Union-wide
Community-led
Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions

GM – Geomorphology

Programme group chairs: Kristen Cook, Daniel Parsons

ITS1.7/GM2 EDI

This session is a compilation of two independent sessions: ITS1.7 ‘Sandy solutions for coastal safety, measurements and modelling’ and GM7.3 ‘Arctic coastal processes’.

Future projections show that coastal regions are among the most vulnerable ecosystems on our planet. From nearshore to dunes, the coastal system provides ecosystem services such as water supply and storage, recreation, biodiversity and flood protection, all of which can be considered of critical importance for human well-being. Climate change, sea level rise and anthropogenic impacts can affect these services by altering topography and habitat development. Flexible nature-based solutions have been proposed to promote resilience against climate change and safeguard coastal services for current and future generations. For this session we aim to bring together experts from varying disciplines focused on measuring, modelling and designing nature-based solutions in a changing world. This includes but is not limited to topics related to coastal morphology, sediment and vegetation dynamics, hydrology, and anthropogenic impacts.

Decreasing extent and duration of sea ice cover, changes in storm patterns as well as rising sea surface and air temperatures impact coastal processes in the Arctic. Wave overtopping, flooding and coastal erosion pose risks to societies and infrastructure located at the coast. There is a pressing need to understand the rates and mechanisms of coastal change to better predict future trajectories under the changing climate. In this session, we invite contributions from a range of disciplines and across time scales on local to pan-Arctic studies related to coastal processes in the Arctic. Those can include observational (satellite and instrumental) data, historical data, geological records and proxy data, model simulations as well as forecasts, for the past, present and future rates and drivers of Arctic coastal change. The common denominator of these studies will be their focus on a better understanding of short- to long-term mechanisms and feedbacks that drive Arctic coastal changes, and their impact on coastal communities and infrastructure, at local to global scales.

Co-organized by BG4
Convener: Michel Riksen | Co-conveners: Zuzanna SwiradECSECS, Maria Ansine Jensen, Juul Limpens, Gregor LuetzenburgECSECS, Anna IrrgangECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room N1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 14:00
MAL7
Arne Richter Award for Outstanding ECS Lecture by Tjalling de Haas
Convener: Daniel Parsons
Abstract
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–11:15 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Thu, 10:45
MAL25
Ralph Alger Bagnold Medal Lecture by Dimitri Lague
Convener: Daniel Parsons
Abstract
| Thu, 27 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Thu, 19:00
DM16
Division meeting for Geomorphology (GM)
Co-organized by GM
Convener: Daniel Parsons | Co-convener: Kristen Cook
Thu, 27 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Thu, 12:45

GM1 – General Geomorphology

Programme group scientific officer: Daniel Parsons

GM1.1 EDI

Landscapes, and how they change over time, provide the foundations of life and affect the ecosystems and human activities that can exist on Earth. Yet, there appears to be no single axis of causality between landscape and Earth surface processes, but rather, each entity can exert a simultaneous influence on the other over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. We are just starting to realise and explore the modes, trajectories and effects of these coupled systems, and to trace and infer the often non-linear feedback mechanisms.
Geomorphology inevitably stands in the center of an emerging science devoted to the Earth's surface, where strong couplings link human dynamics, biology, biochemistry, geochemistry, geology, hydrology, geomorphology, soil science, and atmospheric dynamics, including past and ongoing climate changes.
Motivated by the importance of understanding Earth surface interactions, couplings and feedbacks on a rapidly changing globe, this session will bring together a series of invited speakers to provide insights and perspectives on this hot topic from across the field of geomorphology.

Including Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists Lecture
Convener: Daniel Parsons | Co-conveners: Lonneke RoelofsECSECS, Kristen Cook
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–11:45 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Thu, 10:45

GM2 – Geomorphologist's Tools, Models and Method

Programme group scientific officer: Giulia Sofia

GM2.2 EDI

Our planet is shaped by a multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes. Most of these processes and their effect on the ground’s properties can be sensed by seismic instruments – as discrete events or ongoing signatures. Seismic methods have been developed, adopted and advanced to study those dynamics at or near the surface of the earth, with unprecedented detail, completeness and resolution. The community of geophysicists interested in earth surface dynamics and geomorphologists, glaciologists, hydrologists, volcanologists, geochemists, biologists and engineering geologists interested in using arising geophysical tools and techniques is progressively growing and collaboratively advancing that emerging scientific discipline.

When you are interested in contributing to or getting to know about the latest methodological and theoretical developments, field and lab scale experimental outcomes, and the broad range of applications in geomorphology, glaciology, hydrology, meteorology, engineering geology, volcanology and natural hazards, then this session would be your choice. We anticipate a lively discussion about standing questions in earth surface dynamics research and how seismic methods could help solving them, we will debate about community based research opportunities and are looking forward to bringing together transdisciplinary knowledge and mutual curiousity.

Topical keywords: erosion, transient, landslide, rockfall, debris flow, fracturing, stress, granular flow, rock mechanics, snow avalanche, calving, icequake, basal motion, subglacial, karst, bedload, flood, GLOF, early warning, coast, tsunami, eruption, tremor, turbidity current, groundwater, soil moisture, noise, dv/v, HVSR, fundamental frequency, polarisation, array, DAS, infra sound, machine learning, classification, experiment.

We are happy to announce Agnes Helmstetter as invited speaker!

Co-organized by CR2/GI5/SM5
Convener: Josefine UmlauftECSECS | Co-conveners: Michael Dietze, Małgorzata ChmielECSECS, Ugo Nanni
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:05 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
GM2.3 EDI

Recent advances in image collection, e.g. using unoccupied aerial vehicles (UAVs), and topographic measurements, e.g. using terrestrial or airborne LiDAR, are providing an unprecedented insight into landscape and process characterization in geosciences. In parallel, historical data including terrestrial, aerial, and satellite photos as well as historical digital elevation models (DEMs), can extend high-resolution time series and offer exciting potential to distinguish anthropogenic from natural causes of environmental change and to reconstruct the long-term evolution of the surface from local to regional scale.
For both historic and contemporary scenarios, the rise of techniques with ‘structure from motion’ (SfM) processing has democratized data processing and offers a new measurement paradigm to geoscientists. Photogrammetric and remote sensing data are now available on spatial scales from millimetres to kilometres and over durations of single events to lasting time series (e.g. from sub-second to decadal-duration time-lapse), allowing the evaluation of event magnitude and frequency interrelationships.
The session welcomes contributions from a broad range of geoscience disciplines such as geomorphology, cryosphere, volcanology, hydrology, bio-geosciences, and geology, addressing methodological and applied studies. Our goal is to create a diversified and interdisciplinary session to explore the potential, limitations, and challenges of topographic and orthoimage datasets for the reconstruction and interpretation of past and present 2D and 3D changes in different environments and processes. We further encourage contributions describing workflows that optimize data acquisition and processing to guarantee acceptable accuracies and to automate data application (e.g. geomorphic feature detection and tracking), and field-based experimental studies using novel multi-instrument and multi-scale methodologies. This session invites contributions on the state of the art and the latest developments in i) modern photogrammetric and topographic measurements, ii) remote sensing techniques as well as applications, iii) time-series processing and analysis, and iv) modelling and data processing tools, for instance, using machine learning approaches.

Convener: Anette EltnerECSECS | Co-conveners: Livia PiermatteiECSECS, Amaury DehecqECSECS, Katharina AndersECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
GM2.6 EDI

Numerical frameworks are essential for understanding and interpreting landscape evolution. Over recent decades, geochronological techniques such as cosmogenic nuclides, thermochronology, radiocarbon and luminescence dating have improved in accuracy, precision, and temporal range. Developments in geochronological methods, data treatment and landscape evolution models have provided new insights into the timing, duration and intensity of landscape evolution processes. The combination of temporal constraints with numerical modelling has enormous potential for improving our understanding of landscape evolution. The focus of this session is to bring together geochronology, data science and models of Quaternary landscape change.

This session includes studies of erosional rates and processes, sediment provenance, burial and transport times, bedrock exposure or cooling histories, landscape dynamics, and the examination of potential biases and discordances in geochronological data and model-data comparisons. We welcome contributions that apply novel geochronological methods and that intersect different geochronological techniques and numerical modelling with landscape evolution analysis, with particular focus on cosmogenic nuclides. This includes the determination of rates and timing of landscape change as well as stochastic events, or that highlight the latest developments and open questions in the application of geochronometers to landscape evolution problems.

Co-organized by CL5
Convener: Georgina King | Co-conveners: Zsófia Ruszkiczay-Rüdiger, Romano Clementucci, Sebastien Lenard, Gerald Raab, Ann Rowan, Apolline Mariotti
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
GM2.8 EDI

Transport of sediments in geophysical flows occurs in mountainous, fluvial, estuarine, coastal, aeolian and other natural or man-made environments on Earth, while also shapes the surface of planets such as Mars, Titan, and Venus. Understanding the motion of sediments is still one of the most fundamental problems in hydrological and geophysical sciences. Such processes can vary across a wide range of scales - from the particle to the landscape - which can directly impact both the form (geomorphology) and, on Earth, the function (ecology and biology) of natural systems and the built infrastructure surrounding them. In particular, feedback between flow and sediment transport as well as interparticle interactions including size sorting are a key processes in surface dynamics, finding a range of important applications, from hydraulic engineering and natural hazard mitigation to landscape evolution and river ecology.

Specific topics of interest include (but are not restricted to):

A) particle-scale interactions and transport processes:
-mechanics of entrainment and disentrainment (for fluvial and aeolian flows)
-momentum (turbulent impulses) and energy transfer between turbulent flows and particles
-upscaling and averaging techniques for stochastic transport processes
-interaction among grain sizes in poorly sorted mixtures, including particle segregation

B) reach-scale sediment transport and geomorphic processes
-bedform generation, evolution and disintegration dynamics (e.g. for dunes and other formations)
-discrete element modelling of transport processes and upscaling into continuum frameworks
-derivation and solution of equations for multiphase flows (including fluvial and aeolian flows)
-shallow water hydro-sediment-morphodynamic processes

C) large-scale, highly unsteady and complex water-sediment flows:
-flash floods, debris flows and landslides due to extreme rainfall
-natural and build dam failures and compound disasters (due to landslides, debris flow intrusion and downstream flooding)
-reservoir operation schemes and corresponding fluvial processes
-design of hydraulic structures such as fish passages, dam spillways, also considering the impact of sediment
-dredging, maintenance and regulation for large rivers and navigational waterways

This session is promoted by the IAHR committee on Experimental Methods and Instrumentation.

Convener: Gordon GiljaECSECS | Co-conveners: Anita Moldenhauer-RothECSECS, Rui Miguel Ferreira, Zhixian Cao, Thomas Pähtz
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:35 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 16:15
GM2.9 EDI

The Earth's surface is shaped by many processes occurring over a wide range of time and length scales, all of which are interdependent with each other. Unraveling this complex system is challenging, especially because of the wide range of scales involved, which makes observation difficult. However, in recent years, major advances in understanding are being driven by new methods (e.g. by using fibre optic cables, or via environmental seismology) as well as the use of simplified and controlled experiments, which is widely used to monitor isolated processes or their interactions. Field observations may provide new opportunities to design and adapt the laboratory scale experiments, while laboratory experiments will help in better interpreting field observations. Together results from field and laboratory will provide insights to test and refine numerical models.

Thus, this session aims to bring together researchers from different communities that on one hand are working in the laboratory to reproduce and on the other hand are using novel field methods to monitor the natural processes in various systems and on various scales.

We welcome contributions but not limited to:
- fluvial and coastal systems
- aeolian processes and arid environments
- systems associated with melting, dissolution and precipitation
- gravity-driven flows
Finally, we particularly encourage participation from students and early career scientists.

Co-organized by NP3
Convener: Pauline Delorme | Co-conveners: Jakob HöllriglECSECS, Katrina Kremer, François MettraECSECS, Cyril Gadal, Anne BaarECSECS, Andrew Gunn
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 16:15
GMPV1.2 EDI

Time is a fundamental variable for the understanding of history and dynamics of Earth and planetary processes. Consequently, precise and accurate determination of crystallisation, deposition, exhumation or exposure ages of geological materials has had, and will continue to have, a key role in the geosciences. In recent years, substantial improvement in spatial and temporal resolution of well-established dating techniques and development of new methods have revealed previously unknown complexity of natural systems and in many cases revolutionised our understanding of rates of fundamental geologic processes.

With this session, we aim to provide a platform to discuss 1) advances in a broad spectrum of geochronological and thermochronological methods (sample preparation, analytical techniques, interpretational and modelling approaches) and 2) applications of such methods to a variety of problems across the Earth sciences, across the geological time and across scales of the process studied. We particularly encourage presentations of novel and unconventional applications or attempts to develop new geo/thermochronometers.

Co-organized by CL1.1/GM2/SSP2/TS9
Convener: Dawid SzymanowskiECSECS | Co-conveners: Cody CollepsECSECS, Lorenzo TavazzaniECSECS, Marie GengeECSECS, Catherine Mottram, Maxime BernardECSECS, Perach Nuriel
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
HS9.1 EDI

Obtaining quantitative information on the spatial pattern of soil redistribution during storms and on the spatial sources supplying sediment to rivers is required to improve our understanding of the processes controlling these transfers and to design effective control measures. It is also crucial to quantify the transfer or the residence times of material transiting rivers along the sediment cascade, and to reconstruct the potential changes in sources that may have occurred at various temporal scales. During the last few decades, several sediment tracing or fingerprinting techniques have contributed to provide this information, in association with other methods (including soil erosion modelling and sediment budgeting). However, their widespread application is limited by several challenges that the community should address as priorities.
We invite specific contributions to this session that address any aspects of the following:
• Developments of innovative field measurement and sediment sampling techniques;
• Soil and sediment tracing techniques for quantifying soil erosion and redistribution;
• Sediment source tracing or fingerprinting studies, using conventional (e.g. elemental/isotopic geochemistry, fallout radionuclides, organic matter) or alternative (e.g. colour, infrared, particle morphometry) approaches;
• Investigations of the current limitations associated with sediment tracing studies (e.g. tracer conservativeness, uncertainty analysis, particle size and organic matter corrections);
• Applications of radioisotope tracers to quantify sediment transit times over a broad range of timescales (from the flood to the century);
• The association of conventional techniques with remote sensing and emerging technologies (e.g. LiDAR);
• Integrated approaches to developing catchment sediment budgets: linking different measurement techniques and/or models to understand sediment delivery processes.

Co-organized by GM2
Convener: Olivier Evrard | Co-conveners: Hugh Smith, Núria Martínez-Carreras, Leticia Gaspar
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.44
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall A
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Wed, 08:30
SM5.2 EDI

Geophysical imaging techniques are widely used to characterize structures and processes in the shallow subsurface. Methods include imaging using P-wave seismic but also S-wave and multi-component techniques, (complex) electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar methods, as well as passive monitoring based on ambient noise or electrical self-potentials. Advances in experimental design, instrumentation, data acquisition, data processing, numerical modelling, and inversion constantly push the limits of spatial and temporal resolution. Despite these advances, the interpretation of geophysical images and properties often remains ambiguous. Persistent challenges addressed in this session include optimal data acquisition strategies, (automated) data processing and error quantification, appropriate spatial and temporal regularization of model parameters, integration of non-geophysical measurements and geological realism into the imaging process, joint inversion, as well as the quantitative interpretation of tomograms through suitable petro-physical relations.

In light of these topics, we invite submissions concerning a broad spectrum of near-surface geophysical imaging methods and applications at different spatial and temporal scales. Novel developments in the combination of complementary measurement methods, machine learning, and process-monitoring applications are particularly welcome.

Co-organized by EMRP2/GM2
Convener: Florian WagnerECSECS | Co-conveners: Ellen Van De VijverECSECS, James Irving, Frédéric Nguyen, Sonja Halina WadasECSECS, Cesare Comina, Thomas Burschil
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room G2
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall GMPV/G/GD/SM
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 08:30

GM3 – Weathering, Soils, and Sediment Transport

Programme group scientific officer: Kristen Cook

GM3.1

Mountain belts are characterized by the fastest rates of physical erosion and chemical weathering around the world, making them one of the best places to observe sediment production (e.g. erosion, weathering) and transport processes. In these settings, varied processes such as rockfall, debris flow, hillslope failure, glacial and periglacial erosion, fluvial erosion, transport and deposition, and chemical weathering operate, often simultaneously, over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales.

As a result, tracking the interactions between denudation, climatic forcing, tectonic activity, vegetation and land use is complex. However, these feedbacks affect both long- and short-term natural surface processes, landscape development, and human interactions with the environment. Many of these processes also pose serious threats to the biosphere, mountain settlements and infrastructure. Therefore, understanding and quantifying rates of erosion, weathering, and deposition within mountain landscapes is a challenging, but crucial research topic in Earth surface processes.

We welcome contributions that (1) investigate the processes of production, mobilisation, transport, and deposition of sediment in mountain landscapes, (2) explore feedbacks between erosion and weathering due to natural and anthropogenic forcings, and (3) consider how these processes contribute to natural hazards specific to mountain landscapes. We invite presentations that employ observational, analytical or modeling approaches in mountain environments across a variety of temporal and spatial scales. We particularly encourage early career scientists to apply for this session.

Convener: Erica ErlangerECSECS | Co-conveners: Jesse ZondervanECSECS, Ron NativECSECS, Laure Guerit, Apolline MariottiECSECS, Eric DealECSECS, Romano Clementucci
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:42 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 16:15
GM3.2 EDI | PICO

Sediment transport is a fundamental component of all geomorphic systems (including fluvial, aeolian, coastal, hillslopes and glacial), yet it is something that we still find surprisingly difficult both to monitor and to model. Robust data on where and how sediment transport occurs are needed to address outstanding research questions, including the spatial and temporal controls on critical shear stress, the influence of varying grain size distributions, and the impact of large magnitude events. Recent developments have provided a) new opportunities for measuring sediment transport in the field; and b) new ways to represent sediment transport in both physical laboratory models and in numerical models. These developments include (but are not limited to) the application of techniques such as seismic and acoustic monitoring, 3D imaging (e.g. CT and MRI scanning), deployment of sensors such as accelerometers, replication of field topography using 3D printing, use of luminescence as a sediment tracer, remote sensing of turbidity, discrete numerical modelling, and new statistical approaches.

In this session we welcome contributions from all areas of geomorphology that develop new methods for monitoring and modelling all types of sediment transport, or that showcase an application of such methods. Contributions from ECRs and underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged.

Co-organized by GI5/NH1
Convener: Rebecca Hodge | Co-conveners: Kristen Cook, Catherine Sanders, Benedetta DiniECSECS, Laure Guerit
PICO
| Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 3a
Wed, 08:30
GM3.3 EDI

Landslide susceptibility, the spatial likelihood of occurrence of landslides, is the subject of countless scientific publications. They use heterogeneous data, and apply many different methods, mostly falling under the definition of statistical and/or machine learning with the common feature of considering many input variables and a single target output, denoting landslide presence. It is a classification problem: given N input variables assuming different values, each combination associated with a 0/1 possible outcome, a model should be trained on some dataset, tested, and eventually it applied to unseen data.
Relevant input data (“predictors”, “factors”, “independent variables”) is usually a mixed set of topographic, morphometric, environmental, climatic, and a landslide inventory. Choice of a specific method depends on software availability, personal background, and existence of relevant literature in the area of interest. New methods are proposed regularly and very often is difficult to judge their relative performance based with respect to existing methods.
A meaningful comparison of many different methods would require a common dataset – a benchmark - to train and test each of them in a systematic way. This is a standard procedure in machine learning science and practice, for virtually all the fields: benchmark datasets exist for medical sciences, image recognition, linguistics, and in general any classification algorithm. The “Iris dataset” is a famous example of a benchmark in classification of numerical data into three different variants of the flower Iris. This session aims at establishing one or more benchmark datasets that could be helpful in landslide susceptibility research, to compare the plethora of existing methods and new methods to come.
We propose an interactive session: the organizers will single out benchmark datasets, share them with participants at due time, prior to the conference venue. We expect abstract proposals to describe the method(s) they intend to apply, the type of data it requires, and an independent case study for which the method proved successful. Participants should be ready to disclose minimal computer code (in any major programming language) to run their method, to apply the code to the benchmark dataset prior to the conference, and present their results. We aim at collecting all of the results in a journal publication, including datasets, benchmark and computer codes in collaboration with the participants.
Download dataset at: http://dx.doi.org/10.31223/X52S9C

Public information:

Benchmark dataset described in:

http://dx.doi.org/10.31223/X52S9C

Download dataset at:

https://geomorphology.irpi.cnr.it/tools/slope-units/slope-units-map/dataset_benchmark.zip

Co-organized by ESSI1/NH3
Convener: Massimiliano Alvioli | Co-conveners: Liesbet JacobsECSECS, Marco LocheECSECS, Carlos H. Grohmann
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 10:45
GM3.4 EDI | PICO

A key goal within geomorphic research is understanding the processes linking topographic form, erosion rates, sediment production, transport and deposition, and external forcings such as tectonics, biotic or climatic. Numerical modelling, by allowing the creation of controlled analogues of natural systems, provides exciting opportunities to explore landscape evolution and generate testable predictions.

In this session, we invite contributions that use numerical modelling to investigate landscape evolution in a broad sense, and over a range of spatial and temporal scales. We welcome studies using models to constrain one or more of: erosion rates and processes, sediment production, transport and deposition, and biotic, climatic or tectonic forcings. We also particularly wish to highlight studies that combine numerical modelling with direct Earth surface process monitoring techniques, such as topographic, field, stratigraphic, geophysical or geochronological data. Contributions using numerical models to unravel the interaction between deep processes, such as mantle dynamics, or biotic processes with topographic patterns are further encouraged. There is no geographical restriction: studies may be focused on mountain environments or sedimentary basins, or they may establish links between the two. Studies beyond planet Earth are welcome too.

Convener: Jingtao LaiECSECS | Co-conveners: Kimberly HuppertECSECS, Boris GailletonECSECS, Fiona ClubbECSECS, Jörg Robl
PICO
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 3a
Tue, 08:30
EMRP1.3 EDI

Rock mass deformation and failure at different stress levels (from the brittle regime to the brittle-ductile transition) are controlled by damage processes occurring on different spatial scales, from grain (µm) to geological formation (km) scale. These lead to a progressive increase of micro- and meso-crack intensity in the rock matrix and to the growth of inherited macro-fractures at rock mass scale. Coalescence of these fractures forms large-scale structures such as brittle fault zones, rockslide shear zones, and excavation damage zones (EDZ) in open pit mining and underground construction. Diffuse or localized rock damage have a primary influence on rock properties (strength, elastic moduli, hydraulic and electric properties) and on their evolution across multiple temporal scales spanning from geological time to highly dynamic phenomena as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, slopes and man-made rock structures. In subcritical stress conditions, damage accumulation results in brittle creep processes key to the long-term evolution of geophysical, geomorphological and geo-engineering systems
Damage and progressive failure processes must be considered to understand the time-dependent hydro-mechanical behaviour of fault damage zones and principal slip zones, and their interplay (e.g. earthquakes vs aseismic creep), volcanic systems and slopes (e.g. slow rock slope deformation vs catastrophic rock slides), as well as the response of rock masses to stress perturbations induced by artificial excavations (tunnels, mines) and loading. At the same time, damage processes control the brittle behaviour of the upper crust and are strongly influenced by intrinsic rock properties (strength, fabric, porosity, anisotropy), geological structures and their inherited damage, as well as by the evolving pressure-temperature with increasing depth and by fluid pressure, transport properties and chemistry.
In this session we will bring together researchers from different communities interested in a better understanding of rock deformation and failure processes and consequence, as well as other related rock mechanics topics. We welcome innovative and novel contributions on experimental studies (both in the laboratory and in situ), continuum / micromechanical analytical and numerical modelling, and applications to fault zones, reservoirs, slope instability and landscape evolution, and engineering applications.

Co-organized by GM3/NH3
Convener: Federico Agliardi | Co-conveners: Carolina GiorgettiECSECS, Anne Voigtländer, Christian Zangerl, Patrick Baud, Sergio Vinciguerra
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Mon, 14:00
Tue, 10:45
NH3.2

Large mass movements in rock, debris and ice in glacial masses, represent enormous risks impacting on the socio economic tissue. These complex systems are difficult to describe, investigate, monitor and model. Hence a reliable model of these phenomena requires acquisition and analysis of all the available data. This is the key to support successive steps up to the management of Early Warning systems.
Large instabilities affect all the materials (rock, weak rocks, debris, ice), from low to high altitudes, evolving as slow or fast complex mass movements. This and the complex dependency on forcing factors result in different types and degrees of hazard and risk. Some aspects of these instabilities are still understudied and debated, because of the difficult characterization and few cases thoroughly studied. Regional and temporal distribution and relationships with controlling and triggering factors are poorly understood resulting in poor predictions of their behavior and evolution under present and future climate. Relationships among geological and hydrological boundary conditions and displacements are associated to mechanical controls, hydraulic response and evolution in space and time. Even for well studied and active phenomena warning thresholds are mostly qualitative, based on semi-empirical approaches and do not consider all available data. Then a multidisciplinary approach and a robust set of monitoring data are needed. Many modeling approaches can be applied to evaluate instability and failure, considering triggerings (e.g. rain, seismicity, eruption, snowmelt), failure propagation, leading to rapid mass movements (rock, debris, ice avalanches, flows). Nevertheless, the applied approaches are still phenomenological in most cases and have difficulty to explain the observed behavior. Impacts of such instabilities on structures represents a relevant risk but also an opportunity in terms of investigations and quantitative measurements of effects on structures (e.g. tunnels, dams, roads). Design of these structures and knowledge of their expected performance represent an important element.
We invite all the researchers to present case studies, sharing views and data, to discuss monitoring and modeling approaches and tools, to introduce new approaches for thresholds definition, including advanced numerical modeling, Machine Learning for streamline and offline data analyses, development of monitoring tools and dating or investigation techniques.

Co-organized by GM3
Convener: Giovanni Crosta | Co-conveners: Christian Zangerl, Irene ManzellaECSECS
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 1.15/16
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall NH
Orals |
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 08:30
NH3.5 EDI

Rockfalls, rockslides and rock avalanches are among the primary hazards and drivers of landscape evolution in steep terrain. The physics of rock slope degradation and dynamics of failure and transport mechanisms define the hazards and possible mitigation strategies and enable retrodictions and predictions of events and controls.

This session aims to bring together state-of-the-art methods for predicting, assessing, quantifying, and protecting against rock slope hazards across spatial and temporal scales. We seek innovative contributions from investigators dealing with all stages of rock slope hazards, from weathering and/or damage accumulation, through detachment, transport and deposition, and finally to the development of protection and mitigation measures. In particular, we seek studies presenting new theoretical, numerical or probabilistic modelling approaches, novel data sets derived from laboratory, in situ, or remote sensing applications, and state-of-the-art approaches to social, structural, or natural protection measures. We especially encourage contributions from geomechanics/rock physics, geodynamics, geomorphology and tectonics to better understand how rockfall, rockslides and rock avalanches act across scales.

Co-organized by GM3
Convener: Axel Volkwein | Co-conveners: Michael Krautblatter, Anne Voigtländer
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 1.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 10:45
SSS11.3 EDI | PICO

A well-designed experiment is a crucial methodology in Soil Science, Geomorphology and Hydrology.
Depending on the specific research topic, a great variety of temporal and spatial scales is addressed.
From raindrop impact and single particle detachment to the shaping of landscapes: experiments are designed and conducted to illustrate problems, clarify research questions, develop and test hypotheses, generate data and deepen process understanding.
Every step involved in design, construction, conduction, processing and interpretation of experiments and experimental data might be a challenge on itself, and discussions within the community can be a substantial and fruitful component for both, researchers and teachers.
This PICO session offers a forum for experimentalists, teachers, students and enthusiasts.
We invite you to present your work, your questions, your results and your method, to meet, to discuss, to exchange ideas and to consider old and new approaches.
Join the experimentalists!

Co-organized by EOS2/GM3/HS13
Convener: Miriam MarzenECSECS | Co-conveners: Thomas Iserloh, Jorge Isidoro, Petr Kavka, Anette EltnerECSECS
PICO
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
PICO spot 3b
Fri, 08:30
SSS8.10

The present context of accelerated changes in both climate and land use imposes an unprecedent pressure on a number of vulnerable ecosystems including wetlands, forests and rangelands, in which vegetation closely interacts and coevolves with soils and landforms. Complex interactions between climate, soils and biotic factors are involved in the development of landform-soil-vegetation feedbacks and play an important role in making ecosystems resilient to disturbances. In addition, large shifts in the distribution of vegetation and soils are associated with losses of ecosystem services (including carbon capture), frequently involving thresholds of ecosystem stability and nonlinear responses to both human and climatic pressures.

This session looks back on the successful and exciting sessions on landform-soil-vegetation coevolution and ecosystem stability annually held at EGU since 2013 and will focus on ecogeomorphological and ecohydrological aspects of landscapes and wathersheds (including their connectivity), the conservation of both soil and water resources, and the restoration of ecosystem services and functions.

We welcome theoretical, modelling and empirical studies as well as scaling approaches from the soil profile to the landscape scale addressing soil structure and its functions, including carbon and nutrient cycling, the distribution of vegetation and their coevolving landforms, and also contributions with a wide appreciation of the soil erosion-vegetation relationships that rule the formation of broad, landscape-level spatial organization. We also welcome studies describing the implications of these spatial patterns for the resilience, stability and restoration of ecosystems under the pressure of climate change and/or human disturbances.

We are proud to announce that Prof. Susana Bautista (Head of the Ramon Margalef Multidisciplinary Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Alicante, Spain) has agreed to participate in the session with the invited talk "Within-patch plant diversity modulates the hydrological source-sink dynamics of dryland landscapes".

Co-organized by BG3/GM3
Convener: Mariano Moreno de las Heras | Co-conveners: Patricia Saco, Peng ShiECSECS, Omer Yetemen, Siyu CaiECSECS, Hu Liu, Jose Rodriguez
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room -2.20
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSS
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 14:00
Mon, 14:00
EMRP1.5 EDI

This session comprises fracture focused research that spans disciplines and scales but is all intimately linked to coupled Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes and factors. We divide the session into two parts related to shallow and deep processes, respectively.

The first part is focused on progressive rock failure (PRF) and its applications to surface processes, rock physics and engineering research. Because fractures influence the hydromechanical properties of rocks such as porosity, permeability, erodibility and strength, the rock mechanics and rock physics of PRF is intimately linked to virtually all surface and critical zone processes and also extends beyond the natural world to our own built environment. Yet, the potentially central role that PRF may play in these fracture-related systems has been largely unrecognized or misconceived across surface-process, engineering, and rock physics applications.

The second part of the session is related to THMC processes in geothermal reservoirs with focus on the role of fractures and faults on the reservoir performance, its sustainable use and related risks. We invite contributions including: (i) fluid flow, permeability, fluid conductivity; (ii) heat flow, thermal conductivity and diffusivity; (iii) deformation either compression, shear, or tension; seismic or aseismic; (iv) fracture and fault (re)activation and related seismic risks; (v) coupled THM-processes in fractured and intact reservoir rocks.

Public information:

This session comprises fracture focused research that spans disciplines and scales but is all intimately linked to coupled Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes and factors. We divide the session into two parts related to shallow and deep processes, respectively.
 
The first part is focused on progressive rock failure (PRF) and its applications to surface processes, rock physics and engineering research. Because fractures influence the hydromechanical properties of rocks such as porosity, permeability, erodibility and strength, the rock mechanics and rock physics of PRF is intimately linked to virtually all surface and critical zone processes and also extends beyond the natural world to our own built environment. Yet, the potentially central role that PRF may play in these fracture-related systems has been largely unrecognized or misconceived across surface-process, engineering, and rock physics applications. 
 
The second part of the session is related to THMC processes in geothermal reservoirs with focus on the role of fractures and faults on the reservoir performance, its sustainable use and related risks. We invite contributions including: (i)    fluid flow, permeability, fluid conductivity; (ii)    heat flow, thermal conductivity and diffusivity; (iii)    deformation either compression, shear, or tension; seismic or aseismic; (iv)   fracture and fault (re)activation and related seismic risks; (v)    coupled THM-processes in fractured and intact reservoir rocks.

Co-organized by GM3
Convener: Martha-Cary Eppes | Co-conveners: Guido Blöcher, Philip Meredith, Jean Schmittbuhl, Mauro Cacace, Lucille CarbilletECSECS, Sophie KenmareECSECS
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall TS/EMRP
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 10:45

GM4 – Hillslopes, Landscapes and Source to Sink

Programme group scientific officer: Matteo Spagnolo

GM4.2 EDI

Denudational hillslope and fluvial processes, associated source-to-sink fluxes and sedimentary budgets are controlled by a range of environmental drivers and anthropogenic activities, exacerbated by the consequences of climate change. An improved understanding of the key drivers, mechanisms and quantitative rates of contemporary denudational hillslope and fluvial processes as well as of the sediment and hydrological connectivity across a range of different spatio-temporal scales and climatic zones has significant societal implications for water quality, infrastructures, aquatic ecosystems, public safety, and biogeochemical cycles.
This session aims to bring together interdisciplinary scientists working across various field, experimental, numerical modelling, remote sensing and dating approaches that are advancing methods and providing new insights into (i) slope mass movements (e.g., landslides, rockfalls, and debris flows) and related hazard cascades in mountain environments, (ii) water, sediment and solute source-to-sink processes in different climatic zones (e.g., cold climate, temperate, arid and tropical regions) from small headwater to large river systems at event, seasonal, and multi-decadal scales; and (iii) the anthropogenic impacts and societal implications of changing hillslope and fluvial denudation processes and possible solutions for future sustainable management.
We particularly encourage the participation of early-career researchers and PhD students working in the fields of geomorphology, hydrology, hazards, glaciers, permafrost and aquatic ecosystems, as we wish to expand and integrate the international network of researchers addressing this complex subject across scientific disciplines.

This session is co-organized by the IAG Working Group on Denudation and Environmental Changes in Different Morphoclimatic Zones (DENUCHANGE, 2017-2026).

Co-sponsored by IAG
Convener: Achim A. Beylich | Co-conveners: Katja Laute, Olimpiu Pop, Dongfeng LiECSECS, Ana Navas
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 14:00
GM4.3

A source-to-sink approach represents a quantitative and integrated characterization of the processes involved in the production, transport, and deposition of sediments along a sediment routing system (SRS). This approach conceptualizes the SRS as an interconnected system in which external forcings (such as tectonics and climate) generate and propagate signals that might be recorded in the sedimentary record. Such studies aim at re-creating the spatio-temporal framework of the nature and intensity of the perturbations induced along a sedimentary system due to an external forcing. This has important implications for understanding the sensitivity of the Earth’s surface to tectono-environmental changes, for the reconstruction of paleoclimates, and for modeling the future dynamics of sedimentary systems on the planet. In addition, a sediment routing system approach is a vital tool for the effective identification and management of mineral, hydrocarbon, and water resources.

In this session, we invite scientists who study the signal generation and propagation in source to sink systems from a wide range of backgrounds (e.g., sedimentology, geomorphology, geochemistry, remote sensing, and geomodelling), and we encourage studies focusing on provenance, sedimentary budgets, and response timescales. Further, we welcome contributions focusing on environmental changes and disentangling the role between climate and tectonics, including paleoclimatic response, feedback mechanisms, and applied studies, for instance, raw material production and risk analysis associated with sediment generation and transport.

Co-organized by SSP2
Convener: Rocio Jaimes-GutierrezECSECS | Co-conveners: Iwan SetiawanECSECS, Marine PrieurECSECS, Camilo Esteban GaitanECSECS, Philémon JuvanyECSECS
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–17:53 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 08:30
GM4.4 EDI

Connectivity has emerged as a significant conceptual framework for understanding the transfer of water and materials (e.g. sediment, nutrients, POC, large wood, plant propagules) through landscapes. The concept of connectivity has had particular success in the fields of hydrology, fluvial geomorphology and soil erosion, but has also been employed in, for example, studies of hydrochory. Connectivity as applied in various disciplines can be a transformative concept in understanding complex systems, allowing analyses of how such systems behave in terms of scaling, catastrophic/phase transitions, critical nodes, emergence and self-organization, e.g. by applying network-based analyses and modelling. Recent research also highlights the widespread nature of dis-connectivity landscape systems, caused by natural and anthropogenic structures including dams, log jams, or agricultural terraces. These and other forms of dis-connectivity can have large spatial and temporal implications on ecological, geomorphic, hydrological and biogeochemical processes, e.g. through buffering water and material fluxes. We aim to create a diverse interdisciplinary session that reflects a broad range of research seeking to illustrate the role of (dis-)connectivity in landscape systems. We hope to use the session to develop a discussion on the importance of (dis-)connectivity to generate a basis for an integrated framework to be applied across different fields of geosciences (incl. management applications).

Co-sponsored by IAG
Convener: Ronald Pöppl | Co-conveners: Lina Polvi Sjöberg, Laura Turnbull-Lloyd, Anthony Parsons
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 14:00
NH3.11

Landslides, debris flows and avalanches are common types of unsteady bulk mass movements. Globally, the risk from these mass movements is expected to increase, due to changes in precipitation patterns, rising average temperatures and continued urbanisation of mountainous regions. Climate change also reduces the power of site-specific empirically-based predictions, requiring updated approaches for effective and robust management of the associated risk.

Given sustained improvements in computational power, the techniques involving artificial intelligence and explicit hydromechanical modelling are becoming more and more widespread. Both techniques have the advantages of reducing our dependence on empirical approaches. This session thus covers two main domains:

1) New approaches and state-of-the-art artificial intelligence techniques on remote sensing data for creating and updating landslide inventories.
2) Advances in hydromechanical numerical models and digital tools for geophysical mass flows.

The ultimate goal of both is integration into the wider context of hazard and/or risk assessment and mitigation.

Contributions to this session may involve:
(a) Regional scale analysis for landslide detection and applications for establishing multi-temporal inventories.
(b) Data processing, fusion, and data manipulation, as well as novel AI model tuning practices.
(c) Evaluating the quality of landslide detection through AI techniques.
(d) Comparing the performance of different AI segmentation models.
(e) Novel constitutive and hydromechanical modelling of flows, both at the field- and laboratory-scales.
(f) Hydromechanical modelling of the interaction of mass movements with structural countermeasures.
(g) Advances in risk analysis through the integration of digital technologies and multidisciplinary viewpoints (potentially including combining AI and hydromechanical modelling techniques).

Co-organized by ESSI1/GI5/GM4
Convener: Sansar Raj MeenaECSECS | Co-conveners: Saoirse Robin GoodwinECSECS, Lorenzo NavaECSECS, Johan Gaume, Brian McArdell, Oriol Monserrat, Vikas Thakur
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST), 10:45–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room 1.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall NH
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 14:00
NH3.8 EDI

The global increase in damaging landslide events has attracted the attention of governments, practitioners, and scientists to develop functional, reliable and (when possible) low cost monitoring strategies. Numerous case studies have demonstrated how a well-planned monitoring system of landslides is of fundamental importance for long and short-term risk reduction.
Today, the temporal evolution of a landslide is addressed in several ways, encompassing classical and more complex in situ measurements or remotely sensed data acquired from satellite and aerial platforms. All these techniques are adopted for the same final scope: measure landslide motion over time, trying to forecast future evolution or minimally reconstruct its recent past. Real time, near-real time and deferred time strategies can be profitably used for landslide monitoring, depending on the type of phenomenon, the selected monitoring tool, and the acceptable level of risk.
This session follows the general objectives of the International Consortium on Landslides, namely: (i) promote landslide research for the benefit of society, (ii) integrate geosciences and technology within the cultural and social contexts to evaluate landslide risk, and (iii) combine and coordinate international expertise.
Considering these key conceptual drivers, this session aims to present successful monitoring experiences worldwide based on both in situ and/or remotely sensed data. The integration and synergic use of different techniques is welcomed, as well as newly developed tools or data analysis approaches, including big data management strategies. The session is expected to present case studies in which multi-temporal and multi-platform monitoring data are exploited for risk management and Civil Protection aims with positive effects in both social and economic terms. Specific relevance is given to the evaluation of the impact of landslides on cultural heritage.

Co-organized by GM4
Convener: Lorenzo SolariECSECS | Co-conveners: Peter Bobrowsky, Mateja Jemec Auflič, Federico Raspini, Veronica Tofani, Simone MineoECSECS, Massimiliano Bordoni
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 1.34
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 10:45
SSS9.11 EDI

Wildfires are a worldwide phenomenon with many environmental, social, and economic implications, which are expected to escalate as a consequence of climate change and land abandonment, management, and planning, further promoting land degradation and decreasing ecosystem services supply.
The current situation demands from the scientific community the study of wildfire effects on the ecosystems and the development of integrated tools for pre- and post-fire land management practices that reduce the vulnerability to wildfires and their impacts. However, this research urges the attention not only from researchers, but also from stakeholders and policy-makers all over the world, since basic resources such as raw materials, water, and soils as well as habitats are at stake.
This session aims at gathering researchers on the effects of wildfires on ecosystems, from wildfire prevention to post-fire mitigation. We kindly invite laboratory, field, and/or modelling studies involving the following topics:
i. prescribed and/or experimental fires;
ii. fire severity and burn severity;
iii. fire effects on vegetation, soil and water;
iv. post-fire hydrological and erosive response;
v. post-fire management and mitigation;
vi. socio-economic studies on pre- and post-fire land management;
vii. fire risk assessment and modelling.

Co-organized by GM4/NH7
Convener: Antonio Girona-GarcíaECSECS | Co-conveners: Diana VieiraECSECS, Paulo Pereira, Marta BassoECSECS, Ana Rita LopesECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room K2
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall SSS
Orals |
Fri, 16:15
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 10:45
NH3.9 EDI

Mountain regions are a complex system of different glacial and non-glacial environments rapidly adapting to a changing climate. In this context, short-term landscape evolution is affected by, e.g. glacier motion and a variety of mass movements driven by different processes, evolving at different rates and potentially ending in catastrophic failures. In some cases, deposits may block rivers and form landslide dams that might fail and cause flood waves travelling far from the initial source areas. Such cascading events can pose risks to lives, human activities and infrastructures. With the current state of knowledge, it is very challenging to forecast the exact timing, location and magnitude of such events, raising important scientific and societal questions in terms of when, where and how big the next catastrophic failure may be.

In this session, we bring together researchers from different communities interested in a better understanding of the physical processes controlling mass movements and their associated hazards. The main goals are to present: (i) new examples of large catastrophic slope failures, in particular those causing river-damming; (ii) hitherto unpublished inventories of landslide dams, including statistical analyses of datasets and detailed analyses of case studies, which could be included in a Springer book currently being compiled, iii) insights from field observations and/or laboratory experiments; (iv) statistical and/or artificial intelligence methods to identify and map mass movements; (v) new monitoring approaches (in-situ and remote sensing) applied at different spatial and temporal scales; and (vi) models (from conceptual frameworks to advanced numerical models) for the analysis and interpretation of the governing physical processes.
The session also aims at triggering discussions on strategies applicable for hazard assessment and mitigation and on effective countermeasures that can be implemented to increase preparedness and risk reduction.

Co-organized by GM4
Convener: Andrea Manconi | Co-conveners: Anja Dufresne, Federico Agliardi, Andrea Wolter, Xuanmei Fan, Mylene JacquemartECSECS, Chiara CrippaECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room C
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 16:15
NH3.6 EDI

Landslides are ubiquitous geomorphological processes that can have disastrous consequences. Landslides can cause more deaths than any other natural hazard in a number of countries. Predicting landslides is a challenging problem that is important for scientific interest and societal impact because it has the potential to safeguard lives, individual assets, and shared resources. The session's main focus is on cutting-edge approaches and strategies for predicting landslides, including the location, timing, magnitude, and destructiveness of single and multiple slope failures. All landslide types—from fast rockfalls to rapid debris flows, from slow slides to very rapid rock avalanches—are taken into account, from the local to the global scale. Contributions looking at theoretical aspects of predicting natural hazards, with a focus on landslide forecasting, are of interest. These include contributions examining conceptual, mathematical, physical, statistical, numerical, and computational problems, as well as applied contributions showing, with examples, whether it is possible or not to predict individual or multiple landslides, or specific landslide characteristics. Abstracts that evaluate the quality of landslide forecasts, compare the efficiency of various forecasting models, use landslide forecasts in operational systems, and investigate the potential for exploitation of new or emerging technologies, are welcome as well. We anticipate that, in case of a successful session, the most relevant contributions will be collected in the special issue of an international journal.

Co-organized by GM4
Convener: Filippo Catani | Co-conveners: Anne-Laure ArgentinECSECS, Xuanmei Fan, Ugur Ozturk, Hyuck-Jin Park
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room 1.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X4
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall NH
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 16:15

GM5 – Riverine, Estuarine and Deltaic Geomorphology

Programme group scientific officer: Philippe Steer

GM5.1

Fluvial and coastal systems form and evolve on timescales of days to millennia as a result of complex interactions between physical and ecological processes. Understanding geomorphic adjustments requires consideration of boundary conditions that influence upstream and downstream controls, including discharge, sediment, biota, and marine influences such as tidal and wave processes. Seen through a morphological and geological lens, rivers, floodplains, deltas, estuaries, and coastal lagoons span a continuum of accommodation space infilled by clastic and organic sediments. Natural and anthropogenically induced subsidence, hydraulic infrastructure, fluvial and coastal erosion as well as direct removal of sediment and wetlands disrupt natural riparian dynamics and coastal land building processes. A watershed-scale perspective to sustainable riparian management, including adaptation to changing climate and coastal land gain to keep up with rising sea level, requires a systemic understanding of key processes across a range of timescales. We welcome contributions that aim to understand theoretical and applied dimensions of river systems, as well as methodological advances in monitoring and characterizing associated processes and environments. Potential settings span the watershed, including lowland rivers linked to coastal environments. A primary goal of the session is to improve understanding of river and coastal systems using some combination of numerical models, machine learning, laboratory experiments (analogue models), remote sensing, fieldwork, historical data and geological reconstructions. We also welcome multidisciplinary studies that focus on adaptation to future conditions.

Co-organized by SSP1
Convener: Anne BaarECSECS | Co-conveners: Simone Bizzi, Manudeo SinghECSECS, Richard BoothroydECSECS, Paul Hudson, Lisanne BraatECSECS, Muriel BrücknerECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 14:00
GM5.2 EDI

Fluvial systems cover much of the Earth’s surface; they convey water, sediments, and essential nutrients from the uplands to the sea, intermittently transferring these materials from the river channel to the adjacent floodplain. The routing of sediment and water through the channel network initiates complex process-form interactions as the river bed and banks adjust to changes in flow conditions. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the landform-driven morphodynamic interactions taking place within the channel that ultimately determine patterns of sedimentation and changes of channel form. Furthermore, an understanding of how these process-form interactions scale with the size of the fluvial system is also currently lacking. Recent technological and methodological advances now afford us the opportunity to study and to quantify these process-form interactions in detail across a range of spatial and temporal scales.
This session aims to bring together interdisciplinary researchers working across field, experimental, and numerical modelling approaches who are advancing methods and providing new insights into: (i) sediment transport and morphodynamic functioning of fluvial systems, (ii) evaluating morphological change at variable spatial and temporal scales, such as at event vs. seasonal scales, and (iii) investigating the sedimentology of these river systems. We particularly welcome applications which investigate the morphodynamic response of fluvial systems in all types and sizes and we would specifically like to encourage submissions from early career researchers and students.

Convener: Eliisa Lotsari | Co-conveners: Joshua Ahmed, László BertalanECSECS, Christopher Hackney
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–17:45 (CEST)
 
Room D3
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Thu, 14:00
Thu, 08:30
GM5.5 EDI

Biogeomorphology addresses the two-way interaction between abiotic and biotic elements that shape landscapes at various spatio-temporal scales.

One key biogeomorphic interaction happens in fluvial ecosystems between wood, flow and sediment. Many river systems show disruptions in their natural wood regime and consequently deficits in habitat structures, biodiversity, and ecosystem functions. Large wood (LW) jams create upstream regions of slower, deepened water that may enable deposition and storage of nutrients. In addition, downstream regions of faster flow are created as flow diverges around LW jams and may increase transport of bedload sediment and aid flushing of fine particles from clogged gravels. During floods, the amount of transported LW may increase, jams can form at river infrastructure thus posing an additional flood risk. LW mobility is also important in the carbon cycle. Having highlighted the multiple active functions that LW may have on energy and matter fluxes, a cross-disciplinary effort is required to improve our understanding of the complex interactions of wood with flow and sediment in fluvial ecosystems.

Across all landscapes and ecosystems, investigation of biogeomorphic feedbacks remains poorly understood and quantitatively constrained. Improved understanding of abiotic-biotic interaction across scales improves the scientific basis for environmental management aiding climate change mitigation and adaptation, response to natural hazards, and design of nature-based solutions to increase system resilience.

This session combines the investigation of wood-flow-sediment interactions in fluvial ecosystems with a general biogeomorphic perspective on biotic-abiotic feedbacks across all landscapes and ecosystems. It aims for a broad representation of the scientific communities focusing on geomorphic, hydraulic, ecological, and human aspects associated with wood in rivers and biogeomorphology. We invite presenters to share recent scientific advances in our understanding and management of wood in fluvial ecosystems using field, laboratory, or numerical approaches. Likewise, we provide a platform for all aspects of biogeomorphology, including fundamental science and applied studies. This year we specifically invite contributions focusing on both the short (process-scale) and longer-terms (> centennial) relevance of biogeomorphology to the carbon cycle.

Co-organized by NH1, co-sponsored by AGU
Convener: Isabella SchalkoECSECS | Co-conveners: Christian MohrECSECS, Francesco CaponiECSECS, Jana EichelECSECS, Elizabeth FollettECSECS, Annegret LarsenECSECS, Ingo Schnauder
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 14:00
HS1.2.2 EDI

Water is our planet’s most vital resource, and the primary agent in some of the biggest hazards facing society and nature. Recent extreme heat and flood events are clear demonstrations of how our planet’s climate is changing, underlining the significance of water both as a threat and as an increasingly volatile resource.
The accurate and timely measurement of streamflow is therefore more critical than ever to enable the management of water for ecology, for people and industry, for flood risk management and for understanding changes to the hydrological regime. Despite this, effective monitoring networks remain scarce, under-resourced, and often under threat on a global scale. Even where they exist, observational networks are increasingly inadequate when faced with extreme conditions, and lack the precision and spatial coverage to fully represent crucial aspects of the hydrological cycle.

This session aims to tackle this problem by inviting presentations that demonstrate new and improved methods and approaches to streamflow monitoring, including:
1) Innovative methodologies for measuring/modelling/estimating river stream flows;
2) Real-time acquisition of hydrological variables;
3) Remote sensing and earth observation techniques for hydrological & morphological monitoring;
4) Measurement in extreme conditions associated with the changing climate;
5) Measurement of sudden-onset extreme flows associated with catastrophic events;
6) Strategies to quantify and describe hydro-morphological evolution of rivers;
7) New methods to cope with data-scarce environments;
8) Inter-comparison of innovative & classical models and approaches;
9) Evolution and refinement of existing methods;
10) Guidelines and standards for hydro-morphological streamflow monitoring;
11) Quantification of uncertainties;
12) Development of expert networks to advance methods.

Contributions are welcome with an emphasis on innovation, efficiency, operator safety, and meeting the growing challenges associated with the changing climate, and with natural and anthropogenically driven disasters such as dam failures and flash floods.

Additionally, presentations will be welcomed which explore options for greater collaboration in advancing river flow methods and which link innovative research to operational monitoring.

Public information:

A session examining all the latest methods for measurement of streamflow, for floods, droughts and everything in between.

Co-organized by GM5
Convener: Nick Everard | Co-conveners: Alexandre Hauet, Anette EltnerECSECS, Silvano F. Dal Sasso, Alonso Pizarro
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.15
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall HS
Orals |
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 14:00
HS9.3 EDI

Sedimentary processes in aquatic environments, including erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment by hydrodynamic mechanisms, are key features for various research disciplines, e.g., geomorphology and paleoclimatology or hydraulics, river engineering and water resources management and hydrology. Accurate quantification of erosion, transport, and deposition rates, conditioning river channel morphology, and bed composition, is fundamental for adequate development of conceptual sediment budget models and for the calibration and validation of the numerical tools.
The main goal of this session is to bring together the community of scientists, scholars, and engineers, investigating, teaching, and applying novel measurement techniques, numerical modelling and monitoring concepts, which are crucial in determining sedimentary and hydro-morphological processes in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs, estuaries as well as in coastal and maritime environments. It focuses on the quantification of bedload and suspended load, bedforms migration, channel horizontal migration, bed armouring and colmation, but also the transport mode, flocculation, settling, and re-suspension of the sediment particles.
Contributions are welcome with a particular focus on single and combined measurement techniques and numerical modelling, post-processing methods as well as on innovative and advanced monitoring concepts for field and laboratory applications. We welcome contributions containing recent results in a temporal and spatial scale on sediment budgets as well as on sedimentary and morpho-dynamic processes in open water environments.

Co-organized by GM5
Convener: Slaven ConevskiECSECS | Co-conveners: Bernhard Vowinckel, Michele TrevissonECSECS, Wendy GonzalezECSECS, Katharina BaumgartnerECSECS, Kordula Schwarzwälder
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.44
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall HS
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 14:00

GM6 – Coastal and Submarine Geomorphology

Programme group scientific officer: Andrea Zerboni

GM6.1

Examining the morphodynamics of coasts from the nearshore through to inland dune systems, is a fundamental requirement in understanding their short- to long-term behaviour. Operating across large spatial and temporal scales, examination of their resulting landforms is both difficult and complex. Recent methodological advances, however, now enable traditionally isolated coastal disciplines to be examined across various zones, promoting integration along multiple time and space scales, helping to couple processes with landform responses.

At the coast, dunes provide a physical barrier to flooding during high energy storms, while beaches and nearshore areas help dissipate storm impact through a series of dynamic interactions involving sediment transfers and sometimes rapid morphological changes. Examination of complex interactions between these three interconnected systems has become essential for the understanding, analysis and ultimately, the management of our coasts.

This session welcomes contributions from coastal scientists interested in the measurement and modelling of physical processes and responses within the three sub-units over various spatial and temporal scales. It will highlight the latest scientific developments in our understanding of this part of the planet's geomorphic system and will facilitate knowledge exchange between the submerged (e.g., nearshore waves, currents, and sediment transport) and sub-aerial (e.g., beach and aeolian dune dynamics) zones.

Convener: Emilia Guisado-Pintado | Co-conveners: Derek Jackson, Irene Delgado-Fernandez, Susana Costas, Melanie Biausque, Edoardo Grottoli
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 10:45
Wed, 10:45
GM6.2 EDI

Coastal wetland ecosystems, such as salt marshes, mangroves, seagrass beds and tidal flats, are under increasing pressure from natural and anthropogenic processes shifting climatic conditions, and are declining in area and habitat quality globally. These environments provide numerous ecosystem services, including flood risk mediation, biodiversity provision and climate change mitigation through carbon storage. Hence, the need to get a deeper understanding of processes and interactions in these environments, and how these may be altered by climate change has never been greater. This is the case for ‘managed’, restored wetlands and natural systems alike.
This session will bring together studies of coastal wetland ecosystems across climates and geomorphic settings, to enhance the understanding of ecosystem service provisioning, interactions between hydrodynamics, sediment and ecology, and identify best future management practices. Studies of all processes occurring within coastal wetlands are invited. This includes, but is not exclusive to, sediment dynamics, hydrology, hydrodynamics, biogeochemistry, morphological characterisation, geotechnical analysis, bio-morphodynamics, ecological change and evolution, impact of climate change, sea level rise, anthropogenic and management implications. Multidisciplinary approaches across spatial and temporal scales are encouraged, especially in relation to global climate change. This session aims to enhance our understanding of basic processes governing coastal wetland dynamics and to propose sustainable management solutions for contemporary environmental pressures.

Convener: Mark Schuerch | Co-conveners: Christian Schwarz, Helen BrooksECSECS
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
GM6.3 EDI

The ocean floor hosts a tremendous variety of landforms that reflect the action of a range of tectonic, sedimentary, oceanographic and biological processes at multiple spatio-temporal scales. Many such processes present hazards to coastal populations and offshore installations, and their understanding constitutes a key objective of national and international research programmes and IODP expeditions. Recent advances in geophysical imaging, scientific ocean drilling, and seafloor instrumentation have increased the understanding of offshore geohazards; however, significant knowledge gaps remain in understanding the timing and interplay of geological processes at the origin of geohazards. High quality bathymetry, especially when combined with sub-seafloor and/or seabed measurements, provides an exciting opportunity to integrate the approaches of geomorphology and geophysics, as well as to extend quantitative geomorphology offshore and to integrate it into hazard analysis. 3D seismic reflection data has also given birth to the discipline of seismic geomorphology, which has provided a 4D perspective to continental margin evolution.

This interdisciplinary session aims to examine the causes and consequences of geomorphic processes shaping underwater landscapes, including submarine erosion and depositional processes, submarine landslides and canyons, sediment transfer and deformation, volcanic activity, fluid migration and escape, faulting and folding, and other processes acting at the seafloor. The general goal of the session is to bring together researchers who characterise the shape of past and present seafloor features, seek to understand the sub-surface and surface processes at work and their impacts, or use bathymetry and/or 3D seismic data as a model input, as well as to promote cooperation between different parties (academic, industrial, and governmental) involved in geohazard research and management. Contributions to this session can include work from any depth or physiographic region, e.g. oceanic plateaus, abyssal hills, mid-ocean ridges, accretionary wedges, and continental margins (from continental shelves to abyssal plains), as well as from lakes. Datasets of any scale, from satellite-predicted depth to ultra-high-resolution swath bathymetry, sub-surface imaging and sampling, are anticipated.

This session is co-organised by the IAG Submarine Geomorphology Working Group.