Union-wide
Community-led
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions

GMPV – Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

Programme group chairs: Marian Holness, Holly Stein

MAL26
Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal Lecture by Susan L. S. Stipp
Convener: Marian Holness
Abstract
| Thu, 27 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Thu, 19:00
MAL39
GMPV Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture by Xin Zhong
Convener: Marian Holness
Abstract
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–09:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Mon, 08:30
DM6

The annual meeting of the GMPV Division, where members are updated on the activities of the Union and the GMPV team. The outgoing Division President, Marian Holness, will welcome the incoming President, Holly Stein, who will share her plans for taking GMPV forward through the next few years.
A free bagged lunch is provided!

Co-organized by GMPV
Convener: Marian Holness | Co-convener: Holly Stein
Thu, 27 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Thu, 12:45

GMPV1 – Developments in approaches and techniques with interdisciplinary applications

Programme group scientific officers: Urs Schaltegger, Max Wilke

GMPV1.2 EDI

Time is a fundamental variable for the understanding of history and dynamics of Earth and planetary processes. Consequently, precise and accurate determination of crystallisation, deposition, exhumation or exposure ages of geological materials has had, and will continue to have, a key role in the geosciences. In recent years, substantial improvement in spatial and temporal resolution of well-established dating techniques and development of new methods have revealed previously unknown complexity of natural systems and in many cases revolutionised our understanding of rates of fundamental geologic processes.

With this session, we aim to provide a platform to discuss 1) advances in a broad spectrum of geochronological and thermochronological methods (sample preparation, analytical techniques, interpretational and modelling approaches) and 2) applications of such methods to a variety of problems across the Earth sciences, across the geological time and across scales of the process studied. We particularly encourage presentations of novel and unconventional applications or attempts to develop new geo/thermochronometers.

Co-organized by CL1.1/GM2/SSP2/TS9
Convener: Dawid SzymanowskiECSECS | Co-conveners: Cody CollepsECSECS, Lorenzo TavazzaniECSECS, Marie GengeECSECS, Catherine Mottram, Maxime BernardECSECS, Perach Nuriel
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
GMPV1.3 EDI

Carbonate minerals are ubiquitous throughout all geological environments in the Earth`s crust, forming via biogenic, marine, diagenetic, hydrothermal, magmatic, and metamorphic processes. Therefore, refining our understanding of carbonate formation can contribute towards addressing important geological and societal problems, such as the Earth`s past and present carbon cycle or the exploration of critical raw materials. The study of carbonate minerals is one that crosses multiple sectors and disciplines, with several novel applications emerging in recent years. Similarly, recent analytical developments allow for the application of geochronological, trace element and isotope geochemical techniques across a wide range of scales and sample materials. To keep track of these emerging techniques, this session aims to bring together an interdisciplinary community working both on method development and on the application of techniques investigating carbonate minerals. We invite geoscientists from all fields (e.g., paleoceanology, economic geology, igneous petrology, carbon storage) to contribute to this session by presenting their research in carbonate geochronology (e.g., U-Pb dating), carbonate trace element geochemistry (e.g., rare earth elements), and carbonate isotope geochemistry (e.g., strontium, clumped isotopes).

Co-organized by BG2/GI5/SSP3/TS9
Convener: Johannes RembeECSECS | Co-conveners: Aileen DoranECSECS, Philip RiegerECSECS, Goran Andjic, Renjie Zhou
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 16:15
GMPV1.4 EDI

Data-driven discovery, including data analytics and visualization, has the potential for wide application and advancement in Earth and planetary sciences. Recent work has led to new directions in geosciences including geostatistics, mathematical geosciences, mineral informatics, geospatial and spatio-temporal data analysis, mineral prospectivity mapping and GIS, and machine-learning algorithms in 2D to 5D considering frequency, space, time, uncertainty, and any possible dimensions of the datasets. These methods increase the efficiency of scientific exploration and provide a great depth of understanding and interpretation of geo- and planetary systems. In this session, we welcome abstracts from (1) scientific results related to the application of any data analytics and visualization methods in mineralogy and geochemistry on Earth or other planetary bodies, (2) related methods and/or (3) data resources and infrastructure development that enables scientific exploration in mineralogy or geochemistry in Earth and planetary systems.

Co-sponsored by IAMG
Convener: Behnam SadeghiECSECS | Co-conveners: Shaunna Morrison, Anirudh PrabhuECSECS, Xiaogang Ma
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:10 (CEST)
 
Room 0.15
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 14:00
Thu, 14:00
GMPV1.5 EDI

The use and development of numerical tools has steadily increased over the past few decades, especially in Earth Sciences as physical and chemical processes occurring in planetary interiors are not always directly observable from the surface. In petrology and geochemistry, the growing number of thermodynamic modelling softwares and codes and associated thermodynamic databases for minerals, fluids and melts has allowed to target wider P-T range, rock, fluid and melt compositions and study processes with increasing complexity. In addition, the increase in the amount of geochemical data from state-of-the-art instruments (e.g. ICP-MS, microprobe, SIMS) has fostered the development of advanced software solutions for data reduction and interpretation. The ever-increasing size and easy availability of these datasets (e.g. GEOROC, EarthChem and AusGeochem, Sedimentary Geochemistry & Paleoenvironments Project, Geochemical Earth Reference Model) has, in turn, opened up new avenues for extracting statistical information on geological processes.
The main goal of this session is to bring together geochemists, petrologists and data scientists who are either developing, using and/or applying numerical tools to understand geological processes. Topics of interest include (but are not limited to) geochemical and petrological modeling for fluids, melts and solids using major/trace elements or isotopes, thermodynamics and kinetics of petro/geochemical processes, provenance analysis, optimization and testing of databases. Model developers using machine learning, big data or minimization/inversion routines, thermodynamic codes/databases as well as those developing new softwares and tools for data processing and visualization are particularly encouraged to submit an abstract. We recognise that innovations in data analysis from one Earth science discipline are very likely to have applications in another. As a result we strongly encourage submissions from all fields of Earth science including, but not limited to sedimentology, petrology, mineralogy, climatology, oceanography and applied geochemistry.

Co-sponsored by IAMG
Convener: Guillaume SironECSECS | Co-conveners: Alex LippECSECS, Pierre Lanari, Chetan Nathwani, Freya GeorgeECSECS, Alexander Prent, Jesse WaltersECSECS
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 0.15
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 14:00
GI6.1

Environmental systems often span spatial and temporal scales covering different orders of magnitude. The session is oriented toward collecting studies relevant to understand multiscale aspects of these systems and in proposing adequate multi-platform and inter-disciplinary surveillance networks monitoring tools systems. It is especially aimed to emphasize the interaction between environmental processes occurring at different scales. In particular, special attention is devoted to the studies focused on the development of new techniques and integrated instrumentation for multiscale monitoring of high natural risk areas, such as volcanic, seismic, energy exploitation, slope instability, floods, coastal instability, climate changes, and another environmental context.
We expect contributions derived from several disciplines, such as applied geophysics, geology, seismology, geodesy, geochemistry, remote and proximal sensing, volcanology, geotechnical, soil science, marine geology, oceanography, climatology, and meteorology. In this context, the contributions in analytical and numerical modeling of geological and environmental processes are also expected.
Finally, we stress that the inter-disciplinary studies that highlight the multiscale properties of natural processes analyzed and monitored by using several methodologies are welcome.

Co-organized by CL5/ERE1/ESSI4/GMPV1/NH6/NP3
Convener: Raffaele Castaldo | Co-conveners: Antonello BonfanteECSECS, Pietro Tizzani, Nemesio M. Pérez, Andrea BaroneECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall ESSI/GI/NP
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 10:45
GI5.7 EDI

Finding the best method both to monitor environmental processes occurring at the earth surface and to explore data related to them is a challenge for many scientists. The spatial and temporal extension of a process and the observation scale chosen can strongly conditionate the fully understanding of the phenomenon itself. Further, the structural peculiarities of the geochemical data, describing the composition of the matrices used to monitor the environment, are often capable to hidden meaningful relationships among elements in favor of spurious correlations dependent on the so-called closure effect affecting them.
The intrinsic aim of this session is to propose a comparison of methods, including both innovative monitoring and data elaboration techniques, with the purpose of providing a real time review of the pros and the counter associated to the different approaches reported. All the scientists using geochemical data to evaluate the impact of human activities on the environment and aiming at finding the “best solution” for the spatial and temporal discrimination of contamination are invited to contribute to this session.
Studies on single matrices are welcome although research based on the outcomes of integrated plans based on several matrices, including biological ones, would be of greater interest. Similarly, contributions focusing on data elaboration techniques using multivariate analysis and machine learning are encouraged especially if they consider the compositional nature of geochemical data.

Co-organized by BG2/GMPV1
Convener: Stefano Albanese | Co-conveners: Caterina GozziECSECS, Antonella Buccianti, Gevorg Tepanosyan
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 0.15
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall ESSI/GI/NP
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
BG2.1

This session is open to all contributions in biogeochemistry and ecology where stable isotope techniques are used as analytical tools, with foci both on stable isotopes of light elements (C, H, O, N, S, …) and new systems (clumped and metal isotopes). We welcome studies from both terrestrial and aquatic (including marine) environments as well as methodological, experimental and theoretical studies that introduce new approaches or techniques (including natural abundance work, labelling studies, multi-isotope approaches).

Co-organized by GMPV1, co-sponsored by EAG
Convener: Michael E. Böttcher | Co-conveners: Kirstin Dähnke, Gerd Gleixner, Anne-Désirée Schmitt
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.17
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall A
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Thu, 08:30

GMPV2 – The mantle-surface connection (in partnership with GD)

Programme group scientific officer: Urs Schaltegger

GMPV2.1

The nature of Earth’s lithospheric mantle is largely constrained from the petrological and geochemical studies of xenoliths. They are complemented by studies of orogenic peridotites and ophiolites, which show the space relationships among various mantle rocks, missing in xenoliths. Mantle xenoliths from cratonic regions are distinctly different from those occurring in younger non-cratonic areas. Percolation of melts and fluids through the lithospheric mantle significantly modifies its petrological and geochemical features, which is recorded in mantle xenoliths brought to the surface by oceanic and continental volcanism. Basalts and other mantle-derived magmas provide us another opportunity to study the chemical and physical properties the mantle. These various kinds of information, when assembled together and coupled with experiments and geophysical data, enable the understanding of upper mantle dynamics.
This session’s research focus lies on mineralogical, petrological and geochemical studies of mantle xenoliths, orogenic and ophiolitic peridotites and other mantle derived rocks. We strongly encourage the contributions on petrology and geochemistry of mantle xenoliths and other mantle rocks, experimental studies, the examples and models of mantle processes and its evolution in space and time.

Co-organized by GD2
Convener: Jacek Puziewicz | Co-conveners: Federico CasettaECSECS, Michel Grégoire, Costanza Bonadiman
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 16:15
GD2.2 EDI | PICO

The origin and evolution of the continental lithosphere is closely linked to changes in mantle dynamics through time, from its formation through melt depletion to multistage reworking and reorganisation related to interaction with melts formed both beneath and within it. Understanding this history is critical to constraining terrestrial dynamics, element cycles and metallogeny. We welcome contributions dealing with: (1) Reconstructions of the structure and composition of the lithospheric mantle, and the influence of plumes and subduction zones on root construction; (2) Interactions of plume- and subduction-derived melts and fluids with the continental lithosphere, and the nature and development of metasomatic agents; (3) Source rocks, formation conditions (P-T-fO2) and evolution of mantle melts originating below or in the mantle lithosphere; (4) Deep source regions, melting processes and phase transformation in mantle plumes and their fluids; (5) Modes of melt migration and ascent, as constrained from numerical modelling and microstructures of natural mantle samples; (6) Role of mantle melts and fluids in the generation of hybrid and acid magmas.These topics can be illuminated using the geochemistry and fabric of mantle xenoliths and orogenic peridotites, mantle-derived melts and experimental simulations.

Co-organized by GMPV2
Convener: Igor Ashchepkov | Co-conveners: Sonja Aulbach, Kate Kiseeva, NV Chalapathi Rao, Evgenii Sharkov
PICO
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 2
Mon, 08:30
GD4.2 EDI

Subduction drives plate tectonics, generating the major proportion of subaerial volcanism, releasing >90% seismic moment magnitude, forming continents, and recycling lithosphere. Numerical and laboratory modeling studies have successfully built our understanding of many aspects of the geodynamics of subduction zones. Detailed geochemical studies, investigating compositional variation within and between volcanic arcs, provide further insights into systematic chemical processes at the slab surface and within the mantle wedge, providing constraints on thermal structures and material transport within subduction zones. However, with different technical and methodological approaches, model set-ups, inputs, and material properties, and in some cases conflicting conclusions between chemical and physical models, a consistent picture of the controlling parameters of subduction-zone processes has so far not emerged.

This session aims to follow subducting lithosphere on its journey from the surface down into the Earth's mantle and to understand the driving processes for deformation and magmatism in the over-riding plate. We aim to address topics such as: subduction initiation and dynamics; changes in mineral breakdown processes at the slab surface; the formation and migration of fluids and melts at the slab surface; primary melt generation in the wedge; subduction-related magmatism; controls on the position and width of the volcanic arc; subduction-induced seismicity; mantle wedge processes; the fate of subducted crust, sediments and volatiles; the importance of subducting seamounts, LIPs, and ridges; links between near-surface processes and slab dynamics and with regional tectonic evolution; slab delamination and break-off; the effect of subduction on mantle flow; and imaging subduction zone processes.

With this session, we aim to form an integrated picture of the subduction process, and invite contributions from a wide range of disciplines, such as geodynamics, modeling, geochemistry, petrology, volcanology, and seismology, to discuss subduction zone dynamics at all scales from the surface to the lower mantle, or in applications to natural laboratories.

Co-organized by GMPV2/SM6/TS6
Convener: Ágnes Király | Co-conveners: Patricia Cadenas Martínez, Jeroen van Hunen, Oğuz H Göğüş, Taras Gerya, Brandon ShuckECSECS, César R. Ranero
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 08:30
GD5.2 EDI

Movements across faults allow part of Earth’s surface to move in response to forces driven by tectonic plate motions. Mid-oceanic ridges (MORs) provide the unique opportunity to study two of the three known plate motions: divergence (at the ridge axis) and strike-slip motion along transform faults (crosscutting the ridge axis). Knowledge on active and past processes building and altering the oceanic lithosphere has increased over the past 20 years due to improvements in deep sea technologies and numerical modeling techniques. Yet, several questions remain open, such as the relative role of magmatic, tectonic and hydrothermal processes in the building of the oceanic lithosphere at the ridge axis, especially at slow and ultra-slow spreading ridges and at their intersection with transform faults. Transform faults and their older parts, i.e., the fracture zones, are still poorly studied features. For a long time, they were considered as cold and, for fracture zones, inactive; however, evidences of magmatism have been observed inside both features. Given the complex network of faults existing within these structures, they represent ideal pathways for hydrothermal percolation into the Earth’s lithosphere and may therefore play a significant role in the chemical and the thermal budget of the planet, as well as in the fertilization processes of the oceans in nutrients. This session objective is to share recent knowledge acquired along mid-oceanic ridge axes, transform faults and fracture zones. Works using modern deep-sea high-resolution techniques are especially welcome. The session also welcomes recent developments in thermo-mechanical models, which integrate geophysical and geological data with numerical modeling tools, bridging the gap between observations and numerical models.

Co-organized by GMPV2/TS5
Convener: Marcia Maia | Co-conveners: Eleonora FiciniECSECS, Manon BickertECSECS, Florent Szitkar
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST), 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 14:00
GD1.3 EDI

Vertical motions of the Earth’s lithosphere act as a powerful lens into the dynamic behavior of the asthenosphere and deeper mantle. Surface observations, therefore, provide important constraints on mantle convection patterns through space/time and constitute important constraints for theoretical models and numerical simulations. The asthenosphere is a crucial layer in Earth system.  Its structure and dynamics control processes such as postglacial rebound and dynamic topography, and it plays a crucial role in facilitating plate-like surface motions by reducing horizontal shear dissipation of mantle flow. Vertical motions can now be monitored geodetically with unprecedented precision. At the same time, geological records provide invaluable spatial-temporal information about the deeper history of vertical motion of the lithosphere.  For instance: thermochronological methods, studies of river profiles, sediment provenance, landform analysis, or hiatus mapping at interregional and continental scale. The challenges of using Earth's surface records to better understand asthenospheric and deep Earth processes involve (1) signal separation from other uplift and subsidence mechanisms, such as isostasy and plate tectonics; (2) different spatial resolutions and scales between models and observables; and (3) The challenges of recognizing on what (intercontinental) scales to compile geologic and stratigraphic data.

This session will provide a holistic view of the surface expression of the asthenosphere and deep Earth processes from geodetic to geological time scales using multi-disciplinary methods, including (but not limited to) geodetic, geophysical, geochemical, geomorphological, stratigraphic, and other observations, as well as numerical modeling. Thus, it will provide opportunities for presenters and attendees from a range of disciplines, demographics, and stages of their scientific career to engage in this exciting and emerging problem in Earth science.

Co-organized by GMPV2/SM5
Convener: Ingo L. StotzECSECS | Co-conveners: Simon StephensonECSECS, Yi-Wei ChenECSECS, Megan Holdt, Audrey MargirierECSECS, Roland Pail, Sergei Lebedev
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 14:00

GMPV3 – Earth and terrestrial planets: formation, early history, and planetary interiors (in partnership with PS and GD)

Programme group scientific officers: Chiara Maria Petrone, Eleanor Jennings, Jörg Hermann

GD3.1 EDI

Cratons form the stable cores of most continents and preserve an integrated, yet sometimes controversial archive of the evolution of the mantle, crust, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere for the first two billion years of Earth’s history. In this session, we encourage the presentation of new approaches that improve our understanding on the formation, structure, and evolution of cratonic crust and lithosphere with time. In addition, we welcome contributions from studies of supracrustal cratonic records on the evolution and chemistry of the early surface environments and life. This session aims to bring together scientists from a large range of disciplines to provide an interdisciplinary and comprehensive overview of the field. This includes, but is not limited to, fields such as early mantle dynamics, the formation, evolution and destruction of the early crust and lithosphere, the formation of early land and oceans, the interplay between craton formation and plate tectonics, mineral deposits on cratons, early surface environments and the evolution of the early biosphere.

Co-organized by BG7/GMPV3/TS12
Convener: Ria Fischer | Co-conveners: Desiree Roerdink, Nicolas Luca CelliECSECS, Bing Xia, Peter HaasECSECS, Peter A. Cawood, Jeroen van Hunen
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 08:30
GD3.2 | PICO

Dynamical processes shape the Earth and other rocky planets throughout their history; their present state is a result of this long-term evolution. Early on, processes and lifetimes of magma oceans establish the initial conditions for their long-term development; subsequently their long-term evolution is shaped by the dynamics of the mantle-lithosphere system, compositional differentiation or mixing, possible core-mantle reactions, etc.. These processes can be interrogated through observations of the rock record, geochemistry, seismology, gravity, magnetism and planetary remote sensing all linked through geodynamical modelling constrained by physical properties of relevant phases.

This session aims to provide a holistic view of the dynamics, structure, composition and evolution of Earth and rocky planets (including exoplanets) on temporal scales ranging from the present day to billions of years, and on spatial scales ranging from microscopic to global, by bringing together constraints from geodynamics, mineral physics, geochemistry, petrology, planetary science and astronomy.

Co-organized by GMPV3/PS4
Convener: Paul Tackley | Co-conveners: Gregor Golabek, Lena Noack, Paolo Sossi
PICO
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 3a
Wed, 14:00
TS13.1 EDI

Tectonics, volcanism, and seismicity are the main constructive agents in shaping planetary surfaces and provide precious information on planetary interiors and evolution. They are driven by both endogenous processes and external triggers such as impact events and tidal forces and are associated with an enormous variety of landforms and structures. Even small bodies such as asteroids and comets, where volcanism and tectonics do not play a dominant role, are still affected by fracturing and faulting as a result of other processes like tides, dynamic loading, and gravitational collapse. The study of such geological processes involves many scientific disciplines including remote sensing observation, experimental modelling, geological mapping, rheological and geomechanical studies, field analogue investigations and geophysics. In particular, seismology is one of the most powerful tools to study the interior of planetary bodies and their tectonic regime. Recently, InSight has provided a wealth of seismological data from Mars. Similarly, the selection of Dragonfly by NASA promises a wealth of seismological observations of Titan. It is also expected that seismology will return to the Moon with the selection of the Farside Seismic Suite to fly to the farside of the Moon on a commercial lander in the next few years, and the Lunar Geophysical Network remaining an encouraged mission concept for a future NASA New Frontiers call. In addition to these mission-driven insights, modelling presents an increasingly powerful tool that can help to estimate the expected tectonics and seismicity of different planetary bodies.

This session aims to look at the broad range of tectonics, seismicity, and volcanism and their interactions on Solar System bodies and explore how we could improve our understanding through comparable processes on Earth.

Hence, we welcome contributions on observations from space missions, as well as theoretical estimates and modelling efforts on volcanism, tectonics, and seismicity occurring on all planetary bodies.

Co-organized by GMPV3/PS4
Convener: Matteo Massironi | Co-conveners: Iris van ZelstECSECS, Géraldine ZenhäusernECSECS, Costanza Rossi, Anna Horleston, Valentina Galluzzi, Daniel Mege
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall TS/EMRP
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 16:15

GMPV4 – Mineralogy: from experimental and analytical advances to rock-forming processes and mineral deposits

Programme group scientific officers: Max Wilke, David Dolejs

GMPV4.1 EDI

Mineralogy is the cornerstone of many disciplines and is used to solve a wide range of questions in geoscience. This broad session offers the opportunity to explore the diversity of methods and approaches used to study minerals and how minerals behave and evolve in their many contexts. We welcome contributions on all aspects of mineralogy, including environmental, soil science, metamorphic, plutonic, deep Earth, planetary, applied mineralogy, and so on. All approaches are welcome: analytical, experimental and theoretical.

Including GMPV Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award Lecture
Convener: Jannick Ingrin | Co-conveners: Catherine McCammon, Julien ReynesECSECS, Melanie J. SieberECSECS, Juraj Majzlan
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
GMPV4.2 EDI

In a scenario of growing supply risk and economic vulnerability, the interest in critical and strategic raw materials has increased, leading to enhancing the exploration of previously subeconomic deposits and the re-evaluation of abandoned mines and mining dumps.
Within the present-day circular economy paradigm, this offers the opportunity to integrate the georesources and environmental studies, aiming to build up a sustainable society.
This session will focus on, but is not limited to, contributions in the fields of mineralogy, petrography, structural geology and geochemistry of critical and strategic raw materials ore deposits, including active and abandoned mining sites. Contributions on the recovery of resources from mining dumps and the environmental assessment and remediation are also welcome.

Convener: Micol BussolesiECSECS | Co-conveners: Giovanni Grieco, Alessandro Cavallo, Shenghong Yang, Evangelos Tzamos
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
SSP3.5 EDI

Minerals are formed in great diversity under Earth surface conditions, as skeletons, microbialites, speleothems, or authigenic cements, and they preserve a wealth of geochemical, biological, mineralogical, and isotopic information, providing valuable archives of past environmental conditions. Furthermore, minerals form and dissolve during diagenesis, which modifies the properties of carbonate and clastic rocks. Understanding processes of fluid-rock interactions and interpreting mineral archives still requires fundamental research, with implications for the reconstruction of Earth’s geological record, as well as for man-made systems for carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS), geothermal energy, or critical mineral resources.

In this session we welcome oral and poster presentations from a wide range of research of topics, including process-oriented studies in modern systems, the ancient rock record, experiments, computer simulations, and high-resolution microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. We intend to reach a wide community of researchers sharing the common goal of improving our understanding of the fundamental processes underlying mineral formation, which is essential to read our Earth's geological archive.

Co-organized by BG6/GMPV4, co-sponsored by IAS
Convener: Patrick Meister | Co-conveners: Vinyet Baqués, Michael E. Böttcher, Liam Bullock, David Parcerisa, Sally Potter-McIntyre, Patricia RoeserECSECS
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 14:00

GMPV5 – Fluid-rock interactions and low-temperature metamorphic processes

Programme group scientific officers: Richard Palin, Silvio Ferrero

GMPV5.1 EDI

Reactions between fluids and rocks have a fundamental impact on many of the natural and geo-engineering processes across a wide range of scales. At the nano- and micro-scale, these processes can be recorded by the formation of natural patterns in rocks, such as the dendritic patterns, banding patterns, crack patterns, mineralogical replacement, growth patterns or deformation patterns. The visible regularity of pattern structures or textures elucidates the physio-chemical environment during fluid-rock interactions. At the meso- and macro-scale, such processes manifest in localization of deformation, earthquake nucleation caused by high pressure fluid pulses, as well as metamorphic reactions and rheological weakening triggered by fluid flow, metasomatism and fluid-mediated mass transport. Moreover, the efficiency of many geo-engineering processes is partly dependent on fluid-rock interactions, such as hydraulic fracturing, geothermal energy recovery, CO2 storage and wastewater injection. All our observations in the rock record are the end-product of all metamorphic, metasomatic and deformation changes that occurred during the interaction with fluid. Therefore, to investigate and understand these complex and interconnected processes, it is required to merge knowledge and techniques deriving from several disciplines of the geosciences.
We invite multidisciplinary contributions that investigate fluid-rock interactions throughout the entire breadth of the topic, using fieldwork, microstructural and petrographic analyses, geochemistry, experimental rock mechanics, thermodynamic modeling and numerical modeling.

Co-organized by TS1
Convener: Francesco Giuntoli | Co-conveners: Nicolas Beaudoin, Zhaoliang HouECSECS, Cindy LuisierECSECS, Christine V. Putnis, M. Sophie Hollinetz, Berit Schwichtenberg
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
GMPV5.3

Fluid flow in the Earth’s crust is driven by pressure gradients and temperature changes induced by internal heat. The expression of crustal fluid flow is associated with a range of structural and geochemical processes taking place in the basement and in sedimentary basins. Groundwater, hydrothermal brines and gases circulating in the subsurface interact with local structures across different tectonic and geological settings. Under near-lithostatic conditions fluids and rocks are expelled vertically to the near-surface featuring a variety of surficial geological phenomena ranging from hydrothermal systems to sedimentary and hybrid volcanism and cold seeps both onshore and offshore. These vertical fluid flow expressions and piercement structures are characterized by complex sedimentary deformation and geochemical reactions where life can adapt to thrive in extremely harsh environments making them ideal windows to the deep biosphere. Several studies have shown that CO2- and CH4-dominated (or hybrid) vents played a key role in the evolution of our planet and the cycles of life during several geological eras. Similar structures on other planets are promising sites for exploration where habitable niches could have been present. Furthermore, the elevated pore pressures often encountered in reservoirs at depth make piercements ideal natural laboratories to capture precursors of seismic events and dynamically triggered geological processes. Yet, the geochemical and geophysical processes associated with the evolution of these vertical fluid flow features and piercements remain poorly understood.
This session welcomes contributions from the community working on magmatic and sedimentary environments and the domains where they interact on Earth and in the Universe using geophysical, geochemical, microbial, geological, remote sensing, numerical and laboratory studies to promote a better understanding of modern and paleo fluid-driven systems in the upper crust. In particular we call for contributions from: 1) investigations of tectonic discontinuities pre-existing geological structures; 2) the geochemical reactions occurring at depth and at the surface including microbiological studies; 3) geophysical imaging and monitoring of fluid flow systems associated with vertical fluid expulsion at the upper crust; 4) experimental and numerical studies about fluid flow evolution; 5) studies of piercement dynamics related to climatic and environmental implications.

Co-organized by BG7/SSP1
Convener: Adriano Mazzini | Co-conveners: Matteo Lupi, Andreia Plaza-FaverolaECSECS
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:35 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 10:45
GMPV5.4 EDI

Hydrothermal systems exert crucial influence on volcanic hazards. For example, hydrothermal alteration can reduce the strength of edifice- and dome-forming rocks, increasing the likelihood of volcano spreading and flank collapse, and high pore pressures that develop within hydrothermal systems can promote phreatic/phreatomagmatic explosions and further increase volcano instability. On the other hand, hydrothermal systems also offer the opportunity to exploit minerals of economic interest, and their heat can be harnessed to produce energy. A detailed understanding of hydrothermal systems, fluid-rock interactions in hydrothermal systems, and the resulting effects of alteration, using multidisciplinary studies, is required to better anticipate the hazards posed, to exploit the economic opportunities they provide, and to execute engineering design. We invite diverse contributions dedicated to the characterisation, imaging, monitoring, and hazard/economic assessment of volcanic hydrothermal systems and associated fluid-rock interactions. Contributions can be based on fieldwork, laboratory work, modelling, or a combination of these approaches. Because understanding hydrothermal systems requires multidisciplinary, collaborative teamwork, we welcome contributions based on any subdiscipline (e.g., geology, geophysics, geochemistry, engineering) and using any technique or method (e.g., geological mapping, magnetic, gravity, and spectroscopic methods, laboratory experiments, gas monitoring, numerical modelling). It goes without saying that we hope to have a diverse session in terms of both speakers and audience.

Convener: Claire HarnettECSECS | Co-conveners: Michael Heap, Alexandra Kushnir, Thomas R. Walter, Marlene Villeneuve
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.33
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 10:45
SM6.1 EDI

Fluids permeate and diffuse within the crust being originated by internal or external natural sources or by industrial activities for modern energy exploitation and production. Fluids are involved in several geological processes occurring within the seismogenic crust. Fluid-induced stress changes (seasonal forcing due to surface water redistribution, overpressure within the natural reservoirs and/or along the fault planes, industrial wastewater injection, etc.) can reactivate faults and generate deformation and earthquakes. In volcanic environments, fluids play a key role in governing the evolution of magmatic processes and eruption. In this view, it becomes crucial to reliably image fluid storages and track their movement through the crust. New and innovative methodologies and technologies permit 1) to reconstruct the 4D (space and time) variations of rock physical and geochemical properties in a fluid-filled porous medium, 2) detecting and tracking fluids migration, and 3) studying fluid-related effects (such as induced microseismicity, electric properties changes and surface ground deformation). Hence the scientific communities have a new generation of powerful tools for seismic, volcanic and industrial hazard assessment.
This session focuses on main results obtained within the project FLUIDS funded by the Italian Ministry for Research, which was aimed at developing and applying an integrated multi-parametric and multi-disciplinary approach to image and track crustal fluids at selected test-sites in volcanic, tectonic and industrial exploitation environments. The session focuses also on latest research, field studies, modelling aspects, theoretical, experimental and observational advances on detection and tracking of fluid movements and/or pore fluid-pressure diffusion in different environments worldwide, and on the analysis of their correlation with the induced/triggered seismicity.
We welcome contributions on advances in seismic, geochemical and deformation monitoring; multidisciplinary studies combining different data types and observations; characterization and space-time variations of electrical and seismic elastic/anelastic crustal properties, including stress and pressure changes; and physical and/or statistical analyses for the recognition of peculiar seismicity patterns. The session also encourages contributions from early career scientists.

Co-organized by ERE5/GMPV5
Convener: Grazia De LandroECSECS | Co-conveners: Tony Alfredo Stabile, Jean Vandemeulebrouck, Nicola D'Agostino, Michele Paternoster
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 14:00

GMPV6 – High-temperature metamorphism and orogenesis

Programme group scientific officers: Richard Palin, Silvio Ferrero, Jörg Hermann

GMPV6.1

Metamorphic rocks are witnesses to the tectonic and geodynamic processes that shaped the global lithosphere. The record of their journey through time and space is written in their fabrics and assemblages. Resolving the "how, where and when" of metamorphic processes is crucial in the development of models describing regional and global tectonic processes, the transfer of elements within and between the crust and mantle, and the geodynamic evolution of the Earth.

With new methods and insights come new ways to interrogate metamorphic rocks, to constrain the cause and impact of metamorphic reactions, and to investigate secular changes in tectonic processes through time. This session aims to celebrate accomplishments made in the field, and to provide a platform for sharing and exploring innovative ways to investigate metamorphic processes across tectonic settings and geologic time. We invite contributions in metamorphic petrology, field research, geochronology, geochemistry, numerical modelling and tectonics, and especially welcome contributions that employ novel or cross-disciplinary approaches to make metamorphic rocks tell their story.

Co-organized by GD6/TS12
Convener: Matthijs Smit | Co-conveners: Francesca Piccoli, Lucie Tajcmanova, Tom Raimondo, Richard Palin
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room N1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
GMPV6.2 EDI

Garnet is likely the most useful mineral to understand the evolution of basement areas on Earth. Many aspects of the metamorphic evolution of rocks can be unravelled by studying its zoning and inclusion pattern. In addition, garnet can be a treasure chest of mineral, melt and fluid inclusions capable to provide insights into the often obscures prograde/peak metamorphic history of the host rock evolution. Garnets in peraluminous granitoids offer windows into their genetic processes when they are entrained material originating from the source, or on the magma evolution if magmatic in origin. Finally, recent analytical developments in garnet dating offers new possibilities to characterize and better constrain the temporal evolution of a wealth of deep processes, from partial melting to skarn formation to subduction zone dynamics.
We invite our colleagues geoscientists, being them petrologists, geochemists, petrochronologists and structural geologists to present their studies involving (but not limited to) garnet as a crucial petrological tool to better understand Nature. Studies of fluid, melt and mineral inclusions in garnets and application of new analytical techniques, methodological approaches and dating protocols are welcome!

Convener: Silvio Ferrero | Co-conveners: Gabriele Cruciani, Lorraine TualECSECS, Aratz Beranoaguirre
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 0.14
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 14:00
Thu, 14:00
GD4.3

Ophiolites, mélanges, and blueschists (OMB) are significant components of both accretionary and collisional orogenic belts and provide critical quantitative constraints for the timing of rift-drift, seafloor spreading and subduction initiation, ophiolite emplacement and collision events, peak P–T conditions during orogeny, and exhumation within subduction channels and along suture zones. Typical accretionary orogenic belt examples are exposed around the circum-Pacific region and in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, whereas characteristic collisional orogenic belts occur in the circum-Mediterranean region, Alpine–Himalayan–Tibetan belt, Uralides, Taiwan and Papuan belts, Tasmanides, and Appalachians. Ophiolites and mélanges in these two major types of orogenic belts may show major differences in their crustal anatomies and geochemical fingerprints.

Collectively, OMB complexes and ocean plate stratigraphy (OPS) assemblages display the archives of ocean basin development, subduction initiation, crustal growth via accretionary processes (i.e., offscraping–shallow underplating) and volcanic arc formation at convergent margins, deep tectonic underplating and exhumation within subduction channels, and thermal evolution of subducting slabs. Therefore, systematic documentation of the tectonomagmatic settings of ophiolite formation, mechanisms and processes of mélange development (including non-metamorphosed ones), and P-T-t paths of both blueschist assemblages and high–temperature metamorphic belts in orogenic belts provide significant constraints for a quantitative establishment of the Wilson Cycle evolution of ancient ocean basins and the geodynamics of accretionary and collisional orogenic belt development.

This session will provide an international forum for interdisciplinary presentations and discussions on the diverse origins of OMB terrains and OPS assemblages, and their significance in probing the crustal anatomy and geodynamic evolution of accretionary and collisional belts around the world in a multi-scale approach. We welcome contributions dealing with the structural geology–tectonics, geochemistry–petrology, geochronology, and geophysics–geodynamics of OMB and OPS terrains, as well as numerical and analogue modelling of divergent and convergent margin processes that involve OMB evolution.

Co-organized by GMPV6/TS6
Convener: Yildirim Dilek | Co-conveners: Andrea Festa, Edoardo BarberoECSECS
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 14:00
GD7.2

The goal of this session is to reconcile short-time/small-scale and long-time/large-scale observations, including geodynamic processes such as subduction, collision, rifting, or mantle lithosphere interactions. Despite the remarkable advances in experimental rock mechanics, the implications of rock-mechanics data for large temporal and spatial scale tectonic processes are still not straightforward, since the latter are strongly controlled by local lithological stratification of the lithosphere, its thermal structure, fluid content, tectonic heritage, metamorphic reactions, and deformation rates.

Mineral reactions have mechanical effects that may result in the development of pressure variations and thus are critical for interpreting microstructural and mineral composition observations. Such effects may fundamentally influence element transport properties and rheological behavior.
Here, we encourage presentations focused on the interplay between metamorphic processes and deformation on all scales, on the rheological behavior of crustal and mantle rocks, and time scales of metamorphic reactions in order to discuss
(1) how and when up to GPa-level differential stress and pressure variations can be built and maintained at geological timescales and modeling of such systems,
(2) deviations from lithostatic pressure during metamorphism: fact or fiction?
(3) the impact of deviations from lithostatic pressure on geodynamic reconstructions.
(4) the effect of porous fluid and partial melting on the long-term strength.
We, therefore, invite the researchers from different domains (rock mechanics, petrographic observations, geodynamic and thermo-mechanical modeling) to share their views on the way forward for improving our knowledge of the long-term rheology and chemo-thermo-mechanical behavior of the lithosphere and mantle.

Co-organized by GMPV6/TS1
Convener: Yury Podladchikov | Co-conveners: Lucie Tajcmanova, Shun-ichiro Karato, Evangelos MoulasECSECS, Leni Scheck-Wenderoth
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Thu, 14:00

GMPV7 – Advances in igneous petrology

Programme group scientific officers: Marco Viccaro, Marian Holness, Chiara Maria Petrone, Brendan McCormick Kilbride

GMPV7.2 EDI

In the last few decades, the ideas on the architecture and evolution of volcanic and igneous plumbing systems (VIPS) were profoundly modified. The classical paradigm of the magma reservoir as a large and long-lived liquid-rich region slowly fractionating has been challenged by the view of liquid-poor crystal mush that is repeatedly rejuvenated over the lifespan of the magmatic system. Besides, mushy regions, multiphase regions where melt and solid coexist, appear in various other natural contexts, like sea ice, Earth's-core dynamics, icy moons or general fluid mechanics.

Recent research applying various methods to study these systems have shed light on this complexity, however many questions remain as areas of active research and debate:
• How do plumbing systems develop? How do they evolve over time and in different tectonic settings?
• What are the triggering mechanisms for volcanic eruptions in these systems (e.g., magma reservoir vs mush system)?
• How do magma ascent and dyke propagation occur? Do they occur differently in mush systems?
• What do current monitoring techniques tell us about plumbing systems and precursory phenomena of magma ascent and eruption?
• How do mushy regions evolve? How do processes like thermal and compositional convection, segregation of components, and phase changes work?

This session aims to bring together scientists working in different fields of igneous petrology and geochemistry, structural geology, geodesy, geophysics and material sciences. Studies using different methods such as field studies, compositional and textural analyses, geochronology, structural and metamorphic geology, laboratory experiments, numerical/analogue modelling, and seismic and ground deformation surveys to understand the architecture and dynamics of VIPS as well as the evolution of mushy regions are the core of this session. We, therefore, invite contributions highlighting insights from one of these fields and highly encourage contributions using multi-disciplinary approaches.

This session is sponsored by the IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic and Igneous Plumbing Systems.

Co-sponsored by IAVCEI
Convener: Gianmarco BuonoECSECS | Co-conveners: Fabien Albino, Pavlina Hasalová, Radoslav HurtišECSECS, Juraj Kyselica, Joana MartinsECSECS, Lucia Pappalardo
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Wed, 16:15
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
GMPV7.3 EDI

Magma dynamics from sources in the upper mantle and lower crust to volcanic eruption at the surface or plutonic emplacement in the shallow crust includes a range of complex phenomena. Fluid-mechanical and thermo-chemical interactions between the different phases (liquid melt, solid crystals, exsolved volatile fluid or vapour, and pyroclasts) emerge on sub-millimetre scales but give rise to interlinked systems of melt extraction, magma ascent, differentiation (e.g., fractional crystallization, magma mixing and mingling, rock assimilation, melt-rock and melt-crystal mush reactions), and storage, eruption, and mineral resource generation extending from several metres to dozens of kilometres throughout the lithosphere and crust. Evidence for these processes derives from geophysical tomography, seismic, acoustic, and ground deformation monitoring, as well as geochemical analyses of volcanic and plutonic products. Observations are complemented by study of experimental petrology, thermodynamic and mechanical properties of magmas. Most observational and experimental methods, however, only provide indirect access to the systems of interest. Computational modelling can therefore provide powerful tools for interpreting and synthesising the wealth of observational and experimental data.

This session aims to stimulate discussions on how mult-idisciplinary approaches can be used to advance the interpretation of volcano monitoring, geophysical, geochemical, and petrological observations. We therefore wish to bring together contributions on the theory and implementation of models of magmatic systems and their application in the context of experimental and observational studies. We invite contributions focusing on (but not restricted to) multiphase flow, thermodynamic phase equilibria, as well as studies on melt extraction from sources in the mantle and crust, magma ascent and storage in the crust, interaction between magma and wall-rocks, crystallization and fluid exsolution dynamics, dissolved and exsolved volatiles in magmas, effusive and explosive eruption dynamics, rheology of solid-liquid-gas mixtures, fragmentation processes, magmatic-hydrothermal interactions, and associated mineral resource genesis.

Co-organized by GD2
Convener: Tobias KellerECSECS | Co-conveners: Flavia PalummoECSECS, Adina E. PusokECSECS, Barbara Bonechi, Nicolas RielECSECS, Cristina Perinelli, Mattia de’ Michieli VitturiECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 0.14
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 10:45
TS10.2 EDI

Magma migration and emplacement processes occur at a vast range of spatial and temporal scales. The interplay between singular emplacement mechanisms could make each pluton, intrusive sheet or volcano a unique case. Their study can be approached from many, even distinct, points of view; some approaches are mainly concerned with the chemical and physical mechanisms governing melt genesis, mobilisation, and segregation, as well as the transport/ascent, storage, evolution, and eruption of magma. Others focus on the architecture of magma plumbing systems, a realistic representation of rheologically complex and heterogeneous rock piles, the spatial relationships between faults or shear zones and magmatic processes, or the thermal impact associated with intrusion emplacement. The study of these processes (both active and ancient) is fundamental, and helps in understanding volcanic unrest, eruptions and edifice collapse, the mechanical development of magma conduits and reservoirs, economic mineral deposits and geothermal resources, and the role of different plate tectonic settings.
The data collected at active volcanoes is rapidly increasing in quality; there has been an explosion in high-resolution geodetic and seismic data that captures magma movement and storage conditions in the subsurface. Simple fitting of ground deformation and seismic signals with static, linearly-elastic models lacks predictive power about what will happen to the system next and provides little insight into the physics of the system. Mechanical and fluid-dynamic modelling can answer how such intrusions develop through time, can help investigate the processes controlling where and when magma erupts and can quantify the influence of mechanical complexities and when these should be considered. Such models are typically theoretical, but due to rapid increases in the data quality of magmatic events we can begin to test the predictive power of these models.
The aim of this session is to discuss the next generation of models of magma migration, emplacement and volcano deformation that focus on the interplay between these different approaches and mechanisms, different scales (from micro- to macro-) and methodologies, as well as a more realistic representation of the mechanical response of crustal rock to the migration of dynamically-complex magma.

Public information:

Convener contact: sam35poppe[at]gmail.com

Co-organized by GMPV7
Convener: Sam PoppeECSECS | Co-conveners: Daniele MaestrelliECSECS, Tim DavisECSECS, Claire HarnettECSECS, Kyriaki Drymoni, Domenico Montanari, Matteo Lupi
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 08:30
GMPV7.5 EDI

Processes occurring in magma storage regions control magma compositions and properties, which in turn affect ascent dynamics and eruptive behavior, thus representing a paramount factor for the environmental and societal impact of volcanic eruptions. Magma fractionation, degassing, mixing, and country-rock assimilation occur on a wide range of timescales and depths. Textural, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of eruptive products can be used as forensic tools to elucidate the inner workings of magmatic plumbing systems. Decompression and cooling driven by the ascent of magmas in volcanic conduits also impart their signature on eruptive products, complicating the interpretation of physico-chemical changes of the system. Upon reaching the surface, interaction between the products of volcanic activity and the surrounding environment represent a critical source of volcanic hazards, such as those associated with ice-covered volcanoes in the Arctic, Antarctic or globally.
We welcome a broad range of petrological, geochemical, geophysical and volcanological studies, based on natural, experimental, theoretical, or numerical-based approaches, with the scope of shedding light on magmatic processes at depth. We also encourage submissions of contributions that deal with the mitigation of the hazards associated with volcanic activity. Interdisciplinary work considering the close and complex interplay between magmatic processes, conduit dynamics, and eruptive behavior are of particular interest for this session.

Convener: Alessio PontesilliECSECS | Co-conveners: Chiara Maria Petrone, Eva EiblECSECS, Sivio Mollo, Teresa Ubide, Eleonora Braschi, Iestyn Barr
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 16:15

GMPV8 – Volcanic processes and recent eruptions

Programme group scientific officers: Marco Viccaro, Evgenia Ilyinskaya, Brendan McCormick Kilbride

GMPV8.1 EDI

The session deals with the documentation and modelling of the tectonic, deformation and geodetic features of any type of volcanic area, on Earth and in the Solar System. The focus is on advancing our understanding on any type of deformation of active and non-active volcanoes, on the associated behaviours, and the implications for hazards. We welcome contributions based on results from fieldwork, remote-sensing studies, geodetic and geophysical measurements, analytical, analogue and numerical simulations, and laboratory studies of volcanic rocks.
Studies may be focused at the regional scale, investigating the tectonic setting responsible for and controlling volcanic activity, both along divergent and convergent plate boundaries, as well in intraplate settings. At a more local scale, all types of surface deformation in volcanic areas are of interest, such as elastic inflation and deflation, or anelastic processes, including caldera and flank collapses. Deeper, sub-volcanic deformation studies, concerning the emplacement of intrusions, as sills, dikes and laccoliths, are most welcome.
We also particularly welcome geophysical data aimed at understanding magmatic processes during volcano unrest. These include geodetic studies obtained mainly through GPS and InSAR, as well as at their modelling to imagine sources.

The session includes, but is not restricted to, the following topics:
• volcanism and regional tectonics;
• formation of magma chambers, laccoliths, and other intrusions;
• dyke and sill propagation, emplacement, and arrest;
• earthquakes and eruptions;
• caldera collapse, resurgence, and unrest;
• flank collapse;
• volcano deformation monitoring;
• volcano deformation and hazard mitigation;
• volcano unrest;
• mechanical properties of rocks in volcanic areas.

Co-organized by G3/GD2/NH2/TS10
Convener: Valerio Acocella | Co-conveners: Agust Gudmundsson, Thorbjorg Agustsdottir, Michael Heap, Sigurjon Jonsson, Virginie Pinel
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 16:15
SSP1.3 EDI

Mass extinctions and severe environmental changes in the Phanerozoic are temporarily associated with large volcanic eruptions and meteorite impacts, suggesting causal relationships. This session invites contributions presenting new data and results from the end-Ordovician, Late and end-Devonian, end-Permian, end-Triassic, end-Cretaceous, and other paleoenvironmental crises, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum and Oceanic Anoxic Events in the Mesozoic. The goal of the session is to bring together researchers from geological, geophysical, and biological disciplines to improve our knowledge of the cause-effect scenario of these major environmental changes.

Co-organized by GMPV8
Convener: Alicia FantasiaECSECS | Co-conveners: Thierry Adatte, Sverre Planke, David Bond, Eric Font
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 10:45
GMPV8.5 EDI

Volcanoes release gas effluents and aerosol particles into the atmosphere during eruptive episodes and by quiescent emissions. Volcanic degassing exerts a dominant role in forcing the timing and nature of volcanic unrest and eruptions. Understanding the exsolution processes of gas species dissolved in magma, and measuring their emissions is crucial to characterise eruptive mechanism and evaluate the sub-sequent impacts on the atmospheric composition, the environment and the biosphere. Emissions range from silent exhalation through soils to astonishing eruptive clouds that release gas and particles into the atmosphere, potentially exerting a strong impact on the Earth’s radiation budget and climate over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Strong explosive volcanic eruptions are a major natural driver of climate variability at interannual to multidecadal time scales. Quiescent passive degassing and smaller-magnitude eruptions on the other hand can impact on regional climate system. Through direct exposure and indirect effects, volcanic emissions may influence local-to-regional air quality and seriously affect the biosphere and environment. Volcanic gases can also present significant hazards to populations downwind of an eruption, in terms of human, animal and plant health, which subsequently can affect livelihoods and cause socio-economic challenges. Gas emissions are measured and monitored via a range of in-situ and remote sensing techniques, to gain insights into both the subterranean-surface processes and quantify the extent of their impacts. In addition, modelling of the subsurface and atmospheric/climatic processes, as well as laboratory experiments, are fundamental to the interpretation of field-based and satellite observations.

This session focuses on the state-of-the-art and interdisciplinary science concerning all aspects of volcanic degassing and impacts of relevance to the Volcanology, Environmental, Atmospheric and Climate sciences (including regional climate), and Hazard assessment. We invite contributions on all aspects of volcanic plumes science, their observation, modelling and impacts. We welcome contributions that address issues around the assessment of hazards and impacts from volcanic degassing both in crises and at persistently degassing volcanoes.

Co-organized by AS4/CL1/NH2
Convener: Pasquale Sellitto | Co-conveners: Giuseppe G. Salerno, Corinna KlossECSECS, Tjarda Roberts
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:05 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 10:45
GMPV8.6 EDI

Over the past few years, major technological advances significantly increased both the spatial coverage and frequency bandwidth of multi-disciplinary observations at active volcanoes. Networks of instruments, both ground- and satellite-based, now allow for the quantitative measurement of geophysical responses, geological features and geochemical emissions, permitting an unprecedented, multi-parameter vision of the surface manifestations of mass transport beneath volcanoes. Furthermore, new models and processing techniques have led to innovative paradigms for inverting observational data to image the structures and interpret the dynamics of volcanoes. Within this context, this session aims to bring together a multidisciplinary audience to discuss the most recent innovations in volcano imaging and monitoring, and to present observations, methods and models that increase our understanding of volcanic processes.
We welcome contributions (1) related to methodological and instrumental advances in geophysical, geological and geochemical imaging of volcanoes, and (2) to explore new knowledge provided by these studies on the internal structure and physical processes of volcanic systems.
We invite contributors from all geophysical, geological and geochemical disciplines: seismology, electromagnetics, geoelectrics, gravimetry, magnetics, muon tomography, volatile measurements and analysis. The session will include in-situ monitoring and high- resolution remote sensing studies that resolve volcanic systems ranging from near-surface hydrothermal activity to deep magma migration.

Co-organized by NH2
Convener: Jurgen Neuberg | Co-conveners: Luca De Siena, Thomas R. Walter, Catherine Hayer
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 08:30
GMPV8.7 EDI

After over 800 years of quiescence, the Fagradalsfjall eruptions in 2021 and 2022 may mark the onset of a new cycle of volcanism and unrest across the Reykjanes Peninsula in SW-Iceland. The eruptions followed periods of intense seismicity and deformation triggered by the injection of feeder dikes. The compositions of the erupted lava, melt inclusions, and gas emissions suggested pre-eruption storage from near-moho depths. Over the course of the eruption, the lava composition displayed significant compositional change over time that suggested the rapid mixing of melt batches of different source depth and affinity. Variably pulsating effusion and degassing behavior challenges the traditional views of volcanic plumbing systems. The eruptions were, and still are, popular tourist attractions, posing challenges to safe crowd management in active volcanic areas. Now we ponder: what's next?

We welcome submissions on volcanic systems of the Reykjanes Peninsula; their plumbling systems, eruptive products, and impacts. We particularly encourage comparative studies across different regions and disciplines.

Topics may include, for example: physical volcanology of eruptive products and eruptive behavior; lava flow modeling; acoustic studies; petrology; geochemistry and interaction with groundwater; studies of volcanic gases; crustal deformation; seismology; volcano monitoring; social effects; health effects; hazard mitigation; tectonic implications; volcano-tectonic interactions; atmosphere-climate interactions, etc.

Co-organized by EOS1/NH7/SM6/TS10
Convener: Halldór Geirsson | Co-conveners: Kristín Jónsdóttir, Edward W. Marshall, Sara Barsotti, Sigríður María Aðalsteinsdóttir
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.14
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 10:45

GMPV9 – Living with active volcanoes: resources, monitoring, hazards and risk mitigation

Programme group scientific officers: Marco Viccaro, Evgenia Ilyinskaya, Brendan McCormick Kilbride

GMPV9.1 EDI

Monitoring of volcanic hazards by combining field observations, satellite data and numerical models, presents extraordinarily challenging problems, from detecting and quantifying hazardous phenomena during eruptive events to forecasting their impact to assess risks to people and property. This session welcomes contributions addressing unresolved challenging questions related to complex geophysical flow modeling, including physical-mathematical formulations, numerical methods and satellite data analysis as well as contributions that cross-fertilize efforts in traditional volcano monitoring with new technological innovations from statistical methods and artificial intelligence. Goals for the session include: (i) expanding knowledge of complex volcanic processes and their space-time dynamics; (ii) monitoring and modeling volcanic phenomena; (iii) evaluating model robustness through validation against real case studies, analytical solutions and laboratory experiments; (iv) quantifying the uncertainty propagation through both forward (sensitivity analyses) and inverse (optimization/calibration) modeling in all areas of volcanic hazard; (v) investigating the potential of machine learning techniques to process remote sensing data for developing a better understanding of volcanic hazards.

Co-organized by NH2
Convener: Gaetana Ganci | Co-conveners: Giuseppe Bilotta, Nikola RogicECSECS, Annalisa CappelloECSECS, Claudia Corradino, Federica TorrisiECSECS, Eleonora Amato
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.91
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 08:30
GMPV9.3

The understanding of geochemical processes occurring in volcano systems is the driver for the scientific community and Civil Protection agencies towards an effective geochemical monitoring of volcanic activity. Volatile emissions provide the opportunity to infer information on magma degassing that drives the unrest, the eruption activity and its style. In light of this, scientists study the chemical and isotope composition of different types of gas emissions (volcanic plumes, fumaroles and soil emissions) and waters (groundwater, crater lakes, geysers etc.). Many valuable monitoring activities are carried out all around the world by the members of the scientific community thus contributing to the volcanic risk mitigation. In addition, the study of volcanic gases represents a valuable tool to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions into the atmosphere, characterize the geothermic potential of the areas, identify and characterize outdoor and indoor gas hazard.
We are seeking contributions from any geochemical studies on various topics including (but not limited to):
Soil degassing;
Fumaroles emissions;
Volcanic plumes;
Dissolved gases;
Thermal waters;
All methodological approaches, from the most traditional to the most innovative ones are welcome.

Convener: Marcello Liotta | Co-conveners: Fátima Viveiros, Carlo Cardellini
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D2
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 10:45