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EMRP

EMRP – Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics

MAL21/EMRP
Conveners: Angelo De Santis, Fabio Florindo
Abstract
| Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room K1
MAL23/EMRP
Conveners: Angelo De Santis, Fabio Florindo
Abstract
| Mon, 08 Apr, 19:00–20:00
 
Room K1
DM5/EMRP ECS
Conveners: Angelo De Santis, Fabio Florindo
Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45–13:45
 
Room L6

EMRP1 – Rock Physics

EMRP1.3

The characterisation of linked physical properties such as elasticity, strength and permeability from outcrop to crustal scales is complicated by heterogeneity, fabric anisotropy and damage in so-called “intact rock” and by geological structure and inherited fracturing in the bulk “rock mass”. Rocks can behave as continuous or discontinuous media depending on the scale of consideration and the occurrence of discrete structures (e.g. fault zones). Moreover, rock properties and inherited geological features constrain mechanical damage processes resulting in rock mass weakening, altered permeability and hydro-mechanical coupling between rock and fluids, development of brittle shear zones, and time-dependent behavior (creep).
Despite major experimental, theoretical and modelling advances, a remaining future goal is to develop meaningful, testable methods and models that allow us to quantify the relationships between fabrics and fractures related to the geomechanical behavior of rocks on different scales and in different environmental conditions (P, T, stress, strain rate, fluids). This is critical in order to unravel the complex evolution and dynamics of the Earth’s crust, and develop predictive capabilities for geohazard and energy applications.
In this session we will bring together researchers from different communities, working on problems related to quantifying the hydro-geomechanical properties and behavior of rock masses considered either as continua or discontinua. We will explore their geological controls from the micro- to macro-scale, in a range of crustal environments and geological and geohazard applications (e.g. understanding fluid movement and hydrothermal systems at volcanoes, fluid pressure and damage evolution within fault zones. rock slope instability and related geomorphic impacts, fractured reservoir exploitation, subsidence due to drainage, induced seismicity), using experimental and numerical approaches in the laboratory and the field. We especially welcome studies that adopt novel approaches and combined methodologies.

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Co-organized as NH3.33
Convener: Federico Agliardi | Co-conveners: Michael Heap, Andrea Regina Biedermann, David Healy, Sergio Vinciguerra, Fabian Wadsworth, Christian Zangerl, Jackie E. Kendrick
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15, 10:45–12:30, 14:00–15:45
 
Room K2
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X2
SC1.42

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Please, send registration info (your name and e-mail address to Marina Karsanina: marina.karsanina@gmail.com), this is necessary to estimate the number of participants and redistribute training materials and software prior to the course!
Also note that you will need a laptop (preferably fully charged) for practical work.

Motivation: In numerous scientific areas dealing with flow and transport in porous media such as hydrology, soil and rock physics, petroleum engineering, X-ray microtomography (XCT) is the key tool to obtain information on rock/soil structure under study. If structural information is obtained, one can utilize so-called pore-scale modelling to simulate fluid flow directly in the pore space of the 3D porous media images. Even the simplest workflow to simulate single phase flow and compute permeability requires a number of steps, image processing including segmentation and solution of the Stokes equation in 3D geometry being the most critical or time consuming. Recent developments in the field of pore-scale modelling allow to perform decent simulations using a modern personal computer, but such tools are still not widespread in routine research work.

Aim: To provide an introduction and basic tools to perform all necessary steps from X-ray microtomography images to single-phase flow simulations.

Plan: 1) Introduction to 3D imaging, image processing and pore-scale modelling (20 min.); 2) Overview of available software/solutions and typical problems (10 min.); 3) Description of solutions developed by our group and available to the public (10 min.); 4) Hands-on image processing and segmentation (30 min.); 5) Hands-on single phase flow modelling (20 min.); 6) Interpretation and visualization of results (20 min.); 7) Interactive session with questions (5 min.).
For all hands-on sessions you will use free software developed by our research group (FaT iMP) and some other freely available packages. All necessary materials, including sample XCT images, will be distributed by organizers prior to the course.

What will you learn: 1) The basics of porous media imaging, 2) how to prepare and crop XCT images for pore-scale modelling, 3) how to segment images using current state-of-the-art local thresholding techniques, 4) how to simulate single phase flow and compute permeability of porous media samples from 3D images.
At the end of the course you will be able to simulate single-phase flow based on grey-scale XCT images of porous media.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.7/HS12.14/SSS13.37
Convener: Marina Karsanina | Co-conveners: Kirill Gerke, Efim Lavrukhin
Programme
| Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room -2.85
TS2.2

The advent of novel technologies have boosted our capability of acquiring new evidences that faults behavior is various and extremely sensitive to a large number of parameters. These evidences are supported in natural earthquakes by the occurence of a large pletora of events spanning from slow to fast earthquakes, precursory slips, non volcanic tremors and low frequency earthquakes. The aim of this session is to convey interdisciplinary studies on fault behaviour and processes controlling the propagation of slip instabilities in rocks, granular materials and/or laboratory analogs; we invite contributions at the frontiers between Rock Mechanics, Models, Seismology, Tectonics and Mineralogy dealing with either slow, fast or transient evolution of earthquakes and earthquake sequences in shallow and deep environments; we welcome studies performed at the laboratory and field scale, providing insights on earthquake evolution and/or constraining observed seismological statistical laws like Omori’s and Gutenberg-Richter’s; we welcome innovative techniques that help the observations and take advantage of high-speed imaging and continuous acoustic emission streaming data.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.9/GMPV7.25/SM2.9
Convener: Marco Maria Scuderi | Co-conveners: Giulio Di Toro, Pierre Dublanchet, Francois Passelegue, Elena Spagnuolo
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room K2
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X2
SM2.5

The mechanics of earthquakes is controlled by a spectrum of processes covering a wide range of length scales, from tens of kilometres down to few nanometres. For instance, while the geometry of the fault/fracture network and its physical properties control the global stress distribution and the propagation/arrest of the seismic rupture, earthquake nucleation and fault weakening is governed by frictional processes occurring within extremely localized sub-planar slipping zones. The co-seismic rheology of the slipping zones themselves depends on deformation mechanisms and dissipative processes active at the scale of the grain or asperity. If this is the case of shallow earthquakes, the nucleation of intermediate and deep earthquakes remains enigmatic since it occurs at elevated ambient pressure-temperature conditions which should favour plastic deformation and suppress frictional processes. Though, recent studies on fault rocks of Earth’s lower crust and upper mantle reveal microstructures comparable to those associated with co-seismic slip and off-fault damage in brittle rocks. The study of such complex multiscale systems requires an interdisciplinary approach spanning from structural geology to seismology, geophysics, petrology, rupture modelling and experimental rock deformation. In this session we aim to convene contributions dealing with different aspects of earthquake mechanics at various depths and scales such as:
· the thermo-hydro-mechanical processes associated to co-seismic fault weakening based on rock deformation experiments, numerical simulations and microstructural studies of fault rocks;

· the study of natural and experimental fault rocks to investigate the nucleation mechanisms of intermediate and deep earthquakes in comparison to their shallow counterparts;

· the elastic, frictional and transport properties of fault rocks from the field (geophysical and hydrogeological data) to the laboratory scale (petrophysical and rock deformation studies);

· the internal architecture of seismogenic fault zones from field structural survey and geophysical investigations (e.g. seismic, electric and electromagnetic methods);

· the modeling of earthquake ruptures, off-fault dynamic stress fields and long-term mechanical evolution of realistic fault networks;

· the earthquake source energy budget and partitioning between fracture, friction and elastic wave radiation from seismological, theoretical and field observations.

· the interplay between fault geometry and earthquake rupture characteristics (e.g. coseismic slip and rupture velocity distribution) from seismological, geodetic, remote sensed or field observations;

We particularly welcome novel observations or innovative approaches to the study of earthquake faulting. Contributions from early career scientists are solicited.

Solicited oral presentation: Matthew Tarling (University of Otago)

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Co-organized as EMRP1.20/TS5.8
Convener: Sarah Incel | Co-conveners: Stefano Aretusini, Matteo Demurtas, Michele Fondriest, Francois Passelegue
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room -2.21
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2
ERE6.2

Thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes in geological settings are of increasing interest in different geo-scientific fields. This is especially the case within current research applied to exploration and usage of natural and mineral resources from the underground. This session is intended as a scientific platform to present and discuss studies focused on various kinds of processes relevant for geo-energy related applications. These comprise, but are not limited to, enhanced oil recovery, aquifer storage, and hydro- and enhanced geothermal applications. Therefore, we invite contributions ranging from innovative laboratory experiments, analytical solutions and mathematical model applications to the discussion of an improved way to understand the history, current state as well as future performance of reservoirs.
More specifically, we welcome contributions dealing with analysis and quantification of: (i) fluid flow, permeability, fluid conductivity; (ii) electrical properties, conductivity, resistivity and permittivity in both real and complex domains; (iii) heat flow, geothermal states, thermal conductivity and diffusivity; (iv) transport of energy by elastic waves, their velocities and the dispersion of compression, shear and other types of elastic waves; and (v) mechanical properties of fractured and intact rock materials. Contributions on coupling mechanisms of THMC-processes in fractured and intact reservoir rocks are of special interest.
This session is intended to provide an overview of current research activities in this field. By discussing advances and challenges in quantifying coupled physical processes in geological settings and their implications it aims to stimulate new ideas for future work.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.41
Convener: Guido Blöcher | Co-conveners: Ludovic Bodet, Mauro Cacace, Damien Jougnot, Harald Milsch
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room 0.94
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X1
GD7.1

The goal of this session is to reconcile short-time/small-scale and long-time/large-scale observations, including geodynamic processes such as subduction, collision, rifting or mantle lithosphere interactions. Despite the remarkable advances in experimental rock mechanics, the implications of rock-mechanics data for large temporal and spatial scale tectonic processes are still not straightforward, since the latter are strongly controlled by local lithological stratification of the lithosphere, its thermal structure, fluid content, tectonic heritage, metamorphic reactions and deformation rates.

Mineral reactions have mechanical effects that may result in the development of pressure variations and thus are critical for interpreting microstructural and mineral composition observations. Such effects may fundamentally influence element transport properties and rheological behavior.
Here, we encourage presentations focused on the interplay between metamorphic processes and deformation on all scales, on the rheological behavior of crustal and mantle rocks and time scales of metamorphic reactions in order to discuss
(1) how and when up to GPa-level differential stress and pressure variations can be built and maintained at geological timescales and modelling of such systems,
(2) deviations from lithostatic pressure during metamorphism: fact or fiction?,
(3) the impact of deviations from lithostatic pressure on geodynamic reconstructions.
(4) the effect of porous fluid and partial melting on the long-term strength.
We therefore invite the researchers from different domains (rock mechanics, petrographic observations, geodynamic and thermo-mechanical modelling) to share their views on the way forward for improving our knowledge of the long-term rheology and chemo-thermo-mechanical behavior of the lithosphere and mantle.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.61/GMPV7.8/TS3.6
Convener: Yury Podladchikov | Co-conveners: Shun-ichiro Karato, Magdalena Scheck-Wenderoth, Lucie Tajčmanová
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30, 14:00–15:45, 16:15–18:00
 
Room D2
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X2
ERE6.4

The presence of fractures, whether natural or induced, has become increasingly important in recent years in the exploitation of Earth’s natural resources. Especially in rocks that have a low matrix permeability, the presence of fractures is critical for reaching flow rates sufficient for economic hydrocarbon production and heat extraction for geothermal reservoirs. Better prediction of subsurface fracture arrangements and their mechanical and flow response have become an increasingly relevant field of research.
We propose here a multi-disciplinary session on the arrangement and mechanical evolution of natural and induced fracture networks and their response to fluid flow in low-permeability rocks on a multitude of scales (from pore-scale to basin-scale). We encourage submissions from experimental, numerical and field studies on fracture network formation and control on fluid flow of naturally and hydraulically fractured systems. Also studies that address the role of fractures on both shale gas and tight geothermal reservoir application cases are welcomed. We especially encourage early-career scientists to present their work in this session.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.71/TS2.5
Convener: Richard Bakker | Co-conveners: Auke Barnhoorn, Jan Borgomano, Ismay Vénice Akker
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X1
GD8.1 | PICO

Geological and geophysical data provide quantitative information which permit the advancement of our understanding of the present, and past, interior of the Earth. Examples of such processes span from the internal structure of the Earth, plate kinematics, composition of geomaterials, estimation of physical conditions and dating of key geological events, thermal state of the Earth to more shallow processes such as reservoir geomechanics, or nuclear waste storage.

A quantitative understanding of the dynamics and the feedbacks between geological processes requires the integration of geological data with process oriented numerical models. Innovative inverse methods, linking forward dynamic models with observables, are topics of growing interest within the community. Improving our knowledge of the governing physical parameters can thus be addressed while reconciling models and observables.

Resolving the interactions between various processes occurring at scales differing from each other over several orders of magnitude in space and time represents a computational challenge. Hence, simulating such coupled, nonlinear physics-based forward models requires both the development of new approaches and the enhancement of established numerical schemes.

The majority of geological processes combine several physical mechanisms such as hydrological, thermal, chemical and mechanical processes (e.g. thermo-mechanical convection). Understanding the tight couplings among those processes represents a challenging and essential research direction. The development of novel numerical modelling approaches, which resolve multi-physics feedbacks, is vital in order to provide accurate predictions and gain deeper understanding of geological processes.

We invite contributions from the following two complementary themes:

#1 Computational advances associated with
- alternative spatial and/or temporal discretisations for existing forward/inverse models
- scalable HPC implementations of new and existing methodologies (GPUs / multi-core)
- solver and preconditioner developments
- code and methodology comparisons (“benchmarks”)
- open source implementations for the community

#2 Physics advances associated with
- development of partial differential equations to describe geological processes
- inverse and adjoint-based methods
- numerical model validation through comparison with natural observations and geophysical data
- scientific insights enabled by 2D and 3D modelling
- utilisation of coupled models to address nonlinear interactions

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Co-organized as EMRP1.81/SM7.6/TS11.6
Convener: Thibault Duretz | Co-conveners: Boris Kaus, Dave May, Ludovic Räss
PICOs
| Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
PICO spot 3
ERE6.5

Numerous cases of induced/triggered seismicity have been reported in the last decades as a result of the increasing interest in fluid injection/extraction projects related to geo-resources exploration. When such seismicity is felt by the population, it can negatively affect public perception of geo-energies and may lead to the cancellation of important projects. Furthermore, large earthquakes may jeopardize wellbore stability and damage surface infrastructure. Thus, a key issue is to better understand how to monitor and model the processes leading to seismicity, in order to facilitate the development of effective and reliable forecasting methodologies during deep underground exploitation.
Given the complexity of induced seismicity processes and their interdisciplinary nature, understanding the triggering mechanisms implies to take into account coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical processes.
In this session, we invite contributions from research aimed at understanding such processes during exploitation of deep underground resources, including hydrocarbon
extraction, wastewater disposal, geothermal
energy exploitation, hydraulic fracturing, gas storage and production, mining, and reservoir impoundment for hydro-energy.
We particularly encourage novel contributions based on laboratory and underground near-fault experiments, numerical modelling, spatio-temporal variations of physical parameters and seismicity, and fieldwork, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of induced and triggered seismicity at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.82/SM6.5
Convener: Antonio Pio Rinaldi | Co-conveners: Luisa Valoroso, Victor Vilarrasa, Marie Violay
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room L2
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X1
ERE6.6

Hydraulic stimulation is a well-operation that aims at enhancing fluid flow at depth. It is applied to exploit unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs with low permeability and deep geothermal resources. Induced earthquakes frequently accompany the injection of fluids into boreholes potentially leading to damage to infrastructure at the surface and thus generally raising public concern. Damage caused by such events have already terminated Enhanced Geothermal Energy projects in South Korea and Switzerland. Hence, finding safe stimulation methods is critical for future use and public acceptance of geothermal energy projects and potential other forms of energy extraction from the underground. A range of stimulation techniques have been developed to increase the permeability of low-permeable reservoirs, however, our understanding of the processes involved in the formation of hydrofracs and hydroshears and the effectiveness of these operations regarding flow enhancement are still rather limited. A series of successful mine-back experiments have been performed in a range of underground laboratories in Europe. For this session, we invite presentations covering the full range of rock mechanics experiments, underground laboratory testing, and field-scale operations aiming at improving the fundamental understanding of stimulation operations.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.91/NH4.7/SM6.4
Convener: Georg Dresen | Co-conveners: Grzegorz Kwiatek, Joerg Renner
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room L2
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X1
SC1.37

Grain size or grain size distributions (GSDs) play a major role in many fields of geoscience research. Paleopiezometry is based on the relation between grains size and flow stress. Environments of depositions have typical GSDs. Time temperature and grain size have characteristic relations during static grain growth. Fracture processes are associated with the fractal dimension of the GSD they produce, etc.. In all these cases, meaningful interpretations rest on the correct acquisition and quantification of grain size data.

The aim of this short course is to discuss with participants the following questions

1) when do we need grain size analysis ? what is it good for ? what are the limitations ?
2) how do we identify grains? what are the criteria for segmentation?
3) how do we define reliable measures for grain size ?
4) what do we mean by 'mean grain size' ?
5) how much data do we need ?
6) and what about errors ?

Handouts will be available in electronic form.

Please send email if you want to participate (renee.heilbronner@unibas.ch)

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Co-organized as CR3.14/EMRP1.92/GMPV7.19/TS13.1
Convener: Renée Heilbronner | Co-convener: Rüdiger Kilian
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room -2.31
SC1.25 ECS

Image analysis has become a standard tool for shape and fabric analysis of a wide range of rock types (sedimentary, magmatic and metamorphic) and for microstructure analysis of natural and experimental samples at all scales. From quantified shape fabrics, rock properties may be inferred and related to the processes that created them.

In the first half of the short course, some basic techniques are outlined, in the second half, there will be demonstrations of selected applications.

The following topics will be covered:
1) image acquisition and pre-processing
2) segmentation: from picture to bitmap
3) shape analysis of individual grains or particles
4) fabric and strain analysis: looking at volumes and surfaces
5) analysis of spatial distribution: from clustered to random to ordered

Demonstrations will be made using ImageJ and Image SXM. Note, however, that familiarity with either of these programs is not required. - This is a short course, not a workshop.

Please send email if you want to participate (renee.heilbronner@unibas.ch)

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Co-organized as EMRP1.93/GMPV7.18/TS13.5
Convener: Renée Heilbronner | Co-convener: Rüdiger Kilian
Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room -2.31
SC1.27

This course is aimed at anyone who wants to better understand the origin of physical anisotropy in rocks. The principles and methods learned in the course can be applied to any anisotropy that is described by tensors and depends on the bulk properties of a sample rather than being dominated by grain boundary properties. As such, this course is relevant for researchers working in a range of fields, including those investigating seismic anisotropy, magnetic fabrics, or anisotropy of thermal conductivity.
We will discuss the intrinsic anisotropy of single crystals, the interplay of crystallographic preferred orientation and single crystal anisotropy to control the anisotropy in rocks, and give an introduction to how anisotropic physical properties can be predicted in rocks, including an introduction to the freely available Matlab toolbox MTex.
Participants will leave the course with a thorough and detailed understanding of factors controlling anisotropy in rocks, and have the necessary background to quantitatively predict anisotropy based on their own texture datasets or demonstration data sets.

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Co-organized as EMRP1.94/GD11.5/TS13.4
Convener: Andrea Regina Biedermann | Co-conveners: Bjarne Almqvist, Sarah Brownlee, Mainprice David
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room -2.62

EMRP2 – Geomagnetism

EMRP2.1 Media

This session provides the opportunity for contributions that fall within the broad spectrum of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, but are not directly appropriate to any of the other proposed sessions. We solicit contributions on theory and simulations, instrumentation, laboratory experiments and field measurements, data analysis and interpretation, as well as inversion and modelling techniques.

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Convener: Angelo De Santis | Co-convener: Mioara Mandea
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X2
EMRP2.2 | PICO

The Earth system responds to perturbations of solar origin with sudden and intense variations of the geomagnetic field observed, for instance, during geomagnetic storms and substorms. These variations can give origin to geomagnetically induced currents that can represent a hazard for ground-based critical infrastructures.
Geomagnetic measurements, both from ground-based observatories and satellites, have a twofold role in the space weather framework. One is in the quantification of ground effects due to space weather events. The other is in gaining a more and more accurate knowledge of the sources, both internal and external, of the geomagnetic field. Indeed, an accurate separation of the geomagnetic field contributions is of central importance for the development of tools and methods aimed at reliably monitoring and forecasting space weather effects. In this session, we encourage submissions from those involved in investigations that emphasize the role of satellite and ground-based geomagnetic field measurements as a tool to gain advances in space weather research.

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Convener: Roberta Tozzi | Co-conveners: Georgios Balasis, Paola De Michelis
PICOs
| Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
PICO spot 1
EMRP2.3

This session covers all methods and scales used for registering, processing and interpretation of magnetic field data, from the core to the crustal anomalies and corresponding deep or shallow sources: from satellite missions to oceanic profiles and detailed ground based arrays, and from mathematical processing to petrophysical and geological ground evidence. Presentations on compilation and interpretation methods of heterogenous data sets, useful definitions of magnetic field changes, for scientific Earth's interior studies or natural resources exploration purposes, as well as studies of eventual temporal anomaly changes are also encouraged. New theories of magnetic data modelling and applications in exploration and geological interpretation of magnetic anomalies, jointly with other geodata are warmly welcome.

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Convener: Maurizio Fedi | Co-conveners: Tamara Litvinova, Mark Pilkington
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room 1.61
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2
ST3.3

Many recent advances in aeronomy, space sciences, geomagnetism, and gravity arose from combining specific knowledge of these areas in interdisciplinary research. Current outstanding questions are, for example: What features of ionospheric currents do we discover when we understand the shape, strengths, and variation of the geomagnetic background field? What is the role of upward propagating atmospheric waves in energy and momentum transport into the ionosphere? Which ionospheric processes need to be better quantified to achieve complete knowledge of global core or crustal field variations? How does knowledge of the geometry of ionospheric and magnetospheric sources help in determining Earth’s conductivity in the geomagnetic field? How strongly do we need to consider Earth’s conductivity in quantifying ionospheric currents? How can we quantify and correct for ionospheric perturbations to achieve the best gravity field solutions? Finally, what can we learn about space sciences by studying ionospheric effects on geodetic measurements?

The session invites contributions on any of the subjects and in particular on results that benefit from interdisciplinary works in the areas of space science, geomagnetism, and gravity. Submissions are welcomed that contain analyses of global satellite or ground-based observations or modelling studies, including a combination of them.

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Co-organized as EMRP2.6/G4.5
Convener: Claudia Stolle | Co-conveners: Dimitry Pokhotelov, Patrick Alken, Jorge Luis Chau, Alexander Grayver, Adrian Jaeggi, Rumi Nakamura, Nick Pedatella
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room L1
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X4
GD4.1 | PICO

Our understanding of Earth's inner and outer core is progressing at a rapid pace thanks to cross-fertilization between a number of observational, theoretical and experimental disciplines.

Improved seismic observations continue to provide better images of the core and prompt refinements in structural and geodynamic models. Mineral physics provides constraints for dynamic, structural, and thermodynamic models. The heat budget of the core, paleomagnetic observations, and models promote the exploration of new dynamo mechanisms. Geomagnetic observations from both ground and satellite, along with magneto-hydrodynamic experiments, provide additional insight to our ever expanding view of Earth's core.

This session welcomes contributions from all disciplines, as well as interdisciplinary efforts, on attempts to proceed towards an integrated, self-consistent picture of core structure, dynamics and history, and to understand its overwhelming complexity.

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Co-organized as EMRP2.7/SM4.22
Convener: Sébastien Merkel | Co-conveners: Andy Biggin, Arwen Deuss, Phil Livermore
PICOs
| Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
PICO spot 3
NH6.9

The session aims to collect original or review contributions on the use of data from Low-Earth-Orbiting (LEO) satellites making measurements in the thermosphere-ionosphere to investigate ionospheric anomalies related to space weather, geophysical and artificial sources. In fact, data from LEO satellites can provide a global view of near-Earth space variability and are complementary to ground-based observations, which have limited global coverage. The AMPERE project and integration of the Swarm data into ESA’s Space Weather program are current examples of this. The availability of thermosphere and ionosphere data from the DEMETER satellite and the new operative CSES mission demonstrates that also satellites that have not been specifically designed for space weather studies can provide important contributions to this field. On the other hand, there are evidences that earthquakes can generate electromagnetic anomalies into the near Earth space. A multi-instrumental approach, by using ground observations (magnetometers, magnetotelluric stations, GNSS receivers, etc.) and LEO satellites (DEMETER, Swarm, CSES, etc.) measurements can help in clarifying the missing scientific knowledge of the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) mechanisms before, during and after large earthquakes. We also solicit contributions on studies about other phenomena, such as tropospheric and anthropogenic electromagnetic emissions, that influence the near-Earth electromagnetic and plasma environment on all relevant topics including data processing, data-assimilation in models, space weather case studies, superimposed epoch analyses, etc.

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Co-organized as AS4.57/EMRP2.10/ESSI1.9/GI3.14/NP9.3/SM5.4/ST4.10
Convener: Mirko Piersanti | Co-conveners: Livio Conti, Rune Floberghagen, Xuhui Shen, Michel Parrot
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room M2
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X3
G1.2 | PICO

The analysis of potential fields, especially of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, is becoming increasingly important for the geosciences community. The modern satellite missions are continuing to provide data with ever improving accuracy and nearly global, time-dependent coverage. The gravitational field, respectively the geoid, plays an important role in climate research, as a record of and reference for the observation of mass transport. The study of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal variations is yielding new insights into the behavior of its internal and external sources. Both gravity and magnetic data furthermore constitute primary sources of information also for the global characterization of other planets. With this vast quantity of data and the richness of research topics that can be addressed with it, there continues to be a need to develop new methods of analysis, at the global and local scales, and especially on their interface, where high- and low resolution data are to be jointly represented and interpreted, and where global/local contributions to noise/signal need to be differentiated. Global fields have traditionally been modeled in the spherical harmonics basis; local observations typically in a Cartesian space-based or Fourier framework. For over two decades now, methods that combine global with local sensitivity, often in a multiresolution setting, have been developed as alternatives: these include wavelets, radial basis functions, Slepian functions, splines, spherical cap harmonics, etc. With these, a growing range of problems can be addressed, but many further developments, including particular aspects of their algorithmic implementation, or the explicit search for sparsity in the modeling domain are awaiting further study. On the one hand side the purpose of this session is to provide a forum for exchange on the current state-of-the-art on these research topics, whether related to forward or inverse modeling, theoretical, computational, or observational studies. Especially studies on regional gravity field modeling from the combination of different input data sets as well as comparisons between different solutions are welcome.

On the other hand, besides monitoring the variations of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, space geodetic techniques deliver time series describing changes of the surface geometry, sea level change variations or fluctuations in the Earth's orientation. However, geodetic observation systems usually measure the integral effect of all effects. Thus, analysis methods have to be applied to the geodetic time series for a better understanding of the relations between and within the components of the system Earth. The combination of data from various space geodetic and remote sensing techniques may allow for separating the integral measurements into individual contributions of the Earth system components. Presentations to time frequency analysis, to the detection of features of the temporal or spatial variability of signals existing in geodetic data and in geophysical models, as well as to the investigations on signal separation techniques, e.g. EOF, are highly appreciated. We further solicit papers on different prediction techniques e.g. least-squares, neural networks, Kalman filter or uni- or multivariate autoregressive methods to forecast Earth Orientation Parameters, which are needed for real-time transformation between celestial and terrestrial reference frames.

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Co-organized as EMRP2.13
Convener: Volker Michel | Co-conveners: Katrin Bentel, Christian Gerhards, Wieslaw Kosek, Michael Schmidt
PICOs
| Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
PICO spot 3
GI4.1

Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a safe, advanced, non-destructive and non-invasive imaging technique that can be effectively used for inspecting the subsurface as well as natural and man-made structures. During GPR surveys, a source is used to send high-frequency electromagnetic waves into the ground or structure under test; at the boundaries where the electromagnetic properties of media change, the electromagnetic waves may undergo transmission, reflection, refraction and diffraction; the radar sensors measure the amplitudes and travel times of signals returning to the surface.

This session aims at bringing together scientists, engineers, industrial delegates and end-users working in all GPR areas, ranging from fundamental electromagnetics to the numerous fields of applications. With this session, we wish to provide a supportive framework for (1) the delivery of critical updates on the ongoing research activities, (2) fruitful discussions and development of new ideas, (3) community-building through the identification of skill sets and collaboration opportunities, (4) vital exposure of early-career scientists to the GPR research community.

We have identified a series of topics of interest for this session, listed below.

1. Ground Penetrating Radar instrumentation
- Innovative GPR equipment
- Design, realization and optimization of GPR antennas
- Equipment testing and calibration procedures

2. Ground Penetrating Radar methodology
- Survey planning and data acquisition strategies
- Methods and tools for data analysis and interpretation
- Data processing algorithms, electromagnetic modelling, imaging and inversion techniques
- Studying the relationship between GPR sensed quantities and physical properties of inspected subsurface/structures useful for application needs
- Advanced data visualization methods to clearly and efficiently communicate the significance of GPR data

3. Ground Penetrating Radar applications and case studies
- Earth sciences
- Civil engineering
- Environmental engineering
- Archaeology and cultural heritage
- Management of water resources
- Humanitarian mine clearance
- Vital signs detection of trapped people in natural and man-made disasters
- Planetary exploration

4. Contributions on the combined use of Ground Penetrating Radar and other geoscience instrumentation, in all applications fields

5. Communication and education initiatives and methods

Additional information
This session is organized by Members of TU1208 GPR Association (www.gpradar.eu/tu1208); the association is a follow-up initiative of COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 “Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar”.

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Co-organized as EMRP2.18/HS11.5/NH6.12/PS5.4/SSS12.16/TS11.10
Convener: Aleksandar Ristic | Co-conveners: Alessandro Fedeli, Lara Pajewski, Mercedes Solla, Milan Vrtunski
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room 0.96
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X1
GD7.2

Many regions of the Earth, from crust to core, exhibit anisotropic fabrics which can reveal much about geodynamic processes in the subsurface. These fabrics can exist at a variety of scales, from crystallographic orientations to regional structure alignments. In the past few decades, a tremendous body of multidisciplinary research has been dedicated to characterizing anisotropy in the solid Earth and understanding its geodynamical implications. This has included work in fields such as: (1) geophysics, to make in situ observations and construct models of anisotropic properties at a range of depths; (2) mineral physics, to explain the cause of some of these observations; and (3) numerical modelling, to relate the inferred fabrics to regional stress and flow regimes and, thus, geodynamic processes in the Earth. The study of anisotropy in the Solid Earth encompasses topics so diverse that it often appears fragmented according to regions of interest, e.g., the upper or lower crust, oceanic lithosphere, continental lithosphere, cratons, subduction zones, D'', or the inner core. The aim of this session is to bring together scientists working on different aspects of anisotropy to provide a comprehensive overview of the field. We encourage contributions from all disciplines of the earth sciences (including mineral physics, seismology, magnetotellurics, geodynamic modelling) focused on anisotropy at all scales and depths within the Earth.

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Co-organized as EMRP2.19/SM4.18/TS11.8
Convener: Manuele Faccenda | Co-conveners: Sébastien Chevrot, Tuna Eken, Miriam Christina Reiss
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room D1
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X2
GI3.1

An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly known as a drone, is an aircraft without a human pilot aboard. Originating mostly from military applications, their use is rapidly expanding to commercial, recreational, agricultural, and scientific applications. Unlike manned aircraft, UAVs were initially used for missions too "dull, dirty, or dangerous" for humans. Nowadays however, many modern scientific experiments have begun to use UAVs as a tool to collect different types of data. Their flexibility and relatively simple usability now allow scientist to accomplish tasks that previously required expensive equipment like piloted aircrafts, gas, or hot air balloons. Even the industry has begun to adapt and offer extensive options in UAV characteristics and capabilities. At this session, we would like people to share their experience in using UAVs for scientific research. We are interested to hear about specific scientific tasks accomplished or attempted, types of UAVs used, and instruments deployed.

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Co-organized as AS5.5/CR2.13/EMRP2.20/NH6.11/OS4.27
Convener: Misha Krassovski | Co-conveners: Sebastien Biraud, Jens Klump
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room M1
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X1
GI2.3

Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been increasingly used over the last decades in a wide range of engineering and geosciences applications. New theoretical developments, technological advances in both hardware and software resources as well as the progress achieved in surveying, data processing and interpretation have led to a tremendous growth of equipment reliability, allowing outstanding data quality and accuracy. To this effect, the potential of many optical, acoustic, electric and electromagnetic NDT methods for stand-alone use has been greatly investigated to date. Hence, these pieces of equipment have become popular for assessment and monitoring purposes in many fields of application.
Nevertheless, the requirements of a comprehensive site investigation may be complex and time-consuming and may involve multiple expertise and many pieces of equipment. The challenge is to step forward and provide effective integration between data outputs with different physical quantities, scale domains and resolutions. In this regard, enormous development opportunities relating to data fusion, integration and correlation between different NDT methods and theories are to be further investigated in the near future.
Within this framework, this Session primarily aims at disseminating contributions from state-of-the-art NDT methods and numerical developments, promoting the integration of existing equipment and the development of new algorithms, surveying techniques, methods and prototypes for effective monitoring and assessment of survey sites. Non-destructive testing techniques of interest are related – but not limited to – the application of acoustic emission (AE) testing, electromagnetic testing (ET), ground penetrating radar (GPR), geoelectric methods (GM), laser testing methods (LM), magnetic flux leakage (MFL), microwave testing, magnetic particle testing (MT), neutron radiographic testing (NR), radiographic testing (RT), thermal/infrared testing (IRT), ultrasonic testing (UT), seismic methods (SM), vibration analysis (VA), visual and optical testing (VT/OT).
The Session will focus on the application of different NDT methods and theories and will be related – but not limited to – the following investigation areas:
- advanced data fusion;
- advanced interpretation methods;
- design and development of new surveying equipment and prototypes;
- assessment and monitoring methods for site investigations;
- assessment and monitoring protocols and procedures for site investigations;
- comprehensive and inclusive information data systems for the monitoring and assessment of survey sites;
- numerical simulation and modelling of data outputs with different physical quantities, scale domains and resolutions;
- advances in NDT methods, numerical developments and applications (stand-alone use of existing and state-of-the-art NDTs).

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Co-organized as BG1.9/EMRP2.25/NH11.1
Convener: Andrea Benedetto | Co-conveners: Morteza (Amir) Alani, Andreas Loizos, Francesco Soldovieri, Fabio Tosti
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room 0.96
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Hall X1
GI4.4 Media

Progressively stricter requirements in geophysical prospecting, in urban and inter-urban monitoring make it important to look continuously for innovative solutions to new and old complex problems. In particular, investigation and monitoring of pollution, hydrological resources, energy efficiency, cultural heritage, cities and transportation infrastructures nowadays require technological and methodological innovations of geophysical and sensing techniques in order to properly understand the limits of the current state of art and to identify where possible the most convenient strategies to overcome limitations of current approaches. This goal can be achieved either with more advanced solutions in a general sense or with dedicated solutions, particularly suitable for the specific problem at hand.
Integrated prospecting, refined data processing, new models, hardware innovations, new ICT information and telecommunications systems can and should cooperate with each other in this sense. It is important that the scientific community finds a moment for considering the connection between adjacent aspects of the same problem, e.g. to achieve improved geophysical data, safe and reliable environmental and structural monitoring, improved processing as much as possible.
The session “ Innovative instrumentations, techniques, geophysical methods and models for near surface geophysics, cities and transportation infrastructures aims to propose one such moment, where multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary competences can interact with each other, possibly finding possible new ways to cooperate and to exchange experiences reciprocally to reach sustainable solutions.

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Co-organized as BG1.13/EMRP2.30/HS11.27/NH11.3/SSS12.10
Convener: Raffaele Persico | Co-conveners: Mario Marchetti, Salvatore Piro, F.C. Ponzo
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room M1
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X1
G4.4

Integrated modelling of gravity, magnetic, seismological and petrological data contributes to a wide range of geo-scientific research, from imaging the structure of the Solid earth and geodynamic processes (e.g. GIA and the coupling between Solid Earth and Cryosphere) to near surface investigations. The session especially welcomes contributions related to spatial and temporal variations of the Earth gravity and magnetic field at all scales and their application in an integrated context.

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Co-organized as EMRP2.31/GD10.4/SM5.6
Convener: Jörg Ebbing | Co-conveners: Carla Braitenberg, Alexandra Guy, Bart Root, Holger Steffen
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room -2.21, Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room -2.91
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X3
PS1.4 Media

The InSight mission to Mars landed in Elysium Planitia on November 26. InSight's scientific objective is the study of the Martian interior using two seismometers, a heat flow probe and geodetical measurements. Auxiliary instruments will collect meteorological and magnetic data for at least one Martian year.
This session provides initial results from Mars, status reports of instrument deployment and relevant pre-landing science.

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Co-organized as AS4.60/EMRP2.33/GD9.3/GMPV7.13/SM1.5/TS1.7
Convener: Simon C. Stähler | Co-conveners: Brigitte Knapmeyer-Endrun, Anna Mittelholz, Ana-Catalina Plesa
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room L3, Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–10:15
 
Room L3
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Hall X4
NH4.3

From the real-time integration of multi-parametric observations is expected the major contribution to the development of operational t-DASH systems suitable for supporting decision makers with continuously updated seismic hazard scenarios. A very preliminary step in this direction is the identification of those parameters (seismological, chemical, physical, biological, etc.) whose space-time dynamics and/or anomalous variability can be, to some extent, associated with the complex process of preparation of major earthquakes.
This session wants then to encourage studies devoted to demonstrate the added value of the introduction of specific, observations and/or data analysis methods within the t-DASH and StEF perspectives. Therefore studies based on long-term data analyses, including different conditions of seismic activity, are particularly encouraged. Similarly welcome will be the presentation of infrastructures devoted to maintain and further develop our present observational capabilities of earthquake related phenomena also contributing in this way to build a global multi-parametric Earthquakes Observing System (EQuOS) to complement the existing GEOSS initiative.
To this aim this session is not addressed just to seismology and natural hazards scientists but also to geologist, atmospheric sciences and electromagnetism researchers, whose collaboration is particular important for fully understand mechanisms of earthquake preparation and their possible relation with other measurable quantities. For this reason all contributions devoted to the description of genetic models of earthquake’s precursory phenomena are equally welcome. Every 2 years selected papers presented in thsi session will be proposed for publication in a dedicated Special Issue of an international (ISI) scientific journal.

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Co-organized as AS4.62/EMRP2.40/ESSI1.7/GI2.13/SM3.9, co-sponsored by JpGU
Convener: Valerio Tramutoli | Co-conveners: Mariano Lisi, Pier Francesco Biagi, Katsumi Hattori, Filippos Vallianatos
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–12:30, 14:00–15:45
 
Room M2
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X3
GI3.6 Media

'Cosmic rays’ collectively describe particles that bombard the Earth from space. They carry information about space and, once near the Earth, interact with the magnetosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Secondary cosmic rays created within the atmosphere can provide information about our planet that is vital to science and society. Secondary neutron radiation plays an extraordinary role, as it not only carries information about solar activity, but also produces short and long living tracer isotopes, influences genetic information of living organisms, and is extraordinarily sensitive to hydrogen and therefore also to water. Given the vast spectrum of interactions of cosmic rays with matter in different parts of the Earth, cosmic-ray research ranges from studies of the solar system to the history of the Earth, and from health and security issues to hydrology and climate change.

Although research on cosmic-ray particles is connected to a variety of disciplines and applications, they all share similar questions and problems regarding the physics of detection, modeling, and environmental factors that influence the intensity. Questions that all disciplines have in common are, for example, “How does the cosmic-ray intensity and energy spectra change with time and location on Earth?”, “How to correct the signal for magnetospheric or atmospheric fluctuations?”, “What is the influence of local structures, water bodies, and surface conditions?”, “Which computer model for cosmic-ray propagation is correct?”, or “What can we learn from other types of cosmic-ray particles?”.

The session brings together scientists from all fields of research that are related to monitoring and modeling of cosmogenic radiation. It will allow sharing of expertise amongst international researchers as well as showcase recent advancements in their field. The session aims to stimulate discussions about how individual disciplines can share their knowledge and benefit from each other.

We solicit contributions related but not limited to:
- Health, security, and radiation protection: cosmic-ray dosimetry on Earth and its dependence on environmental and atmospheric factors
- Planetary space science: satellite and ground-based neutron and gamma-ray sensors to detect water and soil chemistry
- Neutron monitor research: detection of high-energy cosmic rays variations and its dependence on local and atmospheric factors
- Hydrology and climate change: low-energy neutron sensing to measure water in reservoirs at and near the land surface, such as soils, snow pack and vegetation
- Cosmogenic nuclides: as tracers of atmospheric circulation and mixing; as a tool in archaeology or glaciology for dating of ice and measuring ablation rates; and as a tool for surface exposure dating and measuring rates of surficial geological processes
- Detector design: technological advancements for the detection of cosmic rays
- Cosmic-ray modeling: advances in modeling of the cosmic-ray propagation through the magnetosphere and atmosphere, and their response to the Earth’s surface
- Impact modeling: How can cosmic-ray monitoring support environmental models, weather and climate forecasting, irrigation management, and the assessment of natural hazards

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Co-organized as AS4.55/EMRP2.41/HS11.18/NH11.14/PS4.6/ST4.8
Convener: Martin Schrön | Co-conveners: Konstantin Herbst, Markus Köhli, W. Rühm, Marek Zreda
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room -2.47
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X1
SC1.3 ECS

Research, especially for early career scientists, starts with the spark of an idea and is then often challenged by empirical or methodological road bumps and seemingly dead ends. A diverse range of challenges face those in earth science research, particularly for early career scientists (ECS). Challenges include (1) access difficulties, whether for field sites, equipment or data, (2) problems of scaling and extrapolation and (3) a lack of methodological understanding or knowledge. In this short course, we will raise engaging discussions, which aim to solve challenges, suggest new research approaches and methods, and encourage networks and possibilities for in-depth discussions amongst early career scientists at international conferences.

This short course will start with 2 minute ‘pop-up’ presentations outlining the questions or challenges submitted by attendees. These pop-ups are followed by chaired group discussions in which short course participants engage to crowd solve the presented challenges. To wrap up the session, solutions and suggestions from each topical group are presented to the whole session in a final discussion. A summary on last years’ crowd solving efforts can be found in the EGU GM blog post https://blogs.egu.eu/divisions/gm/2018/04/25/diving-under-the-scientific-iceberg/.

This short course lives by your input: i) by stating a research idea or challenge you would like to share, and ii) by participating in the discussion during the short course. To organize and prepare the discussions, please send a short statement of your idea or challenge related to geomorphic research, and your motivation for solving it (3-4 sentences) to geomorph-problems@geographie.uni-bonn.de, by March 1, 2019. The contributions within the short course are free of charge. If you want to discuss a specific problem, but rather stay anonymous, please let us know. We are all early career scientists and expect a non-hierarchic, respectful and constructive environment for the discussions, which will hopefully go some way to identifying and engaging with problems which face ECS geomorphologists.

Session organizers: Anne Voigtländer, Johannes Buckel, Eleanore Heasley, Felix Nieberding, Liseth Perez, Anna Schoch, Harry Sanders, Richard Mason,...

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Co-organized as BG1.70/EMRP2.61/GM12.6/GMPV7.17
Convener: Anne Voigtländer | Co-conveners: Johannes Buckel, Eleanore Heasley, Felix Nieberding, Liseth Perez
Wed, 10 Apr, 19:00–20:30
 
Room -2.62
SM4.2

This session will cover applied and theoretical aspects of geophysical imaging, modelling and inversion using both active- and passive-source seismic measurements as well as other geophysical techniques (e.g., gravimetry, magnetic and electromagnetic) to investigate the Earth’s crust and uppermost mantle. We invite contributions focused on methodological developments, theoretical aspects, and applications. Studies across the scales and disciplines are particularly welcome.

Among others, the session may cover the following topics:
- Active- and passive-source imaging using body- and surface-waves;
- Full waveform inversion developments and applications;
- Advancements and case studies in 2D and 3D active-source imaging;
- Interferometry and Marchenko imaging;
- Seismic attenuation and anisotropy;
- Developments and applications of multi-scale and multi-parameter inversion;
- Joint inversion of seismic and complementary geophysical data;
- Applications of new acquisition systems.

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Co-organized as EMRP2.62/GD2.7
Convener: Cedric Schmelzbach | Co-conveners: Matthew Agius, Stefan Buske, Michal Malinowski, Milena Marjanovic
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room D3
Posters
| Attendance Fri, 12 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2

EMRP3 – Paleomagnetism

EMRP3.2

In environmental magnetism, rock and mineral magnetic techniques are used to investigate the formation, transportation, deposition, and postdepositional alterations of magnetic minerals under the influences of environmental processes. Since the eighties, environmental magnetism has grown considerably and contributes to research in the geosciences and in branches of physics, chemistry, and biology and environmental science, including research on climate change, pollution, iron biomineralization, and depositional and diagenetic processes in sediments. Studies from all areas of environmental magnetism that have an impact on climatic, stratigraphic or environmental applications, including new theoretical models or measurement techniques, are invited.

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Convener: Fabio Florindo | Co-conveners: Lennart de Groot, Tadeusz Magiera, Christian Ohneiser, Eric Font
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Room K2
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2
EMRP3.6

Recent methodological and instrumental advances in paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric techniques are continuously increasing their already high potential in solving research questions in various Earth science disciplines. Integrated paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric studies, together with structural geology and petrology, are very efficient tools in increasing our knowledge about sedimentological, tectonic and volcanic processes, both on regional and global scales. Moreover, paleomagnetism and rock magnetism are fundamental tools for assigning both absolute and relative time to geological sequences.
This session is intended to give an opportunity to present innovative theoretical or methodological paleomagnetic, magnetostratigraphic, and magnetic fabric works and their direct applications in different geological settings. Especially welcome are contributions (1) combining paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric data retrieved by several means of fabric analysis (magnetic and non-magnetic), or (2) novel approaches in data evaluation, contributions from both (3) experimental and theoretical aspects of paleomagnetic reconstructions, (4) remagnetization processes and (5) acquisition of petrofabrics. We also invite contributions that use (6) magnetic methods to improve the GPTS, (7) magnetostratigraphy to date and correlate geological sequences, (8) rock magnetism to assign high-resolution chronostratigraphy to geological sequences, and (9) integrated magnetic chronostratigraphy with isotopic dating, bio-, cyclo- and chemostratigraphic records.

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Convener: Martin Chadima | Co-conveners: Luigi Jovane, Bjarne Almqvist, Francesca Cifelli, Mat Domeier, Wout Krijgsman
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room K2
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X2
EMRP3.8

The study of the spatial and temporal evolution of the geomagnetic field in the past is fundamental to understand the processes that take place in the Earth's external core and to obtain information about the geomagnetic field evolution at the core-mantle boundary. For the last decades, such information is provided by historical and instrumental data, while for older periods the investigation of archaeological material, volcanic rocks and sediments is necessary. In this session, we invite contributions that can offer information about the past geomagnetic field variations in both short and long timescales. Acquisition, measurements and elaboration of new records of palaeosecular variation, geomagnetic field reversals, magnetostratigraphy and cyclostratigraphy are welcome. The session solicits also contributions about regional and global palaeomagnetic databases, geomagnetic field modeling, Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scales (GPTS) and other magnetic methods applied in Earth Sciences.

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Convener: Evdokia Tema | Co-conveners: Sanja Panovska, F. Javier Pavón-Carrasco, Kenneth Kodama, Sara Satolli
Orals
| Wed, 10 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room K2
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 09 Apr, 14:00–15:45
 
Hall X2
SSP1.2

Scientific drilling through the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) continues to provide unique opportunities to investigate the workings of the interior of our planet, Earth’s cycles, natural hazards and the distribution of subsurface microbial life. The past and current scientific drilling programs have brought major advances in many multidisciplinary fields of socio-economic relevance, such as climate and ecosystem evolution, palaeoceanography, the deep biosphere, deep crustal and tectonic processes, geodynamics and geohazards. This session invites contributions that present and/or review recent scientific results from deep Earth sampling and monitoring through ocean and continental drilling projects. Furthermore, we encourage contributions that outline perspectives and visions for future drilling projects, in particular projects using a multi-platform approach.

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Co-organized as CL1.32/EMRP3.11/GD2.9/GMPV1.7/NH5.12/TS1.4, co-sponsored by JpGU
Convener: Antony Morris | Co-conveners: Jorijntje Henderiks, Tanja Hörner, Thomas Wiersberg
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 08:30–12:30
 
Room 0.31
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 11 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Hall X1

PGM – Programme group meetings (by invitation only)

PGM12
Convener: Angelo De Santis
Mon, 08 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room 3.17

Union sessions of interest

US2

This year marks the 250th anniversary of the birth of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), the intrepid explorer of the Andes and other regions in the world, and the most famous scientist of his time. Alexander von Humboldt is perhaps best known for his radical new vision of nature as a complex and interconnected global force, thereby becoming the founder of the field of biogeography and laying the ground for modern Earth-System Science approaches. It seems fitting to pay tribute to Alexander von Humboldt’s legacy by reviewing the state of the art in studies of the coupled lithosphere – atmosphere – hydrosphere – biosphere system with a focus on the Andean mountain belt. The Andes have become one of the main natural laboratories in the world to explore these questions and many recent studies have addressed its tectonic and geodynamic evolution, but also the two-way couplings between surface uplift, climatic evolution and biodiversity in the Andes and its foreland. This Union Session will bring together world-leading specialists on these questions with the aim to shed light on both suspected and unexpected couplings in the system.

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Convener: Peter van der Beek | Co-conveners: Mike Burton, Giuliana Panieri, Lily Pereg (deceased)
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 08:30–12:15
 
Room E1
US3 Media|ECS

Over the whole Earth history, the climate has encountered tipping points, shifting from one regulated system to the other. This tilting motion affects both climate and the carbon cycle and has played a major role in the evolution of the Earth climate, at all timescales. Earth History has been ponctuated by large climate changes and carbon cycle reorganizations, from large climate variations occurring in deep times (snowball events, terrestrialisation, Mesozoic and early Cenozoic warm episodes, quaternary glacial cycles…) to past and on-going abrupt events. Many potential triggers of those climate and carbon cycle shifts have been proposed and tested through modeling studies, and against field data, such as those directly or indirectly linked with tectonics (plate motion, orogenesis, opening/closing of seaways, weathering…) and orbital forcing. Given that the Earth climate is currently experiencing an unprecedented transition under anthropogenic pressure, understanding the mechanisms behind the scene is crucial.

Our aim is to point out the most recent results concerning how a complex system as the climate of the Earth has undergone many tipping points and what is the specificity of the future climate changes. Therefore, within this session, we would like to encourage talks discussing advances in our record and modeling of the forces triggering and amplifying the changes of Earth climate and carbon cycle across spatial and temporal scales.

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Convener: Gilles Ramstein | Co-conveners: Ayako Abe-Ouchi, Richard Betts, Robert DeConto
Orals
| Fri, 12 Apr, 14:00–15:45, 16:15–18:00
 
Room E1
US4 ECS

In today’s changing world we need to tap the potential of every talented mind to develop solutions for a sustainable future. The existence of under-representation of different groups (cultural, national and gender) remains a reality across the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM fields) around the world, including the geosciences. This Union Symposium will focus on remaining obstacles that contribute to these imbalances, with the goal of identifying best practices and innovative ideas to overcome obstacles.

EGU is welcoming six high-level speakers from the funding agencies and research centres on both sides of the Atlantic related to geosciences to present efforts and discuss initiatives to tackle both implicit and explicit biases. Speakers are:

Jill Karsten, AGU Diversity and Inclusion Task Force (confirmed)
Erika Marín-Spiotta, University of Wisconsin - Madison (confirmed)
Daniel Conley, Lund University (confirmed)
Giulio di Toro, University of Padua (confirmed)
Liviu Matenco, Utrecht University (confirmed)
Barbara Romanowicz, European Research Council (confirmed)

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Co-sponsored by AGUand JpGU
Convener: Claudia Alves de Jesus Rydin | Co-conveners: Alberto Montanari, Robin Bell, Chiaki Oguchi, Lily Pereg (deceased)
Orals
| Thu, 11 Apr, 14:00–18:00
 
Room E1
US5

Atmospheric composition matters to climate, weather forecasting, human health, terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, agricultural productivity, aeronautical operations, renewable energy production, and more. Hence research in atmospheric composition is becoming increasingly cross-cutting and linked to many disciplines including climate, biogeosciences, hydrology, natural hazards, computer and data sciences, socio-economic studies and many others. There is a growing need for atmospheric composition information and an improved understanding of the processes that drive changes in the composition and resulting impacts. While atmospheric composition research is advancing rapidly, there is a need to pay more attention to the translation of this research to support societal needs. Although translational research is a major focus of the health sciences and meteorology, it is in a relatively early stage in atmospheric composition. In this Union Symposium, we plan to highlight the need for, and to illustrate exciting advances in the translation of atmospheric composition research to support services. We will build upon work within the World Meteorological Organization and other communities related to the closer linkages of weather, atmospheric composition, and climate research and related services. We will also articulate the needs for advances in observing systems, models and a better understanding of fundamental processes. This session will also serve as a celebration of the 30 year anniversary of the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch programme and an opportunity for the broader community to envision partnerships needed to facilitate the effective translation of atmospheric composition research.

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Convener: Oksana Tarasova | Co-conveners: Marcos Andrade, Claudia Volosciuk
Orals
| Tue, 09 Apr, 10:45–12:15, 14:00–15:30
 
Room E1
GDB1 Media

In October 2018, the IPCC published its special report on impacts of global warming of 1.5 deg C. Another recent, highly publicised study suggests that the planet could pass an irreversible threshold into a so called “Hothouse Earth” state for a temperature increase of as low as 2 degrees C above pre-industrial temperatures, while other studies and commentaries have emphasised the urgency on climate action, arguing that 2020 must be a turning point for global fossil fuel emissions, to increase the chance of maintaining a safe operating space for the humans on the planet. In 2018, the IPCC celebrated its 30th anniversary. The importance of taking action on human-induced climate change has been emphasised with governments around the world since the 1990s yet CO2 concentrations continue to rise and international initiatives have, to date, had limited and insufficient impact to avert some of the most serious consequences of climate change.
How close are we to one or more critical thresholds (cliff edge)? Is there time to avert passing one or more of these thresholds? What can the geoscience community do to reduce the risks? How important is bottom up versus top down action to ensuring the least worst outcome? These are some of the questions we will debate with world experts in their field and authors of the thought papers on these topics.

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Convener: Jonathan Bamber | Co-conveners: Alberto Montanari, Didier Roche
Thu, 11 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room E1
GDB2 ECS

The geosciences are currently used by policymakers in a wide variety of areas to help guide the decision-making process and ensure that the best possible outcome is achieved. While the importance of scientific advice and the use of evidence in the policymaking process is generally acknowledged by both policymakers and scientists, how scientific advice is integrated and who is responsible is still unclear.

EU Policymakers frequently highlight institutionalised processes for integrating scientific advice into policy such as European Commission's Group of Chief Scientific Advisors (SAM) and the EU Commission’s Register of Expert Groups. But how efficient and accessible are these mechanisms really?

Some emphasise the need for scientists to have their own policy networks in place so that they can share their research outcomes with policymakers who can then use it directly or pass it on to those responsible for relevant legislation. But from funding applications to teaching and even outreach activities – scientists are often already overloaded with additional tasks on top of their own research. Can they really be held responsible for keeping up with the latest policy news and maintaining a constantly changing network of policymakers as well?

This debate will feature a mixed panel of policymakers and geoscientists who have previously given scientific advice. Some key questions that the panel will debate include:
• How can the accessibility of current EU science-advisory mechanisms be improved?
• Are scientists doing enough to share their research?
• And who is responsible for ensuring that quality scientific evidence is used in policymaking?

Speakers will be encouraged to explain any science advisory mechanism that they highlight (e.g. SAM) to ensure that the debate is understood by all those in attendance.

While the panel and subsequent debate will have an EU focus, it is likely that many of the issues discussed will be applicable to countries around the world.

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Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-conveners: Sarah Connors, Olivia Trani
Mon, 08 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room E1
GDB3 ECS

The ever more challenging work environments and increasing pressures on Early Career Scientists e.g. publish or perish, securing grant proposals, developing transferable skills and many more – and all while having a lack of job security. This puts a big strain on Early Career Scientists and this can lead to neglected mental well-being which in turn increases the risk of developing anxiety, depression or other mental health issues. The graduate survey from 2017 (https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v550/n7677/full/nj7677-549a.html) shows that 12% of respondents had sought help or advice for anxiety or depression during their PhD.

In this debate we want to discuss: Is there a problem? How ECS can take control of their mental wellbeing and prioritise this in the current research environment? And what support would ECS like to see from organisations like EGU or their employers?

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Convener: Stephanie Zihms | Co-conveners: Raffaele Albano, Anita Di Chiara, Olivia Trani, Mathew Stiller-Reeve
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:30
 
Room E1
GDB4 ECS

"What counts may not be countable and what is countable may not count". Assessments of scientists and their institutions tend to focus on easy-to-measure metrics related to research outputs such as publications, citations, and grants. However, society is increasingly dependent on Earth science research and data for immediate decisions and long-term planning. There is a growing need for scientists to communicate, engage, and work directly with the public and policy makers, and practice open scholarship, especially regarding data and software. Improving the reward and recognition structure to encourage broader participation of scientists in these activities must involve societies, institutions, and funders. EGU, AGU, and JPGU have all taken steps to improve this recognition, from developing new awards to starting journals around the topic of engaging the public to implementing FAIR data practices in the Earth, environmental, and space sciences, but far more is needed for a broad cultural change. How can we fairly value and credit harder-to-measure, these less tangible contributions, compared to the favoured metrics? And how can we shift the emphasis away from the "audit culture" towards measuring performance and excellence? This session will present a distinguished panel of stakeholders discussing how to implement and institutionalize these changes.

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Co-sponsored by AGUand JpGU
Convener: Alberto Montanari | Co-conveners: Jonathan Bamber, Robin Bell, Hiroshi Kitazato, Lily Pereg (deceased)
Wed, 10 Apr, 10:45–12:30
 
Room E1
GDB5 Media
Convener: Katja Fennel | Co-convener: Jonathan Bamber
Tue, 09 Apr, 16:15–18:00
 
Room E1
SCS1 Media|ECS

Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45-14:00 / Room E1

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Conveners: Alberto Montanari, Jonathan Bamber
Wed, 10 Apr, 12:45–14:00
 
Room E1
SCS2 Media|ECS

Plastic pollution is recognized as one of the most serious and urgent problems facing our planet. Rates of manufacture, use and ultimately disposal of plastics continue to soar, posing an enormous threat to the planet’s oceans and rivers and the flora and fauna they support. There is an urgent need for global action, backed by sound scientific understanding, to tackle this problem.

This Union Symposium will address the problems posed to our planet by plastic pollution, and examine options for dealing with the threat.

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Convener: Jessica Hickie | Co-conveners: Bruce Newport, Christopher Hackney, David Todd, Tim van Emmerik
Orals
| Mon, 08 Apr, 14:00–17:45
 
Room E1
SCA1 ECS

The Games Night is a space to gather, socialise, and play some games. The catch is that all the games are based on Geoscience! Bring along your own games or try one of the others in the session and meet the people who created them. This will also be your chance to try games featured in the Games for Geoscience session.

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Convener: Christopher Skinner | Co-conveners: Rolf Hut, Sam Illingworth, Elizabeth Lewis, Jazmin Scarlett
Programme
| Wed, 10 Apr, 18:00–20:00
 
Foyer D
SCA2 ECS

Join us to help put some of the world's most vulnerable places on the map. A mapathon is a mapping marathon, where we get together to contribute to OpenStreetMap - the world's free map.
No experience is necessary - just bring your laptop and we will provide the training. Learn more about crowdsourcing, open data and humanitarian response - we will also provide some tips for how to host a mapathon at your home institution.

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Convener: Faith Taylor | Co-conveners: Hessel Winsemius, Joanne Wood, chen zhong
Thu, 11 Apr, 19:00–20:30
 
Room L4/5
SCA3

Plastic Oceans UK have been experts on plastic pollution for nearly a decade - solving the plastic crisis through their science, sustainability and education programmes. This all began with the award-winning documentary A Plastic Ocean, now available for streaming on Netflix.

Through changing attitudes, behaviours and practices on the use and value of plastics, we can stop plastic pollution reaching the ocean within a generation.

Come along to the screening of A Plastic Ocean to understand the impacts of plastic pollution around the world, what action we can take to stop plastics entering our natural world and pose your questions to the film's producer, Jo Ruxton, at the end of film.

http://plasticoceans.uk/

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Convener: Fiona Tovey | Co-convener: Jessica Hickie
Tue, 09 Apr, 19:00–21:00
 
Room E2