Union-wide
Side Events
Disciplinary Sessions
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions

Session programme

TSM

TSM – Townhall and splinter meetings

TM – Townhall meetings

TM1 ECS

Preprints and preprint servers have been proven to revolutionise and disrupt the standard approaches to scholarly publishing in many disciplines. Yet, the concept of preprints is new to many researchers in Earth Sciences. In this townhall we will introduce the general concepts of preprints and preprint servers and their benefits for the researcher, illustrating this with a demonstration of EarthArXiv, a community-led preprint server. The general introduction will be followed by an interactive discussion on preprints, the exchange of experiences and an outlook to the future of publishing.

Share:
Convener: Friedrich Hawemann | Co-conveners: David Fernández-Blanco, Christopher Jackson, Daniel Nüst
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room -2.85
TM2

In December 2017, the UN General Assembly proclaimed the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030). This decision represents a consensus by the global community on the importance, necessity and key role of ocean science and observations for ocean stewardship and society as a whole. The main motivation is to support efforts to reverse the cycle of decline in ocean health and create improved conditions for sustainable development of the ocean, seas and coasts.

The objectives of the Decade are:
(i) Knowledge of the ocean system
(ii) Evidence for ecosystems-based management and blue economy
(iii) Preparedness, response to and mitigation of ccean-related hazards
(iv) Cooperation in observation, data and other infrastructure
(v) Scientific and technical capacity and education
(vi) Enhanced cooperation, coordination, and communication.

It is important that the Decade builds recognition and engagement from within the Ocean Sciences community. This Town Hall seeks to raise awareness of the opportunities presented by the Decade, and to encourage the participation of EGU scientists in the planning stages of the Decade. The first half will present the Road Map for the planning process, and the second half will be an open discussion of ways in which ocean scientists in general, as well as the EGU Ocean Sciences Division, can work together to make the Decade a success.

Share:
Convener: Karen J. Heywood | Co-conveners: Marcus Dengler, Johan van der Molen
Programme
| Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 1.85
TM3

Scientific drilling has transformed the understanding of our planet by addressing some of the most fundamental questions about Earth´s dynamic history, processes, and structure, and by opening up new lines of inquiry. Understanding climate, sea-level and environmental changes, geohazards, natural resources, the structure and evolution of the Earth’s crust and the nature and extent of the deep biosphere all require having access to information recorded in subsurface layers.

Two major and complementary international programs undertake drilling for the scientific community: IODP (International Ocean Discovery Program) and ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program), in oceanic and continental environments respectively. This Townhall meeting will be the opportunity to share our views on exciting challenges to take up for a better understanding of the Earth system and its changing environment and to network with colleagues.

Share:
Convener: Thomas Wiersberg | Co-convener: Nadine Hallmann
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room N2
TM4 ECS

The EGU General Assembly is the largest geoscience conference in Europe, attracting towards 15,000 participants. This large number of attendees implies a substantial environment impact, caused by travel, accommodation, food, and of course conference organisation.

In this Townhall meeting we will give information on measures taken so far by the EGU to reduce the environmental footprint of the General Assembly. We would then like to solicit suggestions for ways forward to further reduce the carbon footprint of the conference. We explicitly devote ample time to a discussion on new green measures.

Measures taken over the last years include:
- The posibility to offset the CO2 emissions from travel upon registration to the General Assembly. In 2018 nearly 17,000 euro was raised which was donated to a Carbon Footprint project that aims to reduce deforestation in Brazil.
- EGU encourages to travel by train to Vienna when possible. In 2018 the Swiss Federal Railways SBB offered a discount to GA attendees and EGU continues negotiations with other railway companies.
- The Austria Center Vienna (ACV) has a number of green measures in place, including energy-saving LEDs, a solar array to heat the water used in the kitchens and toilets, and working with an in-house catering company compliant with green standards.
- EGU no longer offer single-use water bottles at coffee breaks. Instead water fountains throughout the building can be used to fill multiple-use bottles.
- In 2019, the paper programme book will be replaced by online alternatives.

Public information:
Speakers for the townhall on the carbon footprint of EGU's General Assembly:

1. Martin Rasmussen (Managing Director Copernicus.org):
Measures taken by the EGU General Assembly organisers

2. Susanne Baumann-Söllner (CEO of the Austria Centre Vienna):
Measures taken by the Austria Centre Vienna

3. Denise Cosulich (Director Annual Meetings & Industry Relations) and Maria Doppler (Green Event Coordinator):
Experiences and tips from the European Society of Radiology congress as green-certified meeting

4. Olaf Eisen (President of the Division on Cryospheric Science):
A discussion of train travel to the General Assembly

Followed by an open discussion and a call for tips on new measures to investigate.

Share:
Convener: Susanne Buiter | Co-conveners: Jonathan Bamber, Alberto Montanari
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room G1
TM5

This Town Hall Meeting aims to give a future outlook of what new directions in scientific research could be possible if online data sets, tools, and research infrastructures really are fully integrated on a global scale across scientific discipline, sectoral and national boundaries.

We look up to the sky: what spectacular scientific results can we foresee? What would be needed to achieve that. But also down to earth: what are current barriers or challenges? how can we overcome those? What does this require from all of us and our current way of thinking about integrating data and science? How can we boldly go where no scientist has gone before?

This Town Hall Meeting follows up on the session ESSI 2.6 where various approaches demonstrate successful integration on the level of datasets and/or research infrastructures in support of scientific research within single disciplines, national/continental boundaries or the same sector.

The Town Hall has the objective to go one step further on the path to full integration of all these initiatives not just across the Earth and environmental sciences but also include the social sciences and humanities to help make transdisciplinary science a reality. Although this may seem a small step in this day and age of great online, technological possibilities, early attempts hint that it will still be a giant leap to fully achieve this integration.

Public information:
Agenda:
Short statements by all panellists on:
What could be achieved scientifically if data and science is truly integrated across the globe.
What could be Nobel Prize worthy science in Global GeoSciences in the future?
What are the most important challenges and opportunities to achieve this integration of data and research infrastructure?
Which barriers need to be overcome, what do you ask from all of us?
Is this the thing we need? Or how to approach this idea of integration?
Responses by the panellists on the statements, followed by a discussion with the audience

Moderator: Ari Asmi (University of Helsinki, ICOS-ERIC)
Panelists to be announced

Share:
Convener: Jacco Konijn | Co-conveners: Ari Asmi, Lesley Wyborn
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room -2.62
TM7 ECS

Since 2007, the European Research Council (ERC), has had the mission to encourage excellent researchers in Europe through competitive funding, by supporting top researchers across all fields and of any nationality.

In more ten years, the ERC has funded over 9,000 researchers. It has created career opportunities for some 50,000 research staff, resulting in numerous scientific breakthroughs and leading to over 100,000 international scientific journal articles.

This Town Hall will be an opportunity to get a flavour of the ERC projects funded in the various disciplines of geosciences, through short presentations by grantees providing an overview of the major achievements. All researchers interested in innovative research are encouraged to attend.

Public information:
Speakers:
'A new era for observing glaciers from space' - Andreas Kääb, University of Oslo
'History of sedimentary quartz grains: from atoms and radiation towards reconstructing past climate change' - Alida Timar-Gabor, Babeș-Bolyai University
'Earthquakes... in the laboratory' - Alexandre Schubnel, Ecole Normale Superieure
'Methane related iron reduction in sediments' - Orit Sivan, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

Share:
Convener: Claudia Alves de Jesus Rydin
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room -2.47
TM8

The paradigm of Open Science is based on the tiers Open Access, Open Data and Free Open Source Software (FOSS). However, the interconnections between the tiers remain to be improved. This is a critical factor to enable Open Science. This Townhall meeting reaches out all across EGU, espescially welcoming Early Career Scientists, to network and discuss the current challenges and opportunities, including:

OpenPlanetary (OP) was born as a community-driven initiative to address the need of the planetary science community for sharing ideas and collaborating on common planetary research topics mostly related to data analysis problems. OpenPlanetary started back in 2015 from an initial participants effort to stay connected and share information related to and beyond the ESA’s first Planetary GIS Workshop. It then continued during the 2nd USGS Planetary Data Workshop. Since 2018 OP became a non-profit organization.

With 300+ members across many countries, the OpenPlanetary community is made-up of and intended for research and education professionals: scientists, engineers, designers, teachers, and students, as well as space enthusiasts and citizen scientists.

Our common goal is to promote and facilitate the open practice of planetary science and data analysis for professionals and amateurs. We do so by organizing events and conducting collaborative projects aimed at creating scientific, technical and educational resources, tools and data accessible to all. For two years OP has organized the OP-DataCafe within the European Planetary Science Congress, where researchers gather to discuss data and software related topics.

The OP flagship project is OpenPlanetaryMap (OPM), a mapping and social platform to foster planetary mapping and cartography on the web for all.

Since a big part of planetary data comes from the processing of remote sensing instruments, the use of geospatial technologies commonly used for Earth-based application is being spread among the Planetary Science community in the last decade.

This OSGeo/OPM townhall meeting represents the first contact between the newborn OP and the more than 10 years old OSGeo foundation. We will discuss and delineate possible common ground where to develop ideas and coordinates projects.

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation, or OSGeo, is a not-for-profit umbrella organization for Free and Open Source geospatial tools, including QGIS, gvSIG, GRASS GIS, Geoserver and many others. OSGeo is hosting this Townhall event to support the collaborative development of open source geospatial software by promoting sustainable Open Science within EGU.

Share:
Convener: Peter Löwe | Co-convener: Alessandro Frigeri
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room -2.91
TM9

Research software development is an essential, integral part of research activity and has a significant influence on the quality of research results. Research software supports science by aiding acquisition, analysis, simulation and visualization of data and complex processes, enabling collaboration between researchers, and improving science communication. The British Software Sustainability Institute (SSI) has coined the slogan "Better Software - Better Research", and we are sure it applies to geosciences as much as any other scientific discipline.

However, the current approaches to research software as well as the recognition of research software engineering (RSEng) do not adequately reflect the importance of this work. The Research Software Engineers (RSE) in the Geosciences townhall meeting brings together contributors to reseearch software who might or might not already self-identify as Research Software Engineers (RSE). We get to know each other and share experiences from career development, job searches, employers/institutions/organisations, or practical challenges with computers, data & software.

The agenda includes short reports on previous activities for RSEs at EGU and introductions of local chapters (e.g. UK, Germany, The Netherlands, ...). If you are interested to contribute to RSEng actions in the context of EGU or share your experiences, please fill out the survey at https://bit.ly/rse-survey-egu

Share:
Convener: Daniel Nüst | Co-conveners: Anusuriya Devaraju, Niels Drost, Bernadette Fritzsch, David Topping
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room -2.85
TM10

Within the World Climate Research Programme the Water for the Food Baskets of the World Grand Challenge aims to bring together expertise from various disciplines to tackle the evolution of water availability in regions of high intense agriculture under climate change.
The aim of this meeting is to foster community engagement and to develop strategies for future projects and collaborations.

Share:
Convener: Peter van Oevelen
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room -2.31
TM11

This meeting will be focused on giving an update to the community on the current status of Mars Sample Return (MSR) science planning, particularly through the work of the MSR Science Planning Group (MSPG). MSPG has been established by NASA and ESA to help develop a stable foundation for international scientific cooperation for the purposes of returning and analyzing samples from Mars. MSPG’s approach is to formulate and propose mechanisms through which the international scientific community can achieve our shared scientific objectives.


The agenda for this meeting will include:
1) a reprisal of MSPG’s activities and the pathways available for the community to participate; 2) a review of the recent workshop "Science in Containment" and the resulting report; 3) Expectations for future science-related MSR workshops; 4) time for community feedback and input.

Share:
Convener: Brandi Carrier
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room N2
TM12

The new EurofleetsPlus project will facilitate access to an integrated and advanced research vessel fleet, designed to meet the evolving and challenging needs of the user community. European and international researchers from academia and industry will be able to apply for several access programmes fully funded by the project. EurofleetsPlus will prioritise support for research on sustainable, clean and healthy oceans, linking with existing ocean observation infrastructures, and it will support innovation through working closely with industry. The project will enable access to a unique fleet of 27 state-of-the-art research vessels from European and international partners. Through competitive calls, researchers will be able to access the entire North Atlantic, Mediterranean, Black Sea, North Sea, Baltic Sea, Pacific Southern Ocean and Ross Sea. In addition to ship time, researchers will also have access to new AUVs and ROVs. In addition to comprehensive transnational access activitie s, the project will undertake joint research in challenging and highly relevant areas, including deep ocean research and exploration, data management, and enabling future virtual access.

Share:
Convener: Nicole Biebow
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.11
TM15

The ACROSS (Atmospheric ChemistRy Of the Suburban foreSt) is a framework for investigation of the atmospheric chemistry of mixed urban/biogenic air masses. The research is conducted primarily through a comprehensive, multi-platform field campaign near Paris, in which observations will be made to address key scientific questions, but also includes related laboratory and modeling activities. The purpose of this townhall meeting is to present information about ACROSS and to answer questions from scientists who are interested in being involved in the project.

Share:
Convener: Christopher Cantrell
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.31
TM16

New generations of satellites, models and other scientific developments are opening vast opportunities for monitoring and understanding biodiversity and the effects of conservation efforts. Biodiversity strategies, targets and indicators for the future are currently in development in the context of the United Nations, the European Union and other institutions. This event will address how Earth Observation should be further incorporated in these policies building on findings of the ECOPOTENTIAL project. The project applies Earth Observation for practical conservation in over 25 protected areas in Europe and beyond.

Organizer(s): UN Environment and ECOPOTENTIAL

Share:
Convener: Per Magnus Andresen
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.49
TM17

The DFG-funded Coordinated Research Centre (CRC) ‘Earth – Evolution at the dry limit’ approaches the end of the first - of potentially three - four-year funding period (http://sfb1211.uni-koeln.de/). The CRC’s investigators are currently consolidating their project ideas for the envisaged second phase (7/2020-6/2024). Aim of the town hall meeting is to discuss concepts and project ideas with scientist that are currently outside the CRC. The CRC's sub-projects are open to collaboration with external investigators (DFG-rules apply).
The objective of the CRC is to pioneer the research on the mutual evolutionary relationships between Earth surface processes and biota. The target areas are arid to hyper-arid systems, where both biota and Earth surface process are severely and predominantly limited by the availability of water. In doing this we aim to isolate the key fingerprints of biological activity at the (water) limit of the habitable Earth, and to characterize the Earth surface processes operating in the (virtual) absence of liquid water (fog is present in many areas, runoff-creating precipitation is absent in many areas). We aim to characterize thresholds for biological colonization and concurrent fluvial transformation of landscapes, the tipping point(s) of biotically and abiotically controlled Earth surface systems, and establish detailed long-term terrestrial climatic records of the oldest and most arid zones on Earth. Chronometric and spatial information on the colonization and radiation of biota will be related to the landscape evolution and their common driver; climate.
In achieving these goals, we foresee major contributions to emerging concepts of evolutionary lag time, the interplay between geographical barriers and species migration in response to climate change, species diversification in response to climate and geological processes, biogeomorphology and the development and refinement of methodologies to date and determine rates of Earth surface processes and biological evolution.

Share:
Convener: Tibor J. Dunai | Co-convener: Martin Melles
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.11
TM18

Various weather modification and geoengineering options are under discussion for mitigating climate change and for addressing water security issues, e.g., the UAE Research Program for Rain Enhancement Science. These options are controversially discussed in the public. However, their linkages have not been dicussed in detail yet. At this meeting, we would like to discuss the various challenges and opportunities arising from this interdisciplinary collaboration. Contributions are welcome, which investigate the various geoengineering and weather modification options from the local to the regional scale.

Share:
Convener: Volker Wulfmeyer
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.14
TM19

Geosciences are more than ever solicited in their full interdisciplinarity to meet the urgent need to make our cities climate neutral and proof, smart, safe, resilient, sustainable, inclusive, enjoyable, and to increase well-being and health.

This is testified by a series of important international agreements, including the United Nations Sustainable Development Program for 2030, COP21 and the EU Amsterdam Pact. The emergence of large city networks (RC100, ICLEI, C40) also underscores the urgency of achieving these agreements goals. The challenge is to drastically change the interactions between cities and their geophysical environment: to shift from short-term resource and risk management to a wise environmental monitoring over a wide range of space-time scales and to develop integrative responses to both geophysical changes and the ongoing urbanisation.

Is the community of geosciences involved enough? How to move forward?

Share:
Convener: Daniel Schertzer | Co-conveners: Klaus Fraedrich, Stefano Tinti
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 1.85
TM20

Most paleo-environmental records today are provided by correlative and multi-parameter measurements on sediment cores. Therefore, it is of primordial importance to understand processes governing the formation of sediments, possible geometric deformations through seismic or gravitational events and geochemical/mineralogical transformations.

Detailed studies of such processes on actual/recent sediments will dramatically improve the quality of the information retrieved through core analyses.

This meeting aims at gathering experts working on various aspects of sediment core analyses to come up with a long-term (in order to reveal the changes in the vertical and if possible in their horizontal spreadings by the correlative periodic analysis of future additions with today's sediments) research program to monitor ‘recording’
processes in marine and lacustrine environments. These efforts need to be carried at a variety of geographic locations, through 5 to 10 years repeated sampling with same instrumental standards and procedures, taking into account such details as magnetic orientation, geometric angularities, etc. We are hoping to promote such a collaborative and institutional commitment that the nature of such effort requires by the help of scientific collaboration from this townhall meeting. A few scientific institutions in the EU would be enough to accomplish that project subject, but we need to get integration of experiences from other institutions for catching unobserved events through interpretations. Answers of these questions will be explained with meeting attendants: why are we late and waited for such a scientific work? Who will take responsibilities from meeting attendants? Is the work load of samples heavier than regional projects? What is the ways of understanding to later placed events in sediments as flat elongated limbs of folds which is not given proofs in core sample?

Public information:
Meeting will start with scope around subjects "from field sampling until to preparation and measurement stages" will continue with applications at every stages with their different results which being not comparable for same sample. In duration we will discuss . At the end our considerations and decisions at sedimantology how will help for provide new realistic visions? The subject 'Global reference sediment analysis at every five year or end of decade timing' can be latest one of highly realistic mentalities in science will discussed for understand sedimentary processes like possible proxy element migration in time before disturber effect of seismic events. All branches are invited

Share:
Convener: Dursun Acar | Co-convener: Nüzhet Dalfes
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room -2.31
TM21

Addressing the unique set of global challenges that society is facing in the onset of the 21st century requires more than ever that Earth scientists advance their understanding of our planet, its processes and its interactions with human activities and translate that knowledge into solutions for society, policy advice and new digital services for the benefit of citizens. In the next decade Europe will rely on the most comprehensive and sophisticated space-based observation infrastructure in the world (involving the Copernicus Sentinels, the ESA’s Earth Explorers and the meteorological, national and commercial missions) providing an extraordinary potential to observe the different components of the Earth system and its dynamics with unprecedented levels of detail and accuracy from space. However, ensuring that the scientific community takes full advantage from this unprecedented capacity and maximise its impact will require a significant collaborative effort and an integrated approach to science where the synergistic use of EO satellite data, in-situ and citizen observations and advanced modelling capabilities together with interdisciplinary research and new technologies will be essential elements. The alignment of scientific actions funded under both EC and ESA programmes represents an unique opportunity to ensure that the complementary roles, expertise and funding of both institutions may serve a common purpose: provide a coordinated response to the grand science challenges of the next decade. This Town-Hall meeting aims at presenting and discussing with the scientific community the preliminary concepts, status and plans for the preparation of a new joint EC-ESA initiative to jointly advance Earth system science as a tool to respond to the global societal challenges.

Public information:
Addressing the unique set of global challenges that society is facing in the onset of the 21st century requires more than ever that Earth scientists advance their understanding of our planet, its processes and its interactions with human activities and translate that knowledge into solutions for society, policy advice and new digital services for the benefit of citizens. In the next decade Europe will rely on the most comprehensive and sophisticated space-based observation infrastructure in the world (involving the Copernicus Sentinels, the ESA’s Earth Explorers and the meteorological, national and commercial missions) providing an extraordinary potential to observe the different components of the Earth system and its dynamics with unprecedented levels of detail and accuracy from space. However, ensuring that the scientific community takes full advantage from this unprecedented capacity and maximise its impact will require a significant collaborative effort and an integrated approach to science where the synergistic use of EO satellite data, in-situ and citizen observations and advanced modelling capabilities together with interdisciplinary research and new technologies will be essential elements. The alignment of scientific actions funded under both EC and ESA programmes represents an unique opportunity to ensure that the complementary roles, expertise and funding of both institutions may serve a common purpose: provide a coordinated response to the grand science challenges of the next decade. This Town-Hall meeting aims at presenting and discussing with the scientific community the preliminary concepts, status and plans for the preparation of a new joint EC-ESA initiative to jointly advance Earth system science as a tool to respond to the global societal challenges.

Share:
Convener: Gilles Ollier | Co-conveners: Diego Fernández Prieto, Anica Huck
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room -2.91

SMP – Splinter meetings (public)

SMP1

Successful management and coordination of large international or multidisciplinary research projects is a complex and time-consuming task, for which specific knowledge and skills are required. In smaller projects, project management is often one of the tasks of the principal scientist or is delegated to a junior scientist with often-limited management experience. For large projects, a dedicated project manager can help to reduce the work-load of the principal scientists, ensure effective collaboration, day-to-day coordinate operations, and project reporting. Whether project management is in the hands of a scientist or a dedicated project manager, in all cases the job is challenging. But what are those challenges and, more importantly, how to overcome them?
In this highly interactive session, we will exchange experiences and discuss best practices. Together, we will try to find solutions for the most recurrent challenges pointed out by project managers from the international research community by using the ideas, knowledge, and experiences of those attending the session.

Share:
Convener: Luisa Cristini | Co-conveners: Daniela Henkel, Sebastian Hettrich, Sylvia Walter
Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.15
SMP3

ENVRIfair is a new project aiming to improve Findability, Accessability, Interoperability and Reusability ('FAIRness') of Environmental data. Ecosystems data is an important component in this project. Come and explain us how you would like to be able to search and access this type of data for your research, what kind of services would be on your wishlist and what options do you need for combining your own data with other sources to improve your research and scientific outputs.

Share:
Convener: Jacco Konijn | Co-convener: Ari Asmi
Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.51
SMP5

ENVRIfair is a new project aiming to improve Findability, Accessability, Interoperability and Reusability ('FAIRness') of Environmental data. Atmospheric and Climate data is an important component in this project. Come and explain us how you would like to be able to search and access this type of data for your research, what kind of services would be on your wishlist and what options do you need for combining your own data with other sources to improve your research and scientific outputs.

Share:
Convener: Jacco Konijn | Co-convener: Ari Asmi
Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.51
SMP6

Since more than 3 years a group of geoscientists aim to establish an international research network related to the topic "mountain glaciations". After an encouraging first attempt that in the end was not successful, an improved new application for a COST Action to create such a network has been submitted more recently. The current coordinators of this application want to utilise the opportunity that many involved or potentially interested colleagues will gather at the EGU General Assembly to discuss possible future directions. This splinter meeting should also make this initiative more public to those not already aware of it.

Share:
Convener: Stefan Winkler
Tue, 09 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.51
SMP7

During the splinter meeting we would like to introduce MEMO2 – a European Training Network with more than 20 collaborators from 7 countries - to the scientific community. We will present the program and discuss first results. Aim is to create a public awareness right from the beginning and initiate collaborations beyond the network.
MEMO2 will identify and evaluate methane emissions and support mitigation measures by I) developing new and advanced mobile methane measurements tools and networks, isotopic source identification, and modelling at different scales, and II) educating a new generation of “cross–thinking” scientists, which are able to effectively implement novel measurement and modelling tools in an interdisciplinary and intersectoral context. MEMO2 will bridge the gap between large-scale scientific estimates from in situ monitoring programs and the 'bottom-up' estimates of emissions from local sources that are used in the national reporting.

Share:
Convener: Sylvia Walter | Co-convener: Thomas Röckmann
Thu, 11 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.17
SMP8

This splinter session aims to provide a quick insight into the Rosetta Mission data available at ESA's Planetary Science Archive.
We will begin with a short presentation of the ESA Planetary Science Archive as a whole and on the Rosetta archive in particular. This will be followed by presentations from a few select instrument teams who will give a brief overview of their archive data, to provide instrument level insights into data access. Following this , we aim to have a more interactive section which will focus on a published event which will allow attendees to gain experience in interacting with the archive data.
The goal of the session is to make the attendees as autonomous as possible with Rosetta data, so that they can quickly carry out their own cometary science studies.

Share:
Convener: Matthew Taylor | Co-conveners: David Heather, Pierre Henri
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 0.15
SMP9

UNESCO is the only United Nations organization with a mandate to support research and capacity building in geology and geophysics, and the International Geoscience and Geoparks Programme (IGGP) is our flagship with its two pillars: the International Geoscience Programme (IGCP) and UNESCO Global Geoparks (UGGp).

IGGP functions to serve as a knowledge hub of UNESCO to facilitate international scientific cooperation in the geosciences and sustainable use of natural resources, and to advance new initiatives related to geo-diversity and geo-heritage as well as geohazards risk mitigation.

The IGCP is the oldest and most successful example of scientific cooperation between a non-governmental organization – the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) – and an intergovernmental organization – UNESCO.

Over the past 45 years, for thousands of scientists who participated in IGCP projects the Programme has been the gateway to a successful career in and beyond geoscience. IGCP has also been responsible for some major geoscientific programmes of ground-breaking international standards.
In 2015, the 38th general Conference of UNESCO endorsed the creation of the new UNESCO Global Geoparks (UGGp) designation-areas where we celebrate our Earth heritage to promote the sustainable economic development of local communities while demonstrating geological heritage of international significance.

The IGGP, with its two pillar, IGCP and UNESCO Global Geoparks, aims to enable UNESCO Member States to use the UNESCO-designated sites as learning sites for inclusive and comprehensive approaches to environmental, economic and social aspects of sustainable development. IGCP’ five main themes provide an opportunity for geoscientists in the understanding of the transformation of nature within the territories of the UNESCO Global Geoparks: Earth Resources (sustaining our society), Global Change (evidence from the geological record), Geohazards (mitigating the risks), Hydrogeology (geoscience of the water cycle), and Geodynamics (control of our environment).

By offering young scientists from developing countries the opportunity to participate in IGCP projects and field trips organized by leading academic bodies, within the territories of UNESCO Global Geoparks, IGCP aims to foster and increase:

• global distribution of project areas, participants and leaders, • participation and leadership by women and young scientists, • interdisciplinary proposals, approaches and techniques.

We would like to bring together the participants of the IGGP during EGU General assembly to share their experiences working under UNESCO umbrella and learn from their experiences.

Share:
Convener: LOPES Ozlem
Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.16
SMP10

UNESCO is the only United Nations organization with a mandate to support research and capacity building in geology and geophysics, and the International Geoscience and Geoparks Programme (IGGP) is our flagship with its two pillars: the International Geoscience Programme (IGCP) and UNESCO Global Geoparks (UGGp).

IGGP functions to serve as a knowledge hub of UNESCO to facilitate international scientific cooperation in the geosciences and sustainable use of natural resources, and to advance new initiatives related to geo-diversity and geo-heritage as well as geohazards risk mitigation.

The IGCP is the oldest and most successful example of scientific cooperation between a non-governmental organization – the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) – and an intergovernmental organization – UNESCO.

Over the past 45 years, for thousands of scientists who participated in IGCP projects the Programme has been the gateway to a successful career in and beyond geoscience. IGCP has also been responsible for some major geoscientific programmes of ground-breaking international standards.
In 2015, the 38th general Conference of UNESCO endorsed the creation of the new UNESCO Global Geoparks (UGGp) designation-areas where we celebrate our Earth heritage to promote the sustainable economic development of local communities while demonstrating geological heritage of international significance.

The IGGP, with its two pillar, IGCP and UNESCO Global Geoparks, aims to enable UNESCO Member States to use the UNESCO-designated sites as learning sites for inclusive and comprehensive approaches to environmental, economic and social aspects of sustainable development. IGCP’ five main themes provide an opportunity for geoscientists in the understanding of the transformation of nature within the territories of the UNESCO Global Geoparks: Earth Resources (sustaining our society), Global Change (evidence from the geological record), Geohazards (mitigating the risks), Hydrogeology (geoscience of the water cycle), and Geodynamics (control of our environment).

By offering young scientists from developing countries the opportunity to participate in IGCP projects and field trips organized by leading academic bodies, within the territories of UNESCO Global Geoparks, IGCP aims to foster and increase:

• global distribution of project areas, participants and leaders, • participation and leadership by women and young scientists, • interdisciplinary proposals, approaches and techniques.

We would like to bring together the participants of the IGGP during EGU General assembly to share their experiences working under UNESCO umbrella and learn from their experiences.

Share:
Convener: LOPES Ozlem
Thu, 11 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.61
SMP12

Introdution to the H2020 project TiPES (Tipping Points in the Earth System). Short presentation of the project, research planning, discussions on upcoming events and job opportunities within the project.

Share:
Convener: Peter Ditlevsen
Tue, 09 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.15
SMP13

In November 2018, after 10 successful years of data publishing, ESSD welcomed a team of five new Chief Editors. The new Chief Editors would like to take the opportunity of meeting up with Topical Editors and other interested persons (e.g. authors, referees, and readers) in order to introduce themselves, but also to discuss global standards in data publishing and data citation.

Share:
Convener: Kirsten Elger
Thu, 11 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.15
SMP14

During this splinter meeting we will present an update on the status of the Multi-scale Laboratories community (WP16), which is part of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). Anyone interested in publishing their laboratory-based research data through the EPOS platform, or becoming involved in EPOS in general, is kindly invited to attend.

Share:
Convener: Richard Wessels
Tue, 09 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.16
SMP15

Meeting to share plans and gather feedback for the WCRP/CliC Snow Model Intercomparison Project for Earth System Models (ESM-SnowMIP)

Share:
Convener: Richard L.H. Essery
Thu, 11 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.16
SMP16

This meeting will be dedicated to the presentation and discussion of the latest progress and the remaining challenges with regard to the development of the multi-functional open source GIS simulation model for granular avalanches, debris flows, and cascading landslide processes (r.avaflow). We will particularly focus on the extension of r.avaflow with a three-phase flow model, on a new function enabling the simulation of moderate-velocity earth flows, and on the presentation and discussion of new case studies. Everybody interested in the field of mass flow simulation is cordially invited to the meeting.

Share:
Convener: Martin Mergili
Tue, 09 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.17
SMP17

Short training on how to use the Climate4Impact portal to access, visualize and process climate data. This short training is meant for impact researchers and other people with only basic knowledge of climate data. This data portal is developed within the IS-ENES-projects.

Share:
Conveners: Janette Bessembinder, Bernadet Overbeek, Wim Som de Cerff
Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.17
SMP18

A splinter meeting for the users of Open Source Finite Element Software for Ice Sheet, Glaciers and Ice Flow Model Elmer/Ice.

Share:
Convener: Olivier Gagliardini
Tue, 09 Apr, 12:45–15:45
 
Room 2.61
SMP19

We cordially invite you to our second OpenHydrology splinter meeting. Join us for a feedback session on the eWaterCycle II, including a hands-on trial of the system. Connect with your fellow Open Science enthusiast, discover new models to run your data on, or new data to force your model with!

This will be a “bring your own lunch” meeting, but we will bring dessert!

----

From a hydrological point of view, every field, every street, every part of the world, is different. We understand quite well how water moves through plants and soils at small scales but the medium is never the same from one spot to the next. This is the curse of locality. It is difficult to capture such processes with a single global model.

Still, it might be very interesting if there were a computational environment in which you could readily include your local knowledge in a global model. In such an environment, also ideas about process representation can be encoded at a global level to test improvements. In the framework of the eWaterCycle II project (see: http://ewatercycle.github.io), such an environment will be built that allows anyone to include their. Input data, data assimilation, and performance metrics will be provided and generated automatically so you can focus on what you think should be improved. Present partners are Delft University of Technology, Netherlands eScience Center, Utrecht University, and Deltares. The plan is to to build a community multi-model environment that allows rapid and easy combination of local hydrological models with global models, leading to a collaborative environment where anyone can easily contribute to the greater goal of a community built and shared global Hydrological model.
Your input is needed to ensure the optimal environment will be created and to build a true community model.

At this splinter meeting we will demonstrate the first minimal viable product of this environment to the OpenHydrology community. We hope you will share your feedback on our work so far, helping us provide the tools for hydrologist to work together as a global open hydrological community.

By being a member of OpenHydrology you get to actively be part in determining the course of this community and be among the first to use the tools that we developed within the eWaterCycle project hands on at the general assembly.

Share:
Conveners: Rolf Hut, Niels Drost
Tue, 09 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.83
SMP20

The primary focus of this experiment is to demonstrate the interoperability of Citizen Science projects and the way OGC standards can be applied to Citizen Science. a subset of these topics are addressed in this edition:
* Vocabularies for organizing Citizen Science projects
* Data sharing using OGC standards such as O&M and SOS
* Connection Citizen Science projects federations and other authentication systems
* Data quality

The activity started In September 2018 and will last until June 2019. This meeting in Vienna represents a milestone in the Interoperability Experiment were major results should be achieved and preparation for final collection of lessons learned will start.
If you are part of a Citizen Science project, you can still join the group as an observer or active participant. More information: https://www.weobserve.eu/cops/ This activity is an initiative is supported by the Comunity of Practice on interoperability promoted by the H2020 WeObserve project that has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no 776740

Share:
Convener: Joan Masó
Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room 0.16
SMP21

NextGEOSS - the next generation European data hub and service platform - offers a suite of services to the Earth sciences communities. In this session an overview the H2020 project NextGEOSS will be given with a focus on the latest updates in the new release. Examples from the internal pilots will be showcased. External pilot candidates are welcome as well as others with an interest of making Earth observation based applications and services for science and other societal use.

Share:
Convener: Bente Bye
Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–13:45
 
Room 0.16
SMP22

The Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project for CMIP6 (ISMIP6) brings together a consortium of international ice sheet models and coupled ice sheet-climate models to fully explore the sea level rise contribution from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. In this workshop we will discuss first results from projections with standalone ice sheet models and coupled climate-ice sheet models.

Share:
Convener: Heiko Goelzer
Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.51
SMP23

SOPHIE supports the realisation of qualified soil hydro-physics (SHP) data, highly needed in EU policy making, coming from EU-wide agreed, preferred, and innovated cost-effective laboratory- and field methods, accomplished through international collaboration. Soil Hydro-Physics (SHP) properties are the properties that determine the Soil-Water-interactions: i. water flow and water retention, and ii. with the water flow the transport of dissolved compounds, like nitrogen, phosphates, pesticides, antibiotics, and organics. SHP-properties play an important role in variety of societal issues: Crop water stress vs. food security, soil salinity and sodicity, susceptibility for forest fires, soil compaction, dike stability, greenhouse gas emissions, soil health, among others. The need for reliable SHP-properties is thus widely emphasized by researchers and consultants. However, concurrently it is recognized that harmonization, and the development of new techniques is difficult to accomplish.
This is due to the missing attention and missing direct visibility of SHP-properties in the societal topics they address. As a result current methods remain time consuming. They need to be improved towards cost-effective methods, and should be sufficiently harmonized to be used on EU-scale research. There are many opportunities to markedly improve the situation, but these require large scale adaptation, validation and standardization. One example is the adaptation, and innovation towards novel remote and proximal sensing techniques. When they are used in combination with modern field and laboratory techniques, they can lead to standardized SHP-properties, directly usable to faster extend current soil data bases, like LUCAS, and in large scale studies. The INSPIRATION meeting on Dec, 6th 2017 in Brussels, was used to build upon commitment among policy makers, manufacturers, developers, researchers, and users. SOPHIE’s motivation and approach was underlined almost unanimously duri ng the workshop, and it was concluded that SOPHIE should be extended. The University of Liège, located in Gembloux, Belgium organized a SOPHIE workshop on January 30th 2019 to exchange knowledge about the use of reference samples for SHP measurements. This open splinter meeting is setup to further discuss a draft research agenda and gather interest from researchers working with soil hydro-physics data.

Share:
Convener: Martine van der Ploeg
Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.83
SMP24 ECS

Did you know that every year meteorites with a mass equal to a million elephants enter the atmosphere (and BURN)! Or that all the output of the combined American breweries is about 2000 times as small as the discharge of the Rhine in low flow?

Swimming pools, elephants, school busses, light “as bright as the sun on a summer day”. They may not be in the official international system of units and they are definitely not metric (one school bus is about three normal cars…) but they are appealing because they elude to the human measure.

When trying to communicate your research it is often good to relate to the human measure. Some experienced science communicators have a natural knack for finding a human-relatable quantity that communicate easily to people outside of their field. Others may want to communicate in human relatable quantities but lack the network of peers to help them get going. All of you are welcome in the "beyond the metric" community!

In this lighthearted community gathering on the last day of the assembly we will help new community members translate their research results in the most outlandish, yet fun, units possible.

Join our community and go beyond the metric system!

Share:
Conveners: Rolf Hut, Tim van Emmerik, Caitlyn Hall, Sam Illingworth, Anna Solcerova
Fri, 12 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.16
SMP25

We invite people to join us in a pan-European experiment of Climate Impact Model Intercomparison, using the guide-lines from Krysanova et al. 2018, on model calibration/evaluation for more trustworthy hydrological modelling under climate change. The initiative runs under the umbrella of ISI-MIP, JPI/ERA4C Aquaclew and will make use of new climate data from the C3S at ECMWF

Share:
Convener: Berit Arheimer | Co-convener: Lorna Little
Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.15
SMP26

The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is a long-term plan to foster and facilitate the integrated use of data, data products, software and services available from distributed Research Infrastructures (RI) in Europe in the field of Solid Earth Science (SES). One of the EPOS Thematic Core Services (TCS), referred to as Satellite Data (SATD), aims at developing, implementing and deploying advanced satellite data products and services, mainly based on Copernicus data (namely Sentinel acquisitions), suitable to be largely used by the SES community.
The splinter meeting aims at presenting the TCS SATD to the community, showing the activities carried out and to be done in the next months, and introducing the collaborations and cooperations between EPOS and other satellite initiatives in Europe.

Share:
Convener: Michele Manunta
Wed, 10 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.51
SMP27

An international team of scientists and informatics experts has been awarded a grant from the Belmont Forum (PARSEC), to address challenges with Data Sharing and Credit and develop leading practices in active collaboration with science-driven use cases planned across six countries. Part of the grant builds on the work of the Enabling FAIR Data project as well as work by RDA’s Sharing Rewards and Credit (SHARC) Interest Group (IG), Data Usage Metrics IG, and Scholix IG.

During this one-hour overview of the grant we will discuss the grant objectives and their connection to the work of RDA and ESIP, the next steps for the grant, and ways your organization can benefit from the efforts of the grant.

The overall objective of the grant's data strand is to increase the number of properly cited data sets, provide credit and attribution, and accurately track data reuse. To do this we propose to:
A. Work with ORCID, DataCite, ESIP and RDA, specifically RDA’s Sharing Rewards and Credit (SHARC) Interest Group (IG) to robustly connect identifiers across papers, people, and repositories. Currently, even if these identifiers are included, the necessary linking to allow tracking is not fully implemented.
B. Conduct outreach and adoption campaigns on the importance of persistent identifiers and their infrastructure to all relevant stakeholders—these include the data repositories, publishers, researchers, and the key groups that set standards for publishers for reference tagging.
C. Promote and extend data usage metrics generated by RDA’s Data Usage Metrics Working Group and data citations generated by RDA’s Scholix Working Group that demonstrate the increase in citations and usage based on efforts such as AGU’s Enabling FAIR Data project and others.
D. By working with the grant's science-synthesis team and the selected project teams from our partners we will improve ways to optimize data reuse as well as data deposition of generated data for possible reuse. Demonstrate that through collaboration and better understanding of the value of data sharing when researchers follow the FAIR Data Principles, data are better prepared for others to understand, reuse increases, and discovery is improved.
E. Promote the work of integrated guidance in RDA's SHARC IG that will address recommendations (generic and specific to the ecological/biodiversity community) to improve each step of the processes of data sharing, reuse, credit and reward for researchers and repositories.

Share:
Convener: Shelley Stall
Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.17
SMP28

The Splinter meeting is organized by SeaDataCloud partnership aims to present practically the different components of the SeaDataNet infrastructure: data services (discovery interface), metadata services and software tools (ODV and DIVA). The goal is to promote to the marine scientific community the SeaDataNet infrastructure, a very useful toolkit and collaborative workspace for supporting their research.

The SeaDataCloud is an EU H2020 programme, aims at considerably advancing SeaDataNet infrastructure and increasing its usage, adopting cloud and High Performance Computing technology for better performance.
SeaDataNet connects together more than 100 National Oceanographic Data Centres (NODC’s) from 34 coastal states in Europe. At the moment SeaDataNet gives access to more than 2.0 million data sets for physical oceanography, chemistry, geology, geophysics, bathymetry and biology.

The key components of the infrastructure are:

-data services: data from more than 100 data centres active in data collection from ocean observation is available by means of a unique point of access. The architecture is based on a semi-distributed system with the central portal that provides the indexing services based on xml files, called CDI, complaint with ISO 19115 - ISO 19139 standard. The data standard formats are ODV (Ocean Data View) and NetCDF (CF).

-metadata services: SeaDataNet portal provides with free access an overview of the Marine organisations in Europe and their involvement in scientific cruises, data collection and marine projects.

-software tools: the project updates and makes software tools available allowing the data providers to perform their core functions like: data and metadata formatting, their transformation, analysis and finally their publishing.

Share:
Convener: Elena Partescano
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 0.16
SMP29

Discussion about the establishment of the International Gravity Reference System and Frame (IGRF/IGRS) and preparation of the report for IUGG 2019.

Share:
Convener: Hartmut Wziontek
Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.83
SMP30

Meeting of the International Geodynamics and Earth Tide Service (IGETS) for members of the directing board, station operators and interested colleagues.

Share:
Convener: Hartmut Wziontek
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.17
SMP33

This is an opportunity for the Panta Rhei Drought in the Anthropocene working group members (and other interested people) to update each other on ongoing work and to discuss future collaboration.

Public information:
8.40-9.00: BYO coffee & tea
9.00-9.05: Welcome – Anne Van Loon
9.05-9.10: Round of Introductions – all
9.10-9.15: Summary 2018 Panta Rhei Drought group workshop
9.15-9.40: Updates papers
9.40-9.55: Updates MSc student projects
9.55-10.25: Updates proposals & paper plans
10.25-10.30: Next Drought group workshop
10.30-10.35: Round of Announcements – all
10.35-11.00: Catching up & cookies
11.00-12.30: time for bilateral / small-group meetings

For more information: contact Anne Van Loon (a.f.vanloon@bham.ac.uk)

Share:
Convener: Anne Van Loon
Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room 2.17
SMP34 ECS

The mission of 500 Women Scientists is to serve society by making science open, inclusive, and accessible. Join us to grow our network in Europe.

Share:
Convener: Kelly Ramirez
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.16
SMP35

Although the concept of Global Heritage Stone Resource has been used for several years now, more debate is needed to make sure that we are using the term correctly with the implications for World Heritage Sites and other architectural heritage issues. Also, the future of the Heritage Stones group will be discussed, future meetings and potential publication of contributions after the meeting will be proposed.

Share:
Convener: Dolores Pereira
Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.51
SMP36

EO4AGRI main target is the preparation of the European capacity for improving operational agriculture monitoring from local to global levels based on information derived from Copernicus satellite observation data and through exploitation of associated geospatial and socio-economic information services. This meeting aims to gather input from the research community to support EO4Agri reports to the European future research programs using and developing particular the Copernicus program.

Share:
Convener: Bente Bye
Tue, 09 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.61
SMP37

Coupled Atmospheric Composition - Meteorology/Climate Modelling (CCMM) and Aerosol feedback model study - a joint coordination meeting of WMO GAW, WWRP and WCRP WGNE, S2S and APP SAG teams.

Share:
Convener: Alexander Baklanov | Co-conveners: Angela Benedetti, Francois Engelbrecht, Ariane Frassoni dos Santos de Mattos, Georg Grell
Fri, 12 Apr, 12:45–15:45
 
Room 0.51
SMP38

We plan a meeting with key stakeholders and science representatives to propose and identify the priorities for training and applications to be promoted in the next years in the field of atmospheric composition. We address specifically global datasets, with priority on satellite observations from past, current and planned missions.

Share:
Convener: Federico Fierli
Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.16
SMP39

The splinter is organized to discuss the ideas and coordinate efforts potentially leading to future space plasma mission proposals to the European Space Agency.

Share:
Convener: Jan Soucek
Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 0.15
SMP40

The aim of this splinter meeting is to stimulate feedback on achievements and goals and to further develop future perspectives and new activities of the International Soil Modeling Consortium (ISMC). ISMC was established in 2016 with the aim of integrating and advancing soil systems modeling, data collection, and observational capabilities. ISMC is a community-based effort that builds on voluntary contributions and scientists, stakeholders and institutions can sign up freely (https://soil-modeling.org/). ISMC is organized around three science panels that parallels a broad workflow from data collection (DO-LINK) to model development and testing (Soil-MIP) to engagement with different scientific communities (CROSS-CONNECT). Together, these panels jointly foster the development of soil modelling tools, support, expertise and knowledge transfer. We anticipate that the discussion will be facilitated through a report of the state-of-affairs and the activities of the three science panels, followed by an open and engaging dialog with the attendees.

Share:
Convener: Roland Baatz | Co-conveners: Harry Vereecken, Michael Young
Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 0.15
SMP41

The Pages OC3 working group synthesizes published and unpublished downcore stable carbon and oxygen isotopes (d13C, d18O) measured on benthic foraminifera with focus on the last deglaciation. The aim of this data compilation is to get a better insight into the changes in ocean circulation and carbon cycling and can be used for comparison with other paleo data (e.g. from ice cores or speleothems) and transient model simulations.

In this meeting we will discuss the current status and new achievements of the of the OC3 group, as well as further steps for the finalization of the database and collaboration with the IPODS group. Members of the OC 3 and IPODs community as well as interested researchers are welcome to join.

Share:
Convener: Janne Repschlaeger
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 2.17
SMP42

The meeting will bring together the teams in Europe interested in observations of lightning from space and ground to discuss plans for the future

Share:
Convener: Torsten Neubert
Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.17
SMP43

Seamless Prediction of Air Pollution for Africa:
Working meeting for the Monitoring, Analysis, and Prediction of Air Quality (MAP-AQ) project (https://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/MAP-AQ.html) and its PREFIA (Prediction and Forecasting Improvement for Africa) modeling study.

Share:
Convener: Alexander Baklanov | Co-conveners: Guy Brasseur, Ranjeet Sokhi, JJ Pienaar
Fri, 12 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.51
SMP44

The meeting aims at reviewing the basic concepts behind Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA), including the intended meaning of “fiber”, “asbestos”, "acicular crystal", and "fibrous mineral” and the sampling procedures to achieve reliable evaluation of NOA content in geo-environmental settings. Many issues are still unsolved in several steps of the “NOA evaluation task” (from sampling rocks on the field to the sample preparation techniques, from analytical observation and determination to hazard assessment) that require knowledge sharing from different working groups. The know-how gained in several case studies in Europe and US will be compared in order to focus on the most critical issues and to plan joined activities towards the definition of common best practices.

Share:
Convener: Fabrizio Piana
Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.83
SMP45

Samples and collections are a fundamental component of Earth, planetary, and environmental sciences. Registration of samples with IGSN, a persistent, unique identifier system for samples allows to more easily share, discover, access, and reuse samples, and link digital data and publications to the physical objects and their archives. This meeting will provides an opportunity to learn about the IGSN and how to use it and participate in international initiatives that advance consistent representation and identification of samples on the internet.

Share:
Convener: Kerstin Lehnert
Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room 0.51
SMP46

This meeting is to discuss and co-ordinate the production of large-sample hydrological datasets worldwide. Following the first such meeting in 2018, this meeting will discuss progress and ongoing challenges.

We would like to bring together people creating and/or using large samples of catchments, to develop collaborations and to discuss concrete issues related to data format and technical procedures in order to facilitate data exchange. The organisers will report progress made over the last 12 months and participants will also have the chance to share updates with the community.

This meeting is organised as part of the Panta Rhei working group on Large Sample Hydrology and in conjunction with session HS2.5.2 'Large-sample hydrology: characterising and understanding hydrological diversity'.

Organizer(s): Keirnan Fowler; Camila Alvarez-Garreton; Nans Addor; Gemma Coxon; Pablo Mendoza

Share:
Convener: Keirnan Fowler
Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.15
SMP47 ECS

Geosites are geological features and landforms with specific values. We want to bring interested parties to discuss geosites and their use and evaluation in 1) protected areas including UNESCO Global Geoparks and World Heritage sites, and 2) also the reactivation of the IUGS Global Geosite initiative with greater international cooperation, as suggested by the IUCN Geoheritage Specialist Group, and the IAG geodiversity and geomorphosite working groups.

Share:
Convener: Benjamin van Wyk de Vries
Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–13:45
 
Room 0.15
SMP48

Meeting EURO-FRIEND Water project groups (Flow Regimes from International Experimental Network Data, FRIEND).

Share:
Convener: Michael Stoelzle
Fri, 12 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.61
SMP49

The U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has recently announced an important change that will impact users of the Earth Sciences data analysis and visualization package, the NCAR Command Language (NCL). Based on numerous factors NCAR has decided to transition away from future NCL development and instead focus efforts on providing Open Source tools in the Python ecosystem. Detailed plans about this transition are available from the NCL web site: www.ncar.ucar.edu. This splinter session will present the latest information on the future of NCL and NCAR's "Pivot to Python". We will address what this change means for current and future users of NCAR's open source tools. We invite discussion and feedback from the community, and will discuss how the community can get involved with this exciting change!

Share:
Convener: john clyne
Tue, 09 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 0.15
SMP50

In the frame of the European project Climateurope (https://www.climateurope.eu/), a group of experts in Earth system modelling and climate services drafted a recommendation paper on research needs in both fields, to inform the upcoming FP9-Horizon Europe. This meeting offers the possibility to present the recommendations and discuss them with the Earth system modelling and climate services communities.

Share:
Convener: Francesca Guglielmo | Co-convener: Sylvie Joussaume
Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.61
SMP51

The city of Venice and the homonymous lagoon are objects of great historic, ecologic and economic interest. The most known and debated symptom of the frailty of the Venetian lagoon system are the periodic storm surge events that afflict Venice, referred to as “acqua alta”. An increased impact of storm surges on Venice has been observed in recent decades, and the rise in the future of the local mean relative sea level, as a consequence of global warming, may lead to dramatic impacts on both the historical center and the surrounding ecosystem.
However, currently available studies based on long-term future climate projections provide contrasting results about the expected changes in the relative mean sea level in the Venice lagoon. Such discrepancies stem especially from the different approaches followed to downscale projected global mean sea level changes in the Mediterranean, then in the Adriatic and ultimately in the lagoon of Venice. Thus, we propose to establish a multidisciplinary, international working group drawing from the fields of geophysics and numerical modelling that contributes to (i) critically discuss the current state of knowledge about the mean relative sea level in Venice and its near-term predictability, (ii) synthesize new results achieved in the next couple of years within ongoing research projects on the topic, and (iii) set up of future research activities focused on the Venice lagoon under a globally changing climate.
The splinter meeting is thought as a first step toward the establishment of such working group. It will allow to gather together potentially interested participants of sessions ITS4.2/CL4.21/HS11.21/OS2.11, OS2.5, OS1.1, NH5.7 and ITS4.7/NH1.26/AS4.48/CL2.08/HS4.3.3/NP9.9, among others. At the splinter meeting we will outline and discuss our ideas on the working group, its scope and its activities.
The splinter meeting is public, but we have sent invitations to key participants.

Share:
Convener: Davide Zanchettin
Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 2.17
SMP52

In this splinter meeting sustainability of atmospheric observations will be discussed. A special focus is given to emerging economies where large needs to support atmospheric science and provide information to society exists. It is critically important to bring up the value of atmospheric observations in emerging economies where it may not be fully recognized.

Share:
Convener: Claudia Volosciuk | Co-conveners: Oksana Tarasova, Gregory R. Carmichael, Paolo Laj
Wed, 10 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.15
SMP53

Open meeting to discuss activities related to the European Groundwater Drought Initiative project.

https://www.bgs.ac.uk/research/groundwater/waterResources/groundwaterDroughtInitiative/home.html

Public information:
8:30: informal chat / introductions
9:00: update Groundwater Drought Initiative
9:30: discussion on groundwater drought research in Europe (data, impacts)

Share:
Convener: John Bloomfield | Co-convener: Anne Van Loon
Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 2.61
SMP54

The meeting will focus on the inception of the World Atlas of Last Interglacial Shorelines (WALIS). We welcome scientists working on LIG sea level indicators to provide feedback on an open-access online database that is in development with the PALSEA community with the financial support of the ERC StG "WARMCOASTS".

Share:
Convener: Alessio Rovere
Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 2.61
SMP55

The Lake Victoria Basin (LVB) in East Africa is very vulnerable to extreme weather events, like heavy precipitation, heat waves, droughts and wind storms. CORDEX Flagship Pilot Study (FPS) “ELVIC – climate Extremes in the Lake VICtoria basin” is an internationally coordinated program that brings together different regional climate models at convection permitting scale, performed by different research groups. Together, they want to answer following questions: (i) Are moist convective systems in Equatorial Africa better represented by convection permitting models (CPMs) compared to models that rely on a parametrization of convection? (ii) How can we best combine information of CMIP and CORDEX-Africa with CPM (climate change) integrations? (iii) How will extreme weather events evolve in the future in the LVB? (iv) How can improved probabilistic information on convective extremes be used by the impact community?

Share:
Convener: Jonas Van de Walle
Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 0.51
SMP56

The first meeting of a newly established working group about open source software and data file formats in high-precision gravimetry with the main attention, but not limited to, on the absolute gravity measurements.

Share:
Convener: Ilya Oshchepkov
Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.83
SMP57

Meeting of the COSANOVA network to discuss the latest measurements of Carbonyl sulfide in the atmosphere and its regulation by the biosphere. Open to anybody with an interest in COS.

Share:
Convener: Lisa Wingate
Mon, 08 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 2.17
SMP58

Paleolink is the name of a working group framed within the third phase of PAGES 2k, and will run between earl 2018 and the end of 2019. This is a non-funded initiative lead by the Atmospheric Modelling Group of the University of Murcia and co-lead by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. It promotes the creation of an open network of collaborations, so anyone interested in the topics covered by this initiative are invited to participate. Further details about this working group are provided in the official site, hosted within the PAGES webpage.

This meeting is a follow-up of the workshop held in Murcia in February 2019. As such, we will review and discuss the four initiatives proposed during such workshop. Still, we are open to anyone non previously involved but interested in joining the initiative and willing to contribute with new ideas and datasets.

Share:
Convener: Juan José Gómez-Navarro
Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 0.16
SMP59

Welcome to a splinter meeting devoted to the ICDP proposal Drilling Active Faults in Northern Europe (DAFNE). The objectives of the meeting are to present the proposal, develop the DAFNE science team, and to discuss co-funding plans.

Share:
Convener: Maria Ask
Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.51
SMP60

The H2020 project "Open Cloud for Research Environments" wants to introduce the project to the research community and promote the benefits that will bring to the community such as free access to cloud resources and EO services.
We want to listen researchers for bringing to them resources that they need and they will like to use.

Interested? Come and meet us!

Share:
Convener: José Manuel Delgado Blasco
Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 0.16
SMP61

The national research data infrastructure (NFDI) in Germany [1] aims to systematically manage scientific and research data, provide long-term data storage, backup and accessibility, and network the data both nationally and internationally. Within this framework, NFDI4Earth [2], an emerging consortium with many participating institutions, strives to serve researchers within Earth System Research. NFDI4Earth is aware that the objectives of NFDI and in particular NFDI4Earth can only be achieved on a consortia basis anchored in the broader scientific community.
During the splinter meeting, we would like to introduce NFDI4Earth to the scientific community. Aim is to create an awareness right from the beginning and initiate collaborations also beyond Germany’s borders.
[1] https://www.dfg.de/en/research_funding/programmes/nfdi/index.html
[2] https://www.nfdi4earth.de/

Share:
Convener: Hannes Thiemann
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.15
SMP62

CoreTrustSeal certification demonstrates to a repository’s users and funders that they have been evaluated by an independent authority and endorsed for their trustworthiness.
As part of the AGU Coalition Enabling FAIR Data Project, a cohort of ESES data repositories has been assembled to work together to apply for CoreTrustSeal certification. Following two webinars in late 2018 and two Q&A sessions at AGU, the cohort now has a shared mailing list to allow collaboration among members and is organizing side events at community meetings.
This splinter meeting is an opportunity for any and all repositories interested in joining the cohort, or independently becoming a CoreTrustSeal-certified Trustworthy Data Repository, to find out more information about the process and to discuss detailed issues connected with completing the CoreTrustSeal Requirements.

We look forward to welcoming you!

Organizer(s): Rorie Edmunds, Shelley Stall, Lesley Wyborn, Helen Glaves

Share:
Convener: Lesley Wyborn
Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 2.61
SMP64

A meeting of the SCAR action group on Antarctic Clouds and Aerosols to discuss future campaigns and collaborations.

Share:
Convener: Tom Lachlan-Cope
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.16
SMP65

The CEOS Disaster Working Group Landslide Pilot will be holding its annual meeting to discuss current activities, future plans and overarching science progress.

Share:
Convener: Dalia Kirschbaum
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.16
SMP66

We invite representatives of global and regional Early Career Scientist (ECS) organizations for a meet-up to discuss how to best serve the ECS community and ways for future collaboration between networks.

Share:
Convener: Olivia Trani
Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.83

SMI – Splinter meetings (by invitation only)

SMI1

Annual Business Meeting of the International Lithosphere Program (ILP) - Task Forces, Coordinating Committees and friends.

Share:
Convener: Alexander Rudloff
Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–20:00
 
Room 0.15
SMI2

Splinter meeting for partners in the MADEIRA project (Middle Atmosphere Dynamics: Exploiting Infrasound Using a Multidisciplinary Approach at High Latitudes).

Share:
Convener: Sven Peter Näsholm
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.61
SMI3

Alongside the 2019 EGU meeting the joint Working Group/Commission of the International Association of Geomorphologists and the International Geographical Union on "Geomorphology and Society" will take place.
During this meeting, planned activities and possible participation in research calls will be discussed.

Share:
Convener: Sven Fuchs
Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.51
SMI4

This is a splinter meeting for the participants in the CORDEX Flagship Pilot Study on convection over Europe and the Mediterranean. Here will discuss the progress of simulations, analyses and manuscripts. We also will set our goals for the rest of 2019.

Share:
Convener: Stefan Sobolowski
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 2.83
SMI5

Meeting of ArcTrain members and collaborators

Share:
Convener: Anne de Vernal | Co-conveners: Jade Falardeau, Michal Kucera
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.51
SMI6

The annual Meeting for the ALOMAR Science Advisory Committee - the PI's of the ALOMAR Observatory instrumentation

Share:
Convener: Kolbjørn Blix
Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–20:00
 
Room 2.83
SMI7

The first editorial board meeting 2019 of Quaternary Science Journal (EGQSJ) will be held at the EGU meeting in Vienna. EGQSJ is an interdisciplinary open-access journal published by the German Quaternary Association (DEUQUA e.V.) since 1951, and it is one of the longest-running journals related to Quaternary research. It was successfully relaunched in 2018 at Copernicus Publications. EGQSJ publishes peer-reviewed articles and express reports, as well as thesis abstracts related to Quaternary geology, paleo-environments, paleo-ecology, soil science, paleo-climatology, geomorphology, geochronology, archaeology, and geoarchaeology focussing on, but not limited to, research from central Europe.

Share:
Conveners: Christopher Lüthgens, Daniela Sauer, Michael Zech
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.15
SMI8

Mountain regions across Europe, especially in the Alps and the Mediterranean, respond most sensitively to global environmental change driven by the combined changes in climate, land use and socio-economy. This meeting will bring together scientists across Europe interested in joint research and education activities on natural hazards and transportation infrastructure. It is envisaged to discuss funding possibilities so that a successful consortium can be built up.

Share:
Convener: Sven Fuchs
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–13:45
 
Room 2.83
SMI9

The associate editors of the journal Hydrological Processes will meet for their annual update and exchange with the editor in chief Prof Doerthe Tetzlaff.

Share:
Conveners: Sylvia Kanzler, Tom Wordsworth
Thu, 11 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 0.51
SMI10

The meeting will be dedicated to present the latest activities realized, to review some of the priority issues (e.g. Mid-term-Report, 20th General Assembly of WEGENER).

WEGENER is originally the acronym for Working Group of European Geoscientists for the Establishment of Networks for Earth-science Research. It was founded in March 1981 in response to an appeal delivered at the Journées Luxembourgeoises de Geodynamique in December 1980 to respond with a coordinated European proposal to a NASA Announcement of Opportunity inviting participation in the Crustal Dynamics and Earthquake Research Program.
WEGENER was organized as voluntary coordinating body with membership open to any organization actively engaged in research aiming to achieve a better understanding of kinematics, crustal dynamics and of processes leading to earthquakes in Europe and the Mediterranean area.
WEGENER, during the past 38 years, has always kept a close contact with the Agencies and Institutions responsible for the development and maintenance of the global space geodetic networks with the aim to make them aware of the scientific needs and outcomes of the project which might have an influence on the general science policy trends. WEGENER was serving as Inter-commission Project 3.2, between Commission 1 and Commission 3, of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) until 2011. Since then, WEGENER project has became the Sub-commission 3.5 of IAG commission 3, namely Tectonics and Earthquake Geodesy. The acronym WEGENER now refers to The World Earthquake GEodesy Network for Environmental Hazard Research.

Share:
Convener: Haluk Ozener
Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.61
SMI11

Debye is a space plasma mission proposed to ESA's F-Class programme. The Debye mission will answer the question "How are electrons heated in space and astrophysical plasmas?"
ESA have accepted the step-one proposal for Debye in November 2018, and our team are currently preparing the full mission proposal. At this team meeting, we will discuss the science goals and the mission operations for the Debye mission. We will also explore future opportunities for space plasma physics missions based on the Debye concept.

Share:
Convener: Daniel Verscharen
Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.17
SMI12

The AlpArray Gravity Working Group is planning to meet at the EGU 2019 and discuss the status of the Bouguer map project and future steps of collaboration, processing and interpretation of the compilation in the Alpine region. The group aims in the compilation of a modern, homogenized data base in the area of ALPARRY project. We will ask all participants to be prepared for a small (10 min) presentation to inform about the current state of data compilation and own activities.

Share:
Convener: Hans-Jürgen Götze | Co-convener: György Hetényi
Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.17
SMI13

"Changes in the Hydrological Cycle" is one of the four science-driven Collaborative Programmes (CPs) of the European Climate Research Alliance (ECRA, http://www.ecra-climate.eu/activities-events/collaborative-programmes). Starting from the main topics which this CP has focused on since its beginning - global precipitation changes and runoff, the interaction between climate and hydrological/land surface processes, climate hot-spot regions (in particular the Mediterranean region and global mountains), this meeting is intended to bring together researchers interested in advancing science by exchanging on recent findings and current limits in the above mentioned topics, as well as in other themes/tasks which are relevant to characterize and understand the hydrological cycle including, for example, the integration of societal challenges related to the impact of changes in the water cycle and in extreme events. Contributions and discussions on research priorities, joint actions, and research Calls are welcome.

Share:
Convener: Elisa Palazzi | Co-convener: Ralf Ludwig
Wed, 10 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 2.61
SMI14

Meeting of all partners present at the EGU of the SEACRIFOG project.

Share:
Convener: Veronika Jorch
Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.17
SMI15

The IWA Specialist Group “Metals and Related Substances in Drinking Water (METRELS)” has a mission to work for an improved control of metals and related substances in drinking water systems and to contribute to human health and well-being of the society. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with 17 dedicated goals, 169 targets and 232 indicators is looking forward to transform our world in a relatively short span of 15 years. These SDGs make up a comprehensive framework, and demands a systematic approach with robust capabilities in terms of integrating technology, human resource capacity and managing the financial resources. The SDG 6 addresses the water and sanitation goal, with key targets to provide universal access to safe water and sanitation service delivery, management of wastewater, water quality and control of pollution, water use efficiency and integrated water resources management and protecting the aquatic ecosystems.
The growing focus on scaling up the access to safe drinking water needs a holistic approach that needs systems disruptive innovations to measure and monitor the water sources, treatment facilities to ensure safe, reliable and affordable services to the stakeholders. Water Safety Plan designed by the WHO in 2005 as an instrument to ensure the safety of a drinking-water supply most effectively and consistently with a comprehensive risk assessment and risk management approach that encompasses each step in water supply from catchment to consumer. There is a growing need for technology innovation for drinking water programs, which involve on those ideas and frames the business case for water technology innovation; identifies “market opportunities” specifically for solving the drinking water challenges through developing digital tools for assessment and monitoring of water quality, and robust set of actions for technology innovation for clean and safe water.
The SG-METRELS is also actively engaged with activities linked with the IWA Strategic Plans directed towards the implementation of Water Wise Cities and the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Aligned with the strategic plans of the IWA, this Sprinter Meeting we have an ambition to focus our discussions on:
• Mapping the water sources on a digital platform “ASMITAS” for metals and metalloids in drinking water sources at catchment scale –quality and risks
• Platform for Technology to develop best practice for drinking water treatment
• Potential avenues for transfer and dissemination of knowledge – bridging the gaps in safe drinking water access.
• Sharing practitioner experiences across cross-sectoral stakeholders such as water, environmental health and socio-economic impacts
• Critical determinants for implementing the digital platform for drinking water safety plan from a complex inter-disciplinary perspective.

Organizer(s): Prosun Bhattacharya (Sweden/Australia), Arslan Ahmad (The Netherlands), Albert van der Wal (The Netherlands), and Md. Jakariya (Bangladesh)

Share:
Convener: Prosun Bhattacharya
Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.61
SMI16

The Executive Committee (ExeCom; https://www.orfeus-eu.org/organization/structure/) is the executive body of the ORFEUS Organization. The ORFEUS ExeCom meets regularly and, if possible, contextually to scientific and technical meetings attended by most of its members.

Share:
Convener: Carlo Cauzzi
Wed, 10 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 2.17
SMI17

Meeting of the IACS Working Group on Ice Thickness Estimation Methods

Share:
Convener: Daniel Farinotti
Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.83
SMI18

Cambridge University Press- Geol Mag Editorial Board meeting

Share:
Convener: Kathleen Too
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 2.17
SMI19

A meeting for the UK NERC funded V-PLUS project

Share:
Convener: Mike Burton | Co-convener: Anja Schmidt
Mon, 08 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 2.83
SMI20

The meeting of the MedCLIVAR SG (www.medclivar.eu) is meant to discuss ongoing and future activities of the meeting:

- topics for MedCLIVAR2020
- special issues and publications
- workshop/summer school before MedCLIVAR 2020
- networking

Share:
Convener: Piero Lionello
Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–20:00
 
Room 2.83
SMI21

This splinter meeting is inviting all modeling groups working with global or regional single model large ensembles. The purpose of this meeting is to establish a forum to discuss future plans for experiments, data sharing, collaboration across disciplines as well as exchange of experiences and information about existing simulations.

In the recent years, a growing number of modelling groups have created large initial condition ensembles for global climate models as well as high-resolution downscaling of such ensembles using regional climate models. These large ensembles offer new opportunities to quantify a model's true forced response and internal variability and improve our understanding of projected future changes. The ensembles also allow a reinterpretation of the observed record and help in interpreting sparse observations on the one hand, the assessment of model biases on the other hand. Furthermore, the large sample size enables the exploration of extreme events in a changing climate, the detection of compound events, as well as a robust assessment of a model’s variability.

These large ensembles offer unexploited opportunities for a wide range of disciplines, such as hydrology, biogeosciences and open new perspectives for climate dynamics. We want to introduce these new opportunities and explore how a combined analysis of the existing large ensembles can advance our knowledge in different fields.

The configuration of the existing ensembles varies between different modeling groups in their choice of ensemble size, forcing scenarios and initialisation. In this splinter meeting, we will share lessons learned from running the ensembles and coordinate future ensemble experiments to use resources efficiently and make the experiments from different models more comparable. Furthermore, we will discuss how the existing ensemble simulations can be made accessible to the community.

We also encourage anyone who is not yet involved in large-ensemble modeling but interested in the topic and this meeting to contact us.

Public information:
Preliminary programme:

Schedule
16:15 – 17:00 Part I: current state
17:00 – 17:45 Part II: applications and future plans
17:45 – 18:00 Concluding remarks and next steps

Objectives:
- Establish a forum for communication among modelling groups
- Create an overview of existing large ensembles (both RCM and GCM)
- Identify gaps in RCM / GCM ensemble modelling that should be addressed in the future
- Identify topics that need further discussion and decide whether a dedicated workshop should be held in autumn 2019

Agenda:
- Introduction

- Part I - current state
Which large ensembles do exist, why were they created and what have we learned?
-- Presentation of GCM large ensembles 4' (Nicola Maher, Andrea Dittus)
-- Presentation of a RCM large ensemble 3' (Raul Wood)
-- Round table introduction of all participants
-- Open discussion to share information on existing large ensembles and lessons learned from running these simulations.

- Part II - applications and future plans
What are the near-term plans (1-2 years) for large ensembles and which challenges are we facing? What are our expectations for large ensemble modelling in the wider climate science context?
-- Presentation: future plans for a GCM large ensemble 3' (Keith Rodgers)
-- Presentation: future directions for LE: towards a better quantification of changes in extremes 3' (Erich Fischer)
-- Round table introduction of future plans from different groups
-- Open discussion on topics where large ensembles could introduce a new perspective, gaps in the existing large ensembles, and the scientific and technical challenges that we will face in this context

- Conclusions
Based on the previous discussion:
-- identify potential synergy effects both within and between GCM and RCM communities
-- identify topics that need further discussion and decide if a European large ensemble workshop should be held in autumn 2019 to continue this discussion

Share:
Convener: Sebastian Milinski | Co-conveners: Andrea Dittus, Flavio Lehner, Nicola Maher, Raul R. Wood
Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.15
SMI22

This is the annual meeting of the GTN-G Executive Board. The goal is to give updates to current tasks and projects and discuss future projects. This years focus is on the General Assemblies and the GTN-G mid term evaluation.

Share:
Convener: Isabelle Gärtner-Roer
Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 2.17
SMI23

Planning meeting for mentees and mentors participating in EGU's mentoring programme. We will provide general information and tips for the programme. This will be a very good opportunity for all mentoring groups to meet and get started!

Share:
Convener: Helen Glaves | Co-convener: Bárbara Ferreira
Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room -2.31
SMI25

Steering Committee of European partnerships in ice core science.

Share:
Convener: Eric Wolff
Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.16
SMI27

This splinter session will gather scientists involved in the downstream and urban measurements supported under the Climate and Clean Air Coalition Methane Science Studies, which focuses on better quantifying methane emissions from oil and gas infrastructure. This meeting will bring together the scientists involved in urban measurements of methane. It will serve to help summarize overall program progress, discuss strategy, and receive feedback on plans for future work in this area.

Share:
Convener: Christopher Konek
Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.17
SMI28

This splinter session will gather scientists involved in aerial measurements of methane from the oil and gas supply chain supported under the Climate and Clean Air Coalition Methane Science Studies. This meeting will bring together the scientists involved in aerial measurements, primarily focused on offshore operations. It will serve to help summarize overall program progress, discuss strategy, and receive feedback on plans for future work in this area.

Share:
Convener: Christopher Konek
Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 2.17
SMI29

Meeting to assess the CEASELESS project evolution, dealing with coastal processes, observations, simulations and analyses.

Public information:
Meeting to assess the CEASELESS project evolution, dealing with coastal processes, observations, simulations and analyses (by invitation only).

Share:
Convener: Agustín Sánchez-Arcilla
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 2.61
SMI30

This is a brief progress meeting where members of the ISSI team 'Towards an Unified sea level record' provide a brief update on the status of their work

Share:
Convener: Roelof Rietbroek
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 2.83
SMI31

ARISE IA project meeting.

Share:
Convener: Alexis Le Pichon
Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 0.15
SMI32

Kick-off meeting of the scientific cooperation project dedicated for standardization of electromagnetic measurements of soil moisture. The project work packages will be discussed, their objectives and expected results, as well as intended timetable of research visits.

Share:
Convener: Wojciech Skierucha
Tue, 09 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.83
SMI33

Meeting of project partners dealing with processes and structures of ecosystem development under different conditions for planning further cooperation and joint applications.

Share:
Convener: Werner Gerwin | Co-convener: Wolfgang Schaaf
Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–20:00
 
Room 2.17
SMI34

Project meeting with the ESRs of the EU project H2020 ITN SLATE. We will discuss within the group of ESRs news and upcoming activities.

Share:
Convener: Katrin Huhn
Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–20:00
 
Room 2.61
SMI35

Meeting of the Panta Rhei working group "Changes of flood risk" to discuss joint activities

Share:
Convener: Heidi Kreibich
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 0.51
SMI36

We are working on a new interdisciplinary study on Earth-geospheres-interaction and human health by integrating ESA and NASA space and ground-data observations and will discuss the new project's preparation within H2020.

Share:
Convener: Dimitar Ouzounov
Tue, 09 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 0.51
SMI37

This meeting intends to discuss the achievments of EPOS IP and the next challenges in the light of the just granted legal status of EPOS as an ERIC.

Share:
Convener: Carmela Freda
Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room 2.61
SMI39

Meeting of the Editors of Hydrology Journals

Share:
Convener: Günter Blöschl
Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.15
SMI40

Restricted to FuSE-AT project partners and advisory board.

Share:
Convener: Andreas Gobiet
Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–20:00
 
Room 0.51
SMI41

We will discuss modeling with EUHFORIA (EUropean Heliospheric FORecasting Information Asset), newly-developed space weather model for the background solar wind and transient solar events. In the framework of the CCSOM project extended testing of the solar wind modeling and modeling of CMEs with EUHFORIA was already performed. At this meeting we will focus on the planned parameter study of modeling solar wind and implementation of different coronal models to EUHFORIA.

Share:
Convener: Jasmina Magdalenic
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 2.61
SMI42

This internal meeting addresses the question on how to move forward the goals, activities and governance of the International Soil Modeling Consortium (ISMC). It will bring together the ISMC Executive Board members: Science Panel Chairs, Executive Board at Large, and ISMC Chairs. The core of the agenda is the formulation of an inclusive, sustainable and flexible formal framework for the next decade of ISMC. ISMC was established in 2016 with the aim of integrating and advancing soil systems modeling, data collection, and observational capabilities. ISMC is a community-based effort that builds on voluntary contributions and scientists, stakeholders and institutions can sign up freely (https://soil-modeling.org/). The mission is supported and the newsletter reaches so far more than 500 soil scientists over six continents.

Organizer(s): Roland Baatz, Harry Vereecken, Michael Young

Share:
Convener: Roland Baatz | Co-conveners: Harry Vereecken, Michael Young
Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 2.61
SMI45

EUROVOLC working group WP6 meeting on networking of data and collaboration.

Share:
Convener: Freysteinn Sigmundsson
Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 0.15
SMI46

Since 2 year we have initiated to edit a book about landslides, we need to meet all the authors present at EGU.

Share:
Convener: Michel Jaboyedoff
Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 2.61
SMI47

This is a follow-up meeting of the two workshops on "Improving the theoretical underpinning of hydrological models", held in 2016 and 2018.

Share:
Convener: Björn Guse
Fri, 12 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.83
SMI48

WINDSURFER is a 3 year project that is bringing together eight leading research institutions across Europe to co-develop new methods, tools and assessments of extreme wind and wave risk with a focus on Insurance, Forestry and Energy. The meeting is discuss the progress and latest research in the WINDSURFER project and next steps. Eight research organisations (University of Reading, Met Eireann, KNMI, Met.no, FMI, University of Cantabria, Demokritos, CMCC) will be represented.

Share:
Convener: Len Shaffrey
Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 2.17
SMI49

Get together of EMeRGe international partners for a general dicussion and status update of the EMeRGe (Effect of Megacities on the Transport and Transformation of Pollutants at Regional and Global Scales) project.

Share:
Convener: Maria Dolores Andrés Hernández | Co-convener: John P. Burrows
Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 0.16
SMI50

Meeting with the WRR Associate Editors.

Share:
Convener: Martyn Clark
Fri, 12 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room 2.17
SMI51

This meeting will involve discussions related to
(1) raising a TCS on tsunamis in EPOS
(2) preparation for upcoming meetings related to forming the Global Tsunami Model

Share:
Convener: Finn Løvholt | Co-convener: Alexander Rudloff
Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room 2.83
SMI52

The meeting is aimed at discussing the validation of the EUROVOLC VA services.

Share:
Convener: Giuseppe Puglisi
Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 2.83
SMI53

EUROVOLC meeting for work packages who wish to meet and plan work over the next few months, as well as prepare for a one-day workshop at IUGG in Montreal

Share:
Convener: Kristin Vogfjord
Wed, 10 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.16
SMI54

This splinter meeting is for international researchers who have been collaborating on the study of magnetic reconnection using the data from the MMS and Cluster spacecraft.

Share:
Convener: Kyoung-Joo (Joo) HWANG
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.51
SMI55

Project team meeting for the AgWIT PIs, students and post-docs

Share:
Convener: Mark Johnson
Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 0.51
SMI56

We will discuss about modelling-related issues and ISIMIP project.

Share:
Convener: Camelia Eliza Telteu
Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 2.61
SMI57

The meeting will discuss collaborations for multi-hazard risk assessment and modelling

Share:
Convener: Philip Ward
Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 2.83
SMI58

An interdisciplinary team of researchers from Germany, Switzerland, the UK and the US is planning a large-scale isotopic labelling and drought manipulation experiment in the Biosphere 2 experimental facility in Arizona, which will take place in autumn 2019. Several collaborators will attend EGU, and we will meet to plan details for the upcoming experiment.

Share:
Convener: Nemiah Ladd
Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.51
SMI59

For the participants of the Hamburg AIMES-PAGES Past tipping points meeting to review the status of the paper.

Share:
Convener: Victor Brovkin
Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room 0.15
SMI61

Interviews with scientists for purposes of documentary film on climate change.

Share:
Convener: Kelly Nyks
Mon, 08 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 0.16, Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 0.15
SMI62

The meeting is for Italian IUGG delegates present @ EGU 2019 in Vienna.

Share:
Convener: Fausto Guzzetti
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room 2.61