CR – Cryospheric Sciences

Monday, 15 April

CR5.3 EDI

Observing the cryosphere is vital for understanding its impacts in past, current, and future climates. Over the last decade, advances in remote- and close-sensing technologies have facilitated observations of the cryosphere at increasingly high temporal and spatial scales. Remote sensing, now in the ‘Big Data’ era, is characterised by the availability of petabytes of satellite data, facilitating observations of the cryosphere in near real-time spanning several decades and entire ice-sheets. Meanwhile, close sensing technologies offer measurements at extremely high spatial (millimetre to metre scale) and temporal (minutes to days) resolutions, allowing the monitoring and observation of finer details of processes such as iceberg calving, snow and ice albedo, rock glacier dynamics and glacial lake drainage and outburst events.

Recent developments in data processing techniques, such as cloud-optimised geoprocessing platforms (e.g. Google Earth Engine, Microsoft Planetary Computer, and community JupyterHubs) support a rapid advance of monitoring the cryosphere. The increasing use of large-scale data pipelines and machine/deep learning methods allow for large-scale monitoring of entire ice sheets, periglacial landscapes, changing sea ice extents/concentrations, and glaciated regions. Simultaneously, close-range sensors (e.g. radar, LiDAR, photogrammetry, and UAV’s) compliment these big data approaches by providing crucial data at more localised scales, particularly in those environments characterised by complex topography, which are commonplace across the cryosphere. This session looks to bring together the remote- and close-sensing communities, to better understand the recent advances in technology and its applications, and discuss opportunities and challenges.

We strongly welcome case studies from all parts of the cryosphere, including glaciers (both land-based or calving), ice sheets, snow and firn, glacial and periglacial environments, and sea ice.

Convener: Rebecca DellECSECS | Co-conveners: Nathaniel BaurleyECSECS, Tom ChudleyECSECS, Niccolò DematteisECSECS, James Lea, Veronica TollenaarECSECS, William D. HarcourtECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–11:55 (CEST)
 
Room 1.61/62
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 16:15
GM3.1 EDI

Recent advances in image collection, e.g. using unoccupied aerial vehicles (UAVs), and topographic measurements, e.g. using terrestrial or airborne LiDAR, are providing an unprecedented insight into landscape and process characterization in geosciences. In parallel, historical data including terrestrial, aerial, and satellite photos as well as historical digital elevation models (DEMs), can extend high-resolution time series and offer exciting potential to distinguish anthropogenic from natural causes of environmental change and to reconstruct the long-term evolution of the surface from local to regional scale.
For both historic and contemporary scenarios, the rise of techniques with ‘structure from motion’ (SfM) processing has democratized data processing and offers a new measurement paradigm to geoscientists. Photogrammetric and remote sensing data are now available on spatial scales from millimetres to kilometres and over durations of single events to lasting time series (e.g. from sub-second to decadal-duration time-lapse), allowing the evaluation of event magnitude and frequency interrelationships.
The session welcomes contributions from a broad range of geoscience disciplines such as geomorphology, cryosphere, volcanology, hydrology, bio-geosciences, and geology, addressing methodological and applied studies. Our goal is to create a diversified and interdisciplinary session to explore the potential, limitations, and challenges of topographic and orthoimage datasets for the reconstruction and interpretation of past and present 2D and 3D changes in different environments and processes. We further encourage contributions describing workflows that optimize data acquisition and processing to guarantee acceptable accuracies and to automate data application (e.g. geomorphic feature detection and tracking), and field-based experimental studies using novel multi-instrument and multi-scale methodologies. This session invites contributions on the state of the art and the latest developments in i) modern photogrammetric and topographic measurements, ii) remote sensing techniques as well as applications, iii) time-series processing and analysis, and iv) modelling and data processing tools, for instance, using machine learning approaches.

Co-organized by BG2/CR5/GI1/SSS10
Convener: Amaury Dehecq | Co-conveners: Katharina AndersECSECS, Anette EltnerECSECS, Livia PiermatteiECSECS, Benoît Smets
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Tue, 10:45
CL1.2.5

Over the last 1.5 Myr, the rhythm of Earth’s glaciations changed from a 40 kyr to a 100 kyr periodicity, crossing the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT). This transition does not follow directly from Milankovitch theory. Against the background of ongoing deep ice drilling projects and blue ice studies in Antarctica, we encourage the broader paleo community to show their latest results on the glacial dynamics of the 40 kyr and 100 kyr worlds, and the MPT. We invite presentations on proxy studies of paleo-environmental conditions and processes, as well as model studies providing insight into the dynamics and drivers of the Earth climate system . This session is supported by Beyond EPICA-Oldest Ice and COLDEX.

Including Milutin Milankovic Medal Lecture by Peter U. Clark
Co-organized by CR5
Convener: Eric Wolff | Co-conveners: Christo Buizert, Jenn Campos-AyalaECSECS, Margareta Hansson, Inès OllivierECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–17:15 (CEST)
 
Room F1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
ITS5.14/GD7.3 EDI

Geological materials such as ice and olivine are often modelled as viscous fluids at the large scale. However, they have complex, evolving microstructures which are not present in normal fluids, and these can have a significant impact on large-scale flow behaviour. These different materials have many commonalities in how the evolving microstructure influences the large scale flow, yet research is often siloed into individual disciplines.

With this session, we aim to bring together researchers from a range of disciplines, studying a variety of anisotropic materials, and working on different aspects of complex viscous flow such as: viscous anisotropy related to CPO or extrinsic microstructures; crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) or fabric evolution; other controls on rheology such as grain size, dynamic recrystallisation and deformation mechanisms; and impact of rheology on complex flow, e.g. in the transition through a shear margin.

We encourage submissions investigating this topic through numerical modelling, laboratory experiments and observational studies. We are aiming to convene an inclusive and collaborative session, and invite contributions from all disciplines. We particularly encourage early career researchers to participate.

Co-organized by CR6
Convener: Daniel RichardsECSECS | Co-conveners: Felicity McCormack, Lisa CrawECSECS, Ágnes KirályECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 1.34
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 10:45
CR2.2 EDI

Ice sheets play an active role in the climate system by amplifying, pacing, and potentially driving global climate change over a wide range of time scales. The impact of interactions between ice sheets and climate include changes in atmospheric and ocean temperatures and circulation, global biogeochemical cycles, the global hydrological cycle, vegetation, sea level, and land-surface albedo, which in turn cause additional feedbacks in the climate system. This session will present data and modelling results that examine ice sheet interactions with other components of the climate system over several time scales. Among other topics, issues to be addressed in this session include ice sheet-climate interactions from glacial-interglacial to millennial and centennial time scales, the role of ice sheets in Cenozoic global cooling and the mid-Pleistocene transition, reconstructions of past ice sheets and sea level, the current and future evolution of the ice sheets, and the role of ice sheets in abrupt climate change.

Co-organized by CL4/NP3/OS1
Convener: Heiko Goelzer | Co-conveners: Jonas Van BreedamECSECS, Ricarda Winkelmann, Alexander Robinson, Ronja ReeseECSECS
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room L3
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Mon, 10:45
GM10.5 EDI

In glaciated regions, a wide range of surface processes occur over different temporal and spatial scales, including glacial erosion, glacial outburst floods, fluvial erosion, sediment transport and deposition, rockfall, and slope failure. Over short timescales, many glaciated regions are evolving rapidly under the ongoing climate change, posing threats to mountain biodiversity, ecosystem stability, and human settlements. Over timescales of millennia or longer, these processes dramatically alter the landscape. Therefore, quantifying the rates of surface processes and understanding their interactions with climate and glaciation is a crucial challenge in Earth science.
Rock glaciers, in particular, are characteristic landforms associated with periglacial landscapes and play a fundamental role in the feedback between climate and erosion processes in glaciated mountain ranges. Their location, characteristics, and evolution are controlled by a combination of environmental (e.g. internal structure, topography, debris loading) and climatic (e.g. thermal and hydrological regimes) factors. Despite the growing interest and an increasing number of studies, our understanding of the physical processes controlling the dynamics of rock glaciers, and particularly the role of water, remains incomplete. Furthermore, the impact of climate-induced permafrost degradation on the present and future evolution of these landforms is largely unknown.
This session invites contributions that employ observational, analytical, or modelling approaches to address the interactions between climate, glaciations, rock glaciers, and proglacial processes across a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. We welcome contributions that focus on 1) understanding the production, transport, and deposition of sediments by ice and water in glacial and periglacial environments, 2) quantifying the amplitudes and rates of glacial modification to Earth’s surface, 3) understanding the dynamics and distribution of rock glaciers and their relevance to geohazards, geoheritage, water resources, and climate impact studies, and 4) exploring the feedbacks between proglacial processes, glaciations, and natural/anthropogenic climate forcings.

Co-organized by CR4
Convener: Cécile PelletECSECS | Co-conveners: Jingtao LaiECSECS, Sebastián ViveroECSECS, Audrey Margirier, Diego CusicanquiECSECS, Kai Cao, Lea HartlECSECS
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X3
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 14:00
GM10.4 EDI

Mountain and ice sheet glaciations provide an invaluable record for past and present climate change. However, varying geomorphological process-systems, specific glaciological conditions and topography can make regional, intra-hemispheric and global correlations challenging. This problem is further enhanced by ongoing specialisation within the scientific community. Despite such challenges glacier and ice sheet reconstructions remains a crucial paleo-environmental proxy.

The primary aim of this session is to evaluate the potential of mountain and ice sheet glaciation records and stimulate further research in this important field. Contributions on all relevant aspects are welcomed, for example: (a) glacial landforms and reconstruction of past glaciers and ice sheets, (b) dating techniques and geochronology compilations, (c) ice dynamics and paleoclimatic interpretations, or (d) impacts of ecosystems and human evolution/society. We would particularly like to invite contributions addressing regional and hemispheric connections, issues, and advances. The temporal scale of the session will encompass Early Pleistocene glaciations through to the Last Glacial Maximum, and Holocene/modern glaciers. In the past, this session has attracted contributions from a wide range of locations and a diversity in methodological approaches. It has become a platform for on-going collaborative research on mountain glaciations where people are given the opportunity to exchange ideas and expertise.

ECR keynote talks:

Block 1, Mountain glacier reconstruction
Lukas Rettig - A glacier-based reconstruction of the Last Glacial Maximum climate in the southern European Alps.

Block 2, Ice sheet reconstruction
Gwyneth Rivers - Using sediment facies & ground penetrating radar profiles to investigate the internal architecture and genesis of De Geer moraines.

Co-organized by CL1.2/CR4
Convener: Danni Pearce | Co-conveners: Rachel OienECSECS, Benjamin BoyesECSECS, Giovanni Monegato, Helen DulferECSECS, Jürgen Reitner, Stefan Winkler
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:25 (CEST), 14:00–15:40 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Tue, 10:45
Mon, 10:45
CR1.1 EDI

Glaciers and ice caps are major contributors to sea-level rise and have large impacts on runoff from glacierized basins. Major mass losses of glaciers and ice caps have been reported around the globe for the recent decades. This is a general session on glaciers outside the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, emphasizing their past, present and future responses to climate change. Although much progress in understanding the link between glaciers and climate and the impacts of their wastage on various systems has recently been achieved, many substantial unknowns remain. It is necessary to acquire more direct observations, both applying novel measurement technologies and releasing unpublished data from previous years, as well as combining in situ observations with new remote sensing products and modelling. In order to improve our understanding of the processes behind the observed glacier changes, the application of models of different complexity in combination with new data sets is crucial. We welcome contributions on all aspects of glacier changes – current, past and future – based on field observations, remote sensing and modelling. Studies on the physical processes controlling all components of glacier mass balance are especially encouraged, as well as assessments of the impact of retreating glaciers and ice caps on sea-level rise, runoff and other downstream systems.

Convener: Ines DussaillantECSECS | Co-conveners: Harry Zekollari, Lander Van TrichtECSECS, Lindsey Nicholson, Matthias Huss
Orals
| Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room 1.61/62
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–18:00
 
vHall X5
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00
CR2.1 EDI

This session is intended to attract a broad range of ice-sheet and glacier modelling contributions, welcoming applied and theoretical contributions. Theoretical topics that are encouraged are higher-order mechanical models, data inversion and assimilation, representation of other earth sub-systems in ice-sheet models, and the incorporation of basal processes and novel constitutive relationships in these models.
Applications of newer modelling themes to ice-sheets and glaciers past and present are particularly encouraged, in particular those considering ice streams, rapid change, grounding line motion and ice-sheet model intercomparisons.

Convener: Sainan Sun | Co-conveners: Fabien Gillet-Chaulet, Mauro Werder, Rabea SondershausECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:40 (CEST), 16:15–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room 1.61/62
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST) | Display Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 10:45
HS2.1.9

Water stored in the snow pack and in glaciers represents an important component of the hydrological budget in many regions of the world, as well as a sustainment to life during dry seasons. Predicted impacts of climate change in catchments covered by snow or glaciers (including a shift from snow to rain, earlier snowmelt, and a decrease in peak snow accumulation) will reflect both on water resources availability and water uses at multiple scales, with potential implications for energy and food production.

The generation of runoff in catchments that are impacted by snow or ice, profoundly differs from rainfed catchments. And yet, our knowledge of snow/ice accumulation and melt patterns and their impact on runoff is highly uncertain, because of both limited availability and inherently large spatial variability of hydrological and weather data in such areas. This translates into limited process understanding, especially in a warming climate.

This session aims at bringing together those scientists that define themselves to some extent as cold region hydrologists, as large as this field can be. Contributions addressing the following topics are welcome:
- Experimental research on snow-melt & ice-melt runoff processes and potential implementation in hydrological models;
- Development of novel strategies for snowmelt runoff modelling in various (or changing) climatic and land-cover conditions;
- Evaluation of remote-sensing or in-situ snow products and application for snowmelt runoff calibration, data assimilation, streamflow forecasting or snow and ice physical properties quantification;
- Observational and modelling studies that shed new light on hydrological processes in glacier-covered catchments, e.g. impacts of glacier retreat on water resources and water storage dynamics or the application of techniques for tracing water flow paths;
- Studies on cryosphere-influenced mountain hydrology, such as landforms at high elevations and their relationship with streamflow, water balance of snow/ice-dominated mountain regions;
- Studies addressing the impact of climate change on the water cycle of snow and ice affected catchments.

Co-organized by CR2
Convener: Francesco Avanzi | Co-conveners: Giulia MazzottiECSECS, Guillaume Thirel, Abror Gafurov, Doris Duethmann
Orals
| Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.17
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Hall A
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 16:15
SC5.15

The climate is highly variable over wide ranges of scale in both space and time so that the amplitude of changes systematically depends on the scale of observations. As a consequence, climate variations recorded in time series or spatial distributions, which are produced through modelling or empirical analyses are inextricably linked to their space-time scales and is a significant part of the uncertainties in the proxy approaches. Rather than treating the variability as a limitation to our knowledge, as a distraction from mechanistic explanations and theories, in this course the variability is treated as an important, fundamental aspect of the climate dynamics that must be understood and modelled in its own right. Long considered as no more than an uninteresting spectral “background”, modern data shows that in fact it contains most of the variance.

We review techniques that make it possible to systematically analyse and model the variability of instrumental and proxy data, the inferred climate variables and the outputs of GCM’s. A serious but typical paleo problem is that the chronologies are irregular at all scales, indeed they they are typically scaling. We discuss analyses that can handle this problem and enable us to cover wide ranges of scale in both space and in time - and jointly in space-time - without trivializing the links between the measurements, proxies and the state variables (temperature, precipitation etc.).

Scaling analyses allow us to systematically allow us to compare model outputs with data, to understand the climate processes from small to large and from fast to slow. Specific tools that will be covered include spectral analysis, scaling fluctuation analysis, wavelets, fractals, multifractals, and stochastic modeling; we discuss corresponding software. We also include new developments in the Fractional Energy Balance Equation approach that combines energy and scale symmetries. In this’s short course we add material on the long term megaclimate (>1Myr) (geo-biology) regime.

Co-organized by AS6/CL5/CR8
Convener: Shaun Lovejoy | Co-conveners: Thomas Laepple, Christian Franzke
Mon, 15 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room N2
Mon, 19:00