Union-wide
Side Events
Disciplinary Sessions
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions

Session programme

PS

PS – Planetary & Solar System Sciences

MAL3/PS/ST
Conveners: Jonathan Bamber, Alberto Montanari
Abstract
| Thu, 11 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room E1
MAL28/PS
Convener: Stephanie C. Werner
Programme
| Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–17:15
 
Room L8
MAL40/PS ECS
Convener: Stephanie C. Werner
Programme
| Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–11:15
 
Room L3
DM17/PS ECS
Convener: Stephanie C. Werner
Tue, 09 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 1.61

PS1 – Terrestrial Planets Systems and Comparative Planetology

PS1.1

The Open Session on Moon, Mars, Mercury, Venus as terrestrial planets systems aims at presenting highlights of relevant recent results through observations, modelling, laboratory and theory. Key research questions concerning the surface, subsurface, interior and their evolution will be discussed, as well as instruments and techniques from Earth and space.
Review talks on specific topics will be accepted on the basis of invitation by the conveners. Please contact the conveners if you have a topic that may be suitable for a review talk.
The session is open to all branches of terrestrial planets systems geosciences, and is intended as an open forum and discussion between their diverse experts and Earth geoscientists.

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Co-organized as GD9.4/GI3.16
Convener: Bernard Foing | Co-conveners: Gregor Golabek, Johannes Benkhoff, Dmitrij Titov
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:27, 14:00–15:46
 
Room L8
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
GM1.5

Planetary Geomorphology aims to bring together geomorphologists from terrestrial sciences with those who work on other bodies such as Mars, Venus, Mercury, the Moon, icy satellites of the outer solar system, comets, and asteroids. Studies of landscapes on any scale on any solid body are welcome. We particularly encourage those who use Earth analogues (either in the field or laboratory) to present their work. Submissions can include studies on glacial, periglacial, aeolian, volcanic, fluvial, or "undetermined" landforms. We welcome contributions from early-career scientists and geomorphologists who are new to planetary science.

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Co-organized as PS1.2
Convener: Susan Conway | Co-conveners: Davide Baioni, Frances E. G. Butcher, Tjalling de Haas, Nikolaus J. Kuhn
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room -2.32
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X2
PS1.3 Media

The Mars Science and Exploration Session will address the latest results on the interior, surface, atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars from recent and ongoing Mars missions, as well as the future exploration of the Red Planet. In particular, the session is primarily targeted at: (1) presentations on scientific investigations as well as theoretical models concerning the deep interior and subsurface structure and composition; the surface morphology and composition; the atmospheric composition, dynamics and climate; the ionospheric environment and its interaction with the solar wind; Phobos, water evolution, astrobiology and habitability of Mars; (2) discussions on scientific goals, long-term plans and proposed experiments for future missions to Mars, as well as results obtained from ground-based measurements. The session includes also a small subsession of a community effort for a receiving and curation facility of Mars Sample Return. Both broad solicited talks and contributed presentations will be included in the program.

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Convener: Anna Fedorova | Co-conveners: Arianna Piccialli, Elliot Sefton-Nash, Betsy Pugel
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room L3, Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room L3
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
PS1.4 Media

The InSight mission to Mars landed in Elysium Planitia on November 26. InSight's scientific objective is the study of the Martian interior using two seismometers, a heat flow probe and geodetical measurements. Auxiliary instruments will collect meteorological and magnetic data for at least one Martian year.
This session provides initial results from Mars, status reports of instrument deployment and relevant pre-landing science.

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Co-organized as AS4.60/EMRP2.33/GD9.3/GMPV7.13/SM1.5/TS1.7
Convener: Simon C. Stähler | Co-conveners: Brigitte Knapmeyer-Endrun, Anna Mittelholz, Ana-Catalina Plesa
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room L3, Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room L3
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X4
ITS3.5/PS1.6/BG1.47/CL3.11/ERE1.3/HS11.25 | PICO

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) (or Global Goals for Sustainable Development) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations Development Programme.The formal name for the SDGs is: "Transforming our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development." That has been shortened to "2030 Agenda." The goals are broad and interdependent, yet each has a separate list of targets to achieve. Achieving all 169 targets would signal accomplishing all 17 goals. The SDGs cover social and economic development issues including poverty, hunger, health, education, global warming, gender equality, water, sanitation, energy, urbanization, environment and social justice.
For this interdisciplinary session, we invite contributions discussing How Earth, Planetary and Space Scientists can address UN Sustainable Development Goals . We shall discuss the relevance of fields of research disciplines covered by EGU, and how they can inform and support society government bodies, and stakeholders for the SDGs.
The session will include invited and contributed oral papers, as well as interactive posters, and panel discussions.

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Co-organized as PS1.6/BG1.47/CL3.11/ERE1.3/HS11.25
Convener: Bernard Foing | Co-convener: Germaine Van der Sanden
PICOs
| Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
PICO spot 4
PS1.8

This session primarily focuses on the neutral atmospheres of terrestrial bodies other than the Earth. This includes not only Venus and Mars, but also exoplanets with comparable envelopes and satellites carrying dense atmospheres such as Titan or exospheres such as Ganymede. We welcome contributions dealing with processes affecting the atmospheres of these bodies, from the surface to the exosphere. We invite abstracts concerning observations, both from Earth or from space, modeling and theoretical studies, or laboratory work. Comparative planetology abstracts will be particularly appreciated.

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Co-organized as AS4.58
Convener: Francisco González-Galindo | Co-conveners: Arnaud Beth, Sebastian Danielache, Hiroyuki Kurokawa, Arianna Piccialli, Yamila Miguel
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15, 10:45–12:30
 
Room L8
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X4
PS1.9

The solar system terrestrial planets, and especially the Earth, provide the best opportunity to learn about the basic physical principles of rocky planets, which can then be applied to the evolution of exoplanets and their atmospheres. Similarly, knowledge of the diversity and properties of exoplanetary systems can provide important information about the formation and evolution of our own solar system. In this session, we will focus on general discussions of exoplanetary science, and especially the application of solar system based knowledge to exoplanets and understanding how the Earth can be understood in the exoplanetary context. Of particular interest are studies of atmospheric evolution due to surface-atmosphere interactions and atmospheric losses to space, as well as interactions between stars and planets. Topics include recent advances in observations of (exo)planets lying in the habitable zone, model studies calculating the habitable zone boundaries, factors affecting habitability including atmospheric processes (e.g. outgassing, escape), high energy particles, remote biosignatures and their spectra, planned missions such as JWST, PLATO, E-ELT, LUVOIR, HABEX and ELF and their impact on our knowledge of exoplanetary habitability.

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Co-organized as AS4.59/BG7.2/GD9.2
Convener: Colin Johnstone | Co-conveners: Lena Noack, Georg Feulner, Maria Schönbächler, Mareike Godolt
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room L8
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4
GD9.1

Terrestrial planets are complex systems. Their evolution is dependent on a wide array of different mechanisms and how they interact together. The aim of this session is to emphasize the importance of coupling between different layers of the terrestrial planets and
feedback processes. For example, surface conditions are dependent on atmosphere composition, which results from early and on-going degassing, atmospheric losses and chemistry, and chemical reactions with the surface. In turn, surface conditions can affect the
habitability of the planet. Changes in surface temperature affect surface alteration processes as well as volatile exchanges and might even govern the tectonic regime.
We welcome contributions focused on a single terrestrial body as well as from comparative planetology. Both solar system bodies and exoplanets studies are covered. This session will bring together scientists from a wide range of domains and examine how they can affect planetary evolution. Targeted disciplines include mantle dynamics, planetary structure and composition, tectonic regimes, geomagnetism, volcanism, surface interaction/erosion, atmospheric sciences, volatile cycling, climate and habitability.

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Co-organized as PS1.10
Convener: Gregor Golabek | Co-convener: Cédric Gillmann
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room -2.32
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2
GD3.1

Dynamic processes shape the Earth and other planets throughout their history. Processes and lifetimes of magma oceans establish the initial conditions on the development of rocky planets and their early atmospheres. The dynamics of the mantle, the composition and mineral physics shape the present-day observable structure of the Earth's mantle and planetary bodies visible through seismic observations.
This session aims to provide a multidisciplinary view on the processes and structures of the Earth and planets. We welcome contributions that address the structure, dynamics, composition and evolution of their mantle, and their interactions with the outer layers, on temporal scales ranging from the present day to billions of years, and on spatial scales ranging from microscopic mineralogical samples, kilometer-size seismic structures to global planetary models.

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Co-organized as PS1.11/SM4.9
Convener: Paul Tackley | Co-conveners: Christine Thomas, Sébastien Merkel, Stephanie C. Werner
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room D1
GD3.2 | PICO

Dynamic processes shape the Earth and other planets throughout their history. Processes and lifetimes of magma oceans establish the initial conditions on the development of rocky planets and their early atmospheres. The dynamics of the mantle, the composition and mineral physics shape the present-day observable structure of the Earth's mantle and planetary bodies visible through seismic observations.
This session aims to provide a multidisciplinary view on the processes and structures of the Earth and planets. We welcome contributions that address the structure, dynamics, composition and evolution of their mantle, and their interactions with the outer layers, on temporal scales ranging from the present day to billions of years, and on spatial scales ranging from microscopic mineralogical samples, kilometer-size seismic structures to global planetary models.

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Co-organized as PS1.12/SM4.10
Convener: Christine Thomas | Co-conveners: Sébastien Merkel, Paul Tackley, Stephanie C. Werner
PICOs
| Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
PICO spot 3
GD3.4

Mantle upwellings are an important component of the Earth’s convective system that can cause volcanism and anomalies in surface topography. Upwellings can rise from thermal boundary layers as hot “mantle plumes”. Alternatively, they can be the response to upper-mantle convective flow, subduction, or rifting. Clearly, different mechanisms sustain mantle upwellings of various temperature, vigour and composition, causing characteristic signals that can potentially be imaged using geophysical data, as well as expressed in the geochemistry and petrology of related magmatism.

This session invites contributions that focus on mantle upwellings from geophysics, geochemistry, and modelling perspectives. Our aim is to bring together constraints from multiple disciplines to understand the origin and dynamics of mantle upwellings, as well as their potential to trigger mantle melting, create volcanism, generate ore deposits, and build dynamic topography.

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Co-organized as GMPV2.8/PS1.13/SM4.12/TS9.4
Convener: Maxim Ballmer | Co-conveners: Maria Tsekhmistrenko, Catherine Chauvel, Sebastien Pilet, Catherine A. Rychert, Karin Sigloch, Bernhard Steinberger, Vincent Strak
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room -2.32
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X2

PS2 – Small Bodies (dwarf planets, asteroids, comets) to Dust

PS2.1

The scope of this session covers all aspects of small solar system objects from comets and asteroids, to dust and meteoroids, as well as dwarf planets and other Kuiper belt objects. Topics include, but are not limited to, dynamics, evolution, physical properties, composition, and interactions. You are invited to present results obtained from space missions, remote sensing observations, laboratory studies, theory and numerical simulations. This session also provides a forum for presenting future space missions and instrumentation. Research results should preferably be presented from a multi-disciplinary perspective.

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Convener: Ingrid Mann | Co-conveners: Johan De Keyser, Charles Lue, Ernesto Palomba
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X4
PS2.2

The JAXA and NASA space missions Hayabusa 2 and Osiris-Rex have the ambitious objective to orbit around two primitive carbonaceous Near Earth Asteroids (162173 Ryugu and 101955 Bennu) to understand the origin and evolution of the Solar System. The two missions will collect samples of the two bodies and return back them to the Earth for further and more accurate analysis in laboratory. At the time of the EGU Assembly, Hayabusa 2 will likely have already published their first results about Ryugu and Osiris-Rex will have started to survey of Bennu. This session is open to all the scientists directly involved in the two missions to show the first results obtained so far, and to discuss possible links between the two objects. Nevertheless, we invite all other scientists to present their scientific discussions, modelling, laboratory simulations about these two primitive NEA’s. We believe that this session is rare opportunity to show the hot scientific results of Hayabusa 2 and Osiris-Rex involving a scientific audience much wider than the specific planetary science community

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Convener: Ernesto Palomba | Co-conveners: Fabrizio Dirri, Stephan Ulamec, Makoto Yoshikawa
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
PS2.3

This session aims to showcase recent results from Rosetta of its investigation of 67P/Churyumov –Gerasimenko. Studies involving and also combining simulation, theory and also other ground and space based observations are also very welcome.

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Convener: Matthew Taylor | Co-conveners: Bonnie Buratti, Mathieu Choukroun, Patrick Martin
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room L8
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
PS2.5

The session should address all aspects of dust detection in space by both dedicated and non-dedicated dust detectors (i.e., electric field antennas, Faraday cups, etc.), theoretical approaches to detection mechanisms, and laboratory simulations of dust impact.

Solicited talk by Paul Kellogg (Minnesota Institute of Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) focused on the dust impacts detected by STEREO.

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Co-organized as GI3.26/ST1.7
Convener: Jiri Pavlu | Co-conveners: Harald Krüger, Jakub Vaverka
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
PS2.6

Asteroid impacts are crucial events for the evolution of Earth. Asteroids and comets may have transported some of the ingredients of life (water and organic molecules from the outer solar system to our planet. At the same time, there is strong evidence that impacts destroyed much of the life on earth multiple times. The last and most famous event is the impact of an order of 10 km sized object that led to the extinction of dinosaurs, 65 million years ago. Those big impacts are rare, however, much smaller events can create large damage. The estimated age of Meteor Crater in Arizona, an impact crater of approximately 1.2 km in diameter, is only 50000 years. Only a century ago, in the Tunguska event on 30 June 1908, a small asteroid exploded in the atmosphere above Siberia and destroyed more than 2000 km2 of Forest. And very recently, in 2013, the impact of an only ~20 m asteroid damaged a large number of buildings in the Russian town of Chelyabinsk, luckily killing nobody, but injuring more than 1500 people. The question is not if another asteroid will get on a collision trajectory, but when it will happen.
For the first time in history, humankind is becoming able to prevent a catastrophic asteroid impact. Search programs are nearly complete for km-sized near-earth asteroids, and are striving to reach completeness for 100m-sized objects in the next years. Deflection of hazardous asteroids is in reach with current technology. In the International AIDA cooperation, NASA’s DART mission is in development for launch in 2021 for a deflection demonstration of asteroid Didymos in 2022. ESA’s Hera spacecraft, currently under study, is expected to follow on to study the impact effect in 2026.
Abstracts are invited covering all aspects of planetary defense: Search programs for near-earth asteroids, dynamical and physical characterization of potentially hazardous objects, theoretical studies of potential deflection methods, and all components of deflection missions.

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Convener: Michael Küppers | Co-conveners: Özgür Karatekin, Patrick Michel
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4

PS3 – Giant Planets Systems

PS3.1

This session welcomes abstracts on the gas giant planets and Pluto systems, including their internal structures, atmospheres, magnetospheres, satellites and rings and coupling processes within those systems. Abstracts on observations from space and from the ground, modelling are also solicited. Supporting laboratory investigations and concepts for future space missions and Earth-based observations are also relevant to this session.

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Convener: Athena Coustenis | Co-conveners: Nicolas Altobelli, Sushil K. Atreya, Glenn Orton, Christina Plainaki
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room L8, Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room L3
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
PS3.2

This session welcomes abstracts addressing the exploration of ice giants systems, including internal structure, atmosphere composition, structure, and processes, magnetospheres, satellites and rings. Potential concepts for future ice giant system exploration, instrumentation, technology developments and international cooperation are also solicited.

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Convener: Olivier Mousis | Co-conveners: David H. Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreya, Patrick Irwin, Amy Simon
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4
PS3.3 Media

NASA’s Juno mission is devoted to study the origin and evolution of
Jupiter, which are the keys to understand the fundamental processes
and conditions that governed our solar system during its formation.

Orbiting around Jupiter since July 4, 2016, Juno is the first
spacecraft in a polar
orbit around this gas giant. Its scientific payload includes
instrumentation to study the interior, the atmosphere, and to perform
the first in-situ exploration of Jupiter’s polar magnetosphere and
aurorae.

An Earth-based observation campaign of Jupiter and the solar wind has
been organised to boost Juno's scientific return.

This session welcomes presentation of outcomes from the Juno
measurements, the collaborative campaign during the first two year of
Juno’s prime mission and results from studies of other giants in the
solar system.

The session will focus on data analysis and on theoretical modelling
of Jupiter’s interior structure, its intense magnetic field and
plasma circulation, the atmospheric dynamics and composition, and on
the structure and evolutions of the planet's auroras. We also welcome
discussions about comparative planetology with other giants in the
solar system.

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Convener: Yamila Miguel | Co-conveners: Daniele Durante, Therese Encrenaz, Alessandro Mura, Glenn Orton
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room L8
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4
PS3.4

The Cassini-Huygens mission ended with a plunge into Saturn's atmosphere in September 2017 sending back data until Cassini tumbled and vaporized in Saturn's atmosphere. Preceding the final plunge, Cassini executed 22 highly inclined Grand Finale orbits with closest approaches between the innermost rings and atmosphere. Many surprises and new discoveries were made in this previously unexplored territory, and during the final year of the mission, and many new findings are still being made in Cassini’s 13 years of incredible data.

This session will highlight new Cassini discoveries from multiple disciplines, including magnetospheric physics, outer solar system planetary and ring science, and space physics, revealed by data collected during this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore Saturn in a region where no spacecraft had flown before. Topics will include new results on Saturn's gravitational and magnetic fields; Saturn's ring mass; first in-situ sampling of main ring particles, Saturn's plasma environment, upper atmosphere and exosphere; high resolution imaging, spectra and radar measurements of both Saturn and its rings. Highlights from the last year of the mission and other new findings will be presented.

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Convener: Linda Spilker | Co-conveners: David H. Atkinson, Athena Coustenis, Scott Edgington, Jonathan I. Lunine
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4

PS4 – Space Weather, Climate, Habitability, and Life in (Exo-) Planetary Context

PS4.1

Planetary Space Weather: fundamental plasma interactions in space environments

The emphasis of the session is on crucial processes of planetary space weather, that is, plasma physics and interactions of the interplanetary medium with the Solar System bodies, including:
(a) magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling dynamics and auroras: from the Earth to other planets
(b) the solar wind interaction with planets, moons, asteroids and comets
(c) plasma interactions with exospheres, dust and surfaces
(d) surface space weathering
(e) potential impact of planetary environment on technological space systems
(f) inter-comparisons of planetary environments

Contributions are welcome which address previous (e.g. Chandrayaan-1, KAGUYA, Venus Express, MESSENGER, Rosetta, Cassini), present (e.g. Juno,
Mars Express, MAVEN, CHANG'E 2), forthcoming (e.g. BepiColombo, Parker Solar Probe) and planned (e.g. JUICE, Solar Orbiter) observations from space. Analyses of ground-based observations of neutral and ionized environments are welcome, as well as laboratory studies aiming to simulate the interactions on planetary analogues in space. Theoretical modeling and simulations are also strongly encouraged, both in themselves and as a basis for inter-comparisons and interpretation of measurements. Regarding that major breakthroughs on terrestrial space weather have been made with measurements from THEMIS, Cluster, AMPERE, MMS and Van Allen Probes, we very welcome the relevant topics at the Earth too, as comparative study has proven to be a powerful tool in understanding planetary space weather.

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Convener: Zhonghua Yao | Co-conveners: Philippe Garnier, Valeria Mangano
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 1.61
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X4
PS4.2

The ionospheres and magnetospheres of weakly magnetized bodies with substantial atmospheres (e.g. Mars, Venus, Titan, Pluto and comets) are subject to disturbances due to solar activities, interplanetary conditions, or parent magnetospheric environments (e.g. solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles), sharing similarities with their magnetized counterparts but with scientifically important differences. As an integral part of planetary atmospheres, ionospheres are tightly coupled with the neutral atmosphere, exosphere and surrounding plasma environment, possessing rich compositional, density, and temperature structures. The interaction among neutral and charged components affects atmospheric loss, neutral winds, photochemistry, and energy balance within ionospheres. This session invites abstracts concerning remote and in-situ data analysis, modeling studies, comparative studies, instrumentation and mission concepts for weakly magnetized solar system bodies. Topics such as dayside and nightside ionospheric characteristics and variability, ion-neutral coupling, and responses of the ionized and neutral regimes to transient space weather events are especially encouraged.

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Convener: Martin Volwerk | Co-conveners: Niklas Edberg, Charlotte Götz, Beatriz Sanchez-Cano
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room L8
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4
PS4.3

The session solicits contributions that report on nonthermal solar and planetary radio emissions. Coordinated multi-point observations from ground radio telescopes (e.g., LOFAR, LOIS, LWA1, URAN-2, UTR-2) and spacecraft plasma/wave experiments (e.g., Cassini, Cluster, Demeter, Galileo, Juno, Stereo, Ulysses and Wind) are especially encouraged. Presentations should focus on radiophysics techniques used and developed to investigate the remote magnetic field and the electron density in solar system regions, like the solar corona, the interplanetary medium and the magnetized auroral regions. Interest also extends to laboratory and experimental studies devoted to the comprehension of the generation mechanisms (e.g., cyclotron maser instability) and the acceleration processes (e.g., Alfven waves). Further preparations, evaluations, investigations, analyses of forthcoming space missions (like BepiColombo, Juice, Solar Orbiter, Solar Probe, SunRISE, Taranis) are also welcome.

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Convener: Patrick Galopeau | Co-convener: Mohammed Y. Boudjada
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
NP6.7

Turbulence, reconnection and shocks are fundamental non-linear processes observed in solar, heliospheric, magnetospheric and laboratory plasmas. These processes are not separate, but rather appear to be interconnected. For instance, a close link exists between reconnection and turbulence. On the one hand the turbulence cascade favors the onset of magnetic reconnection between magnetic islands and, on the other hand, magnetic reconnection is able to trigger turbulence in the reconnection outflows and separatrices. Similarly, shocks may form in collisional and collisionless reconnection processes and can be responsible for turbulence formation, as for instance in the turbulent magnetosheath.

This session welcomes simulations, observational and theoretical works relevant for the study of these non-linear phenomena. Particularly welcome will be works focusing on the link between them in a range of scale going from fluid MHD to kinetic. The topic of this session is relevant for the understanding of solar atmosphere (from the photosphere to the solar wind), interaction of solar wind with planetary magnetospheres, planetary magnetospheric physics and particle acceleration and transport throughout the heliosphere. The session is also relevant to past and present space missions in plasma astrophysics such as Cluster, MMS and Parker Solar Probe.

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Co-organized as PS4.4/ST2.8
Convener: Francesco Pucci | Co-conveners: Alexandros Chasapis, Maria Elena Innocenti, Giovanni Lapenta
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room M1
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X4
GI3.6 Media

'Cosmic rays’ collectively describe particles that bombard the Earth from space. They carry information about space and, once near the Earth, interact with the magnetosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Secondary cosmic rays created within the atmosphere can provide information about our planet that is vital to science and society. Secondary neutron radiation plays an extraordinary role, as it not only carries information about solar activity, but also produces short and long living tracer isotopes, influences genetic information of living organisms, and is extraordinarily sensitive to hydrogen and therefore also to water. Given the vast spectrum of interactions of cosmic rays with matter in different parts of the Earth, cosmic-ray research ranges from studies of the solar system to the history of the Earth, and from health and security issues to hydrology and climate change.

Although research on cosmic-ray particles is connected to a variety of disciplines and applications, they all share similar questions and problems regarding the physics of detection, modeling, and environmental factors that influence the intensity. Questions that all disciplines have in common are, for example, “How does the cosmic-ray intensity and energy spectra change with time and location on Earth?”, “How to correct the signal for magnetospheric or atmospheric fluctuations?”, “What is the influence of local structures, water bodies, and surface conditions?”, “Which computer model for cosmic-ray propagation is correct?”, or “What can we learn from other types of cosmic-ray particles?”.

The session brings together scientists from all fields of research that are related to monitoring and modeling of cosmogenic radiation. It will allow sharing of expertise amongst international researchers as well as showcase recent advancements in their field. The session aims to stimulate discussions about how individual disciplines can share their knowledge and benefit from each other.

We solicit contributions related but not limited to:
- Health, security, and radiation protection: cosmic-ray dosimetry on Earth and its dependence on environmental and atmospheric factors
- Planetary space science: satellite and ground-based neutron and gamma-ray sensors to detect water and soil chemistry
- Neutron monitor research: detection of high-energy cosmic rays variations and its dependence on local and atmospheric factors
- Hydrology and climate change: low-energy neutron sensing to measure water in reservoirs at and near the land surface, such as soils, snow pack and vegetation
- Cosmogenic nuclides: as tracers of atmospheric circulation and mixing; as a tool in archaeology or glaciology for dating of ice and measuring ablation rates; and as a tool for surface exposure dating and measuring rates of surficial geological processes
- Detector design: technological advancements for the detection of cosmic rays
- Cosmic-ray modeling: advances in modeling of the cosmic-ray propagation through the magnetosphere and atmosphere, and their response to the Earth’s surface
- Impact modeling: How can cosmic-ray monitoring support environmental models, weather and climate forecasting, irrigation management, and the assessment of natural hazards

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Co-organized as AS4.55/EMRP2.41/HS11.18/NH11.14/PS4.6/ST4.8
Convener: Martin Schrön | Co-conveners: Konstantin Herbst, Markus Köhli, W. Rühm, Marek Zreda
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room -2.47
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X1
GM5.3

Water is the defining feature of the habitable Earth; it is essential for all life as we know it. Evolution and maintenance of life in extremely water limited environments, which cover significant portions of the Earth, is not well understood. Akin to life, water-driven processes leave unique marks on the Earth’s surface. Mars is the only other planet currently known to bear the marks of water-driven surface processes, albeit fossil and of great age. The slow biotic and abiotic surface processes that may operate even in the virtual absence of liquid water are still essentially unknown. What is evident is that transient episodes of increased water availability can leave long lasting traces in extremely water limited environments. Intriguingly, those traces of bursts in Earth surface evolution have rarely been related to bursts in biological colonization/evolution, and vice versa, although both relate to the same trigger: water.

The objective of this session is to showcase research on the mutual evolutionary relationships between Earth surface processes and biota in arid to hyper-arid systems, where both biota and Earth surface process are severely and predominantly limited by the availability of water (rather than by extreme temperatures).
Solicited topics include (not exhaustive):
• fingerprints of biological activity at the (water) limit of the habitable Earth
• surface processes operating in the (virtual) absence of liquid water on Earth or extraterrestrial analogues (e.g. Mars)
• thresholds for biological colonization and concurrent fluvial transformation of landscapes
• tipping point(s) of biotically and abiotically controlled Earth surface systems
• chronometric and spatial information on the colonization and radiation of biota
terrestrial climatic records of (hyper-) arid regions on Earth

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Co-organized as BG7.4/CL4.38/PS4.7
Convener: Tibor J. Dunai | Co-conveners: Eduardo Campos, Cristina Dorador, Claudia Knief, Laura Evenstar
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–12:30, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.31
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X2

PS5 – Techniques and Mission Concepts for Exploration of Planetary Systems

PS5.1 | PICO

This session will cover instrumentation and measurement techniques for all aspects of space borne scientific sensors. The intention is to encourage a discussion between instrument scientists/engineers across the fields on the one hand and between these people and the data exploiting scientists on the other hand. We welcome contributions discussing new ideas and enabling technologies as well as reviews and presentations of instruments already in space or near launch. In addition, generic talks discussing design principles, miniaturisation, shared use of subsystems, component selection, instrument calibration etc. are most appreciated

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Co-organized as GI3.23
Convener: Maike Brigitte Neuland | Co-conveners: David Mimoun, Kim Reh
PICOs
| Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
PICO spot 4
PS5.2

This session is seeking papers that address new mission concepts, enabling technologies, and terrestrial analogue studies for future planetary science and exploration. In particular, papers describing mission studies proposed for ESA and international space agency programs are encouraged.

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Co-organized as GI3.24
Convener: Kim Reh | Co-conveners: Angelo Pio Rossi, Monica Pondrelli, Barbara Cavalazzi, Maike Brigitte Neuland
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room L8
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X4
PS5.3

The analysis of spectral remote sensing observations from orbiting spacecraft and rovers in the last decades has improved our knowledge about the different bodies in our Solar System. Visible to near infrared as well as thermal infrared spectroscopy enable the mapping of surface compositions of the different planetary surfaces, through the detection of rock-forming minerals as well as secondary mineralogies. Moreover, future explorations will likely involve other spectroscopic techniques (e.g., Raman) and will achieve new scientific goals including high spatial resolution hyperspectral mapping of planetary bodies (e.g. Mercury, asteroids, Phobos, and outer icy moons) and the search for biosignatures (e.g. Mars, Europa, and Enceladus).
Each Solar System object has its specifics, including surface temperature ranges, atmospheric pressure and composition and exposition level to solar and galactic energetic particles. For these reasons, past and future explorations, both from orbit and in-situ, need the support of laboratory activities involving different types of spectroscopic techniques, sample characterization and the integration of those different data sets.
Papers on experimental works and modeling of laboratory data, as well as the integration of data from different experimental techniques applied to planetary missions are solicited to provide the scientific community the opportunity to exchange their expertise and knowledge.

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Co-organized as GI3.25
Convener: Cristian Carli | Co-conveners: Rosario Brunetto, Sabrina Ferrari
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4
GI4.1

Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a safe, advanced, non-destructive and non-invasive imaging technique that can be effectively used for inspecting the subsurface as well as natural and man-made structures. During GPR surveys, a source is used to send high-frequency electromagnetic waves into the ground or structure under test; at the boundaries where the electromagnetic properties of media change, the electromagnetic waves may undergo transmission, reflection, refraction and diffraction; the radar sensors measure the amplitudes and travel times of signals returning to the surface.

This session aims at bringing together scientists, engineers, industrial delegates and end-users working in all GPR areas, ranging from fundamental electromagnetics to the numerous fields of applications. With this session, we wish to provide a supportive framework for (1) the delivery of critical updates on the ongoing research activities, (2) fruitful discussions and development of new ideas, (3) community-building through the identification of skill sets and collaboration opportunities, (4) vital exposure of early-career scientists to the GPR research community.

We have identified a series of topics of interest for this session, listed below.

1. Ground Penetrating Radar instrumentation
- Innovative GPR equipment
- Design, realization and optimization of GPR antennas
- Equipment testing and calibration procedures

2. Ground Penetrating Radar methodology
- Survey planning and data acquisition strategies
- Methods and tools for data analysis and interpretation
- Data processing algorithms, electromagnetic modelling, imaging and inversion techniques
- Studying the relationship between GPR sensed quantities and physical properties of inspected subsurface/structures useful for application needs
- Advanced data visualization methods to clearly and efficiently communicate the significance of GPR data

3. Ground Penetrating Radar applications and case studies
- Earth sciences
- Civil engineering
- Environmental engineering
- Archaeology and cultural heritage
- Management of water resources
- Humanitarian mine clearance
- Vital signs detection of trapped people in natural and man-made disasters
- Planetary exploration

4. Contributions on the combined use of Ground Penetrating Radar and other geoscience instrumentation, in all applications fields

5. Communication and education initiatives and methods

Additional information
This session is organized by Members of TU1208 GPR Association (www.gpradar.eu/tu1208); the association is a follow-up initiative of COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 “Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar”.

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Co-organized as EMRP2.18/HS11.5/NH6.12/PS5.4/SSS12.16/TS11.10
Convener: Aleksandar Ristic | Co-conveners: Alessandro Fedeli, Lara Pajewski, Mercedes Solla, Milan Vrtunski
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room 0.96
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X1
PS5.6

Analogue planetary research (APR) describes the development and testing of space exploration strategies including scientific, technical, operational, social and medical aspects in terrestrial environments under simulated space or planetary conditions [Hettrich S. et al. (2015), https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-15982-9_34]. As such, APR can be performed in analogue planetary simulation, for example Lunar or Martian analogue missions, where future crewed or robotic space exploration missions are simulated and evaluated towards their performance.
With increasing popularity of analogue planetary simulations as test-beds to develop and test technologies, techniques and operational procedures for planetary missions in facilities such as HiSeas, MDRS, LunAres, etc., or campaigns like Pangea, CAVES, or Amadee, this session invites contributions in the field of analogue planetary research including, but not limited to:

- results and lessons-learned from Lunar / Martian analogue missions
- field tests for space exploration hardware, software and techniques
- scientific contributions through analogue research
- geological field work during planetary simulations
- future analogue mission concepts
- transferring APR results into actual space exploration missions

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Convener: Bernard Foing | Co-convener: Sebastian Hettrich
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4
GM2.1 | PICO Media

This session aims to bridge the existing gap between the process-focused fields (hydrology, geomorphology, soil sciences, natural hazards, planetary science, geo-biology, archaeology) and the technical domain (engineering, computer vision, machine learning, and statistics) where terrain analysis approaches are developed.
The rapid growth of survey technologies and computing advances and the increase of data acquisition from various sources (platforms and sensors) has led to a vast data swamp with unprecedented spatio-temporal range, density, and resolution (from submeter to global scale data), which requires efficient data processing to extract suitable information. The challenge is now the interpretation of surface morphology for a better understanding of processes at a variety of scales, from micro, to local, to global.

We aim to foster inter-disciplinarity with a focus on new techniques in digital terrain analysis and production from any discipline which touches on geomorphometry, including but not exclusive to geomorphology (e.g., tectonic/volcanic/climatic/glacial), planetary science, archaeology, geo-biology, natural hazards, computer vision, remote sensing, image processing.
We invite submissions related to the successful application of geomorphometric methods, innovative geomorphometric variables as well as their physical, mathematical and geographical meanings. Submissions related to new techniques in high-resolution terrain or global scale data production and analysis, independent of the subject, as well as studies focused on the associated error and uncertainty analyses, are also welcome. We actively encourage contributors to present work “in development”, as well as established techniques being used in a novel way. We strongly encourage young scientists to contribute and help drive innovation in our community, presenting their work to this session.

We want to foster collaboration and the sharing of ideas across subject-boundaries, between technique developers and users, enabling us as a community to fully exploit the wealth of knowledge inherent in our digital landscape. Just remember, the driver for new ideas and applications often comes from another speciality, discipline or subject: Your solution may already be out there waiting for you!

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Co-organized as GI4.17/NH3.29/NP9.10/PS5.7/SSS13.9
Convener: Giulia Sofia | Co-conveners: Susan Conway, John K. Hillier, Michael Smith
PICOs
| Tue, 09 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
PICO spot 4
GI3.4

This session invites contributions on the latest developments and results in lidar remote sensing of the atmosphere, covering
• new lidar techniques as well as applications of lidar data for model verification and assimilation,
• ground-based, airborne, and space-borne lidar systems,
• unique research systems as well as networks of instruments,
• lidar observations of aerosols and clouds, thermodynamic parameters and wind, and trace-gases.
Atmospheric lidar technologies have shown significant progress in recent years. While, some years ago, there were only a few research systems, mostly quite complex and difficult to operate on a longer-term basis because a team of experts was continuously required for their operation, advancements in laser transmitter and receiver technologies have resulted in much more rugged systems nowadays, many of which are already operated routinely in networks and some even being automated and commercially available. Consequently, also more and more data sets with very high resolution in range and time are becoming available for atmospheric science, which makes it attractive to consider lidar data not only for case studies but also for extended model comparison statistics and data assimilation. Here, ceilometers provide not only information on the cloud bottom height but also profiles of aerosol and cloud backscatter signals. Scanning Doppler lidars extend the data to horizontal and vertical wind profiles. Raman lidars and high-spectral resolution lidars provide more details than ceilometers and measure particle extinction and backscatter coefficients at multiple wavelengths. Other Raman lidars measure water vapor mixing ratio and temperature profiles. Differential absorption lidars give profiles of absolute humidity or other trace gases (like ozone, NOx, SO2, CO2, methane etc.). Depolarization lidars provide information on the shapes of aerosol and cloud particles. In addition to instruments on the ground, lidars are operated from airborne platforms in different altitudes. Even the first space-borne missions are now in orbit while more are currently in preparation. All these aspects of lidar remote sensing in the atmosphere will be part of this session.

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Co-organized as AS5.6/BG1.34/NH6.16/PS5.8
Convener: Andreas Behrendt | Co-conveners: Adolfo Comeron, Paolo Di Girolamo, Doina Nicolae, Andreas Fix
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room 0.96
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X1

Union sessions of interest

US2

This year marks the 250th anniversary of the birth of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), the intrepid explorer of the Andes and other regions in the world, and the most famous scientist of his time. Alexander von Humboldt is perhaps best known for his radical new vision of nature as a complex and interconnected global force, thereby becoming the founder of the field of biogeography and laying the ground for modern Earth-System Science approaches. It seems fitting to pay tribute to Alexander von Humboldt’s legacy by reviewing the state of the art in studies of the coupled lithosphere – atmosphere – hydrosphere – biosphere system with a focus on the Andean mountain belt. The Andes have become one of the main natural laboratories in the world to explore these questions and many recent studies have addressed its tectonic and geodynamic evolution, but also the two-way couplings between surface uplift, climatic evolution and biodiversity in the Andes and its foreland. This Union Session will bring together world-leading specialists on these questions with the aim to shed light on both suspected and unexpected couplings in the system.

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Convener: Peter van der Beek | Co-conveners: Mike Burton, Giuliana Panieri, Lily Pereg (deceased)
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–12:15
 
Room E1
US3 Media|ECS

Over the whole Earth history, the climate has encountered tipping points, shifting from one regulated system to the other. This tilting motion affects both climate and the carbon cycle and has played a major role in the evolution of the Earth climate, at all timescales. Earth History has been ponctuated by large climate changes and carbon cycle reorganizations, from large climate variations occurring in deep times (snowball events, terrestrialisation, Mesozoic and early Cenozoic warm episodes, quaternary glacial cycles…) to past and on-going abrupt events. Many potential triggers of those climate and carbon cycle shifts have been proposed and tested through modeling studies, and against field data, such as those directly or indirectly linked with tectonics (plate motion, orogenesis, opening/closing of seaways, weathering…) and orbital forcing. Given that the Earth climate is currently experiencing an unprecedented transition under anthropogenic pressure, understanding the mechanisms behind the scene is crucial.

Our aim is to point out the most recent results concerning how a complex system as the climate of the Earth has undergone many tipping points and what is the specificity of the future climate changes. Therefore, within this session, we would like to encourage talks discussing advances in our record and modeling of the forces triggering and amplifying the changes of Earth climate and carbon cycle across spatial and temporal scales.

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Convener: Gilles Ramstein | Co-conveners: Ayako Abe-Ouchi, Richard Betts, Robert DeConto
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45, 16:15–18:00
 
Room E1
US4 ECS

In today’s changing world we need to tap the potential of every talented mind to develop solutions for a sustainable future. The existence of under-representation of different groups (cultural, national and gender) remains a reality across the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM fields) around the world, including the geosciences. This Union Symposium will focus on remaining obstacles that contribute to these imbalances, with the goal of identifying best practices and innovative ideas to overcome obstacles.

EGU is welcoming six high-level speakers from the funding agencies and research centres on both sides of the Atlantic related to geosciences to present efforts and discuss initiatives to tackle both implicit and explicit biases. Speakers are:

Jill Karsten, AGU Diversity and Inclusion Task Force (confirmed)
Erika Marín-Spiotta, University of Wisconsin - Madison (confirmed)
Daniel Conley, Lund University (confirmed)
Giulio di Toro, University of Padua (confirmed)
Liviu Matenco, Utrecht University (confirmed)
Barbara Romanowicz, European Research Council (confirmed)

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Co-sponsored by AGUJpGU
Convener: Claudia Alves de Jesus Rydin | Co-conveners: Alberto Montanari, Robin Bell, Chiaki Oguchi, Lily Pereg (deceased)
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room E1
US5

Atmospheric composition matters to climate, weather forecasting, human health, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, agricultural productivity, aeronautical operations, renewable energy production, and more. Hence research in atmospheric composition is becoming increasingly cross-cutting and linked to many disciplines including climate, biogeosciences, hydrology, natural hazards, computer and data sciences, socio-economic studies and many others. There is a growing need for atmospheric composition information and an improved understanding of the processes that drive changes in the composition and resulting impacts. While atmospheric composition research is advancing rapidly, there is a need to pay more attention to the translation of this research to support societal needs. Although translational research is a major focus of the health sciences and meteorology, it is in a relatively early stage in atmospheric composition. In this Union Symposium, we plan to highlight the need for, and to illustrate exciting advances in the translation of atmospheric composition research to support services. We will build upon work within the World Meteorological Organization and other communities related to the closer linkages of weather, atmospheric composition, and climate research and related services. We will also articulate the needs for advances in observing systems, models and a better understanding of fundamental processes. This session will also serve as a celebration of the 30 year anniversary of the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch programme and an opportunity for the broader community to envision partnerships needed to facilitate the effective translation of atmospheric composition research.

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Convener: Oksana Tarasova | Co-conveners: Marcos Andrade, Claudia Volosciuk
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 10:45–12:15, 14:00–15:30
 
Room E1
GDB1 Media

In October 2018, the IPCC published its special report on impacts of global warming of 1.5 deg C. Another recent, highly publicised study suggests that the planet could pass an irreversible threshold into a so called “Hothouse Earth” state for a temperature increase of as low as 2 degrees C above pre-industrial temperatures, while other studies and commentaries have emphasised the urgency on climate action, arguing that 2020 must be a turning point for global fossil fuel emissions, to increase the chance of maintaining a safe operating space for the humans on the planet. In 2018, the IPCC celebrated its 30th anniversary. The importance of taking action on human-induced climate change has been emphasised with governments around the world since the 1990s yet CO2 concentrations continue to rise and international initiatives have, to date, had limited and insufficient impact to avert some of the most serious consequences of climate change.
How close are we to one or more critical thresholds (cliff edge)? Is there time to avert passing one or more of these thresholds? What can the geoscience community do to reduce the risks? How important is bottom up versus top down action to ensuring the least worst outcome? These are some of the questions we will debate with world experts in their field and authors of the thought papers on these topics.

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Convener: Jonathan Bamber | Co-conveners: Alberto Montanari, Didier Roche
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room E1
GDB2 ECS

The geosciences are currently used by policymakers in a wide variety of areas to help guide the decision-making process and ensure that the best possible outcome is achieved. While the importance of scientific advice and the use of evidence in the policymaking process is generally acknowledged by both policymakers and scientists, how scientific advice is integrated and who is responsible is still unclear.

EU Policymakers frequently highlight institutionalised processes for integrating scientific advice into policy such as European Commission's Group of Chief Scientific Advisors (SAM) and the EU Commission’s Register of Expert Groups. But how efficient and accessible are these mechanisms really?

Some emphasise the need for scientists to have their own policy networks in place so that they can share their research outcomes with policymakers who can then use it directly or pass it on to those responsible for relevant legislation. But from funding applications to teaching and even outreach activities – scientists are often already overloaded with additional tasks on top of their own research. Can they really be held responsible for keeping up with the latest policy news and maintaining a constantly changing network of policymakers as well?

This debate will feature a mixed panel of policymakers and geoscientists who have previously given scientific advice. Some key questions that the panel will debate include:
• How can the accessibility of current EU science-advisory mechanisms be improved?
• Are scientists doing enough to share their research?
• And who is responsible for ensuring that quality scientific evidence is used in policymaking?

Speakers will be encouraged to explain any science advisory mechanism that they highlight (e.g. SAM) to ensure that the debate is understood by all those in attendance.

While the panel and subsequent debate will have an EU focus, it is likely that many of the issues discussed will be applicable to countries around the world.

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Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-conveners: Sarah Connors, Olivia Trani
Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room E1
GDB3 ECS

The ever more challenging work environments and increasing pressures on Early Career Scientists e.g. publish or perish, securing grant proposals, developing transferable skills and many more – and all while having a lack of job security. This puts a big strain on Early Career Scientists and this can lead to neglected mental well-being which in turn increases the risk of developing anxiety, depression or other mental health issues. The graduate survey from 2017 (https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v550/n7677/full/nj7677-549a.html) shows that 12% of respondents had sought help or advice for anxiety or depression during their PhD.

In this debate we want to discuss: Is there a problem? How ECS can take control of their mental wellbeing and prioritise this in the current research environment? And what support would ECS like to see from organisations like EGU or their employers?

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Convener: Stephanie Zihms | Co-conveners: Raffaele Albano, Anita Di Chiara, Olivia Trani, Mathew Stiller-Reeve
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:30
 
Room E1
GDB4 ECS

"What counts may not be countable and what is countable may not count". Assessments of scientists and their institutions tend to focus on easy-to-measure metrics related to research outputs such as publications, citations, and grants. However, society is increasingly dependent on Earth science research and data for immediate decisions and long-term planning. There is a growing need for scientists to communicate, engage, and work directly with the public and policy makers, and practice open scholarship, especially regarding data and software. Improving the reward and recognition structure to encourage broader participation of scientists in these activities must involve societies, institutions, and funders. EGU, AGU, and JPGU have all taken steps to improve this recognition, from developing new awards to starting journals around the topic of engaging the public to implementing FAIR data practices in the Earth, environmental, and space sciences, but far more is needed for a broad cultural change. How can we fairly value and credit harder-to-measure, these less tangible contributions, compared to the favoured metrics? And how can we shift the emphasis away from the "audit culture" towards measuring performance and excellence? This session will present a distinguished panel of stakeholders discussing how to implement and institutionalize these changes.

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Co-sponsored by AGUJpGU
Convener: Alberto Montanari | Co-conveners: Jonathan Bamber, Robin Bell, Hiroshi Kitazato, Lily Pereg (deceased)
Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room E1
GDB5 Media
Convener: Katja Fennel | Co-convener: Jonathan Bamber
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room E1
SCS1 Media|ECS

Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45-14:00 / Room E1

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Conveners: Alberto Montanari, Jonathan Bamber
Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45–14:00
 
Room E1
SCS2 Media|ECS

Plastic pollution is recognized as one of the most serious and urgent problems facing our planet. Rates of manufacture, use and ultimately disposal of plastics continue to soar, posing an enormous threat to the planet’s oceans and rivers and the flora and fauna they support. There is an urgent need for global action, backed by sound scientific understanding, to tackle this problem.

This Union Symposium will address the problems posed to our planet by plastic pollution, and examine options for dealing with the threat.

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Convener: Jessica Hickie | Co-conveners: Bruce Newport, Christopher Hackney, David Todd, Tim van Emmerik
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–17:45
 
Room E1
SCA1 ECS

The Games Night is a space to gather, socialise, and play some games. The catch is that all the games are based on Geoscience! Bring along your own games or try one of the others in the session and meet the people who created them. This will also be your chance to try games featured in the Games for Geoscience session.

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Convener: Christopher Skinner | Co-conveners: Rolf Hut, Sam Illingworth, Elizabeth Lewis, Jazmin Scarlett
Programme
| Wed, 10 Apr, 18:00–20:00
 
Foyer D
SCA2 ECS

Join us to help put some of the world's most vulnerable places on the map. A mapathon is a mapping marathon, where we get together to contribute to OpenStreetMap - the world's free map.
No experience is necessary - just bring your laptop and we will provide the training. Learn more about crowdsourcing, open data and humanitarian response - we will also provide some tips for how to host a mapathon at your home institution.

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Convener: Faith Taylor | Co-conveners: Hessel Winsemius, Joanne Wood, chen zhong
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:30
 
Room L4/5
SCA3

Plastic Oceans UK have been experts on plastic pollution for nearly a decade - solving the plastic crisis through their science, sustainability and education programmes. This all began with the award-winning documentary A Plastic Ocean, now available for streaming on Netflix.

Through changing attitudes, behaviours and practices on the use and value of plastics, we can stop plastic pollution reaching the ocean within a generation.

Come along to the screening of A Plastic Ocean to understand the impacts of plastic pollution around the world, what action we can take to stop plastics entering our natural world and pose your questions to the film's producer, Jo Ruxton, at the end of film.

http://plasticoceans.uk/

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Convener: Fiona Tovey | Co-convener: Jessica Hickie
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–21:00
 
Room E2