joint effort for monitoring, understanding and modelling geological systems that are specific to each resource.
A sustainable use of geothermal resources requires advanced understanding of the properties of the entire system during exploration as well as monitoring, including geophysical properties, thermo-/petro-physical conditions, fluid composition; structural and hydrological features; and engineering challenges. Challenges faced are, among others, exploration of blind systems, reservoir stimulation, induced seismicity or related to multiphase fluid and scaling processes.

The integration of analogue field studies with real-life production data, from industrial as well as research sites, and their organization and the combination with numerical models, are a hot topic worldwide. With this session we aim to gather field, laboratory and numerical experts who focus their research on geothermal sites, to stimulate discussion in this multi-disciplinary applied research field. We seek for contributions from all disciplines, ranging from field data acquirements and analysis to laboratory experiments, e.g. geophysical surveys or geochemical experiments, and from the management and organization of information to numerical models as well as from (hydro)geologists, geochemists, (geo)physicists, surface and subsurface engineers.

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM6
Convener: Maren BrehmeECSECS | Co-conveners: Marco Calò, Anne PluymakersECSECS, Ivan Granados ChavarriaECSECS, Eugenio TrumpyECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)

SM7 – Computational & Theoretical Seismology

SM7.1

Innovative forward and inverse modeling techniques, advances in numerical solvers and the ever-increasing power of high-performance compute clusters have driven recent developments in inverting seismic and other geophysical data to reveal properties of the Earth at all scales.

The interpretation of single disciplinary geophysical field data often allows for various, equally probable models that may not always sufficiently discern plausible hypotheses that are challenged. Therefore, co-validation of data from different disciplines is critical.

This session provides a forum to present, discuss and learn the state-of-the-art in computational seismology, non-linear and joint inversion, uncertainty quantification and collaborative interpretation.

Invited Speakers:
Christel Tiberi, "Joint inversion and collaborative interpretations in complex geodynamical context";
Andrew Curtis, "Variational Probabilistic Tomography";
Yann Capdeville, "Intrinsic non-uniqueness of the acoustic full waveform inverse problem"

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Co-organized by EMRP2/ESSI1/GD10
Convener: Christian Boehm | Co-conveners: Maik NeukirchECSECS, Anne BarnoudECSECS, Ebru Bozdag, Stéphanie Gautier, Lion Krischer, Christian SchifferECSECS, Zack SpicaECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
SM7.3

Numerical modeling of earthquakes provides new approaches to apprehend the physics of earthquake rupture and the seismic cycle, seismic wave propagation, fault zone evolution and seismic hazard assessment.
Recent advances in numerical algorithms and increasing computational power enable unforeseen precision and multi-physics components in physics-based earthquake simulation but also pose challenges in terms of fully exploiting modern supercomputing infrastructure, realistic parameterization of simulation ingredients and the analysis of large synthetic datasets while advances in laboratory experiments link earthquake source processes to rock mechanics.
This session aims to bring together modelers and data analysts interested in the physics and computational aspects of earthquake phenomena and earthquake engineering. We welcome studies focusing on all aspects of seismic hazard assessment and the physics of earthquakes - from slow slip events, fault mechanics and rupture dynamics, to wave propagation and ground motion analysis, to the seismic cycle and inter seismic deformation - and studies which further the state-of-the art in the related computational and numerical aspects.

Public information:
Welcome to session SM7.3 "Physics-based earthquake modeling and engineering”.
Our session aims to bring together modelers and data analysts interested in the physics and computational aspects of earthquake phenomena and earthquake engineering.
We are looking forward to discussing uploaded displays in display number order as appearing to your right. Presenters please prepare a short introduction, then we will discuss questions. We will end with an open discussion at the end of the session.

We stick with the simple EGU text chat during all the session increasing accessibility. Please take advantage by asking lots of questions, and, importantly, post comments beneath displays!

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Co-organized by NH4
Convener: Alice-Agnes GabrielECSECS | Co-conveners: Jean Paul Ampuero, Hideo Aochi
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
GD10.1

Geological and geophysical data sets are in essence the output of physical processes governing the Earth’s evolution. Such data sets are widely varied and range from the internal structure of the Earth (e.g. seismic tomography), plate kinematics (e.g. GPS), composition of geomaterials (e.g. petrography), estimation of physical conditions and dating of key geological events (e.g. thermobarometry), thermal state of the Earth (e.g heat-flow measurements) to more shallow processes such as natural and “engineered” reservoir dynamics and waste sequestration in the subsurface (e.g. seismic imaging).

Combining the abundant data to process-based numerical models fosters our understanding of the dynamical Earth. Process-based models are powerful tools to predict the evolution of complex natural systems resolving the feedbacks among various physical processes. Integrating high-quality data into direct numerical simulations leads to a constructive workflow to further constrain the key parameters within the models. Innovative inversion strategies, linking forward dynamic models with observables, are topics triggering a growing interest within the community.

The complexity of geological systems arises from their multi-physics nature, as they combine hydrological, thermal, chemical and mechanical. Multi-physics couplings are prone to nonlinear interactions ultimately leading to spontaneous localisation of flow and deformation. Understanding the couplings among those processes requires the development of appropriate tools to capture spontaneous localisation and represents a challenging though essential research direction.

We invite contributions from the following two complementary themes:

#1 Computational advances associated with
- alternative spatial and/or temporal discretisation for existing forward/inverse models
- scalable HPC implementations of new and existing methodologies (GPUs / multi-core)
- solver and preconditioner developments
- AI / Machine learning-based approaches
- code and methodology comparisons (“benchmarks”)
- open source implementations for the community

#2 Physics advances associated with
- development of partial differential equations to describe geological processes
- inversion strategies and adjoint-based modelling
- numerical model validation through comparison with observables (data)
- scientific discovery enabled by 2D and 3D modelling
- utilisation of coupled models to explore nonlinear interactions

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Co-organized by EMRP1/SM7/TS10
Convener: Ludovic RässECSECS | Co-conveners: Marie BocherECSECS, Thibault Duretz, Boris Kaus, Dave May, Georg ReuberECSECS, Sabrina SanchezECSECS, Ylona van DintherECSECS
Displays
| Mon, 04 May, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)

SM8 – Short Courses