TP – Terrestrial Planets

Monday, 9 September

TP1

Space missions have provided a wealth of data on the atmospheres and aeronomy of rocky planets and moons, from the lower layers up to the external envelopes in direct contact with the solar wind. A recent emerging finding is evidence that the atmosphere behaves as a single coherent system with complex coupling between layers. This session solicits contributions that investigate processes at work (chemistry, energetics, dynamics, electricity, escape etc...) on the terrestrial bodies of the Solar System and includes studies of the coupling between the lower/middle and upper atmospheres. Contributions based on analysis of recent spacecraft and ground- based observations, comparative planetology studies, numerical modelling and relevant laboratory investigations are particularly welcome. In view of the three future Venus missions selected by ESA and NASA, papers discussing contemporary Venus atmospheric science in preparation for these missions are also encouraged. The session will consist of invited and contributed oral talks as well as posters.

Convener: Anni Määttänen | Co-conveners: Francisco González-Galindo, Gabriella Gilli, Tanguy Bertrand, Orkun Temel
Orals
| Mon, 09 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 09 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 09 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 14:30
OPS2

The Juno spacecraft continues its journey around Jupiter and its satellites making new important discoveries. Results from Juno at Jupiter have revealed numerous processes associated with the physics and chemistry of its interior, atmosphere, magnetosphere and its origin and evolution. Juno’s extended mission transformed the Jupiter-focused mission to a full system explorer. The extended mission runs through 2025 and includes numerous close and distant flybys of Io, Europa, and Ganymede along with an exploration of Jupiter’s enigmatic ring system. This session invites observational and modeling results related to Juno’s results on Jupiter and the comparison to other giant planets and exo-planetary systems. New results from Juno’s extended mission on Jupiter’s northern latitudes as well as the satellites and ring system are welcome.

Co-organized by TP/EXOA
Convener: Scott Bolton | Co-conveners: Francesca Zambon, Heidi Becker, Anton Ermakov, Paul Hartogh, Alessandro Moirano, Ali Sulaiman
Orals
| Mon, 09 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST), 14:30–16:00 (CEST)|Room Sun (Auditorium)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00, Attendance 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Tue, 10:30
MITM1

This merged session welcomes a broad range of presentations about future missions and instrumentation. We encourage presentations on new Planetary science mission architectures and associated technologies, as well as dedicated instrumentation that can be developed for these applications.

Co-organized by TP/OPS/SB
Convener: Sébastien Besse | Co-conveners: Antonin Wargnier, Giovanni Munaretto, Stéphane Erard, Giovanni Poggiali
Orals
| Mon, 09 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 09 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 09 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 14:30
TP15

The renewed ExoMars Rosalind Franklin Mission (RFM), a partnership between ESA and NASA, is scheduled for launch in 2028 and will address one of the most important scientific objectives of our time: to search for signs of life on Mars. Oxia Planum remains the selected landing site and the eight scientific instruments aboard the Rosalind Franklin Rover comprise the ‘Pasteur’ Payload. The unique ability to drill to a depth of 2m and extract samples for processing and analysis by three instruments in the rover’s Analytical Laboratory Drawer (ALD), coupled with its mobility, are key enabling capabilities for the search for biosignatures and for investigation of paleo-environments on early Mars.

This session welcomes submissions regarding the mission and its Pasteur Payload instruments, its scientific investigations, and on research activities pertinent to mission science objectives, including but not limited to: study of the Oxia Planum landing site and related locations, terrestrial analogue studies, astrobiological and sample analysis studies, and other relevant research topics. We also invite submissions regarding synergies between the ExoMars Rosalind Franklin Mission and other Mars missions and programmes.

Co-organized by MITM
Conveners: Nicole Schmitz, Elliot Sefton-Nash, Jorge Vago, Andrew Coates, Bernard Foing
Orals
| Mon, 09 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Jupiter (Hörsaal A)
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 09 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 09 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Mon, 10:30
Mon, 14:30
OPS7

Atmospheric aerosols and cloud particles are found in every atmosphere of the solar system, as well as, in exoplanets. Depending on their size, shape, chemical composition, latent heat, and distribution, their effect on the radiation budget varies drastically and is difficult to predict. When organic, aerosols also carry a strong prebiotic interest reinforced by the presence of heavy atoms such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur.

The aim of the session is to gather presentations on these complex objects for both terrestrial and giant planet atmospheres, including the special cases of Titan’s, Pluto's and Triton's hazy atmospheres. All research aspects from their production and evolution processes, their observation/detection, to their fate and atmospheric impact are welcomed, including laboratory investigations and modeling.

Co-organized by TP/EXOA
Convener: Panayotis Lavvas | Co-conveners: Anni Määttänen, Audrey Chatain, Nathalie Carrasco
Orals
| Mon, 09 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST)|Room Jupiter (Hörsaal A)
Posters
| Attendance Mon, 09 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Mon, 09 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Mon, 14:30
Mon, 10:30
TP12

A great wealth of knowledge of our Moon stems from sampling and observing its surface. This session aims to attract a variety of scientific contributions addressing lunar surface processes and (mega)regolith evolution in terms of geology, geochronology, geophysics, geodynamics, geochemistry, numerical modeling, and remote sensing.

Lunar science and exploration are developing further with new and exciting missions being developed by China, the US, Japan, India, Russia, Korea and Europe, and with new stakeholders. This session will address open lunar science and innovation:

- Celebrating the legacy of Apollo and Luna programmes after 50+ years
- Recent lunar results: geochemistry, geophysics in the context of open planetary science and exploration
- Synthesis of results from Clementine, Prospector, SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang’e 1, 2 and 3, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LADEE, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Artemis and GRAIL
- First results from Chang'E 4, Chang'E 5 , Chandrayaan2,
- Goals and Status of missions under preparation: orbiters, CLPS, Luna25-27, SLIM, Commercial landers, Lunar sample return missions, Future cargo landers, EL3
- Precursor missions, instruments and investigations for landers, rovers, sample return, and human cis-lunar activities, Gateway, and human lunar surface sorties (Artemis and International Lunar Base)
- Next International Lunar Decade: databases, instruments, missions, terrestrial field campaigns, support studies
- ILEWG and Global Exploration roadmaps towards a global robotic/human Moon village
- Strategic Knowledge Gaps, and key science Goals relevant to Lunar Global Exploration
- The Moon for planetary science, life sciences, astronomy, fundamental research, resources utilisation, human spaceflight, peaceful cooperation, economical development, inspiration, training and capacity building.
- How a laboratory on the Moon should be equipped to be useful for a variety of disciplines, including geology, biology, and chemistry
- Historical, societal, humanistic aspects of lunar exploration

The EPSC 2024 TP12 Lunar Science and Exploration Open Session is co-sponsored by ILEWG, COSPAR, Moon Village Association, LUNEX EuroMoonMars, International Moonbase Alliance, EuroSpaceHub Academy, IAF committees (ITACCUS, Space Habitats, and Space Exploration), and contributes to ICEUM2024

Co-organized by MITM
Conveners: Bernard Foing, Gregory Schmidt | Co-conveners: Akos Kereszturi, Kristina Gibbs, Brian Day, Wajiha Iqbal, Carolyn van der Bogert
Orals
| Mon, 09 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C), Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Mon, 14:30
Tue, 14:30

Tuesday, 10 September

TP12

A great wealth of knowledge of our Moon stems from sampling and observing its surface. This session aims to attract a variety of scientific contributions addressing lunar surface processes and (mega)regolith evolution in terms of geology, geochronology, geophysics, geodynamics, geochemistry, numerical modeling, and remote sensing.

Lunar science and exploration are developing further with new and exciting missions being developed by China, the US, Japan, India, Russia, Korea and Europe, and with new stakeholders. This session will address open lunar science and innovation:

- Celebrating the legacy of Apollo and Luna programmes after 50+ years
- Recent lunar results: geochemistry, geophysics in the context of open planetary science and exploration
- Synthesis of results from Clementine, Prospector, SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang’e 1, 2 and 3, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS, LADEE, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Artemis and GRAIL
- First results from Chang'E 4, Chang'E 5 , Chandrayaan2,
- Goals and Status of missions under preparation: orbiters, CLPS, Luna25-27, SLIM, Commercial landers, Lunar sample return missions, Future cargo landers, EL3
- Precursor missions, instruments and investigations for landers, rovers, sample return, and human cis-lunar activities, Gateway, and human lunar surface sorties (Artemis and International Lunar Base)
- Next International Lunar Decade: databases, instruments, missions, terrestrial field campaigns, support studies
- ILEWG and Global Exploration roadmaps towards a global robotic/human Moon village
- Strategic Knowledge Gaps, and key science Goals relevant to Lunar Global Exploration
- The Moon for planetary science, life sciences, astronomy, fundamental research, resources utilisation, human spaceflight, peaceful cooperation, economical development, inspiration, training and capacity building.
- How a laboratory on the Moon should be equipped to be useful for a variety of disciplines, including geology, biology, and chemistry
- Historical, societal, humanistic aspects of lunar exploration

The EPSC 2024 TP12 Lunar Science and Exploration Open Session is co-sponsored by ILEWG, COSPAR, Moon Village Association, LUNEX EuroMoonMars, International Moonbase Alliance, EuroSpaceHub Academy, IAF committees (ITACCUS, Space Habitats, and Space Exploration), and contributes to ICEUM2024

Co-organized by MITM
Conveners: Bernard Foing, Gregory Schmidt | Co-conveners: Akos Kereszturi, Kristina Gibbs, Brian Day, Wajiha Iqbal, Carolyn van der Bogert
Orals
| Mon, 09 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C), Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Mon, 14:30
Tue, 14:30
TP14

The aim of this session is to share the knowledge and experience gained by all Mars exploration programmes, both in Europe and worldwide, to promote synergies among the various missions in operations and development. We welcome contributions from any field of Mars science (observation or modelling) and exploration, in particular mission status and instrument overviews of latest scientific results and technical developments. These may include latest scientific results and mission overviews, as well as new challenges, for orbiters (Mars Express, ExoMars TGO, Odyssey, MRO, MAVEN, Mangalyaan/Mars Orbiter Mission, Tianwen-1, Hope), surface assets (Mars Science Laboratory, Insight, Mars2020, Tianwen-1), and future missions (ExoMars Rosalind Franklin Mission, Martian Moons eXploration (MMX), Mars Sample Return, and beyond).

Co-organized by MITM
Conveners: Alejandro Cardesin Moinelo, Lucie Riu | Co-conveners: Elliot Sefton-Nash, Colin Wilson, Eleni Bohacek, Csilla Orgel, Claire Parfitt
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST), 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Jupiter (Hörsaal A)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Wed, 10:30
TP3

Planetary field analogues (PFAs) are places on Earth sharing physical, chemical, or geological and environmental similarities with extra-terrestrial environments or approximate conditions or features found on other planetary bodies. PFAs are essential for ongoing and coming missions, including testing and improving technologies, workflows and protocols, space mission concepts, and human factors for space exploration.
In this session we welcome abstracts on different surface planetary processes, geochemical and astrobiological investigations using field analogues and laboratory simulation studies, field methods and sampling techniques. We also encourage abstracts focused on studies testing robotic missions and research regarding training crewed exploration missions and strategies, and testing exploration technology applications. Furthermore, we welcome abstracts outlining the use of the analogue field sites in engaging the public, as well as space agencies, the media, and educators.

Conveners: Fulvio Franchi, Barbara Cavalazzi | Co-conveners: Gareth Davies, Alexandra Hillebrand-Voiculescu, Jonathan Merrison, Roger Lawrence R. L. Gibson, Felipe Gómez
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 14:30
Tue, 10:30
TP5

Ionospheres are a fundamental part of planetary and cometary atmospheres that are formed by solar radiation and are affected by a myriad of different processes, such as space weather activity or neutral atmosphere variations. Moreover, ionospheres play an important role in controlling the dynamics of the system, as they are the link between the neutral atmosphere, exosphere and surrounding plasma environments (e.g. the solar wind for Mars, Venus, Pluto and comets, and the Kronian magnetosphere for Titan). Understanding how each unmagnetized body reacts to all these factors is a key in comparative aeronomy because although a priori all of them have a general similar behaviour, they also have scientifically important differences caused by their different natures.

This session focuses on the ionospheres of Mars, Venus, Pluto, Titan, and comets, and solicits abstracts concerning remote and in situ data analysis, modelling studies, instrumentation and mission concepts. Abstracts on planetary flybys, such as the BepiColombo and Solar Orbiter flybys to Venus, are also welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to, day and night side ionospheric variability, sources and influences of ionization, ion-neutral coupling, current systems, comparative ionospheric studies, and solar wind-ionosphere interactions and responses of the ionized and neutral regimes to transient space weather events. Abstracts on general plasma and escape processes are also welcome.

Co-organized by SB
Convener: Katerina Stergiopoulou | Co-conveners: Beatriz Sanchez-Cano, Christopher Fowler, Lina Hadid, Valeria Mangano, Niklas Edberg, Charlotte Götz
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00, Attendance 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 16:30
Tue, 10:30
EXOA6

Over the last decades, we have been getting closer to characterizing the atmospheres of exoplanets. This has sparked renewed investigations of how planetary atmospheres could act as a tracer of the evolution of planets as a whole system. Advances in planetary science have revealed an incredible diversity of possible atmospheres on the various planetary bodies in our galaxy and through time. Considerable efforts are being made at international level to better understand such diverse atmospheres and the driving forces behind their evolution. This session welcomes presentations regarding how our knowledge of current planetary atmospheres can shed light on their evolutionary paths. How can the exploration of planetary atmospheres inform about the history of planet formation, their long-term climate, and the interaction between atmosphere, surface, interior and volatile reservoirs?

Co-organized by TP/OPS
Convener: Ann Carine Vandaele | Co-conveners: Giuliano Liuzzi, Yeon Joo Lee, Cédric Gillmann, Anne Grete Straume-Lindner
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 14:30
Tue, 10:30
SB5

The session includes results from sample return missions, in particular those achieved by the recent OSIRIS-Rex (NASA), Hayabusa2 (JAXA), and Chang’e 5 (CNSA). The aim is to stimulate the discussion on the perspective of future sample return missions, in terms of both sciencific return and technological value, specifically in view of NASA’s Mars Sample Return mission.
The session is opened, but not restricted, to the following topics: a) new results from in-orbit observations of sample return missions; b) new laboratory analyses on samples returned from OSIRIS-REx, Hayabusa2, Chang’e 5 and past missions (e.g., Luna, Apollo, Stardust, Hayabusa); c) preliminary activities for the Mars Sample Return mission; d) preparation, performed studies and expected results from future sample return missions (e.g., Mars Sample Return, Tianwen2); e) new sample return mission concepts; f) technologies and methods for sample return; g) technologies and concepts for curation facilities; h) technologies and concepts for handling, transport and analysis of returned samples.

Co-organized by TP/MITM
Convener: Andrea Longobardo | Co-convener: Stefano Rubino
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Neptune (Hörsaal D)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 16:30
Tue, 10:30
OPS2

The Juno spacecraft continues its journey around Jupiter and its satellites making new important discoveries. Results from Juno at Jupiter have revealed numerous processes associated with the physics and chemistry of its interior, atmosphere, magnetosphere and its origin and evolution. Juno’s extended mission transformed the Jupiter-focused mission to a full system explorer. The extended mission runs through 2025 and includes numerous close and distant flybys of Io, Europa, and Ganymede along with an exploration of Jupiter’s enigmatic ring system. This session invites observational and modeling results related to Juno’s results on Jupiter and the comparison to other giant planets and exo-planetary systems. New results from Juno’s extended mission on Jupiter’s northern latitudes as well as the satellites and ring system are welcome.

Co-organized by TP/EXOA
Convener: Scott Bolton | Co-conveners: Francesca Zambon, Heidi Becker, Anton Ermakov, Paul Hartogh, Alessandro Moirano, Ali Sulaiman
Orals
| Mon, 09 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST), 14:30–16:00 (CEST)|Room Sun (Auditorium)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00, Attendance 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Tue, 10:30
MITM3

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to the development of computer software capable of performing tasks that would typically require human intelligence. Machine learning (ML) is a branch of computer science that explores algorithms that can learn from data. It is primarily divided into supervised learning, where the algorithm is presented with examples of labeled entries and the goal is to learn a general rule that maps inputs to outputs, and unsupervised learning, where no label is provided to the learning algorithm, allowing it to autonomously identify structures. Deep learning is a branch of machine learning based on multiple layers of artificial neural networks, which are computing systems inspired by the biological neural networks found in animal brains. This session aims to provide a forum for discussing recent advancements in the applications of AI and ML to planetary science.

Co-organized by TP/SB/ODAA
Conveners: Valerio Carruba, Evgeny Smirnov, Dagmara Oszkiewicz | Co-conveners: Bryce Bolin, Safwan Aljbaae, Gabriel Caritá, Antti Penttilä, Hanna Klimczak-Plucińska, Kat Volk, Rita C. Domingos, Hauke Hussmann, Mariela Huaman, Mario D'Amore
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B), Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 16:30
Tue, 10:30

Wednesday, 11 September

TP4

Shape, gravity field, orbit, tidal deformation, and rotation state are fundamental geodetic parameters of any planetary object. Measurements of these parameters are prerequisites for spacecraft navigation and mapping from orbit as well as modelling of planetary internal structure and evolution. This session welcomes contributions from all aspects of planetary geodesy, including relevant theories, observations, planned measurement concepts as well as modeling efforts in application to planets, satellites, asteroids and comets.

Co-organized by SB
Convener: Alexander Stark | Co-conveners: Bart Root, Marie Yseboodt, Anton Ermakov, Haifeng Xiao, Michaela Walterova
Orals
| Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Wed, 08:30
Wed, 14:30
MITM3

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to the development of computer software capable of performing tasks that would typically require human intelligence. Machine learning (ML) is a branch of computer science that explores algorithms that can learn from data. It is primarily divided into supervised learning, where the algorithm is presented with examples of labeled entries and the goal is to learn a general rule that maps inputs to outputs, and unsupervised learning, where no label is provided to the learning algorithm, allowing it to autonomously identify structures. Deep learning is a branch of machine learning based on multiple layers of artificial neural networks, which are computing systems inspired by the biological neural networks found in animal brains. This session aims to provide a forum for discussing recent advancements in the applications of AI and ML to planetary science.

Co-organized by TP/SB/ODAA
Conveners: Valerio Carruba, Evgeny Smirnov, Dagmara Oszkiewicz | Co-conveners: Bryce Bolin, Safwan Aljbaae, Gabriel Caritá, Antti Penttilä, Hanna Klimczak-Plucińska, Kat Volk, Rita C. Domingos, Hauke Hussmann, Mariela Huaman, Mario D'Amore
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B), Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Posters
| Attendance Tue, 10 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 16:30
Tue, 10:30
TP2

This session welcomes all presentations on Mars' interior and surface processes. With many active missions, Mars research is as active as ever, and new data come in on a daily basis. The aim of this session is to bring together disciplines as various as geology, geomorphology, geophysics, mineralogy, glaciology, and chemistry. We welcome presentations on both past and present processes, either pure Mars science or comparative planetology (including fieldwork on terrestrial analogues), either observations or modeling or laboratory experiments (or any combination of those). New results on Mars science obtained from recent in situ and orbital measurements are particularly encouraged, as well as studies related to upcoming missions and campaigns (ExoMars, Mars Sample Return).

Convener: Ernst Hauber | Co-conveners: Solmaz Adeli, Ana-Catalina Plesa, Peter Fawdon, Maurizio Pajola, Oguzcan Karagoz, Akos Kereszturi
Orals
| Thu, 12 Sep, 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C), Fri, 13 Sep, 08:30–10:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Thu, 14:30
Wed, 10:30
TP6

The early history of many rocky planetary bodies is dominated by differentiation into a silicate magma ocean, and an iron-alloy core. This is then followed by the solidification of the magma ocean and the first stages of crustal formation, as well as the formation of heterogeneities that may be preserved until the present day. Additionally, during this time, these bodies are still able to accrete new material, which can further alter their composition, size, and structure. Therefore, the accretionary and differentiation history of a rocky body has a profound influence on its subsequent geodynamic evolution, leading to divergent evolutions of planetary bodies within the same solar system e.g. the terrestrial planets. However, the complexity of the physical and chemical processes at play, as well as the paucity of samples, makes elucidating the conditions of late accretion and differentiation a present challenge.

This session invites contributions from all fields of planetary sciences that enlighten our understanding of the influence of late accretion and the physicochemical processes and conditions of planetary differentiation on the early evolution of rocky bodies, both in our own solar system, and in exoplanetary system. We especially encourage submissions from early career researchers.

Co-organized by SB/EXOA
Conveners: Valentin Bonnet Gibet , Kathryn Dodds, Simon Matthews, Pierru Rémy, Harry Becker, Doris Breuer, Harald Hiesinger, STEPHAN KLEMME, Kai Wünnemann
Orals
| Wed, 11 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Wed, 14:30
Wed, 10:30
TP7

Volcanism and tectonics are two of the most ubiquitous processes at work in the Solar System, substantially shaping the diverse surfaces of terrestrial planets, moons, and icy satellites. High-resolution orbital data, samples from the lunar surface, and seismic data from the Moon and Mars, have provided important constraints on the evolution of planetary bodies and their tectonic regimes. This gives us a much better understanding of how these worlds evolved, how they are internally structured, and why their surfaces look the way they do. Following the success of InSight on Mars, the selection of e.g., Dragonfly, VERITAS, EnVision, Chang’e 6 and the Farside Seismic Suite promise a wealth of additional observations of Titan, Venus, and the Moon that will contribute to furthering knowledge not only of the extent of volcanic and tectonic activity on these worlds, but also of their seismicity. Small body seismology is also becoming a hot topic, with space agencies considering seismometers for inclusion in future missions to asteroids and comets.

This session invites observational, analytical, theoretical, and analogue fieldwork research into any aspect of planetary endogenic processes. We welcome submissions on comparing landforms and processes on multiple bodies; geochemical and chronological data from planetary material; numerical modeling studies; tectonics and seismicity across the Solar System; theoretical and technical designs for current or future missions; as well as data analysis and insights on the seismicity and interior structures of planets and small bodies.

Co-organized by MITM
Conveners: Petr Broz, Oguzcan Karagoz, Iris van Zelst | Co-conveners: Ernst Hauber, Chloe Michaut, Sam Poppe, Filippo Carboni, Carolyn van der Bogert, Evandro Balbi, Gene Schmidt, Paola Cianfarra, Anna Horleston, Naomi Murdoch, Maxence Lefevre
Orals
| Wed, 11 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Wed, 16:30
Wed, 10:30
TP14

The aim of this session is to share the knowledge and experience gained by all Mars exploration programmes, both in Europe and worldwide, to promote synergies among the various missions in operations and development. We welcome contributions from any field of Mars science (observation or modelling) and exploration, in particular mission status and instrument overviews of latest scientific results and technical developments. These may include latest scientific results and mission overviews, as well as new challenges, for orbiters (Mars Express, ExoMars TGO, Odyssey, MRO, MAVEN, Mangalyaan/Mars Orbiter Mission, Tianwen-1, Hope), surface assets (Mars Science Laboratory, Insight, Mars2020, Tianwen-1), and future missions (ExoMars Rosalind Franklin Mission, Martian Moons eXploration (MMX), Mars Sample Return, and beyond).

Co-organized by MITM
Conveners: Alejandro Cardesin Moinelo, Lucie Riu | Co-conveners: Elliot Sefton-Nash, Colin Wilson, Eleni Bohacek, Csilla Orgel, Claire Parfitt
Orals
| Tue, 10 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST), 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Jupiter (Hörsaal A)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Wed, 10:30
EXOA4

Astrobiology is the study of whether present or past life exists elsewhere in the universe. To understand how life can begin in space, it is essential to know what organic compounds were likely available, and how they interacted with the planetary environment. This session seeks papers that offer existing/novel theoretical models or computational works that address the chemical and environmental conditions relevant to astrobiology on terrestrial planets/moons or ocean worlds, along with other theoretical, experimental, and observational works related to the emergence and development of Life in the Universe. This includes work related to prebiotic chemistry, the chemistry of early life, the biogeochemistry of life’s interaction with its environment, chemistry associated with biosignatures and their false positives, and chemistry pertinent to conditions that could possibly harbor life (e.g. Titan, Enceladus, Europa, TRAPPIST-1, habitable exoplanets, etc.).
Understanding how the planetary environment has influenced the evolution of life and how biological processes have changed the environment is an essential part of any study of the origin and search for signs of life. A central issue in the research on the emergence of life is the paradoxical role of water in pre-biotic chemistry. In fact,on the one hand, water is essential for all known life, on the other hand it is highly destructive for key biomolecules such as nucleic and polypeptides. Earth analogues experiments/instruments test and/or simulation campaigns and limits of life studies are included as well as one of the main topics of this session.

Major Space Agencies identified planetary habitability and the search for evidence of life as a key component of their scientific missions in the next two decades. The development of instrumentation and technology to support the search for complex organic molecules/sings of life/biosignatures and the endurance of life in space environments is critical to define unambiguous approaches to life detection over a broad range of planetary environments. A truly interdisciplinary approach is needed to delve into the core of the issue of emergence of life, because in addition to physics and chemistry it is also need to deploy a number of other sciences. We rely on contribution coming from mathematical or philosophical perspectives not only on astrobiology moreover we think that a part of the answers may lie in scientists who working on cancer research, genetics, space exploration paleontology who are not necessarily involved in this field.

Co-organized by TP
Convener: Felipe Gómez | Co-convener: Rosanna del Gaudio
Orals
| Wed, 11 Sep, 14:30–15:55 (CEST)|Room Neptune (Hörsaal D)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Wed, 14:30
Wed, 10:30

Thursday, 12 September

TP9

Impact processes have been shaping the Solar System, and modifying planetary surfaces and small bodies from its birth until today. This session aims at understanding impact processes in terms of impact cratering and ejecta dynamics, crater distribution and crater chronology, material mixing, shock metamorphism and other geochemical consequences, ejecta-atmosphere interactions, impact induced climatic and environmental effects, and biotic responses.

We welcome oral and poster presentations across this broad range of studies about natural or artificial impact collision phenomena on planetary surfaces and small bodies. In particular, abstracts on impact modelling, impact laboratory experiments, geologic and structural mapping, petrographic and geochemical analysis of impact products, as well as remote sensing observations from space missions to planets and small bodies.

Impacts also have a technical application for Planetary Defence, therefore we invite contributions from studies related to DART experiments and the upcoming HERA mission.

Co-organized by OPS/SB
Convener: Chrysa Avdellidou | Co-conveners: Robert Luther, Elena Martellato, Isabel Herreros, Jens Ormö, Christopher Hamann, Cem Berk Senel
Orals
| Thu, 12 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 12 Sep, 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 12 Sep, 08:30–19:30
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 14:30
EXOA5

Mineral surfaces might have played a pivotal role in the concentration, oligomerization, and compartmentalization of biologically relevant organic molecules, shielding them from radiation and hydrolysis. Concurrently, abiotic mineral precipitates known as biomorphs are able to mimic microbial cells and biologic remnants both morphologically and chemically. Join us in this session as we explore the dual role of minerals in igniting prebiotic chemical reactions and in hindering the detection of Life on Earth and Beyond. We welcome contributions focusing on reactions of mineral and/or metal surfaces with organic molecules in early Earth conditions and in extraterrestrial settings, such as interstellar media, icy moons, cometary environments and others. Topics can include both experimental and computational work tied to: i) adsorption processes and chemical reactivity of biomolecules on mineral surfaces, ii) hydrothermal alteration of organic matter in presence of minerals, iii) vesicle and protocell formation assisted by minerals, iv) the role of minerals/metals in the production of protometabolic reaction networks, v) mineral self-organized patterns and biomorphs that obscure the detection of true biosignatures and Life traces, including examples from laboratory experiments and field studies.

Co-organized by TP
Convener: Electra Kotopoulou | Co-conveners: Albert Rimola, Vassilissa Vinogradoff
Orals
| Thu, 12 Sep, 08:30–10:00 (CEST)|Room Neptune (Hörsaal D)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 12 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 12 Sep, 08:30–19:30
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 10:30
TP10

After the joint ESA/JAXA mission BepiColombo completed 3 successful swingbys of Mercury with closest approaches of only 200 km, spacecraft observations and numerical modelling give us insight into the unexplored regions around the innermost terrestrial planet.
Together with data obtained by the late NASA mission MESSENGER, BepiColombo’s swingbys and orbit phase will lead to new understanding about the origin, formation, evolution, composition, interior structure, and magnetospheric environment of Mercury.
This session hosts contributions to planetary, geological, exospheric and magnetospheric science results based on spacecraft observations by Mariner 10, MESSENGER, BepiColombo, and Earth-based observations, modelling of interior, surface and planetary environment and theory.
In particular, studies investigating the required BepiColombo observations during the nominal mission to validate the existing theoretical models about the interior, exosphere and magnetosphere are welcome,
as well as presentations on laboratory experiments useful to confirm potential future measurements.

Co-organized by MITM
Convener: Willi Exner | Co-conveners: Sébastien Besse, Jack Wright, Alice Lucchetti, Anna Milillo, Johannes Benkhoff, Valeria Mangano, Riku Jarvinen
Orals
| Fri, 13 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST), 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 12 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 12 Sep, 08:30–19:30
Orals |
Fri, 10:30
Thu, 10:30
TP11

Venus is commonly referred to as the twin planet of the Earth because of their similarities in mass, size, and distance to the Sun. However, the planet has embarked on a distinct evolutionary path that remains a puzzle. Studying Venus not only enhances our understanding of the history and properties of terrestrial planets in our Solar System but also permits for a better characterization of Earth-sized exoplanets.

The key role of Venus in the future of planetary exploration has been spotlighted in recent years, marked by the selection of several new missions, such as EnVision (ESA), VERITAS and DAVINCI (NASA). In addition, other missions are in preparation, such as Shukrayaan-1 (ISRO) and Venus Life Finder (Rocket Lab). This sets off a new era for Venus science and exploration, that will dramatically advance our understanding of the atmosphere, surface, and interior of our sister planet.

"Unveiling Venus from atmosphere to core" aims to holistically address the recent and upcoming advancements in Venus science and technology. We welcome a wide range of contributions from interior modeling, surface investigation, atmosphere research, laboratory experiments, and data analysis that can help us better understand the mysterious history of Venus and prepare us for space missions ahead.

Co-organized by MITM
Conveners: Julia Maia, Anne Grete Straume-Lindner, Ana-Catalina Plesa, Solmaz Adeli, Gabriella Gilli, Anne Davaille, Ann Carine Vandaele
Orals
| Fri, 13 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST), 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Jupiter (Hörsaal A)
Posters
| Attendance Thu, 12 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 12 Sep, 08:30–19:30, Attendance 14:30–16:00 (CEST) | Display Thu, 12 Sep, 08:30–19:30
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Thu, 10:30
TP2

This session welcomes all presentations on Mars' interior and surface processes. With many active missions, Mars research is as active as ever, and new data come in on a daily basis. The aim of this session is to bring together disciplines as various as geology, geomorphology, geophysics, mineralogy, glaciology, and chemistry. We welcome presentations on both past and present processes, either pure Mars science or comparative planetology (including fieldwork on terrestrial analogues), either observations or modeling or laboratory experiments (or any combination of those). New results on Mars science obtained from recent in situ and orbital measurements are particularly encouraged, as well as studies related to upcoming missions and campaigns (ExoMars, Mars Sample Return).

Convener: Ernst Hauber | Co-conveners: Solmaz Adeli, Ana-Catalina Plesa, Peter Fawdon, Maurizio Pajola, Oguzcan Karagoz, Akos Kereszturi
Orals
| Thu, 12 Sep, 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C), Fri, 13 Sep, 08:30–10:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Thu, 14:30
Wed, 10:30
MITM9

This session is to oversee the current and fast changing roles of drones (unmanned aerial vehicles, UAVs) and resemble mission types in planetary science. The presentations will provide examples, experiences and case studies how various drones have been used and planned to be applied in planetary science in the future, what type of instruments could be carried onboard and which strategy to follow in their planning. Among the targets of drones Venus, Mars, Titan and Earth analogues provide rich and diverse conditions to work under, while the understanding of applied technologies from this session help to formulate next steps.

Co-organized by TP
Convener: Akos Kereszturi | Co-conveners: Gian Gabriele Ori, Baptiste Chide
Orals
| Thu, 12 Sep, 16:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Saturn (Hörsaal B)
Thu, 16:30

Friday, 13 September

TP2

This session welcomes all presentations on Mars' interior and surface processes. With many active missions, Mars research is as active as ever, and new data come in on a daily basis. The aim of this session is to bring together disciplines as various as geology, geomorphology, geophysics, mineralogy, glaciology, and chemistry. We welcome presentations on both past and present processes, either pure Mars science or comparative planetology (including fieldwork on terrestrial analogues), either observations or modeling or laboratory experiments (or any combination of those). New results on Mars science obtained from recent in situ and orbital measurements are particularly encouraged, as well as studies related to upcoming missions and campaigns (ExoMars, Mars Sample Return).

Convener: Ernst Hauber | Co-conveners: Solmaz Adeli, Ana-Catalina Plesa, Peter Fawdon, Maurizio Pajola, Oguzcan Karagoz, Akos Kereszturi
Orals
| Thu, 12 Sep, 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C), Fri, 13 Sep, 08:30–10:00 (CEST)|Room Uranus (Hörsaal C)
Posters
| Attendance Wed, 11 Sep, 10:30–12:00 (CEST) | Display Wed, 11 Sep, 08:30–19:00
Orals |
Thu, 14:30
Wed, 10:30
TP11

Venus is commonly referred to as the twin planet of the Earth because of their similarities in mass, size, and distance to the Sun. However, the planet has embarked on a distinct evolutionary path that remains a puzzle. Studying Venus not only enhances our understanding of the history and properties of terrestrial planets in our Solar System but also permits for a better characterization of Earth-sized exoplanets.

The key role of Venus in the future of planetary exploration has been spotlighted in recent years, marked by the selection of several new missions, such as EnVision (ESA), VERITAS and DAVINCI (NASA). In addition, other missions are in preparation, such as Shukrayaan-1 (ISRO) and Venus Life Finder (Rocket Lab). This sets off a new era for Venus science and exploration, that will dramatically advance our understanding of the atmosphere, surface, and interior of our sister planet.

"Unveiling Venus from atmosphere to core" aims to holistically address the recent and upcoming advancements in Venus science and technology. We welcome a wide range of contributions from interior modeling, surface investigation, atmosphere research, laboratory experiments, and data analysis that can help us better understand the mysterious history of Venus and prepare us for space missions ahead.

Co-organized by MITM
Conveners: Julia Maia, Anne Grete Straume-Lindner, Ana-Catalina Plesa, Solmaz Adeli, Gabriella Gilli, Anne Davaille, Ann Carine Vandaele
Orals
| Fri, 13 Sep, 08:30–12:00 (CEST), 14:30–18:00 (CEST)|Room Jupiter (Hörsaal A)