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SPM – Splinter Meetings

SPM1

The ISIMIP Groundwater sector is new to the ISIMIP family. In this splinter meeting, we will discuss the progress of the Groundwater sector and upcoming model outputs we anticipate for this sector. This meeting is open for current sector participants and we encourage other groundwater modelers working at large-scale to join us too.

Convener: Inge de GraafECSECS | Co-convener: Robert ReineckeECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Tue, 10:45
SPM2

This splinter meeting aims to bring together scientists who use stable isotopes to study the critical zone. The meeting will allow ample time for networking, to meet other researchers in the field and to catch up with colleagues. It will also provide an update on the activities of the WATSON Cost Action (https://watson-cost.eu/). The splinter meeting is open to all critical zone scientists and anyone who wants to learn more about the WATSON Cost Action.

Convener: Ilja van Meerveld | Co-conveners: Daniele Penna, Josie Geris
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Thu, 12:45
SPM3

The International Commission on Human-Water Feedbacks of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) was founded in 2023 to capitalise on the momentum of the scientific decade Panta Rhei – Change in Hydrology and Society (2013–2023).
We focus on the feedbacks between humans and water over decadal and centennial time scales. We therefore mainly consider changes that involve a two-way coupling between human actions and water quantity and quality, i.e. how the water environment and humans coevolve. We are inclusive and interdisciplinary and invite all interested people, regardless of their field, be it social sciences, economics, engineering, hydrology, etc., from all career levels and regardless of memberships in commissions or IAHS.
Come to our splinter meeting when interested in collaborating and discussing on Human-Water Feedbacks, e.g. sharing knowledge, information, papers and organise joint studies and activities.

Convener: Heidi Kreibich
Wed, 17 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Wed, 12:45
SPM4

The meeting will bring together international scientists and practitioners working with models of human-water interactions with the goal of simulating scenarios or transformational and robust adaptation to water scarcity and climate change under deep uncertainty.

Convener: Giuliano Di Baldassarre
Wed, 17 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Wed, 12:45
SPM5

During the 2024 EGU General Assembly, the first in-person meeting of the Joint Working Group “Tailored Parameterization Strategies for Climate Applications of Satellite Gravimetry” of the Inter-Commission Committee Geodesy for Climate Research (ICCC) of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) will take place.
This working group focuses on identifying and implementing spatiotemporally tailored parameterization strategies for satellite gravimetry observations designed for different climate applications. Building up from the simulation environments implemented in previous working groups, parameter models can be evaluated concerning their capabilities to represent climate-related mass transport signals and their feasibility in real data applications. To envision the possibilities that will arise with upcoming satellite gravity missions, improvements expected from MAGIC and future mission concepts shall be investigated next to current single-pair satellite GRACE-type missions. The parameter models shall be defined in close interaction with the respective applications to identify the main criteria to allow new science to emerge from the advanced parameterization strategies.
In the meeting, the newly launched JWG will discuss planned activities, possible collaboration, and future research activities.

Convener: Marius Schlaak
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Tue, 10:45
SPM6

Some years ago a group of interested geoscientists aimed to establish an international research network related to the topic "mountain glaciations". Two application for a COST action to create such a network have been prepared and submitted, unfortunately without success but with partly encouraging feedback. After pausing all related activies during the Covid 19 pandemic, the former coordinators of these applications want to utilise the opportunity that many previously involved or potentially interested colleagues will gather at the EGU General Assembly to discuss possibilities of a future revival of such activities in whatever format. This splinter meeting will be related to a proposed scientific session at EGU and should make former and potential future directions of this initiative public.

Convener: Stefan Winkler
Wed, 17 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Wed, 12:45
SPM7

The splinter meeting will inform about the joint forces of the Horizon Europe project group of AVENGERS, EYE-CLIMA, and PARIS and offers a discussion platform for project activities.
The shared objective is to improve emissions data to support the implementation of the Paris Agreement. The projects provide GHG and aerosol emissions estimates using observation-based methods to improve estimates of national emissions and national greenhouse gas inventories (NGHGIs). They collaborate with NGHGI stakeholders, government entities, NGOs, and policy makers.

Convener: Sylvia Walter | Co-conveners: Thomas Röckmann, Rona Thompson, Anita Ganesan, Marko Scholze
Wed, 17 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Wed, 12:45
SPM8

Allin-Wayra is the new IGAC Activity on small sensors. Do you use low-cost sensors or small small sensors in your atmospheric science research? Would you like to connect with others in the community? Then come to our splinter meeting and learn more about Allin Wayra, what we offer and how you can be involved. Our mission is to construct a diverse, inclusive, global community of practice around small sensors. Allin Wayra aims to advance knowledge and responsible use of small sensors in air quality and atmospheric science, with a particular focus on regions lacking air quality measurements. In the context of the activity, we will also address urgent issues related to small sensors in atmospheric science, foster capacity, and champion accessibility through collaborative initiatives. Learn more, provide input on directions for the activity and exchange with colleagues.

Convener: Erika von Schneidemesser | Co-convener: Sebastian Diez
Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Wed, 10:45
SPM9

EXCITE is a Horizon Europe project, aiming to integrate X-ray and electron microscopy techniques applied to earth materials and to make those accessible for new and existing users. The splinter meeting will be a networking platform for researchers who need access to European microscopy facilities. We will present an overview of available facilities, introduce researcher to the application procedure and encourage the exchange of experiences exchange of experiences between former and future users.

Convener: Geertje ter Maat | Co-conveners: Oliver Plümper, Sylvia Walter
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Tue, 12:45
SPM10

The meeting is inteneded to provide crosslinks between recent activties on studying the lithosphere in Greenland.
We summarize current activties targeted at the Greenland lithosphere and discuss ongoing or planned field installations. We will also report on a workshop on the Greenland lithosphere to be held in Copenhagen in March 2024 to inform participants not able to join us there.

Public information:

Please note the Splinter Meeting starts at 16.30h
•Similarities and disagreement between current models 
•Implicationsfor sub-ice geology/GIA
•Data coverage and reprocessing of vintage data
•Planned and needed field installations
•Future plans

Convener: Jörg Ebbing | Co-conveners: John R. Hopper, Clinton Conrad
Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Tue, 16:15
SPM11

Meeting of the ORFEUS Executive Committee

Convener: Carlo Cauzzi
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Tue, 12:45
SPM12

Meeting of the ORFEUS Executive Committee

Convener: Carlo Cauzzi
Tue, 16 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Tue, 19:00
SPM13

Meeting of the ORFEUS Board of Participants

Convener: Carlo Cauzzi
Wed, 17 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Wed, 19:00
SPM14

The World Heat Flow Database Project aims to develop a new research data infrastructure for the IHFC Global Heat Flow Database that offers a one-stop shop for comprehensive information on heat-flow related data, publications, projects, and researchers. Supported by the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC), this new user-oriented web service will offer to the geoscientific community quality-proofed, up-to-date, well-documented, extended, enriched, and restructured heat-flow data. The project supports the Global Heat Flow Data Assessment Project, led by IHFC and Task Force VIII of the International Lithosphere Program (ILP).

The splinter meeting will be an intermediate step in the global stakeholder process on the platform development.

Convener: Sven Fuchs
Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Wed, 14:00
SPM15

We will report on the status of AdriaArray – a seismic experiment to cover the Adriatic Plate and its actively deforming margins by a dense broad-band seismic network. We will discuss the time schedule, participating institutions, mobile station pools, maps of temporary station distribution, station coverage, data transmission and access. We will also report on the work of Collaborative Research Groups. Invited scientific contributions will be presented during the splinter meeting too. We will share the outcomes of the AdriaArray meeting in Sofia, Bulgaria, 12. - 15. March 2024.

Convener: Petr Kolínský | Co-conveners: Thomas Meier, Carlo Cauzzi
Thu, 18 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Thu, 19:00
SPM16

The Deep-time Model Intercomparison Project (DeepMIP-Eocene; https://www.deepmip.org/), is a large, international effort aimed at improving our understanding of climate during the early Eocene and PETM. In this splinter session, we will bring together the paleoclimate data and modelling communities to evaluate lessons learned from phase one of DeepMIP-Eocene (2016-2022) and explore future directions for phase two (2023-onwards).

Convener: Gordon InglisECSECS | Co-conveners: Dan Lunt, Anna Nele Meckler, Agatha De Boer, David Evans
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Tue, 14:00
SPM17

This is the mid-term project meeting for the European metrology project isoMET funded by EURAMET.

Convener: Javis Nwaboh | Co-convener: Tim Arnold
Mon, 15 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Mon, 08:30
SPM18

One of the easiest ways that scientists can start engaging with policymaking is through the established, institutionalised mechanisms hosted by the European Commission that aim to collect expert input and feedback on their legislative proposals. This Short Course will provide participants with all the information that they need to start engaging with these formal engagement processes. The convening team and invited experts will provide an overview of a range of Commission-driven mechanisms including the EU Transparency Register, EU Consultations, and EU Expert Groups.

Make sure you bring your laptop so that you can join the walkthrough of the European Commission website and access these mechanisms.

Public information:

Speakers:

  • Kelsey Beltz: Global partnerships and education, The Good Lobby
  • Alessandro Allegra: Policy Assistant to the Deputy Director-General for Research & Innovation, EU Commission
  • Emmanuel Salmon: Head of Strategy & International Cooperation at ICOS
Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-convener: Alfonso Acosta
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Tue, 10:45
SPM19

As the amount of information needed to make an informed decision that adequately considers policy options increases, so too does the need for scientific evidence and those who are able to communicate it accurately and concisely. This role, between science and policy, is becoming increasingly recognised as a necessary profession with the number of knowledge brokers and those working on the interface expanding.

But what does a career in between science and policy look like? What types of positions exist and what skills do professionals who work on the science-policy interface need? Join us in this session to meet those working across the science-policy spectrum, learn about how they developed the necessary skills, and find out what their tips are for those who want to take the next step in their own career!

Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-conveners: Noel Baker, Erika von Schneidemesser
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Tue, 14:00
SPM20

The European Union’s proposed Nature Restoration Law aims to provide essential guidance and support to restore ecosystems, habitats, and species across the EU’s land and sea areas. Expertise from researchers has played a vital role in creating and supporting this legislation that not only aims to restore degraded ecosystems but also improve soil health and water management, support the mitigation of climate change, and increase Europe’s resilience to droughts, floods, and other extreme weather events.

During this interactive session, experts involved in the creation of the EU Nature Restoration Law will share insights on the legislation process, the decisions that were taken, how scientific information was used to support the process, and what the next steps will be. Members of the EGU Biodiversity Task Force will also share their experiences engaging with this policy and the lessons that they learned along the way.

This session will not only provide participants with information on the Nature Restoration Law but also on how scientists can engage with the European Parliament in other legislative areas.

Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-conveners: Bikem EkberzadeECSECS, A. Rita Carrasco, Felicia Olufunmilayo Akinyemi
Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Wed, 16:15
SPM21

Understanding the aspects of your research and expertise that are relevant and of interest to policymakers is a key component of engaging in the policymaking process. This session will give you the opportunity to present the key aspects of your research to a panel of policymakers and those working on the science-policy interface! The panel will then give their feedback and provide insights on areas that you can improve on when discussing your research with policymakers in the future. This will not only allow you to develop your science-policy presentation and communication skills but also highlight areas that you can consider including to ensure that your research resonates with the policy community moving forward! The panel will also provide feedback on the policy areas in which they believe your research could be relevant, including current and upcoming policies.

The panel will assess up to eight scientists during this session. Timeslots will be allocated on a first-come, first-serve basis. You can submit your topic for consideration here: https://www.egu.eu/forms/Pitching4Policy/

Public information:

With an expert panel:

  • Sarah Connors: Climate Applications Scientist, ESA
  • Mario Scharfbillig: Science Policy Advisor, Joint Research Centre, European Commission
  • Régine Roncucci: EU Affairs Manager, European Parliament Intergroup 
Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-conveners: Adam Izdebski, Mario Scharfbillig
Tue, 16 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Tue, 08:30
SPM22

This interactive Short Course will provide practical examples from EGU’s Policy Programme - including the Science-Policy Pairing Scheme, Science for Policy Working Group, and Biodiversity Task Force - and explain how these initiatives can be replicated.

During the first half of this session, leaders from these initiatives will be invited to present their experiences and give practical insights from the lessons that they learned. Session participants will then be invited to share their own experiences and brainstorm potential methods of creating science-policy spaces and dialogues within their own scientific organisations and research institutes.

Please bring questions and some of the challenges that you or your organisation is experiencing so that these can be discussed!

Public information:

Speakers:

  • Chloe Hill: EGU Policy Manager
  • Annegret Larsen: Wageningen University
  • Megan O'Donnell: Head of Policy and Communications, Geological Society of London
  • Juha-Pekka Jäpölä: Project Officer, DG ECHO, European Commission
Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-conveners: Adam Izdebski, Adriano Sofo, Emmanuel Salmon
Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Wed, 10:45
SPM23

Policy briefs are concise, accessible documents that aim to communicate the practical implications of research to a particular policy audience and provide them with solutions to a specific issue. Although policy briefs are just one method to communicate information to a policy audience, they can be a valuable communication tool when effectively written and disseminated.

This Splinter Meeting will be run in the form of an interactive workshop. Participants will be provided with tips and tools to create their own policy brief as well as interactive exercises to work on with other attendees and the session’s leaders.

Participants are requested to bring along one of their (single-authored or collaborative) publications to use during the workshop. If attendees do not yet have any publications, they may bring along an article authored by someone else that they are familiar with.

Public information:

Speakers:

  • Chloe Hill: EGU Policy Manager
  • Megan O'Donnell: Head of Policy and Communications, Geological Society of London
  • Juha-Pekka Jäpölä: Project Officer, DG for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (DG ECHO), European Commission
Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-convener: Megan O'DonnellECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Thu, 10:45
SPM24

The objective of Task Force VIII of the International Lithosphere Program (ILP) is to coordinate the "Global Heat Flow Data Assessment Project" in support of the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC). The splinter meeting of the ILP Task Force will be used to present our activities, the current status, on-going work, and the next steps of the ILP Task Force. It opens space for networking and creating connections to other activities.

Convener: Sven Fuchs
Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Thu, 14:00
SPM25

EOV's are essential ocean variables, that reflect physical, chemical, or biological processes in the oceanic system. EOV's are defined by the Ocean Observations Physics and Climate Panel (OOPC) of the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS), which in turn is led by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO.
In a collaborative joint development (IHFC of IUGG, TF8 of ILP), the definition of a new EOV is prepared that reflects the heat flow at the interface between lithosphere and oceanic hydrosphere. Heat-flow and oceanic experts will discuss and develop the foundation for such a new EOV definition. During the open splinter meeting, the process will be introduced to interested EGU attendees. This open meeting is followed by a two-day writing workshop.

Convener: Sven Fuchs | Co-convener: Florian Neumann
Fri, 19 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Fri, 14:00
SPM26

Welcome to our splinter meeting on the science-policy-interface! We would love to exchange ideas, network, share experiences and insights with scientists, science managers, science communicators, and policymakers alike. Whether you're deeply involved in policy discussions or eager to learn more about how science informs policy-making, you are warmly welcome to join us for snacks and drinks!

We also invite you to continue the dialogue at our session on Thursday, "EOS4.1 Science Policy Interface: Shaping Debates" (https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU24/session/49288). This session will identify the most effective formats for science-policy engagement and highlighting success stories and lessons learned from scientists and communicators who have engaged in policy and made critical societal impacts – either on a European, national, or local level.

Convener: Marie Heidenreich | Co-conveners: Giorgia StasiECSECS, Chloe Hill, Marie G. P. CavitteECSECS, Maria Vittoria GargiuloECSECS, Raffaella Russo
Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Mon, 16:15
SPM27

The ordinary meeting of the governing bureau of International Lithosphere program. The meeting will review the status of ILP: https://ilp.nju.edu.cn/main.htm

Convener: Hans Thybo | Co-conveners: Mian Liu, Qin Wang
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Tue, 14:00
SPM28

ILP (International Lithosphere Program) has a tradition to present and discuss its activities during the EGU GA. The meeting will include presentation of this year's Burov medal and Flin-Hart award.

This meeting is open to all interested participants. More information is available at https://ilp.nju.edu.cn/main.htm Public information:

The meeting will begin at 17.30 and continue until 20.00 with a break mid-way. Everyone interested in the activities of ILP is invited to participate.

Convener: Hans Thybo | Co-conveners: Mian Liu, Qin Wang
Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST), 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Tue, 16:15
SPM29

To bring together key datasets in the OceanICU project from different groups.

Convener: Richard Sanders
Wed, 17 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Wed, 19:00
SPM30

The EGU’s policy programme hosts several initiatives and activities that help researchers to engage more with European policymaking processes… but some EGU Divisions also have representatives that can help you to connect and engage!

Want to learn more about what EGU Policy Officers and Representatives do? Want to share your ideas and experiences? Or just join in on the discussion and meet others within your division who are interested in Science for Policy? Then join this Splinter Meeting meet and greet!

Convener: Chloe Hill | Co-conveners: Marie G. P. CavitteECSECS, Roberta D'AgostinoECSECS, Antonella Peresan
Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Thu, 14:00
SPM31

This splinter meeting aims to have a short report on the UPFLOW project and start brainstorming with the European community on future European OBS initiatives and on how to improve OBS experiments. From early-stage planning, pre- and post-processing, to publishing data reports and sharing final outputs. So far exchange between different institutes and projects has been limited. We want to encourage the exchange of knowledge in the European OBS community, improve current practices and develop new strategies which could ease challenges for future OBS projects.

Convener: Maria TsekhmistrenkoECSECS | Co-convener: Ana Ferreira
Thu, 18 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Thu, 19:00
SPM32

The Drought in the Anthropocene research network connects scientists that aim to gain a better understanding of the feedbacks between drought and human society at different scales.
As the IAHS HELPING scientific decade has just started, the Drought in the Anthropocene research network is collecting new collaborative ideas.
We will hold discussions around our 3 new research questions, together with the 3 questions of the Panta Rhei decade, and see how we can proceed working on solving these.

Convener: Marthe WensECSECS
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Tue, 12:45
SPM33

The Working Group (WG) "Co-Creating Water Knowledge" of the HELPING Initiative of IAHS (https://iahs.info/Initiatives/Topic-for-the-Next-IAHS-decade/helping-working-groups/) is active as a community of practice of researchers on different topics, working in understanding how the concept of co-creation can be used to integrate local and indigenous knowledge in hydrological sciences, and how hydrological knowledge can be integrated into them. This Splinter Meeting is an in-person opportunity to meet the WG and follow up on its activities.

Convener: Giulio CastelliECSECS | Co-conveners: Wouter Buytaert, Natalie Ceperley
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Tue, 14:00
SPM34

The IAHS Drought in Mountain Regions Working Group is working within the IAHS HELPING decade. It is a global initiative including scientists and practitioners working on droughts in mountain regions. We aim at organizing an on-site meeting at EGU to meet all participants to this WG who are also at EGU.

Convener: Francesco Avanzi | Co-convener: Marit Van TielECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Thu, 12:45
SPM35

The Floods Working Group (FWG) of the Past Global Changes project (PAGES) aims to bring together all the scientific communities reconstructing past floods (historians, geologists, geographers, biologists, etc.) and those studying current and future floods (hydrologists, modellers, statisticians, etc.) to coordinate, synthesize and promote data and results on the natural variability of floods. The splinter meeting at the EGU 2024 is the 2024 annual meeting of the FWG and the kick-off meeting of the third phase 2024-2026 of the working group. During the meeting, the steering committee will propose and discuss the scientific activities planned for the next three years: pilot projects, special issues, topic sessions and workshops and a new call for the Open-access flood metadata base. The splinter meeting is open to FWG Group members, early-career researchers and anyone interested.

Convener: Lothar Schulte | Co-conveners: Daniela Kroehling, Juan Antonio Ballesteros-Canovas, Rachel LombardiECSECS, Michael Kahle
Wed, 17 Apr, 12:45–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Wed, 12:45
SPM36

IRISCC is a new European Research Infrastructure project providing services for research on Climate Change Risks. The splinter meeting will facilitate the start up phase of the IRISCC project and interaction with its target groups.

Adaptation to climate change requires in-depth understanding of climate change driven risks, including their determinants (hazards, exposure and vulnerabilities) and impacts to human, production and natural systems. Integrated Research Infrastructure Services for Climate Change Risks (IRISCC) is a consortium of diverse and complementary leading research infrastructures (RIs) covering disciplines from natural sciences to social sciences, across different domains and sectors. IRISCC provides scientific and knowledge services to foster cutting-edge research and evidence-based policymaking to improve Europe's resilience to climate change. IRISCC ensures a “one-stop-shop” for various user communities on climate change risk related RI services by setting up a dedicated Catalogue of services and related access management system both for granting transnational (onsite and remote) and offering virtual access. The Catalogue of services will be built through three consecutive releases, each
delivering increasingly integrated services to its user communities. The IRISCC service integration will include Service Design Labs employing co-design and transdisciplinary action, and Service Demonstrators benchmarking the integrated cross-RI services. In addition to services aimed towards the scientific community, IRISCC will offer knowledge services aimed towards policymakers and other stakeholders. This is done together with risk management platforms. The research enabled by IRISCC contributes to future reports on climate change effects (IPCC, IPBES) as well as policy- and decision-making to meet the targets of climate adaptation strategies. IRISCC contributes to training a new generation of scientists to efficiently use RI services and for data stewardship. Data from IRISCC will be open and made available in compliance with FAIR principles and linked to European initiatives such as EOSC. Strong links will be created between IRISCC and current and future efforts under Horizon.

Convener: Janne Rinne
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Tue, 14:00
SPM37

Calving Model Intercomparison Project – updates and discussion of progress

Convener: Isabel Nias | Co-conveners: Jim Jordan, Felicity McCormack
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Tue, 12:45
SPM38

This splinter meeting will host an open discussion on open source and benchmarking-ready open-data approaches for simulation tools in the field of gravitational mass flows. We want to, but not exclusively, discuss the following: i) benchmarking and model/simulation comparison, ii) open-data common data formats, iii) cascading processes, slow-flows, deformation control and iv) modes of communicating results, including virtual reality interfaces and probabilistic hazard maps.

Convener: Anna Wirbel | Co-conveners: Jan-Thomas Fischer, Julia Kowalski, Martin Mergili
Tue, 16 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Tue, 14:00
SPM39

The Geological Service for Europe Project (https://www.geologicalservice.eu/) aims to establish a sustainable organisation (GSE) from 2027 that will provide European institutions, academia, research organisations, national and regional policymakers, industry and citizens with up-to-date, high-quality EU/national level aggregated geoscientific information and advice about sustainable use and management of the subsurface.
The data core of the GSE is and will be the European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI). EGDI provides access to Pan-European and national geological datasets, tools, trainings and services from the Geological Survey Organisations of Europe.
EGDI gives access to more than 800 map layers as well as a large number of documents (reports, images, spreadsheets, etc.). The layers can be shown on maps and all the information can be searched in a free text search system.
During the GSEU Project, new components will be implemented and developed in EGDI to meet the needs of scientific users and support research in the areas of expertise for decision support, visualisation, Big Data approaches and the enhancement of a comprehensive Linked Data knowledge base.
Moreover, the IT infrastructure will be consolidated and made highly scalable. The improvement of the existing repositories, search system and semantic web technologies will facilitate the transition to a knowledge infrastructure.
In this splinter session, GSEU application will present to industry stakholder major benefits provided by the EGDI platform in terms of georesources exploration and exploitation. State of art and future development will be discussed engaging participants to collect market’s needs and expectations.

Convener: Claudia Delfini | Co-convener: Gabriele Leoni
Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Wed, 10:45
SPM40

The Geological Service for Europe Project (https://www.geologicalservice.eu/) aims to establish a sustainable organisation (GSE) from 2027 that will provide European institutions, academia, research organisations, national and regional policymakers, industry and citizens with up-to-date, high-quality EU/national level aggregated geoscientific information and advice about sustainable use and management of the subsurface.
The data core of the GSE is and will be the European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI). EGDI provides access to Pan-European and national geological datasets, tools, trainings and services from the Geological Survey Organisations of Europe.
EGDI gives access to more than 800 map layers as well as a large number of documents (reports, images, spreadsheets, etc.). The layers can be shown on maps and all the information can be searched in a free text search system.
During the GSEU Project, new components will be implemented and developed in EGDI to meet the needs of scientific users and support research in the areas of expertise for decision support, visualisation, Big Data approaches and the enhancement of a comprehensive Linked Data knowledge base.
Moreover, the IT infrastructure will be consolidated and made highly scalable. The improvement of the existing repositories, search system and semantic web technologies will facilitate the transition to a knowledge infrastructure.
In this splinter session, a core group of GSEU and EGDI professionals will present the newest developments of the EGDI platform and will actively engage with the session’s attendees via use cases and feedback sessions to collect precious feedback to further tailor the features of the EGDI platform to the needs of current and future users.

Convener: Claudia Delfini | Co-convener: Gabriele Leoni
Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Wed, 16:15
SPM41 EDI

"The time for climate action is now. Science is critical in shaping the policies and actions to tackle the global climate change challenge,” said former IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee. Scientist Rebellion is an international movement of scientists and scholars who are extremely concerned about the climate and ecological crisis and believe the scientific community has the responsibility to step up and join the forefront of the environmental movement.
Unless those who are best placed to understand this crisis behave according to the emergency we live in, we cannot expect the public to do the same. The latest IPCC report notes “Any further delay in concerted action will miss a brief and rapidly closing window of opportunity to secure a livable and sustainable future for all.”
We believe that we must expose the reality and severity of the climate and ecological emergency through nonviolent direct actions, including civil disobedience. In this Splinter meeting we would like to share how we work and what we do. If you want to have a chat with some of us to see if this is a network you would like to join, feel free to stop by at this informative splinter meeting organized by EGU participants who are also member of Scientist Rebellion.

Public information:

The meeting is part of a series of events about engagement, co-organized during EGU 2024 by scientists active in Scientist Rebellion, including a social dinner (Tue) and a Great Debate (Fri). All details here : https://linktr.ee/sr_egu24

Convener: Sylvain Kuppel | Co-conveners: Odin Marc, Marthe WensECSECS
Programme
| Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Thu, 12:45
SPM42

The process of transforming research outputs into policy and practice outcomes is described using various terms influenced by factors such as geography, time, domain, trends, and personal preferences. Research translation, knowledge translation, research utilization, knowledge transfer, and knowledge-to-action, among others, are some of these keywords. Regardless of the word choice, there is a growing global interest in this paradigm across diverse disciplines. The reason for this is the widespread acknowledgment that the conventional steps of knowledge creation (primary research), knowledge distillation (systematic reviews and guidelines), and knowledge dissemination (journal publications and presentations) fall short in ensuring that users beyond academia in industry, government and community can effectively leverage scientific knowledge for demonstrable real-world changes. This is especially important now as the world races to achieve just and timely decarbonisation and sustainabl e development.

Whilst knowledge translation practices focus primarily on the gap between research outputs and outcomes, gaps between evidence and decision-making exist at every stage of the research and development pipeline, spanning research infrastructure to long-term positive impacts for societies, environments and economies. In this meeting, we will share knowledge translation initiatives undertaken within research infrastructures AuScope (in the Australian context) and EPOS (in the European context), who support diverse users in academia, industry, government and community across those continents, respectively. We invite you, as a member of the global research and user community, to join us in exploring gaps in research innovation ecosystems around the world, and creative ways that we can work together to overcome them.

Convener: Federica Tanlongo | Co-conveners: Jo Condon, Otto Lange
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Tue, 12:45
SPM43

Meeting of the Volcanology Section - Spanish Commission of Geodesy and Geophysics addressed to researchers of Spanish and Portuguese groups working on volcanology-related topics. The aim of this meeting is to carry on networking activities, look for joint initiatives and explore future collaborations.

Convener: Carmen López Moreno | Co-convener: Adelina Geyer
Tue, 16 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Tue, 12:45
SPM45

GERI member networks (SAEON/South Africa, TERN/Australia, CERN/China, NEON/USA, ICOS/Europe, eLTER/Europe, and others) will have invited talks and workshop activities to advance our goals to develop harmonized data systems and foster opportunities for collaboration, training and development. Open and all are invited, pending available space.
We will first focus on a use case of 'ecological drought' and will also bring together other collaborators, including the International Drought Experiment (Drought-Net) at Colorado State University, the Sullivan Lab at Oregon State University, and additional partnerships in Mexico and Latin America. Moving forward, GERI welcomes participation by other large-scale ecological networks and drought researchers.

Convener: Henry W. Loescher
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Tue, 10:45
SPM46

The Elmer/Ice ice-flow model community regularly meets in person at the EGU to discuss latest developments, both, in code base as well as applications.

Convener: Thomas Zwinger
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Thu, 12:45
SPM47

DeepSoil 2100 is a network for whole-ecosystem warming experiments. The aim of DeepSoil 2100 is to bring together researchers working on long-term experiments, whole soil or ecosystem manipulations (warming depth ideally greater than 30 cm, with or without other manipulations such as water and carbon dioxide concentrations), and studying responses of plants, soil biogeochemistry, ecology, etc.

https://iscn.fluxdata.org/network/partner-networks/deepsoil2100/

Convener: Michael W. I. Schmidt
Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Wed, 08:30
SPM48

AntClimNow invites researchers, and especially ECRs, with an interest in near-term Antarctic climate variability to a 2-part workshop.
In Part 1, we will introduce AntClimNow’s Antarctic Climate Indicators project and invite participants to explore ways to characterise and visualise the state of all components of the Antarctic Climate System (atmosphere, ocean, ice).
Part 2 aims to provide an informal forum to network and exchange information on ongoing and planned work to apply machine learning techniques to help answer major science questions in Antarctic climate science.
Anyone interested in either aspect is encouraged to attend both sessions to join our discussions and look for future opportunities to collaborate.

Convener: Tom Bracegirdle | Co-conveners: Clare Eayrs, Andrew McDonald, Ilana Wainer
Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST), 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Mon, 16:15
SPM49

Meeting for PAGES PlioMioVAR Working Group.

Convener: Heather L. Ford
Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Thu, 14:00
SPM50

Discuss advances in tsunami modelling within the European tsunami community, related to ongoing progress in EU projects, as well as community building (Global Tsunami Model, EPOS).

Convener: Finn Løvholt
Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Wed, 14:00
SPM51

PAGES welcomes all those interested in past global changes. You are much welcome to come and ask questions, whether it is about PAGES activities, how to organize one, how to attend one, or about the special events, such as the open science meeting(OSM in 2024 in Shanghai) or the topical science meeting . All the questions about PAGES will be welcome. We hope to make you more familiar with PAGES.

Convener: Marie-France Loutre | Co-convener: Iván Hernández-Almeida
Wed, 17 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Wed, 16:15
SPM52

Cryospheric-specific climate interventions focused on sea level rise have been discussed for at least the past 40 years, but 2023 has had a significant increase in these discussions including several new research papers, two community workshops, and an AGU Town Hall event. The workshops took place in Chicago (Oct 2/3) and Stanford (Dec 9/10), and included ~60 glaciologists. Methods discussed focused mainly on ocean interventions (blocking warm water from reaching the ice sheet) and subglacial interventions (removing subglacial water or heat to slow down ice streams).
We seek broad community input on what a responsible intervention strategy would look like, how to think about the risks of intervening (or not intervening) to reduce rates of sea-level rise, and additional intervention approaches or other methods to reduce sea level rise rates beyond the necessary (but perhaps now insufficient) step of emission reduction.

Convener: John Moore | Co-conveners: Christine Dow, Michael Wolovick, Rupert Gladstone
Mon, 15 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Mon, 12:45
SPM53

A meeting for anyone interested in contributing and/or using ADMAP digital magnetic anomaly products in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. We aim to summarize and identify newly available data sets, and discuss progress towards the next version of the group's compilation product.

Convener: Graeme Eagles | Co-convener: Fausto Ferraccioli
Thu, 18 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Thu, 12:45
SPM54

Several initiatives are developing to facilitate co-ordinated analysis of legacy core material and associated assets from the IODP and its predecessors. As part of the PAGES-PlioMioVAR initiative we here seek presentation and discussion of potential Pliocene-focussed legacy projects, which could be focussed by region, time interval, proxy etc.
The meeting is open to anyone interested in developing a legacy project, but spaces are limited so please express your interest by emailing the convenors.

Convener: Erin McClymont | Co-convener: Heather L. Ford
Fri, 19 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Fri, 08:30
SPM55

The SURFEIT project, managed by the British Antarctic Survey (PI Louise Sime), will be running a project meeting as many international project partners will be attending EGU.

Convener: Romy Hall | Co-convener: Louise Sime
Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Tue, 16:15
SPM56

The gravity field community has become familiar with the ICGEM service during the last 20 years. ICGEM is now planning to realise the need for scientific and technical expansion, modernisation, and upgrading of the existing database, as well as its calculation and visualisation components, in which the scientific community and society have a great interest. At this meeting, we would like to discuss about the future goals and plans of the ICGEM service with global gravity field model (GGM) developers, experts, geoscientists and users. We would like to address why it is important to know how to respond to the growing need and demand for improved and quality-assured, well-documented GGMs and related products with additional types of datasets and data representations that are enriched with metadata and provided in a sustainable and freely accessible research data infrastructure. Over the next 3 years, ICGEM will be rebuilt and integrated with other geodetic services with the aim of servi ng global users. Such a platform will make the quality-assured data and products exchangeable and supports education, science, and society. We should therefore discuss future steps and exchange ideas as the community of experts and users.

Convener: E. Sinem InceECSECS
Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Wed, 10:45
SPM57

The communication gap that exists between scientists and journalists is well established, but the first step to closing it is to understand why it exists. This by-invitation only meeting will be recorded to provide educational material for scientists and journalists working on the science-media interface. It will offer room for open discussion on the expectations and challenges of each side and explore new ways that both can find to share science more accurately and effectively with the world.

Convener: Gillian D'Souza | Co-convener: Hazel GibsonECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Thu, 16:15
SPM59

Earthquake hazard analyses rely on the availability of seismogenic source models. The recently released European Fault-Source Model 2020 (EFSM20), which was one of the primary input datasets of the European Seismic Hazard Model 2020, was entirely based on reusable data from existing active fault regional compilations. As scientific research on identifying and characterizing active faults progresses, the systematization and distribution of such research outputs should keep pace with the most recent technical developments in data distribution and usage.
The aim of this meeting is to identify the future perspectives of seismogenic fault databases at various scales, analyze their user needs (e.g., earthquake hazard analysts), and discuss how to tackle the challenges ahead of us.

Convener: Roberto Basili | Co-convener: Roberto Vallone
Tue, 16 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Tue, 16:15
SPM60

In the context of space-borne geodetic techniques, Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) has demonstrated its efficacy in measuring surface displacements in different conditions and deformation scenarios. In particular, the advanced DInSAR method referred to as Parallel Small BAseline Subset (P-SBAS), developed by IREA-CNR, has emerged as particularly suitable to effectively and efficiently investigate the temporal evolution of surface displacements both in natural and anthropogenic hazard contexts. We refer to volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides, or human-induced deformation like subsidence from fluid exploitation, mining activities, and the construction of large infrastructures.

The P-SBAS algorithm has been released as an on-demand web-based tool by integrating it within the EarthConsole® platform and currently contributes to the on-demand remote sensing component of the EPOSAR service. In particular, EarthConsole® is a cloud-based platform supporting the scientific community with the development, testing, and hosting of their processing applications to enable Earth observation data exploitation and processing services. Nevertheless, the P-SBAS processing capability is still available through EPOSAR, the processing service developed by IREA-CNR, also accessible in the framework of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) Satellite community, that provides systematic ground displacement products of several areas on Earth.

The herein presented on-demand P-SBAS tool enlarges the EPOSAR service portfolio and empowers users to seamlessly generate surface displacement maps and time series exploiting C-band satellite data. In particular the P-SBAS service allows the scientific users to process both Sentinel-1 and ENVISAT SAR images in fully autonomous manner, through a user-friendly web graphical interface which permits them to follow the progress of the processing tasks and avoids the need of data download on their own processing and archiving facilities.

The presented on-demand P-SBAS/EarthConsole® processing service will be accessible for the scientific community through the Network of Resources (NoR). In particular, the NoR is an ESA initiative that, among several missions, sponsors the scientific users to exploit commercial platform resources and services in the Earth Observation field, like EarthConsole®.

The training course has been designed to be a hands-on session structured in three main modules:

1. Overview on the Advanced DInSAR technique with a focus on the P-SBAS algorithm for obtaining displacement time series and corresponding mean deformation velocity maps;

2. Introduction to the EarthConsole® platform and its processing environment;

3. Presentation of the on-demand P-SBAS/EarthConsole® service for C-band satellite data interferometric processing focused on the Sentinel-1 platform, with also a brief overview on the ENVISAT one.

Requirements and materials:

1. To ensure an optimal learning experience, we kindly ask you to confirm your participation at this link: https://www.eventbrite.it/e/training-course-on-the-p-sbas-dinsar-web-tool-for-earth-surface-deformation-tickets-853458857417

2. To follow this training course a basic knowledge of SAR data is desirable. A laptop with internet connection will be needed.

Public information:

Registration

To ensure an optimal learning experience, we kindly ask you to confirm your participation at this link: https://www.eventbrite.it/e/training-course-on-the-p-sbas-dinsar-web-tool-for-earth-surface-deformation-tickets-853458857417 

Convener: Claudio De Luca | Co-convener: Maddalena Iesué
Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Thu, 14:00
SPM61

The goal of this meeting is to gather ca. 20-30 scientists to prepare a MSCA doctoral network proposal on the general theme of paleogeography. The first part of the meeting will consist in presenting and discussing the overall doctoral network proposal goals and training activities. The second part is a workshop in breakout groups defined by the work packages of the proposal. The meeting is for people involved in the proposal, please contact the meeting convener if you are interested to participate in the project.

Convener: Guillaume Dupont-Nivet
Mon, 15 Apr, 12:45–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Mon, 12:45
SPM62

This COPDESS meeting agenda includes an update on current work and next steps for the group. COPDESS: Coalition on Publishing Data for the Earth and Space Sciences.

Public information:

Agenda:

0-10: Introduction K. Lehnert
10-20: Engaging editors. K. Lehnert
20-45: What can editors do & what can journals afford. M. Giampoala & K. Vrouwenvelder
45-90: What can editors do (and resources)
90-100: Next: K. Lehnert
100-105: Close: H. Glaves.

Convener: Shelley Stall | Co-conveners: Lesley Wyborn, Kristina VrouwenvelderECSECS, Helen Glaves, Kerstin Lehnert
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Tue, 10:45
SPM63

Coordination activity that aims to build a global RI network for the solid Earth and related disciplines and domains.

This meeting follows on from the meeting held at EGU 2023 with the intention of continuing discussions on common challenges and progressing opportunities for co-development to address specific issues.

Agenda will focus on next steps, tangible coordinated actions, and engaging with other relevant initiatives.

Convener: Helen Glaves
Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST), 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Thu, 10:45
SPM64

This splinter meeting is for members of the WCRP Regional Information for Society (RIfS) Scientific Steering Group, and the CORDEX Science Advisory Team who are present at EGU to share information, brainstorm, and consider opportunities to integrate activities with aligned purpose. RIfS is a relatively new project that is still being structured, and CORDEX is a well-established effort with a long history and the largest network under the RIfS umbrella. This will be an opportunity to co-produce some potential next steps and align on vision and ways of structuring collaborations across themes. In particular we wish to coordinate on themes that have broader reach than the individual CORDEX regions. We will briefly summarize some of the activities that are planned this year. We also will brainstorm ways to incorporate the experiences from across the CORDEX regions with other efforts to produce regional information for society. For example, we may discuss ways to piggyback additional elem ents on existing CORDEX activities, or develop activities that address common barriers and challenges across different regions. This is an open discussion for these committee members to bring up anything of interest, and also to get to know one-another better. Other WCRP project leads are welcome to attend.

Convener: Naomi Goldenson | Co-convener: Irene Lake
Tue, 16 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Tue, 10:45
SPM65

The international initiatives CATCH, PACES, BEPSII, ASPeCt and QUiesCENT will hold a joint meeting bringing together scientists with an interest in atmosphere-ice-ocean research focussing on chemical, biogeochemical and physical processes in the Arctic and Antarctic and links to climate change. Cold regions which are seasonally or permanently covered by snow and ice, notably the Third Pole, are also of interest. The primary objective of this meeting is to strategize for the 5th International Polar Year 2032 planning workshop scheduled to take place in Aussois, Alps, France, in November 2024.

Convener: Hélène Angot | Co-convener: Markus Frey
Mon, 15 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Mon, 12:45
SPM66

The Rock Glacier Inventories and Kinematics (RGIK) initiative invites all interested researchers to meet and discuss the current and future developments within the community. Potential discussion topics include amongst others rock glacier database, rock glacier velocity products, new research topics in the field of rock glaciers, etc.

Convener: Cécile PelletECSECS | Co-convener: Sebastián ViveroECSECS
Mon, 15 Apr, 12:45–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Mon, 12:45
SPM67

PEOPLE-ER is a European Space Agency supported research project to develop open Earth observation tools for ecosystem restoration assessment and monitoring. The PEOPLE-ER final project meeting will include presentation and discussion of the open spectral recovery tool for forest restoration monitoring, with use cases in Finland, Romania, and Canada. Project website: https://www.people-er.info/

Convener: Andy Dean | Co-conveners: Melissa Birch, Sarah Zwiep
Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Wed, 08:30
SPM68

The OneGeochemistry initiative is an international collaboration between organisations that support geochemistry capability and data accessibility. The initiative focuses on coordinating and consolidating global efforts in geochemical data standardisation in order to create a sustainable data infrastructure that guarantees persistent, machine readable access to the global wealth of FAIR geochemical data. OneGeochemistry has formed a Working Group as part of the International Science Council’s Committee on Data (CODATA) and invites the wider community to engage in the creation and publication of standard geochemical data formats and data gathering-creation-storage workflows. This Splinter Meeting is intended to provide updates on OneGeochemistry activities and offer a forum for engagement and discussion.

During this Town Hall, the OneGeochemistry initiative will give an update on activities and progress and invite feedback and suggestions from all disciplines. We invite you to join a discussion on how the community can best help and participate in the creation of geochemical data standards. Our goal is to broaden community awareness of and participation in the initiative, and to further learn from successful initiatives in other disciplines.

Convener: Kerstin Lehnert | Co-convener: Lesley Wyborn
Tue, 16 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Tue, 19:00
SPM69

The AGU and EGU Hydrology communities are embarking on a project to co-develop discipline-specific data management guidance. In this splinter we will provide an update on the progress and next steps.

We invite all hydrologists or researchers in any discipline interested in supporting this work.

Convener: Shelley Stall | Co-convener: Kristina VrouwenvelderECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Thu, 10:45
SPM70

European FRIEND (EURO-FRIEND) is one of the eight regional groups of the FRIEND programme.
FRIEND (Flow Regimes from International Experimental and Network Data) is an international research programme within the framework of IHP. Its objective is to study the spatial and temporal variability of hydrological regimes on a European scale and in other regions outside Europe. Originally initiated in Northern Europe, FRIEND has developed into a worldwide network of similarly structured projects. Today about 140 countries in different parts of the world participate in this programme.

EURO-FRIEND has evolved into a well-developed network of hydrologists, who are implementing an active research programme within five scientific project groups:

Project 1: European Water Archive
Project 2: Low Flow and Drought
Project 3: Large-scale Variations in Hydrological Characteristics

During this meeting, we will review the latest advances of the group, identify emerging challenges, and discuss potential funding sources (research grant, PhD, etc...).

This meeting is open to existing members of the EURO-FRIEND Project-3 and scientists from diverse disciplines wishing to join our discussion (and the group).

Convener: Bastien Dieppois | Co-conveners: Stephan Dietrich, Jamie Hannaford
Mon, 15 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Mon, 19:00
SPM71

The correct measurement and availability of soil moisture data is crucial for the assessment of plant available water and the separation of energy and water fluxes on the land surface. Furthermore, in situ soil moisture data is used as “ground truth” to improve soil moisture model or satellite data products in many disciplines and communities, like climate and environmental sciences, hydrology, meteorology, agricultural engineering, decision making, disaster risk assessment and management. Although, in situ measurement error sources are well understood, there are still many unknowns concerning the uncertainties and their magnitudes that need to be considered when using in situ soil moisture data as a reference.

The collection, harmonization and quality control of freely available in situ soil moisture is the main mission of the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN). In the last decade data from more than 77 networks (~3000 stations, ~12000 time series) covering the time period from 1952 until near real time were collected by the ISMN. This extensive database enables us to take the next important steps towards reliable model and satellite soil moisture product validation: identifying error sources of in situ soil moisture measurements, and calculating the uncertainty budgets of individual soil moisture sensors. For this purpose, ESA`s “Fiducial Reference Measurement for Soil Moisture” (FRM4SM) project and EURAMET`s “Soil Moisture Metrology” (SoMMet) Green Deal project were initiated in 2021 and 2022, respectively. All three initiatives—ISMN, FRM4SM, and SoMMet—are interdisciplinary collaborations that bring together a number of scientific communities to tackle data availabil ity and the deeper understanding of the soil moisture measurement, e.g., remote sensing, metrology, soil science, hydrology, and sensor production.

Within this splinter meeting, we want to take the opportunity to facilitate a lively discussion between soil moisture enthusiasts, users, data providers, and sensor manufacturers that are interested in the assessment of in situ soil moisture and their uncertainties. Our goal is to get a better understanding of:

· data availability, usage, and quality control · influences and error sources that drive the in situ soil moisture component, · challenges currently faced (e.g., missing standards to derive reliable data, etc.) · what we are still missing (e.g., stations at certain locations, etc.) in order to answer the questions: (1) what are the error sources; and (2) how can we derive a traceable uncertainty budget.

If you are working with in situ soil moisture probes, calibration, installation, or data, you are very welcome to join this open discussion round, organized by the FRM4SM, SoMMet, and ISMN project teams.

Convener: Irene HimmelbauerECSECS | Co-conveners: François GibonECSECS, raffaele crapolicchio, Miroslav Zboril, Matthias Zink
Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Thu, 14:00
SPM72

Natural gas hydrates are ice-like solids that form at low temperatures under increased pressure and are widespread in permafrost regions. As they predominantly contain climate-active methane as gas molecules and their stability is endangered by the global warming, there is a risk of a self-reinforcing process: permafrost and gas hydrates decompose due to global warming, methane gas is released into the atmosphere, which in turn increases the greenhouse effect. As the local geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological boundary conditions have a considerable influence on the decomposition process of the gas hydrates, an interdisciplinary approach is required in order to understand the complex problem. The Splinter meeting will provide an opportunity for all interested scientists to discuss how these issues can be addressed as part of an international collaboration and to discuss possible initial concrete steps.

Convener: Judith Schicks
Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Wed, 14:00
SPM73

The ESA's Climate Change Initiative for Soil Moisture data record is reaching in Spring 2024 its 9th version, providing a wealth of satellite based observations spanning over 4 decades aimed at improving our Climate System understanding.

This workshop wants to bring together the product development team and its user base, with the goal of shaping new product specifications tailored to the needs of the climate community.

The workshop participants will have a chance to learn more about the ESA CCI SM products---including their latest development and applications---, to provide guided feedback during the interactive session, and to participate in the open community discussion.

Join us if you have experience with the initiative and would like to contribute, or if you wish to use or simply improve your understanding of the data!

Convener: Wouter Dorigo | Co-conveners: Pietro StradiottiECSECS, Thomas Frederikse, Martin Hirschi, Nemesio Rodriguez-Fernandez
Wed, 17 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Wed, 14:00
SPM74

Global climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts remain largely inadequate, leading to a significant increase in climate-related lawsuits. This open splinter meeting offers geoscientists interested in climate change litigation a chance to engage with peers and legal scholars. The goal is to facilitate discussions, exchange ideas, and enhance mutual understanding of how the collaboration between science and law can develop to serve society in the best possible way.

Convener: Joeri Rogelj | Co-convener: Rosa PietroiustiECSECS
Thu, 18 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Thu, 10:45
SPM75

This splinter meeting invites all interested scientists to discuss how we can bring controlled/active source seismic data to the EPOS.
EPOS, the European Plate Observing System, is a multidisciplinary, distributed research infrastructure that facilitates the integrated use of data, data products, and facilities from the solid Earth science community in Europe. The EPOS Data Portal is a virtual platform where FAIR principles are put into practice, enabling access to data and products from more than 250 scientific data services across Europe. Data and data services provided by EPOS are defined in a bottom-up approach by the experts in the respective thematic communities. Organised as Thematic Core Services, these communities are also responsible for providing their data and data services to EPOS.

Seismic data are key to understanding the structure and composition of the lithosphere at different scales. However, seismic data are not available through EPOS, the only European research infrastructure for solid Earth sciences. Primarily, because EPOS is still lacking the support of a dedicated community. This splinter meeting is a community-building effort that reaches out to all colleagues who regard themselves as part of the wider controlled/active source seismics community, both data producers and data consumers. We want to inform about EPOS in general and propose options for the community to get involved.

Convener: Henning Lorenz | Co-conveners: Suvi Heinonen, Ramon Carbonell, Christopher Juhlin
Thu, 18 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Thu, 16:15
SPM76

The meeting is devoted to the evaluation the TCS services and the assessment of the participation to the EC Projects

Convener: Giuseppe Puglisi
Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Mon, 16:15
SPM77

This splinter meeting is the first working group meeting of the newly founded IAG Joint Working Group (IAG JWG) in January 2024 under the umbrella of the Inter-Commission Committee on Geodesy for Climate Research (ICCC). Our mission is aimed at researchers interested in using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) sensors for mass-market (or low-cost) climate and environmental monitoring to redefine methods to enable reliable measurements. In addition to precise positioning, we are researching the determination of important variables such as the water equivalent of snow and the water vapour content of the atmosphere. Being a global initiative, our aim is to overcome technological boundaries and promote international co-operation to tackle the challenges of climate change. All researchers interested in the use of small-scale GNSS sensors for climate monitoring and research are cordially invited to join.

Convener: Tobias Kersten
Mon, 15 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Mon, 12:45
SPM79

Meeting of the members of the project "Glacier Mass Balance Intercomparison Exercise"

Convener: Isabelle Gärtner-Roer
Thu, 18 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Thu, 14:00
SPM80

The Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project for CMIP (ISMIP) is preparing its the next iteration. Join us for an update and discussion of next steps.

Public information:

ISMIP7 splinter meeting

Please join us for an update and discussion of next steps of the Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project for CMIP, in its current iteration (ISMIP7). 

Convener: Heiko Goelzer
Mon, 15 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Mon, 12:45
SPM81

Within the framework of European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative, the High Resolution (HR) Land Cover (LC) Essential Climate Variable (ECV) project presents their products generated at Phase 1. The HRLC team presents the project products and some examples for the historical and the static maps, the LC change maps and the additional quality layers. We are very interested in your feedbak for the improvements on phase 2. More info at https://climate.esa.int/en/projects/high-resolution-land-cover/

Public information:

Open to anybody!
10:45 ESA CCI+ projects C.Albergel, ESA
11:00 Methods & HRLC products L.Bruzzone, Univ.Trento
11:30 HRLC in Land Surface Models C.Ottlé, LSCE
11:45 HRLC in Landscape analysis L.Pesquer CREAF
12:00 Open discussion: outputs & requirements

Convener: Lluís Pesquer | Co-convener: Cristina Domingo-Marimon
Wed, 17 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Wed, 10:45
SPM82 EDI

With this splinter meeting, which is open for everyone, we would like to have a discussion on how to conduct scientific expeditions in remote and inaccessible areas more effectively.

Since these regions are not easy to reach, it can be difficult to find the means and infrastructure to reach those areas. It is important that the scientific community collaborates together where possible and with this splinter meeting we hope to bring together scientists that have an interest in scientific expeditions in remote and inaccessible areas.

We would like to discuss:
- ongoing initiatives
- potential new collaborations
- type of infrastructure needed
- practical aspects of such expeditions.

The organisers are mainly involved with offshore Arctic and Antarctic regions, but the discussions during this session are not limited to these geographical regions.

Public information:

Update from the conveners: the main case study that will be discussed during this splinter meeting will be the Scotia Sea region.

Convener: Anouk BeniestECSECS | Co-conveners: Victoria Kürzinger, Nicole Richter, Graeme Eagles, Wolfram Geissler
Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Fri, 10:45
SPM83

There is still a gap in quantifying future water availability when considering (weather) forecasting on one hand side and climate projections on the other. Apart from (sub-s)seasonal predictions, near-term (annual to decadal) climate predictions might help to shed light on a period that is relevant for decision-making. This, however, also requires the involvement of local stakeholders to figure out what needs they have and how to best possibly communicate uncertainties involved in this kind of predictions.

This splinter meeting brings together people interested in the working group "Near-term (annual to decadal) forecasts of water availability" (which is part of Theme 2: Holistic Solutions for water in the framework of the IAHS HELPING initiative). The main idea of this session is to give any interested person the chance to get in touch with this working group just to get informed or to actively participate in its activities like plans on papers or project joined applications.

https://iahs.info/Initiatives/Topic-for-the-Next-IAHS-decade/helping-working-groups/near-term-annual-to-decadal-forecasts-of-water-availability/

Convener: Kristian Förster
Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Mon, 14:00
SPM84

The stable isotopic composition of seawater and the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon are essential ocean tracers that have been widely measured since the 1960s. They are in particular used to investigate the hydrological cycle and the exchanges between the ocean with , sea ice, ice sheets, the atmosphere and continental runoffs, as well as the bio-geochemical cycles, the anthropogenic carbon penetration, and the associated acidification of the oceans. Moreover, they are used to validate proxy-tracers measured in natural archives for reconstructing past climate evolution. Modeling studies suggest that the isotopes are currently experiencing large changes linked to global warming and the associated changes in the hydrological and biogeochemical cycles. However, using and interpreting current data sets is often hampered by substantial issues in data collection/measurement, validation, analysis, and synthesis, as well as in their interpretation.

This splinter session is aimed at sharing your experience with such data, whether you are data producers or data users, and discuss what could be done to improve the situation. You are welcome to come with a few slides on a USB key to provide material for discussion. We should in particular discuss the next steps, such as setting a working groups and meetings, maybe also a web site to further share our experience, reports, papers, venues... exchanging water samples or reference materials...

Convener: Gilles Reverdin | Co-convener: Antje Voelker
Tue, 16 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Tue, 19:00
SPM85 EDI

ESMValTool is an open-source software package that is developed internationally with many different institutions and researchers contributing. In this splinter meeting we would like to bring the ESMValTool user/developer community attending EGU together to discuss new developments and ideas.

Convener: Birgit Hassler | Co-conveners: Ranjini Swaminathan, Romain Beucher, Manuel Schlund, Lisa Bock, Axel Lauer
Fri, 19 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Fri, 10:45
SPM86

The focus of this meeting will be on showcasing the innovative approaches and findings of the EIFFEL project in utilizing nature-based solutions (NbS) to address climate change challenges. This session aims to highlight the project's efforts in leveraging Earth Observation (EO) technologies, advanced analytics, and data integration tools to understand, monitor, and enhance the efficacy of nature-based interventions.

Participants will explore how the Pilot Applications & EIFFEL Horizontal Tools Suite supports the design, implementation, and evaluation of NbS by providing key insights into ecosystem services, biodiversity, and the socio-economic benefits of such solutions. The session will feature presentations on successful case studies, methodologies for assessing NbS impacts, and discussions on integrating these solutions into climate adaptation strategies.

The splinter meeting will serve as an opportunity for researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and stakeholders to engage in knowledge exchange, discuss challenges and opportunities, and foster collaborations for advancing the use of NbS in climate change adaptation. Through this session, the EIFFEL project aims to contribute to the broader discourse on sustainable, resilient, and inclusive approaches to climate adaptation, in line with global sustainability goals and the European Green Deal.

Convener: Dimitris Bliziotis
Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Mon, 10:45
SPM87

The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is currently formulating its post-2025 Implementation Plan to serve its new Strategy. The paradigm of Earth Intelligence is prominent therein, among others calling for integration of earth, social sciences and new technologies (incl. Artificial Intelligence-AI, Machine Learning-ML etc), combining different scales and sectors and with special emphasis on user needs. Despite the fact that AI is expected to further thrust the design of services that provide Earth intelligence, there are also other ways to facilitate the use and experience of EO. The meeting aims at presenting what was implemented in this direction over the past 3 years by the H2020 EIFFEL project, how the different aspects of AI came into play and to discuss potential AI routes for the GEO community to pursue over the next years.

The first part of the session will comprise brief presentations on the EIFFEL pilots which utilized GEO infrastructure, such as GEOSS Platform (GEO DAB+ GEO Portal), GEOSS datasets and socio-economic data in unison with local authorities to build diverse climate change applications. These applications culminated in GEO Knowledge Hub entries, available to a much wider pool of potential users. One of the objectives is to identify how this process, i.e. an H2020 project contributing to the GKH, can be mainstreamed.

The second part revolves around the different aspects of AI touched upon during EIFFEL. A Large Language Model (LLM) was fine-tuned based on a compiled, expansive corpus, and utilised for the GEO Infrastructure search and metadata augmentation. The developments of the GEOSS Platform Plus (GPP) and EIFFEL projects based on this work will be presented. The training corpus was further utilised by the Knowledge Centre on Earth Observation (KCEO) to enhance semantic search in a variety of databases (including CORDIS and Copernicus). Further AI aspects include of course data processing but also explainable AI (XAI), a cornerstone in creating trustworthy information. The second, and major objective, will therefore be to map these AI elements against the GEO Strategy’s Earth Intelligence paradigm and respond to the growing needs coming from the GEO community.

Participants, including members from EIFFEL, GPP, GEO, EuroGEO and the KCEO will discuss how the above know-how can accommodate the rapidly evolving AI landscape to the benefit of GEO and Earth Intelligence.

Agenda:

-Introduction, scope (5mins)
-EIFFEL climate change Pilots, using the GEO infrastructure in unison with local stakeholders (8mins)
-GKH, paving the way for other Horizon projects (8mins)
-The EIFFEL Large Language model and the GPP (8mins)
-LLM co-benefits and other AI aspects (8mins)
-Open Discussion including (60mins):
• Mainstreaming GKH for Horizon projects.
• A generalised “GEO” LLM.
• Articulate a first response to the GEO AI foreseen activities.

Convener: Dimitris Bliziotis
Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.43
Mon, 14:00
SPM88

This splinter meeting offers an opportunity to discuss and learn about the International Generic Sample Number IGSN and how it can help improve use and utility of physical samples and the data generated by their study. Using the IGSN to identify and cite a sample throughout its life from collection to laboratory to sample archive not only ensures that the sample and the data can be located and linked, but also that the people involved in the collection, analysis, and curation of a sample get the appropriate credit.

Public information:

Agenda

0-5 MIns (K. Lehnert):  Introduction on the IGSN ID.
5-15 Mins (K. Elger): Overview of the IGSN Organisational structure
15-30 Mins (K. Lehnert): Using the IGSN - what, why, how, where and when?
30-60 Mins (all): Ask us anything on IGSN.

 

 

Convener: Kerstin Lehnert | Co-conveners: Jens Klump, Lesley Wyborn, Kirsten Elger
Mon, 15 Apr, 16:15–18:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Mon, 16:15
SPM89

OpenAQ invites folks working with air quality data to an informal gathering. This is an opportunity to spend time with fellow air quality enthusiasts and share stories. OpenAQ is an NGO that aggregates open air quality data from across the globe onto an open-source data platform so that anyone concerned about air quality has unfettered access to the data they need to analyze, communicate and advocate for clean air.

Convener: Chris Hagerbaumer
Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Thu, 08:30
SPM90

Meeting between the EGU Pride group, APECS Germany, Rainbow Geosciences and GayGU to share ideas and future plans on how to better promote inclusion of LBTQIA+ people at all career stages in the geosciences.

Convener: Anita Di Chiara
Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.61
Mon, 10:45
SPM91

This splinter meeting will host discussions on the latest results of the physical properties of the martian moons, their origin, and their comparison to other dark primitive populations of small bodies in the Solar System.
This meeting aims bringing together scientists from different backgrounds (spectroscopists, geologists, geophysicists, meteoritisists, dynamicists) and forge a network of collaborations in the era of space exploration for such primitive objects at different locations in our Solar System (Martian Moon eXplorations, Juice, UAE mission to main belt asteroids).

Convener: Chrysa Avdellidou | Co-convener: Anezina Solomonidou
Mon, 15 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Mon, 19:00
SPM92

This splinter meeting intends to bring the outer solar system community together to showcase the current understanding of giant planets and their moons. This includes discussing the discoveries made by Juno, Cassini and ground-based studies and putting them in context of the forthcoming missions to Jupiter (Juice, Europa Clipper) and Uranus (Uranus Orbiter and Probe).

Convener: Anezina Solomonidou | Co-conveners: Tristan Guillot, Chrysa Avdellidou
Wed, 17 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.97
Wed, 19:00
SPM94

Here, we build on the momentum we achieved at the Town Hall Meeting (TM19) Common Grounds between the Global South and North. In this discussion, we ask: What cultural and professional perils and barriers exist that mitigate political discussions at conferences? How are colleagues from under-represented nations discouraged by some EDI initiatives? What are some examples of successful EDI? How can Global South scientists feel more invited at EGU?

Convener: Stephen J. Mojzsis | Co-conveners: Ruth Phoebe Tchanawandji, Jorgina Akushika
Fri, 19 Apr, 12:45–13:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Fri, 12:45
SPM95

Electron Backscatter Diffraction routinely yields large datasets for use in microstructural and microchemical investigations. Lattice distortions can be characterised and used to extract information on geometrically necessary dislocation densities and types. There are several approaches to this and one is the weighted Burgers vector approach. The splinter meeting will allow for discussion of the approach, with hands-on usage of code to show how it works and how it assists in microstructural investigations.

Convener: John Wheeler
Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Thu, 08:30
SPM96

Earth Observation can contribute to disaster mitigation in many ways: from estimating risk through providing early warnings of events and timely information to responders to assessing damage and follow up activities. Sentinel data are particularly relevant in this context due to their high quality, regular acquisitions, and open data access model. This meeting will connect data users, service providers and scientists to discuss the use of Sentinel data infrastructures, processing algorithms and visualization tools relevant for disaster response and monitoring. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to engage in hands-on tooling in Jupyterlab environment.
The Copernicus Data Space Ecosystem is a public service intended to highlight the capabilities of the Ecosystem for the processing of the Copernicus Sentinel data using the free and open, public interfaces and application programming interfaces. The Copernicus Data Space Ecosystem is placed as the primary access point for public space data. The integration of earth observation data from space in many environmental and earth system applications has great potential for the benefit of society and the use of public funded satellite programmes (through the European Union and European Space Agency).

Convener: András Zlinszky | Co-convener: Marketa Raym
Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Wed, 08:30
SPM97

Earth Observation plays a crucial role in mitigating disasters by providing risk estimates, early warnings, and essential information for responders. Moreover, beyond monitoring land-based situations, it's also a valuable tool for understanding atmospheric conditions. Sentinel data, known for high quality and an open data access model, are essential for these Earth Observation tasks. Similarly, the Streamlined Data Access API available in the ecosystem, including openEO, provides a suite of tools and services to support data processing and analysis.

Therefore, in this session, we aim to bring together data users, service providers, and scientists interested in analyzing these collections with this novel approach(openEO). By adopting openEO, developers, researchers, and data scientists gain access to a unified and interoperable platform, empowering them to harness distributed computing environments and leverage cloud-based resources for addressing complex geospatial challenges. Thus, we'll delve into utilizing the openEO API within the Copernicus Data Space Ecosystem for analyzing Sentinel data, with a specific focus on Disaster and Atmospheric Monitoring. Additionally, users will be guided in utilizing the freely available JupyterLab environment provided by the ecosystem.
The Copernicus Data Space Ecosystem is a public service intended to highlight the capabilities of the Ecosystem for the processing of the Copernicus Sentinel data using the free and open, public interfaces and application programming interfaces. The Copernicus Data Space Ecosystem is placed as the primary access point for public space data. The integration of earth observation data from space in many environmental and earth system applications has great potential for the benefit of society and the use of public funded satellite programmes (through the European Union and European Space Agency).

Convener: Pratichhya Sharma | Co-convener: Marketa Raym
Thu, 18 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Thu, 08:30
SPM98

In this splinter meeting, we will focus on the astrobiological potential of planetary targets in the Solar System and beyond, with a specific emphasis on their physics, (geo-)chemistry, climate, and exploration with robotic missions, laboratory experiments, and astronomical observations. Targets of special interest are Venus, Mars, the icy moons, and exoplanets with astrobiological implications.

Convener: Tim Lichtenberg | Co-convener: Lena Noack
Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Wed, 08:30
SPM99

Following the last years sprinter at EGU23, "Heliophysics in Europe" workshop at ESTEC last autumn, and PS3.1 session, we continue discussion how to build a common community covering the Solar Terrestrial and Solar Planetary plasma physics (corresponding to EGU ST division and PS division, respectively). We summarize what has beed proceeded and what to be done toward and during the next "Heliophysics in Europe" workshop at ESTEC in November.
The motivation of this activity following: Solar Terrestrial and Solar Planetary plasma physics have common fundamental physics with the same scientists working on both subjects, and hence called as Heliophysics in NASA/ESA terminology. However, no solid community nor even email list does not exist to cover this Heliophysic field i Europe, making communication between European heliophysics scientists even between nearby sub-field. This is large disadvantage in forming teams aimed for missions (e.g. ESA) and large projects (e.g., EU funding).

Convener: Lina HadidECSECS | Co-convener: Rumi Nakamura
Mon, 15 Apr, 19:00–20:00 (CEST)
 
Room 2.96
Mon, 19:00
SPM100

This networking event, organised by APECS, invites ECRs from across the polar community to come along and meet your fellow colleagues. A short presentation by the APECS ExCom will be followed by speed dating as a way to get to know one another.

Convener: William D. HarcourtECSECS | Co-conveners: Lina Madaj, Marek Muchow
Mon, 15 Apr, 14:00–15:45 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Mon, 14:00
SPM101

Discussion on current state and next steps of coupling of ice sheet models to Earth System components, especially ocean and subglacial hydrology.

This can include technical aspects such as handling asynchonicity and approaches for initialising the coupled model system.

Discussion of the newly published Marine Ice Sheet - Ocean Model Intercomparson Project phase 2 (MISOMIP2) protocol.

Convener: Rupert Gladstone | Co-conveners: Qin Zhou, Jan De Rydt
Mon, 15 Apr, 10:45–12:30 (CEST)
 
Room 2.83
Mon, 10:45
SPM102

The MOXXI Working Group has the task to “promote the advancement of novel observational techniques that lead to new sources of information to help better understand the hydrological cycle”. The meeting will be used to plan initiatives and activities of the IAHS Working Group.

Convener: Salvatore Manfreda | Co-conveners: Nick van de Giesen, Theresa Blume
Wed, 17 Apr, 08:30–10:15 (CEST)
 
Room 2.42
Wed, 08:30
SPM103

Background

There are an increasing number of models for which large ensembles (LEs) have been generated. This is important for assessing the role of internal climate variability in a changing climate and is also key to understanding responses in extreme weather and climate events. The first part of the meeting will provide the opportunity for short presentations on key issues and/or opportunities, followed by a brainstorming discussion session based around the below questions and aims. This meeting is part of the European Climate Research Alliance (ECRA) Polar Collaborative Programme.

Questions

With a range of LE datasets to choose from, the question of which may be more reliable arises.
• In general different models produce different characteristics in internal variability. Which ones are more accurate? Given the relatively short observational record and large internal climate variability of the polar regions this is a challenging question to answer.
• Which models are most appropriate for assessing extreme weather/climate events? What are the best practices for downscaling?


Aims

The specific aims of this splinter meeting are to:
1. Identify the opportunities and challenges in using LEs to study polar climate change.
2. Identify best practice for evaluating LEs for use in polar studies.
3. Identify strategies for ensuring future LEs are designed, where feasible, to be appropriate for use in studies of polar climate change.

Convener: Tom Bracegirdle | Co-conveners: Einar Örn Ólason, Saskia Knispel de Acosta