Union-wide
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Inter- and Transdisciplinary Sessions
Disciplinary sessions

CL – Climate: Past, Present & Future

Programme group chairs: Irka Hajdas, Kerstin Treydte, Kerstin Treydte

CL1 EDI

Present day climate is characterized by the presence of two ice sheets, one in each hemisphere, which is rare in the climate history of the Earth. This feature is strongly associated with the fact that during quaternary, the amount of GHG, especially atmospheric CO2 content in the atmosphere, was low compared to cenozoic's one. At the scale of centuries, the warming of high latitudes will be pivotal for humankind, but are we really able to diagnose such climate changes?
The warm climates of Cenozoic and Mesozoic offer the unique opportunity to investigate the climate behaviour in a rich GHG world. For many decades, a large number of scientists, from climate modeling groups to data reconstruction communities, have addressed several issues concerning the comparison of temperature simulations and proxies reconstructions for many warm periods at mid and high latitudes, but also between the surface and the bottom of paleo ocean. These efforts pointed out a large mismatch for mid and high latitude surface temperatures. Models largely under estimating temperature reconstructions derived from many terrestrial and oceanic proxies. A consequence was that the thermal gradient form equator to pole, which was very low by the reconstructions, has remained over estimated by the models, with a weak polar amplification. These issues have been exacerbated by Model Intercomparison Projects (MIP), which clearly pointed out that these mismatches were shared by most models (Pliomip for mid Pliocene and Deepmip for Eocene), and therefore, this mismatch can be considered as a robust feature.
This long-lasting paradox is associated with our ability to simulate earth's climate with a very low equator to pole temperature gradient compared to quaternary glacial inter-glacial cycles has been arising since the 1970s'. Therefore, it could be interesting to revisit this issue together with modelers of past warm climates and data people and discuss the plausible causes of this mismatch: lack of processes (cloud physics, GHG atmospheric content, aerosols...), but also uncertainties on data reconstructions. Moreover, this issue has important consequences for our ability to correctly understand and simulate the future climates, especially at high latitudes, and the interactions with ice sheets at scales of decades to centuries.

Public information:

The ongoing climate change is already prominent. Its evolution during this century is the major topic tackled by the IPCC, even though some projections are investigated up to 2300. The different scenarios used by the IPCC, from SSP1-1.9 to SSP5-8.5 depict pCO2 emissions that may lead to a drastic increase, reaching 125 Gt/year at the end of the century. Such high values correspond to warm climates of the Cenozoic. It is therefore pivotal to know how the climate models currently used for projections are able to describe this warm and Pco2 rich climates. 

In a first step, thanks to mips (model intercomparison projects) similar to those used for projections (Cmip), we will depict the robust features and weaknesses of modelling mid-Pliocene, mid-Miocene, and Eocene climates when comparing model results and data reconstructions. For all these climates, there is a large mismatch between model simulation and reconstruction from different proxies at mid and high latitudes. Most of the models largely underestimate the temperature increase for these latitudes. This long-lasting paradox is also puzzling for future long-term projections. 

In a second step, we will investigate the uncertainties, limitations, but also the important advantages due to the possibility of comparing model results to real data. 

Last but not least, in a final step, we will investigate the possible explanations to partly solve this paradox, pointing out how these studies may help to better constrain long-term future climates.

 

 

16h15-17h: Part I.  How current MIPs deal with comparison with temperature reconstructions: a review from Cenozoic warm climates Mid/late Pliocene, Mid Miocene Climate Optimum and deeper warm climates

·       16h45-17h: Alan Haywood: Pliocene climate and the high latitudes: a data/model perspective 

 

·        16h30-16h45: Natalie Burls: Simulating Miocene warmth: insights from an opportunistic MultiModel ensemble (MioMIP1) and efforts towards a coordinated intercomparison (MioMIP2)

 

·       16h15-16h30: Dan Lunt: DeepMIP-Eocene: A window to a super-warm world, 50 million years ago, through an model-model-proxy-proxy intercomparison approach

 

 

 

 

 

17h-17h30: Part II. Forcing factors and validation

 

·       17h-17h10: James Rae: Cenozoic CO2: from the deep ocean to the atmosphere

 

·       17h10-17h20: Erin McClymont: Pliocene climate variability on glacial-interglacial timescales (PlioVAR): lessons learned from multi-proxy reconstructions of seasurface temperatures and data-model comparisons

 

 

·       17h20-17h30: Aisling Dolan: Efforts towards reconstructing ice sheets during the Pliocene

 

 

17h30-18h???Part III: Some hints to better understand this long-standing paradox

 

·       17h30-17h40: Ran Feng: Revisiting the low-gradient problem with weather-resolving atmosphere-ocean coupled simulations
 

·       17h40-17h50: Gerrit Lohmann: Effects of CO2 and Ocean Mixing on Miocene and Pliocene Temperature Gradients

 

 

·       17h50-18h:  Peter Hopcroft: Potential role of methane and other non-CO2 trace gases in past warm climates
 

 

Convener: Gilles Ramstein | Co-conveners: Ayako Abe-Ouchi, Paul Valdes, Anna Ruth Halberstadt
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room F1
Mon, 16:15
MAL4
Arne Richter Award for Outstanding ECS Lecture by Wim Thiery
Convener: Irka Hajdas
Abstract
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:20–16:50 (CEST)
 
Room E2
Tue, 16:20
MAL14
Hans Oeschger Medal Lecture by Hugues Goosse
Convener: Irka Hajdas
Abstract
| Thu, 27 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room F1
Thu, 19:00
MAL21
Milutin Milankovic Medal Lecture by Bette L. Otto-Bliesner
Convener: Irka Hajdas
Abstract
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–14:30 (CEST)
 
Room F1
Wed, 14:00
DM15
Division meeting for Climate: Past, Present & Future (CL)
Co-organized by CL
Convener: Irka Hajdas | Co-convener: Kerstin Treydte
Wed, 26 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room F1
Wed, 12:45

CL1 – Past Climates

Programme group scientific officers: Irka Hajdas, Kerstin Treydte

CL1.1

Over recent decades we have gained a robust understanding of climate change fundamentals, but its specific and localized impacts are anything but certain. The need to provide boundary conditions for forecasting and computational modelling has increased the importance of quantitative methods in the field of palaeoenvironmental, palaeoclimatic and palaeohydrological reconstruction.

Continental environmental archives (e.g. speleothems, lake and river sediments, peatlands, and vertebrate and invertebrate remains) are often highly temporally resolved (subdecadal to seasonal) and provide more direct information about atmospheric and hydrological processes than marine archives. The wide variety of continental archives allows for intercomparison and ground-truthing of results from different environments, while multi-proxy reconstructions from the same archive can disentangle local and supra-regional environmental conditions. This approach is particularly useful when dealing with high spatial variability, signal buffering, nonlinearities, and uncertainties in the proxy sensitivity.

This session aims to highlight recent advances in the use of innovative and quantitative proxies to reconstruct past environmental change on land. We welcome studies of all continental archives, including but not limited to carbonates (cave deposits, palaeosols, snails), sediments (lakes, peatlands, rivers, alluvial fans), and biological materials (tree rings, fossil assemblages, bones, biomarkers). If you calibrate physical and chemical proxies that incorporate modern transfer functions, perform forward modeling and/or geochemical modeling to predict proxy signals, or attempt at quantitative estimates of past temperature and palaeohydrological dynamics you are mostly welcomed in our session! We are keen to invite reconstructions of temperature and hydrologic variability over large spatial scales, palaeoclimate data assimilation and monitoring studies leading to calibration or simply better understanding of climate proxies. Our session provides a forum for discussing recent innovations and future directions in the for continental palaeoenvironmental studies on seasonal to multi-millennial timescales.

Convener: Ola Kwiecien | Co-conveners: Jessica Oster, Cindy De Jonge, Bethany Fox, Sebastian F.M. Breitenbach
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–10:05 (CEST)
 
Room 0.49/50
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall CL
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 16:15
CL1.2 EDI

Modelling past climate states, and the transient evolution of Earth’s climate remains challenging. Time periods such as the Paleocene, Eocene, Pliocene, the Last Interglacial, the Last Glacial Maximum or the mid-Holocene span across a vast range of climate conditions. At times, these lie far outside the bounds of the historical period that most models are designed and tuned to reproduce. However, our ability to predict future climate conditions and potential pathways to them is dependent on our models' abilities to reproduce just such phenomena. Thus, our climatic and environmental history is ideally suited to thoroughly test and evaluate models against data, so they may be better able to simulate the present and make future climate projections.

We invite papers on palaeoclimate-specific model development, model simulations and model-data comparison studies. Simulations may be targeted to address specific questions or follow specified protocols (as in the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project – PMIP or the Deep Time Model Intercomparison Project – DeepMIP). They may include anything between time-slice equilibrium experiments to long transient climate simulations (e.g. transient simulations covering the entire glacial cycle as per the goal of the PalMod project) with timescales of processes ranging from synoptic scales to glacial cycles and beyond. Comparisons may include past, historical as well as future simulations and focus on comparisons of mean states, gradients, circulation or modes of variability using reconstructions of temperature, precipitation, vegetation or tracer species (e.g. δ18O, δD or Pa/Th).

Evaluations of results from the latest phase of PMIP4-CMIP6 are particularly encouraged. However, we also solicit comparisons of different models (comprehensive GCMs, isotope-enabled models, EMICs and/or conceptual models) between different periods, or between models and data, including an analysis of the underlying mechanisms as well as contributions introducing novel model or experimental setups.

Including Milutin Milankovic Medal Lecture
Co-organized by NP5/OS4
Convener: Kira Rehfeld | Co-conveners: Manuel Chevalier, Marie-Luise Kapsch, Nils Weitzel, Julia Hargreaves, Marcus Lofverstrom
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room F1
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Wed, 10:45
Mon, 14:00
CL1.5 EDI

The half-century since the first deep ice core drilling at Camp Century, Greenland, has seen extensive innovation in methods of ice sample extraction, analysis and interpretation. Ice core sciences include isotopic diffusion analysis, multiple-isotope systematics, trace gases and their isotopic compositions, ice structure and physical properties, high-resolution analysis of major and trace impurities, and studies of DNA and radiochemistry in ice, among many others. Many climate and geochemical proxies have been identified from ice cores, with ongoing effort to extend their application and refine their interpretation. Great challenges remain in the field of ice coring sciences, including the identification of suitable sites for recovery of million-year-old ice; spatial integration of climate records (e.g. PAGES groups Antarctica2k and Iso2k); and deeper understanding of glaciological phenomena such as streaming flow, folding of layers and basal ice properties. This session welcomes all contributions reporting the state-of-the-art in ice coring sciences, including drilling and processing, dating, analytical techniques, results and interpretations of ice core records from polar ice sheets and mid- and low-latitude glaciers, remote and autonomous methods of surveying ice stratigraphy, and related modelling research.

Convener: Michael Döring | Co-conveners: Michael Dyonisius, Helle Astrid Kjær, Anja Eichler
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room 0.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall CL
Orals |
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 08:30
SSP1.5 EDI

What role did climate dynamics play in human evolution, the dispersal of different Homo species within and beyond the African continent, and key cultural innovations? Were dry spells, stable humid conditions, or rapid climate fluctuations the main driver of human evolution and migration? In order to evaluate the impact that different timescales and magnitudes of climatic shifts might have had on the living conditions of prehistoric humans, we need reliable and continuous reconstructions of paleoenvironmental conditions and fluctuations from the vicinity of paleoanthropological and archaeological sites. The search for the environmental context of human evolution and mobility crucially depends on the interpretation of paleoclimate archives from outcrop geology, lacustrine and marine sediments. Linking archeological data to paleoenvironmental reconstructions and models becomes increasingly important.

As a contribution towards a better understanding of these human-climate interactions the conveners encourage submission of abstracts on their project’s research on (geo)archaeology, paleoecology, paleoclimate, stratigraphy, and paleoenvironmental reconstructions. We especially welcome contributions offering new methods for dealing with difficult archive conditions and dating challenges. We hope this session will appeal to a broad audience by highlighting the latest research on paleoenvironmental reconstructions in the vicinity of key sites of human evolution, showcasing a wide variety of analytical methods, and encouraging collaboration between different research groups. Conceptual models, modelling results and model-data comparisons are warmly welcomed, as collaborative and interdisciplinary research.

Co-organized by CL1
Convener: Verena E. Foerster | Co-conveners: Annett Junginger, Christian Zeeden, Janina J. Nett, Simon Kübler, Rachel Lupien, Inka Meyer
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room -2.21
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 16:15
Mon, 16:15
SSP2.2 EDI

This session aims to showcase an exciting diversity of state-of-the-art advances in all aspects of paleoceanography and paleoclimatology. We invite studies ranging across organic and inorganic geochemistry, sedimentology, and paleontology from marine and terrestrial environments, as well as multidisciplinary and modeling studies reaching into the future. We invite contributions that provide insight into the evolution of the Earth on short and long timescales, including how studies of paleoclimate and drivers can inform our current climatic changes and the implications for future Earth.

Co-organized by CL1/OS1
Convener: Gregory Price | Co-conveners: Madeleine Vickers, Jack Longman, Laura Rasmussen
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–17:35 (CEST)
 
Room G1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Fri, 10:45
Fri, 10:45
SSP4.2 EDI

Carbonate (bio)minerals have been essential indicators for life throughout most of Earth’s history and are important archives for past climate and environmental change. Geochemical investigations are crucial for understanding (I) the paleobiology of carbonate biomineralizers, (II) the evolution of microbial habitats, and (III) complementary changes in the atmosphere-hydrosphere systems through time. With this session, we encourage contributions from sedimentology, geochemistry and (geo)biology that utilize carbonate (bio)minerals (e.g., invertebrate shells, foraminifera, microbialites and stromatolites) with the aim to reconstruct paleo-environments, seasonality, seawater chemistry and paleobiology in a wide range of modern to deep time settings, including critical intervals of environmental and climate change. This includes studies targeting original skeletal carbonate preservation and diagenetic alteration and theoretical or experimental studies of trace element partitioning and isotope fractionation in carbonate (bio)minerals.

Co-organized by BG5/CL1
Convener: Niels de Winter | Co-conveners: Johan Vellekoop, Mónica Sánchez-Román, Alexandra Rodler, Sebastian Viehmann
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room -2.31
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall SSP/GM
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 10:45
Tue, 10:45
GMPV8.5 EDI

Volcanoes release gas effluents and aerosol particles into the atmosphere during eruptive episodes and by quiescent emissions. Volcanic degassing exerts a dominant role in forcing the timing and nature of volcanic unrest and eruptions. Understanding the exsolution processes of gas species dissolved in magma, and measuring their emissions is crucial to characterise eruptive mechanism and evaluate the sub-sequent impacts on the atmospheric composition, the environment and the biosphere. Emissions range from silent exhalation through soils to astonishing eruptive clouds that release gas and particles into the atmosphere, potentially exerting a strong impact on the Earth’s radiation budget and climate over a range of temporal and spatial scales. Strong explosive volcanic eruptions are a major natural driver of climate variability at interannual to multidecadal time scales. Quiescent passive degassing and smaller-magnitude eruptions on the other hand can impact on regional climate system. Through direct exposure and indirect effects, volcanic emissions may influence local-to-regional air quality and seriously affect the biosphere and environment. Volcanic gases can also present significant hazards to populations downwind of an eruption, in terms of human, animal and plant health, which subsequently can affect livelihoods and cause socio-economic challenges. Gas emissions are measured and monitored via a range of in-situ and remote sensing techniques, to gain insights into both the subterranean-surface processes and quantify the extent of their impacts. In addition, modelling of the subsurface and atmospheric/climatic processes, as well as laboratory experiments, are fundamental to the interpretation of field-based and satellite observations.

This session focuses on the state-of-the-art and interdisciplinary science concerning all aspects of volcanic degassing and impacts of relevance to the Volcanology, Environmental, Atmospheric and Climate sciences (including regional climate), and Hazard assessment. We invite contributions on all aspects of volcanic plumes science, their observation, modelling and impacts. We welcome contributions that address issues around the assessment of hazards and impacts from volcanic degassing both in crises and at persistently degassing volcanoes.

Co-organized by AS4/CL1/NH2
Convener: Pasquale Sellitto | Co-conveners: Giuseppe G. Salerno, Corinna Kloss, Tjarda Roberts
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–10:05 (CEST)
 
Room -2.47/48
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 10:45

CL1.1 – Deep Time

Programme group scientific officers: Jan-Berend Stuut, Elisabeth Dietze

CL1.1.1 EDI

The pacing of the global climate system by orbital variations is clearly demonstrated in the timing of e.g. glacial-interglacial cycles. The mechanisms that translate this forcing into geoarchives and climate changes continue to be debated. We invite submissions that explore the climate system response to orbital forcing, and that test the stability of these relationships under different climate regimes or across evolving climate states (e.g. mid Pleistocene transition, Pliocene-Pleistocene transition, Miocene vs Pliocene, and also older climate transitions). Submissions exploring proxy data and/or modelling work are welcomed, as this session aims to bring together proxy-based, theoretical and/or modelling studies focused on global and regional climate responses to astronomical forcing at different time scales in the Phanerozoic.
Hamdi Omar will give an invited presetation on case studies of Phanerozoic Cyclostratigraphy in North Africa.

Co-organized by SSP2
Convener: Christian Zeeden | Co-conveners: Stefanie Kaboth-Bahr, Matthias Sinnesael, Romain Vaucher, Anya Crocker, Peter Hopcroft, Anne-Christine Da Silva
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST)
 
Room 0.49/50
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 16:15
CL1.1.2 EDI

Several hyperthermal crises, i.e., times of sharp but short-term temperature rise, punctuated Earth history, and often coincided with marine and/or terrestrial mass extinctions. The largest occurred at the Permo-Triassic boundary 252 Myr ago when >80% of marine species went extinct, and more recent, smaller examples include the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Studies on hyperthermal crisis have focused mainly on the oceans, but heating and acid rain had drastic effects also on land, stressing the terrestrial environments and killing plants and animals at all trophic levels. Understanding past hyperthermal crises may provide critical insight for our near future, in the context of anthropogenic warming and our rapidly changing planet.
Hyperthermal crises have remained a challenge to pin down, largely due to discrepancies among (and within) proxies and models, as well as the interpretation of that data. Furthermore, understanding the impact of temperature extremes and the unprecedented reorganisation of the hydrological cycle, palaeogeographic controls, and biotic condition have likewise remained a challenge. However, recent developments in dating, proxies, spatial/temporal resolution, and deep-time Earth system modelling are now shedding new light on common mechanisms and processes leading up to, during, and after these catastrophic events.
In this session, we welcome research regarding hyperthermal crises both from marine and terrestrial environments. Research may include (but not limited to) novel findings in fundamental geology (e.g., sedimentary response), proxy development (e.g., isotopic geochemistry), fossil interpretations (e.g., palaeontology), and paleoclimate Earth system modelling at a regional or global scale, aimed towards understanding paleoclimatic changes and their impact on biodiversity during hyperthermal intervals. Furthermore, we welcome comparative studies between hyperthermal events (including ocean anoxic events) in which investigators explore commonalities and consequences of high temperature on life and biogeochemical cycles, and how these consequences may scale to the magnitude of the temperature change.
We particularly welcome more data from terrestrial settings, both to 1) provide quantifiable evidence to mirror the effect of massive volcanism and related greenhouse gas input and 2) link hyperthermal crises with our current warming world (e.g., droughts, heatwaves, biodiversity crisis).

Public information:

This session and related hyperthermal studies of conveners were supported by the National Science Foundation of China (Grant 42202256, 42288201, 41672111 and 41888101), the China Geological Survey Project (Grant DD20190005), IGCP739, the State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy (Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS) (Grant 223138), the International Postdoctoral Exchange Fellowship Program (Grant 2020026), NERC (Grant NE/X013111/1) and Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship (Grant DHF\R1\221014).

Convener: Zhicai Zhu | Co-conveners: Alexander Farnsworth, Jacopo Dal Corso, Caitlyn Witkowski, Michael Benton
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Mon, 24 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall CL
Orals |
Tue, 08:30
Mon, 10:45
Mon, 10:45
CL1.1.3 EDI

Today, the Indian, Pacific and Southern Oceans and associated ocean gateways capture the complex intermediate and deep-water return pathways of the global thermohaline circulation. The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) acts as a low latitude heat source for the polar regions and is a crucial part in globally significant climatic systems like the Australasian Monsoon, Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). This highlights the Indo-Pacific’s importance in deciphering past and future coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics.
The Cenozoic also sees large reorganisation of the hydrographic and atmospheric fronts across the Southern Hemisphere (SH). These changes have significant consequences for icesheet build-up in Antarctica and ocean-atmosphere carbon cycling, with further implications for surface ocean dynamics and productivity. Characterisation of these fronts using sedimentary records, located in mid-to-high latitudes in the SH allow us to understand the sensitivity and interconnection between Antarctic icesheets and carbon cycle to frontal shifts.
This session explores the role of the Indian, Pacific and Southern Oceans and their gateways in global climate change and as a biogeographic diversity hot spot from the geological past to the present. To understand the Cenozoic evolution of these Oceans and associated low- and high-latitude (especially SH) gateways, we invite submissions on wide-ranging topics including paleoclimatology, palaeoceanography, sedimentology, palaeontology, and data-model comparisons. This session will examine how feedbacks between the IPWP, Australasian hydroclimate and tectonic and/or weathering processes affect the evolution of the global monsoons and the ITCZ. We also encourage marine and/or terrestrial multi-proxy studies, investigating Cenozoic teleconnections of both equatorial Indo-Pacific (e.g., ENSO/IOD) and high latitude SH processes (e.g., variability of hydrographic fronts).

Co-organized by BG5/OS1/SSP1
Convener: Anna Joy Drury | Co-conveners: Deborah Tangunan, Gerald Auer, Mariem Saavedra-Pellitero, Elisa Malinverno, Iván Hernández-Almeida, Beth Christensen
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 0.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 10:45
CL1.1.4

The geological record provides insight into how climate processes operate and evolve in response to different than modern boundary conditions and forcings. Understanding deep-time climate evolution is paramount to progressing on understanding fundamental questions of Earth System feedbacks and sensitivity to perturbations, such as the behaviour of the climate system under elevated atmospheric CO2 levels—relative to the Quaternary—, or the existence of climatic tipping points and thresholds. In recent years, geochemical techniques and Earth System Models complexity have been greatly improved and several international projects on deep-time climates (DeepMIP, MioMIP, PlioMIP) have been initiated, helping to bridge the gap between palaeoclimate modelling and data community. This session invites work on deep-time climate simulations and proxy-based reconstructions from the Cambrian to the Pliocene. We especially encourage submissions featuring palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, palaeoclimate modelling, and the integration of proxies and models of any complexity.

Convener: Jean-Baptiste Ladant | Co-conveners: Marlow Cramwinckel, Yannick Donnadieu, Yonggang Liu, Zhongshi Zhang, Ran Feng
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST), 14:00–15:40 (CEST)
 
Room 0.49/50
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 16:15
GMPV1.2 EDI

Time is a fundamental variable for the understanding of history and dynamics of Earth and planetary processes. Consequently, precise and accurate determination of crystallisation, deposition, exhumation or exposure ages of geological materials has had, and will continue to have, a key role in the geosciences. In recent years, substantial improvement in spatial and temporal resolution of well-established dating techniques and development of new methods have revealed previously unknown complexity of natural systems and in many cases revolutionised our understanding of rates of fundamental geologic processes.

With this session, we aim to provide a platform to discuss 1) advances in a broad spectrum of geochronological and thermochronological methods (sample preparation, analytical techniques, interpretational and modelling approaches) and 2) applications of such methods to a variety of problems across the Earth sciences, across the geological time and across scales of the process studied. We particularly encourage presentations of novel and unconventional applications or attempts to develop new geo/thermochronometers.

Co-organized by CL1.1/GM2/SSP2/TS9
Convener: Dawid Szymanowski | Co-conveners: Cody Colleps, Lorenzo Tavazzani, Marie Genge, Catherine Mottram, Maxime Bernard, Perach Nuriel
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room D1
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X2
Orals |
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 10:45

CL1.2 – Last ~2.6 Ma

Programme group scientific officers: Jan-Berend Stuut, Carole Nehme

CL1.2.1 EDI

Tree rings are one of nature’s most versatile archives, providing insight into past environmental conditions at annual and intra-annual resolution and from local to global scales. Besides being valued proxies for historical climate, tree rings are also important indicators of plant physiological responses to changing environments and of long-term ecological processes. In this broad context we welcome contributions using one or more of the following approaches to either study the impact of environmental change on the growth and physiology of trees and forest ecosystems, or to assess and reconstruct past environmental change: (i) dendrochronological methods including studies based on tree-ring width, MXD or Blue Intensity, (ii) stable isotopes in tree rings and related plant compounds, (iii) dendrochemistry, (iv) quantitative wood anatomy, (v) ecophysiological data analyses, and (vi) mechanistic modeling, all across temporal and spatial scales.

Co-organized by BG3
Convener: Elisabet Martinez-Sancho | Co-conveners: Kerstin Treydte, Flurin Babst, Jernej Jevšenak, Pieter Zuidema
Orals
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–17:55 (CEST)
 
Room 0.49/50
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
vHall CL
Orals |
Wed, 14:00
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 08:30
CL1.2.2

Cave and karst formations such as speleothems, cave ice, cryogenic carbonate, sediments, tufa and travertines are important terrestrial archives of past environmental and climatic changes. They provide high resolution and accurately dated records using not only traditional geochemical tracers such as stable isotopes (d13C, d18O), trace elements, fluid inclusion analyses, or dead carbon fractions but also innovative methods such as organic markers or new paleothermometers. In recent years, the fields of cave and karst-based research has seen:
(1) Development of novel and innovative methods as well as continuously improving analytical capacity of established techniques allowing new applications also of traditional markers (e.g. combined multi-proxy approaches),
(2) Increasing numbers of long-term monitoring campaigns and cave-analogue experiments facilitating (quantitative) interpretation of proxy time series,
(3) Advancement of process and proxy-system models which are necessary to understand and disentangle proxy-relevant processes such as water infiltration, carbonate dissolution, degassing, precipitation, or diagenesis,
(4) The development and extensive use of databases such as SISAL (Speleothem Isotope Synthesis and AnaLysis) which enable regional-to-global and seasonal-to-orbital scale analyses of the relationships between proxies and environmental parameters,
Applied together, advancements in these cornerstones pave the way towards robust and quantitative reconstructions of climate and environmental variability. We invite cave- and karst-related modern and paleo studies to this session, which show progress in one of the four outlined domains. This comprises all integrated and interdisciplinary research helping to improve the understanding of the environment in which continental carbonates grow and the incorporation of climate-sensitive proxies at various time scales. In particular, this includes speleothem-based and other records using traditional proxies or novel markers and methods to reconstruct paleoclimate and paleoenvironment, data analysis studies and data-model comparisons. In addition, research contributing to current international co-ordinated activities, such as the PAGES working group on Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and AnaLysis (SISAL) and others are welcome.

Co-organized by SSP3, co-sponsored by PAGES
Convener: Sophie Warken | Co-conveners: Nikita Kaushal, Gabriella Koltai, Vanessa Skiba, Laura Endres
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 0.49/50
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
vHall CL
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 10:45
Thu, 10:45
CL1.2.4 EDI

This session aims to place recently observed climate change in a long-term perspective by highlighting the importance of paleoclimate research spanning the past 2000 years. We invite presentations that provide insights into past climate variability, over decadal to millennial timescales, from different paleoclimate archives (ice cores, marine sediments, terrestrial records, historical archives and more). In particular, we are focussing on quantitative temperature and hydroclimate reconstructions, and reconstructions of large-scale modes of climate variability from local to global scales. This session also encourages presentations on the attribution of past climate variability to external drivers or internal climate processes, data syntheses, model-data comparison exercises, proxy system modelling, and novel approaches to producing multi-proxy climate field reconstructions such as data assimilation or machine learning.

Co-sponsored by PAGES 2k
Convener: Andrea Seim | Co-conveners: Hugo Beltrami, Nikita Kaushal, Steven Phipps, Stefan Bronnimann
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 0.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 14:00
SSS3.1 EDI

Soil is the function of soil forming factors. This basic principle of soil genesis lies behind the concept of soil memory: the capability of soil systems to imprint in their intrinsic features (environmental indicators) environmental conditions, thus keeping a memory of both current and past environments. Soils and paleosols can be studied to reconstruct environmental factors that were present during the time of their formation and to disentangle the relative influences of different environmental conditions, both local and regional, on soil formation.
Anthropogenic soils in archaeological settings provide valuable archives for geoarchaeological studies, with their stratigraphy and properties reflecting settlement life cycles (occupation, abandonment, and reoccupation) and land-use history. Land-use legacy soils also have enormous potential for process-related research.
Geophysical prospection and geospatial methods contribute to the detection and delimitation of buried structures as a prior step to an archaeological excavation, to the study of cultural heritage remains, and to paleosol and geoarchaeological studies.
This session is open to all contributions focused on the study of polygenetic soils and sediments; including paleosols, anthropogenic soils, and archaeological structures. The following aspects are of special consideration:
- The use of paleosols as records of present and former environments, both local and regional;
- Studies of soil memory linking pedogenesis and sedimentary processes;
- Anthropogenic soils and paleosols in archaeological contexts;
- Predictions of future soil changes as a result of changes in environmental conditions and/or land use, based on observed past soil responses to environmental changes;
- The methodological progress in the study of soil records (biochemical, geochemical, and micromorphological (sub-)microscopic techniques, interpretation of palaeoenvironmental data such as biomarker and isotope data, remote sensing or modelling methods, );
- Studies that combine geophysics (ground-penetrating radar, magnetics, electrical resistivity tomography, electromagnetic induction, seismics) with geospatial methods (photogrammetry, LIDAR, differential GNSS), to improve the data representation, increasing the understanding of the geophysical results;
- Studies of archaeological sites and structure characterization, with geophysical and geospatial methods, as well innovations in data acquisition and processing methods.

Co-organized by CL1.2/GM11
Convener: Anna Schneider | Co-conveners: Anna Andreetta, Rui Jorge Oliveira, Oren Ackermann, Pedro Trapero Fernández, Bento Caldeira, Maria Bronnikova
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.15
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X3
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall SSS
Orals |
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 16:15
Tue, 16:15
BG1.2 EDI

Fire is an essential feature of many ecosystems and an important component of the Earth system. Climate, vegetation, and human activity regulate fire occurrence and spread, but fires also feedback to them in multiple ways, resulting in changing fire regimes in many regions of the world. This session welcomes contributions that explore the role of fire in the Earth system at any temporal and spatial scale using modeling, field and laboratory observations, proxy-records including tree fire scars, sedimentary charcoal cores, ice cores, speleothems, and/or remote sensing. We encourage abstracts that advance our understanding on (1) fire related emissions (e.g. emission factors, emission height, smoke transport), (2) spatial and temporal changes of fire regimes in the past, present, and future, (3) fire products and models, and their validation, error/bias assessment and correction, (4) analytical tools designed to enhance situational awareness among fire practitioners and early warning systems. We are also welcoming submissions on fire related changes (5) in weather, climate, as well as atmospheric chemistry and circulation, (6) vegetation composition and structure, (7) cryosphere (e.g. permafrost, sea ice), (2) biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen and trace elements, (8) soil functioning and soil organic matter dynamics, as well as (9) effects of fires on humans (e.g., impact of fire on air and water quality, freshwater resources, human health, land use and land cover change, fire management).

Early career researchers and underrepresented groups in the field are strongly encouraged to apply.

Co-organized by AS4/CL1.2/NH7
Convener: Gabriel Sigmund | Co-conveners: Micheline Campbell, Rebecca Scholten, Liza McDonough, Renata Libonati, Fang Li, Angelica Feurdean
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:25 (CEST), 14:00–15:40 (CEST)
 
Room C
Posters on site
| Attendance Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall A
Posters virtual
| Tue, 25 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall BG
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Tue, 14:00
Tue, 14:00
OS1.7 EDI

The Indian Ocean is unique among the other tropical ocean basins due to the seasonal reversal of monsoon winds and concurrent ocean currents, lack of steady easterlies that result in a relatively deep thermocline along the equator, low-latitude connection to the neighboring Pacific and a lack of northward heat export due to the Asian continent. These characteristics shape the Indian Ocean’s air-sea interactions, variability, as well as its impacts and predictability in tropical and extratropical regions on (intra)seasonal, interannual, decadal timescales and beyond. They also make the basin particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic climate change, as well as related extreme weather and climate events, and their impacts for surrounding regions, home to a third of the global population. Advances have recently been made in our understanding of the Indian Ocean’s circulation, interactions with adjacent ocean basins, and its role in regional and global climate. Nonetheless, significant gaps remain in understanding, observing, modeling, and predicting Indian Ocean variability and change across a range of timescales.

This session invites contributions based on observations, modelling, theory, and palaeo proxy reconstructions in the Indian Ocean that focus on recent observed and projected changes in Indian Ocean physical and biogeochemical properties and their impacts on ecological processes, diversity in Indian Ocean modes of variability (e.g., Indian Ocean Dipole, Indian Ocean Basin Mode, Madden-Julian Oscillation) and their impact on predictions, interactions and exchanges between the Indian Ocean and other ocean basins, as well as links between Indian Ocean variability and monsoon systems across a range of timescales. We encourage submissions on weather and climate extremes of societal relevance in the Indian Ocean and surrounding regions, including evaluating climate risks, vulnerability, and resilience.

We also welcome contributions that address research on the Indian Ocean grand challenges highlighted in the IndOOS Decadal Review, and as formulated by CLIVAR, the Sustained Indian Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research (SIBER), the International Indian Ocean Expedition 2 (IIOE-2), findings informed by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project v6 on past, present and future variability and change in the Indian Ocean climate system, and contributions making use of novel methodologies such as machine learning.

Co-organized by BG4/CL1.2
Convener: Caroline Ummenhofer | Co-conveners: Alejandra Sanchez-Franks, Peter Sheehan, Yan Du, Muhammad Adnan Abid
Orals
| Fri, 28 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room L3
Posters on site
| Attendance Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Fri, 28 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall CR/OS
Orals |
Fri, 08:30
Fri, 14:00
Fri, 14:00
AS1.24 EDI

Regional monsoons and the global monsoon circulation to which they belong have profound impacts on water, energy, and food security. Monsoons cause severe floods and droughts as well as undergoing variability on subseasonal, interannual and decadal-to-multi-decadal time scales. In addition to profound local effects, monsoon variability is also associated with global-scale impacts via teleconnections.

Monsoons are among the most complex phenomena involving coupled atmosphere-ocean-land interactions and remain notoriously difficult to forecast at leads times ranging from numerical weather prediction (NWP) to long-term climate projections. A better understanding of monsoon physics and dynamics, with more accurate simulation, prediction and projection of monsoon systems is therefore of great importance.

This session invites presentations on any aspects of monsoon research in present-day, future and palaeoclimate periods, involving observations, modelling, attribution, prediction and climate projection. Topics ranging from theoretical works based on idealized planets and ITCZ frameworks to the latest field campaign results are also invited, as is work on impacts, extremes, NWP modelling, S2S and decadal forecasting, and the latest CMIP6 findings.

Co-organized by CL1.2
Convener: Andrew Turner | Co-conveners: Roberta D'Agostino, Kyung-Ja Ha, Jianping Li
Orals
| Tue, 25 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 1.85/86, Wed, 26 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST), 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 1.85/86
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Wed, 26 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
vHall AS
Orals |
Tue, 16:15
Wed, 14:00
Wed, 14:00

CL2 – Present Climate – historical and direct observations period

Programme group scientific officer: Martin Wild

CL2.1 EDI

The radiation budget of the Earth is a key determinant for the genesis and evolution of climate on our planet and provides the primary energy source for life. Anthropogenic interference with climate occurs first of all through a perturbation of the Earth radiation balance. We invite observational and modelling papers on all aspects of radiation in the climate system. A specific aim of this session is to bring together newly available information on the spatial and temporal variation of radiative and energy fluxes at the surface, within the atmosphere and at the top of atmosphere. This information may be obtained from direct measurements, satellite-derived products, climate modelling as well as process studies. Scales considered may range from local radiation and energy balance studies to continental and global scales. In addition, related studies on the spatial and temporal variation of cloud properties, albedo, water vapour and aerosols, which are essential for our understanding of radiative forcings, feedbacks, and related climate change, are encouraged. Studies focusing on the impact of radiative forcings on the various components of the climate system, such as on the hydrological cycle, on the cryosphere or on the biosphere and related carbon cycle, are also much appreciated.

Co-organized by AS3
Convener: Martin Wild | Co-conveners: Jörg Trentmann, Maria Z. Hakuba, Paul Stackhouse
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST), 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 0.49/50
Posters on site
| Attendance Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Posters virtual
| Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
vHall CL
Orals |
Thu, 08:30
Thu, 16:15
Thu, 16:15
CL2.2 EDI

ENSO and its interactions with other tropical basins are the dominant source of interannual climate variability in the tropics and across the globe. Understanding the dynamics, predictability, and impacts of ENSO and tropical basins interactions, and anticipating their future changes are thus of vital importance for society. This session invites contributions regarding all aspects of ENSO and tropical basins interactions, including: dynamics, multi-scale interactions; decadal and paleo variability; theoretical approaches; ENSO diversity; global teleconnections; impacts on climate, society and ecosystems; seasonal forecasting and climate change projections of tropical mean state changes, ENSO and its tropical basins interactions. Studies aimed at evaluating and improving model simulations of ENSO, the tropical mean state and the tropical basins interactions basin are especially welcomed.

Co-organized by AS1/NP2/OS1
Convener: Dietmar Dommenget | Co-conveners: Sarah Ineson, Fred Kucharski, Nicola Maher, Yann Planton
Orals
| Mon, 24 Apr, 08:30–12:15 (CEST), 14:00–15:30 (CEST)
 
Room 0.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Mon, 24 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Mon, 08:30
Mon, 16:15
CL2.3

Phenological changes induced by ongoing climate change are affecting species, ecosystems, and even the global climate by altering species performance, species interactions (potential mismatches and new opportunities in the food web), and water and carbon cycles. Observations of plant and animal phenology as well as remote sensing and modeling studies document complex interactions and raise many open questions about the future sustainability of species and ecosystems.
In this session we invite all contributions that address seasonality changes based on plant and animal phenological observations, pollen monitoring, historical documentary sources, or seasonality measurements using climate data, remote sensing, flux measurements, modeling studies or experiments. We also welcome contributions addressing cross-disciplinary perspectives and international collaborations and program-building initiatives including citizen science networks and data analyses from these networks.
This session is organized by a consortium representing the International Society of Biometeorology (Phenology Commission), the Pan-European Phenology Network - PEP725, the Swiss Academy of Science SCNAT, the TEMPO French Phenology Network and the USA National Phenology Network.

Co-organized by BG3
Convener: Yann Vitasse | Co-conveners: Iñaki Garcia de Cortazar-Atauri, Marie Keatley, Ellen Denny, Hans Ressl
Orals
| Thu, 27 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 0.31/32
Posters on site
| Attendance Wed, 26 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Hall X5
Orals |
Thu, 16:15
Wed, 10:45
CL2.4